dunnettreader + article + event   2

George Steinmetz - William Sewell's "Logics of History" as a Framework for an Integrated Social Science | JSTOR: Social Science History, Vol. 32, No. 4 (Winter, 2008), pp. 535-553
This essay surveys the contributions of William H. Sewell Jr.'s "Logics of History" and concludes that the book sketches a compelling agenda for an integrated historical social science. The author first summarizes Sewell's ontological and epistemological claims concerning social structure and event, history and temporality, and sociohistorical causality. The author then discusses five main areas in which ambiguities in Sewell's approach might be clarified or his arguments pushed farther. These concern (1) the relationship between historical event and traumatic event; (2) the idea of the unprecedented event or "antistructure"; (3) the theory of semiosis underlying Sewell's notion of a multiplicity of structures; and (4) the compatibilities and differences between the concepts of structure and mechanism (here the author argues that social structures are the distinctive "mechanisms" of the human or social sciences). Finally, (5) Sewell's call for "a more robust sense of the social" in historical writing locates the "social" mainly at the level of the metafield of power, or what regulation theory calls the mode of regulation; the author suggests a possible integration of this society-level concept with Pierre Bourdieu 's theory of semiautonomous fields. -- This is a Duke journal that only uses jstor for posting abstracts for the entire history of the journal
article  find  libraries  social_theory  historiography  historical_sociology  philosophy_of_social_science  methodology  mechanisms-social_theory  structure  event  causation-social  power  levels_of_analyis  Bourdieu  fields  ontology-social  EF-add 
october 2014 by dunnettreader
Peter Bearman, Robert Faris and James Moody - Blocking the Future: New Solutions for Old Problems in Historical Social Science | JSTOR: Social Science History, Vol. 23, No. 4 (Winter, 1999), pp. 501-533
Good bibliography for recent work in history and sociology on networks, events selection for explanation, creation of bounded "cases" within which network analysis applied to events, not just social relations, can produce explanation -- opens with focus on meaning rather than causation, though speculate that historical processes less subject to contingency than most historians believe -- see jstor information page for multiple cites to the article
article  jstor  social_theory  historiography  historical_sociology  historical_change  methodology  event  networks  networks-social  contingency  agency-structure  bibliography  downloaded  EF-add 
january 2014 by dunnettreader

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