dunnettreader + article + economic_history   183

Karaman
Theoretical work on taxation and state-building borrows heavily from early modern European experience. While a number of European states increased centralized tax revenues during this period, for others revenues stagnated or even declined and these variations have motivated alternative arguments for the determinants of fiscal and state capacity. This study reviews the arguments concerning the three determinants that have received most attention, namely warfare, economic structure, and political regime, and tests them by making use of a new and comprehensive tax revenue dataset. Our main finding is that these three determinants worked in interaction with each other. Specifically, when under pressure of war, it was representative regimes in more urbanized-commercial economies and authoritarian regimes in more rural-agrarian economies that tended to better aggregate domestic interests towards state-building. - Downloaded via iphone
tax_collection  taxes  state-building  nation-state  urban_politics  competition-interstate  political_culture  political_participation  agriculture-surplus  Absolutism  government_finance  fiscal-military_state  agriculture  Europe-Early_Modern  economic_history  article  bibliography  political_sociology  central_government  19thC  financial_instiutions  downloaded  18thC  15thC  urban_elites  military_history  political_economy  17thC  governing_class  constitutional_regime  local_government  fiscal_policy  16thC  government-forms  jstor  Crown_finance  financial_system 
july 2017 by dunnettreader
(Url is a pdf) N. Cummins, M. Kelly & C. O'Grada - Living Standards and Plague in London, 1560–1665
Living Standards and Plague in London, 1560–1665.
Neil Cummins, Morgan Kelly, and Cormac Ó Gráda∗ 2015 forthcoming Economic History Review
Abstract -- We use records of 870,000 burials and 610,000 baptisms to recon- struct the spatial and temporal patterns of birth and death in London from 1560 to 1665, a period dominated by outbreaks of plague. The plagues of 1563, 1603, 1625, and 1665 appear of roughly equal mag- nitude, with deaths running at five to six times their usual rate, but the impact on wealthier central parishes falls markedly through time. Tracking the weekly spread of plague before 1665 we find a consis- tent pattern of elevated mortality spreading from the same two poor northern suburbs. Looking at the seasonal pattern of mortality, we find that the characteristic autumn spike associated with plague con- tinued in central parishes until the early 1700s, and in the poorer surrounding parishes until around 1730. Given that the symptoms of plague and typhus are frequently indistinguishable, claims that plague suddenly vanished from London after 1665 should be treated with caution. In contrast to the conventional view of London as an undif- ferentiated demographic sink we find that natural increase improved as smaller plagues disappeared after the 1580s, and that wealthier... Downloaded via iPhone to DBOX
17thC  Black_Death  social_history  statistics  birth_rates  Mathusian_checks  living_standards  economic_history  medicine  political_arithmetick  death_rates  18thC  British_history  plague  London  demography  article  fertility  downloaded  16thC  spatial  segregation 
february 2017 by dunnettreader
G. Clark & N. Cummins - Malthus to modernity: wealth, status, and fertility in England, 1500–1879 (2015)
Journal of Population Economics
January 2015, Volume 28, Issue 1, pp 3–29
Abstract -- A key challenge to theories of long-run economic growth has been linking the onset of modern growth with the move to modern fertility limitation. A notable puzzle for these theories is that modern growth in England began around 1780, 100 years before there was seemingly any movement to limit fertility. Here we show that the aggregate data on fertility in England before 1880 conceals significant declines in the fertility of the middle and upper classes earlier. These declines coincide with the Industrial Revolution and are of the character predicted by some recent theories of long-run growth.
Keywords: Fertility transition, Demographic transition, Preindustrial fertility
economic_growth  middle_class  article  19thC  paywall  16thC  British_history  fertility  marriage-age  social_history  18thC  status  economic_history  elites  17thC  demography  marriage  birth_control 
january 2017 by dunnettreader
Peter Solar - Poor Relief and English Economic Development before the Industrial Revolution (1995) | Economic History Review on JSTOR
The English system of poor relief helped to shape the country's distinctive pre-industrial economy. English relief, when set against continental experience, stands out as uniform and comprehensive in coverage; as reliant on local property taxation for funding; and as generous and reliable in benefits. The insurance provided by relief underpinned the growth of a mobile wage-labour force and facilitated changes inland tenure and use. The fiscal impact of relief expenditure gave taxpayers incentives to put labourers to work and to keep local demographic and economic development in balance.
agriculture-productivity  Labor_markets  economic_history  welfare  Industrial_Revolution  local_government  downloaded  jstor  agriculture  18thC  British_history  17thC  Poor_Laws  article  Europe-Early_Modern  19thC  demography  unemployment 
october 2016 by dunnettreader
Acemoglu, Cantoni, Johnson
The Consequences of Radical Reform: The French Revolution
Daron Acemoglu, Davide Cantoni, Simon Johnson and James A. Robinson
The American Economic Review
Vol. 101, No. 7 (DECEMBER 2011), pp. 3286-3307
Downloaded via iPhone to DBOX
commerce  urbanization  guilds  elites  republicanism  reform-legal  Rhineland  reform-political  Germany  economic_growth  political_economy  reform-economic  jstor  political_history  civil_code  French_Revolution  rule_of_law  institutional_economics  bourgeoisie  aristocracy  trade  article  downloaded  feudalism  economic_history 
september 2016 by dunnettreader
Paolo Malanima - When did England overtake Italy? Medieval and early modern divergence in prices and wages - European Review of Economic History
When did England overtake Italy? Medieval and early modern divergence in prices and wages PAOLO MALANIMA Institute of Studies on Mediterranean Societies (National Research Council), ISSM-CNR, malanima@issm.cnr.it According to Allen, between 1500 and 1750, a “great divergence” among countries in the level of wages occurred in Europe. Italian real wages were already among the lowest in the late medieval and early modern age. Their relative level diminished even more from the seventeenth century. An analysis of prices and wages in Italy and England does not support this view. Actually, until the beginning of the eighteenth century, Italian real wages were either higher than in England (fourteenth and fifteenth centuries) or more or less equal (sixteenth and seventeenth). It was not until the eighteenth century that England began to overtake Italy. However, the disparity in wages before 1800 was modest. It increased fast from then onwards. Downloaded via iPhone to DBOX
labor_history  Italy  15thC  medieval_history  labor_force_structure  competiveness-labor  wages  economic_history  British_history  14thC  economic_growth  downloaded  Renaissance  16thC  Labor_markets  17thC  article  prices  18thC  England 
september 2016 by dunnettreader
Paolo Malanima - The long decline of a leading economy: GDP in central and northern Italy, 1300–1913 (2013) - European Economic History Review
The long decline of a leading economy: GDP in central and northern Italy, 1300–1913 PAOLO MALANIMA Institute of Studies on Mediterranean Societies (Naples) Italian National Research Council (CNR), malanima@issm.cnr.it The purpose of the article is to present the statistical reconstruction of a series of per capita output in central–northern Italy between 1300 and 1913. The various phases of both the statistical procedure and the results are presented and discussed. From the Renaissance until the 1880s, when modern growth starts, the curve of per capita GDP is downward bent. Output series together with three robustness tests, are collected in the Appendices.
Downloaded via iPhone to DBOX
productivity  economic_growth  17thC  agriculture  18thC  16thC  Renaissance  economic_history  14thC  stats  urbanization  Italy  GDP  manufacturing  GDP-per_capita  economic_decline  downloaded  article  proto-industry  agriculture-productivity  19thC  commerce  15thC 
september 2016 by dunnettreader
Paolo Malanima - Energy consumption in England
The displacement of the centre of the European economy from the Mediterranean to the Atlantic and the beginning of north–south divergence in Europe has been discussed on the basis of data on real wages, urbanization rates, and, more recently, estimates of gross domestic product for a number of European countries. The purpose of the present article is to contribute to this line of research with the elaboration of yearly series of total energy consumption in Italy and England for the long period 1560–1913. New data on energy services, energy intensity, and, finally, social savings from the use of energy are also presented and discussed for both Italy and England.These new data allow us to specify that energy played a central role.Yet it was relatively late that its importance as a provider of mechanical work developed fully; that is, from 1830 onwards in England and from the end of the nineteenth century in Italy. - Downloaded via iPhone to DBOX
16thC  economic_growth  pre-WWI  17thC  transport  manufacturing  energy  modernization  18thC  industrialization  energy-transition  energy-markets  Industrial_Revolution  economic_history  Italy  consumption  downloaded  19thC  article  energy-intensity  British_history 
september 2016 by dunnettreader
Cummins, N., Kelly, M. and Ó Gráda, C - Living standards and plague in London, 1560–1665 - The Economic History Review (2016) - Wiley Online Library
Cummins, N., Kelly, M. and Ó Gráda, C. (2016), Living standards and plague in London, 1560–1665. The Economic History Review, 69: 3–34. doi:10.1111/ehr.12098This article uses individual records of 930,000 burials and 630,000 baptisms to reconstruct the spatial and temporal patterns of birth and death in London from 1560 to 1665, a period dominated by recurrent plague. The plagues of 1563, 1603, 1625, and 1665 appear of roughly equal magnitude, with deaths running at five to six times their usual rate, but the impact on wealthier central parishes falls markedly through time. Tracking the weekly spread of plague, we find no evidence that plague emerged first in the docks, and in many cases elevated mortality emerges first in the poor northern suburbs. Looking at the seasonal pattern of mortality, we find that the characteristic autumn spike associated with plague continued into the early 1700s. Natural increase improved as smaller crises disappeared after 1590, but fewer than half of those born survived childhood. -- downloaded via Air to DBOX
article  downloaded  social_history  economic_history  16thC  17thC  British_history  England  London  demography  urbanization  sanitation  plague  poverty 
august 2016 by dunnettreader
Olivier Blanchard & Michael Kremer - Disorganization - Quarterly Journal of Economics (1997)
Abstract
Under central planning, many firms relied on a single supplier for critical inputs. Transition has led to decentralized bargaining between suppliers and buyers. Under incomplete contracts or asymmetric information, bargaining may inefficiently break down, and if chains of production link many specialized producers, output will decline sharply. Mechanisms that mitigate these problems in the West, such as reputation, can only play a limited role in transition. The empirical evidence suggests that output has fallen farthest for the goods with the most complex production process, and that disorganization has been more important in the former Soviet Union than in Central Europe. - downloaded via iPhone to DBOX
trust  Russia  information-asymmetric  20thC  privatization  industrialization  reputation  Eastern_Europe  risk_management  article  Central_Asia  economic_history  information-markets  transition_economies  supply_chains  manufacturing  downloaded  post-Cold_War 
august 2016 by dunnettreader
Alan Greer - Commons and Enclosure in the Colonization of North America | American Historical Review
On Junto March Madness list - The American Historical Review (2012) 117 (2): 365-386. doi: 10.1086/ahr.117.2.365 - WHAT WERE THE BROAD PROCESSES by which settlers of European stock created new forms of tenure and wrested control of lands from indigenous peoples, first in the Americas and later across wide stretches of Africa and Oceania? Anyone interested in this basic question about colonization and dispossession in an Atlantic world setting may be tempted to think in terms of a great “enclosure movement” that took shape first in England and Western Europe and then extended overseas to the New World, bringing survey lines, fences, and legal rules fostering exclusive access and transferability. More than one historian has pointed in the direction of such an extended conception of enclosure, although none has so far made the case in detail. (...) In relation to the 18thC and 19thC, EP Thompson has also pointed to a connection between enclosure within England and the imposition of private property across the overseas British Empire, notably in India, where the Permanent Settlement of Bengal (1793) represented a particularly brutal and doctrinaire attempt to establish unitary proprietorship over land. Thompson's argument about enclosure and colonization appeared in an essay published late in his life, (...). Richly suggestive, it remains schematic and preliminary, pointing to a long‐term global movement to privatize the commons that emanated outward from the British Isles. Certainly, there is an intriguing, if rough, coincidence of peak periods of enclosure in England—the Tudor period and the late 18thC—with times of imperial expansion and reinvigoration. - good tour d'horizon of lit on settler colonialism as well as East Asia property relations creation - and different takes on Locke - downloaded pdf to Note
article  economic_history  social_history  legal_history  British_Empire  settler_colonies  property  property_rights  commons  enclosure  property-confiscations  North_America  American_colonies  Australia  New_Zealand  India  India-British_Empire  political_economy  political_history  historiography  Locke-2_Treatises  natural_law  natural_rights  political_philosophy  political_culture  democracy  downloaded 
april 2016 by dunnettreader
Paul Slack - Material Progress and the Challenge of Affluence in Seventeenth-Century England (2009)| JSTOR
Material Progress and the Challenge of Affluence in Seventeenth-Century England
Paul Slack
The Economic History Review
New Series, Vol. 62, No. 3 (Aug., 2009), pp. 576-603
Downloaded via iPhone to Sente
trade-policy  British_foreign_policy  17thC  British_Empire  inequality  article  agriculture  moral_economy  British_history  economic_growth  transport  downloaded  labor  trade  property_rights  progress  colonialism  mercantilism  ports  jstor  political_arithmetick  Sente  political_economy  improvement  economic_history  infrastructure 
april 2016 by dunnettreader
M. Ali Khan, The Irony in/of Economic Theory | JSTOR - MLN Vol. 108, No. 4 (Sep., 1993)
MLN, Vol. 108, No. 4, French Issue (Sep., 1993), pp. 759-803 -- DOI: 10.2307/2904961 -- via Eric Schliesser, attack on lack of reflexive thought by economists about the nature of their own enterprise and the assumptions undergirding their work -- starts with Samuelson's justification of the language of mathematics, and includes discussion of Kenneth Boulding's attack on his own profession for its failure to engage in philosophy of science, referring back positively to Veblen's critique -- downloaded pdf to Note
article  jstor  philosophy_of_science  philosophy_of_social_science  economic_theory  economic_models  history_of_science  history-and-social_sciences  economic_history  sociology_of_knowledge  sociology_of_science  mathematization  Methodenstreit  Samuelson  downloaded 
january 2016 by dunnettreader
JAMES LIVESEY, review essay - Berkeley, Ireland and 18thC Intellectual History (Aug 2015) | Cambridge Journaks - Modern Intellectual History Modern Intellectual History - BERKELEY, IRELAND AND EIGHTEENTH-CENTURY INTELLECTUAL HISTORY - Cambridge Journals O
Modern Intellectual History / Volume 12 / Issue 02 / August 2015, pp 453-473
Department of History, School of Humanities, University of Dundee -- (1) Marc A. Hight ed., The Correspondence of George Berkeley (Cambridge University Press, 2013) (2) Scott Breuninger , Recovering Bishop Berkeley: Virtue and Society in the Anglo-Irish Context (Palgrave, 2010) (3) Daniel Carey and Christopher J. Finlay , eds., The Empire of Credit: The Financial Revolution and the British Atlantic World, 1688–1815 (Irish Academic Press, 2011) -- 18thC Irish intellectual history has enjoyed a revival in recent years. New scholarly resources, such as the Hoppen edition of the papers of the Dublin Philosophical Society and the recently published Berkeley correspondence, have been fundamental to that revival. Since 1986 the journal Eighteenth-Century Ireland: Iris an dá chultúr has sponsored a complex conversation on the meaning and legacy of the 18thC in Irish history. Work in the journal and beyond deploying “New British” and Atlantic histories, as well as continuing attention to Europe, has helped to enrich scholarly understanding of the environments in which Irish people thought and acted. The challenge facing historians of Ireland has been to find categories of analysis that could comprehend religious division and acknowledge the centrality of the confessional state without reducing all Irish experience to sectarian conflict. Clearly the thought of the Irish Catholic community could not be approached without an understanding of the life of the Continental Catholic Church. Archivium Hibernicum has been collecting and publishing the traces of that history for a hundred years and new digital resources such as the Irish in Europe database have extended that work in new directions. The Atlantic and “New British” contexts have been more proximately important for the Protestant intellectual tradition
books  reviews  article  paywall  intellectual_history  18thC  Ireland  Berkeley  British_history  Three_Kingdoms  Church_of_England  Catholics-Ireland  Protestants-Ireland  Atlantic  economic_history  financial_system  finance_capital  credit  Glorious_Revolution  colonialism  Protestant_Ascendancy 
november 2015 by dunnettreader
Joel Mokyr, Chris Vickers, and Nicolas L. Ziebarth - The History of Technological Anxiety and the Future of Economic Growth: Is This Time Different? | AEAweb: Journal of Economic Perspectives, 29(3): 31-50
Technology is widely considered the main source of economic progress, but it has also generated cultural anxiety throughout history. The developed world is now suffering from another bout of such angst. Anxieties over technology can take on several forms, and we focus on three of the most prominent concerns. First, there is the concern that technological progress will cause widespread substitution of machines for labor, which in turn could lead to technological unemployment and a further increase in inequality in the short run, even if the long-run effects are beneficial. Second, there has been anxiety over the moral implications of technological process for human welfare, broadly defined. While, during the Industrial Revolution, the worry was about the dehumanizing effects of work, in modern times, perhaps the greater fear is a world where the elimination of work itself is the source of dehumanization. A third concern cuts in the opposite direction, suggesting that the epoch of major technological progress is behind us. Understanding the history of technological anxiety provides perspective on whether this time is truly different. We consider the role of these three anxieties among economists, primarily focusing on the historical period from the late 18th to the early 20th century, and then compare the historical and current manifestations of these three concerns. - downloaded pdf to Note
article  economic_history  technology  18thC  20thC  21stC  Industrial_Revolution  change-economic  change-social  unemployment  labor_history  robotics  AI  political_economy  economic_culture  economic_growth  labor_share  labor-service_sector  downloaded 
september 2015 by dunnettreader
Jeet Heer - Sex, Economics, and Austerity | The American Prospect - 2013
John Maynard Keynes was the sexiest economist who ever lived. This might seem like half-hearted praise since in our mind’s eye the typical economist appears as… On the decades of right-wing attacks on Keynes and Keynesianism using sexual "immorality" as linked to purported moral failings of Keynes' policy responses from Versailles onward.
article  Instapaper  intellectual_history  intellectual_history-distorted  20thC  21stC  Keynes  Keynesianism  economic_history  economic_theory  macroeconomics  Great_Depression  right-wing  neoconservatism  fiscal_policy  budget_deficit  austerity  economics-and-morality  from instapaper
august 2015 by dunnettreader
Aubrey Gwynn - Indentured Servants and Negro Slaves in Barbados (1642-1650) | JSTOR - Studies: An Irish Quarterly Review Vol. 19, No. 74 (Jun., 1930)
Studies: An Irish Quarterly Review, Vol. 19, No. 74 (Jun., 1930), pp. 279-294, Published by: Irish Province of the Society of Jesus -- describes contents of a memoir of 3 years in West Indies, Barbados by a returned "gentleman adventurer", published in 1653 and reissued without dedicatiry material 1673 -- trained in engraving, architecture so detailed descriptions as well as drawings -- deals with topography, natural history, planter society with all the different countries of origin, classes, and the sugar industry from the slaves in fields to the machinery -- didn't download
article  jstor  17thC  economic_history  social_history  Atlantic  West_Indies  labor_history  English_Civil_War  plantations  planters  sugar  slavery  indentured_labor  British_history  British_Empire  Ireland-English_exploitation  Irish_migration  memoirs  publishing 
august 2015 by dunnettreader
Emmanuel Mourlon-Druol - La zone euro est-elle viable? Une perspective historique - La Vie des idées - 20 mai 2014
La crise de la zone euro a révélé les faiblesses constitutives de la monnaie unique ; mais les débats portant sur sa viabilité se limitent trop souvent à une vision purement économique de la zone euro. L’histoire complexe de la création de l’euro éclaire les enjeux financiers et politiques internationaux de l’unification monétaire. -- in many ways it's the same-old, same-old -- a group of countries with intense economic interaction that gets whip-sawed by exchange rates in a constantly evolving world that's increasingly globalized, especially capital movements -- under a series of arrangements from Bretton Woods onwards, they've been trying to manage or mitigate the problem, but they never solve it -- he repeatedly notes that the entire EC budget isn't more than 1% of the aggregate GNP of the member states -- useful aide-mémoire for each step in the evolution of the EU and European money arrangements paralled with each modification of the international monetary system -- though he notes repeatedly that finance is extremely mobile, not only within the Eurozone or within the EU but globally, and that labor and fiscal adjustments are extremely immobile within the Eurozone by comparison, he doesn't draw the obvious link of these severe mismatches to the repeated problems the EU has faced re money -- downloaded pdf to Note
article  economic_history  political_history  European_integration  post-WWII  post-Cold_War  international_monetary_system  Bretton_Woods  EU_governance  FX  FX-rate_management  FX-misalignment  Eurozone  Eurocrsis  Great_Recession  financial_crisis  sovereign_debt  Europe-federalism  EU-regulation  cross-border  Labor_markets  banking  ECB  EU-elections  political_participation  EU-Parliament  EU-parties  monetary_union  monetary_theory  international_economics  capital_flows  capital_controls  EU-fiscal_policy  convergence-econimic  fiscal_policy  Maastricht  downloaded 
july 2015 by dunnettreader
Laurence Badel - Conflicting Identities: French Economic Diplomacy between the State and Companies in the 20thC | Diplomacy & Statecraft - Volume 25, Issue 3 - Taylor & Francis Online
The question of diplomatic identity has rarely seen study from a specifically historical perspective rooted in the long term. This analysis explores the role and self-perceptions of an unknown and, yet, central actor in the French economic diplomacy: the commercial counsellor. It offers new and stimulating ideas on the entangled links between State and the business sphere in France. The fundamental ambivalence of the commercial counsellor’s identity illuminates the atypical nature of French commercial diplomacy from 1918 to the 2000s. Through assimilation into the Ministry of Economy and in a Janus-like role facing both the Quai d’Orsay and French companies, French commercial counsellors have had to endure a complicated situation whilst remaining the Cinderella of the diplomatic sphere. Deploying an historical analysis to enrich the contemporary debate on the state of diplomacy, this study explores the impact of interventions by non-state actors at the heart of the diplomatic machinery. Far from being an innovation of the 1990s, this intervention was a recurring theme throughout the twentieth century, and its examination sheds new light on the persistence of the neo-corporatist practice of commercial diplomacy in France. -- paywall
article  paywall  diplomatic_history  20thC  France  economic_history  business-and-politics  business_influence  diplomacy-  non-state_actors  international_economics  trade-policy  competition-interstate  FDI  corporatism  neo-colonialism  diplomats 
may 2015 by dunnettreader
Geoffrey Jones, Marco H.D. van Leeuwen, and Stephen Broadberry - The Future of Economic, Business, and Social History | Scandinavian Economic History Review 60, no. 3 (November, 2012): 225–253
3 leading scholars in the fields of business, economic, and social history review the current state of these disciplines and reflect on their future trajectory. Jones reviews the development of business history since its birth at HBS during the 1920s. He notes the discipline's unique record as a pioneer of the scholarly study of entrepreneurship, multinationals, and the relationship between strategy and structure in corporations, as well as its more recent accomplishments, including exploring new domains such as family business, networks and business groups, and retaining an open architecture and inter-disciplinary approach. Yet Jones also notes that the discipline has struggled to achieve a wider impact, in part because of methodological under-development. He discusses 3 alternative futures for the discipline. (1) which he rejects, is a continuing growth of research domains to create a diffuse "business history of everything." (2) is a re-integration with the sister discipline of economic history, which has strongly recovered from its near-extinction 2 decades ago through a renewed attention to globalization and the Great Divergence between the West and the Rest. (3) which he supports, is that business historians retain a distinct identity by building on their proud tradition of deep engagement with empirical evidence by raising the bar in methodology and focusing on big issues for which many scholars, practitioners and students seek answers. He identifies 4 such big issues related to debates on entrepreneurship, globalization, business and the natural environment, and the social and political responsibility of business.
article  economic_history  economic_sociology  business_history  business-and-politics  business-norms  business_practices  business-ethics  globalization  MNCs  methodology  environment  climate-adaptation  entrepreneurs  CSR  paywall 
april 2015 by dunnettreader
Peter Turchin – The history of inequality | Aeon - Feb 2013
From the Roman Empire to our own Gilded Age, inequality moves in cycles. The future looks like a rough ride
article  cliometrics  economic_history  cycles  inequality  Instapaper 
march 2015 by dunnettreader
Thornton, Mark. "Cantillon and the Invisible Hand." - Quarterly Journal of Austrian Economics (2009) | Mises Institute
The Quarterly Journal of Austrian Economics 12, No. 2 (2009) 27–46. -- from the blurb, looks like he thinks Adam Smith was using the metaphor in a theoretically significant sense which theorists should take seriously -- downloaded pdf to Note
article  intellectual_history  18thC  France  Cantillon  Scottish_Enlightenment  Smith  invisible_hand  economic_history  economic_theory  political_economy  social_order  equilibrium  prices 
february 2015 by dunnettreader
JULIAN GOODARE - The debts of James VI of Scotland | JSTOR - The Economic History Review New Series, Vol. 62, No. 4 (NOVEMBER 2009), pp. 926-952
James VI (1567–1625) was chronically indebted, and this caused him frequent problems. This article presents two series of systematic data that together indicate the main contours of his indebtedness: (1) end-of-year deficits, and (2) hived-off debts which the Crown left unpaid for long periods (sometimes permanently). The hived-off debts, reconstructed individually, constitute a narrative of fiscal policy-making. Instead of a large and catastrophic bankruptcy, James in effect had numerous small bankruptcies. He benefited from an emerging structure of Scottish domestic credit. He eventually repaid many of his debts after succeeding to the English throne in 1603. -- huge bibliography, mostly Scottish history -- downloaded pdf to Note
article  jstor  economic_history  political_history  16thC  17thC  James_I  Scotland  Britain  public_finance  fiscal_policy  deficit_finance  sovereign_debt  Crown_finance  financial_system  credit  bankruptcy  bibliography  downloaded  EF-add 
january 2015 by dunnettreader
Liam Brunt - Mechanical Innovation in the Industrial Revolution: The Case of Plough Design | JSTOR - The Economic History Review Vol. 56, No. 3 (Aug., 2003), pp. 444-477
Variations in levels of embodied technology generated variations in English plough prices in 1770. Using plough prices as a quality index, this article explains size and daily output of plough teams. It shows that variations in plough technology were due to technological change-not static optimization-and village plough technology was influenced by neighbouring villages. But technological advance was not constrained on the demand size: farmers purchased the best ploughs available. Rather, local supply of technology was the limiting factor. Technological change, urbanization, and information networks are rejected as explanations of local supply of technology. The key factor was market density. -- excellent bibliography on agrarian "revolution" in England and comparative -- downloaded pdf to Note
article  jstor  economic_history  Europe-Early_Modern  18thC  19thC  British_history  agriculture  agrarian_capitalism  technology  technology_transfer  technology-adoption  Innovation  Industrial_Revolution  bibliography  downloaded  EF-add 
january 2015 by dunnettreader
George Selgin - Steam, Hot Air, and Small Change: Matthew Boulton and the Reform of Britain's Coinage | JSTOR - The Economic History Review Vol. 56, No. 3 (Aug., 2003), pp. 478-509
This article challenges the claim that Great Britain solved its 'big problem of small change' (the problem of keeping decent low-denomination coins in circulation) by embracing Matthew Boulton's steam-based coining technology. Evidence from Great Britain's commercial token episode (1787-97) shows that a successful small change system depended, not on the motive power employed in coining, but on the quality and consistency of coin engravings and on having means for systematically withdrawing worn coins. The Tower Mint failed to solve Great Britain's small change problem, not because its equipment was old-fashioned, but because its policies and constitution were flawed. -- excellent bibliography -- challenges story in Sargeant and Velde "Big Problem of Small Change" - bookshelf -- downloaded pdf to Note
article  jstor  economic_history  Europe-Early_Modern  18thC  19thC  British_history  currency  commerce  Innovation  UK_Government  monetary_policy  gold_standard  Napoleonic_Wars  bookshelf  bibliography  downloaded  EF-add 
january 2015 by dunnettreader
Robert C. Allen - Progress and Poverty in Early Modern Europe | JSTOR - The Economic History Review, New Series, Vol. 56, No. 3 (Aug., 2003) , pp. 403-443
An econometric model of economic development is estimated with data from leading European countries between 1300 and 1800. The model explores the impact of population, enclosure, empire, representative government, technology, and literacy on urbanization, agricultural productivity, proto-industry, and the real wage. Simulations show that the main factors leading to economic success in north-western Europe were the growth of American and Asian commerce and, especially, the innovations underlying the export of the new draperies in the sixteenth and seventeenth centuries. The enclosure of the open fields, representative government, and the spread of literacy did not play major roles. -- downloaded pdf to Note
article  jstor  economic_history  Europe-Early_Modern  Great_Divergence  North-Weingast  agrarian_capitalism  literacy  14thC  15thC  16thC  17thC  18thC  British_Empire  Dutch  colonialism  trade  Asia  textiles  Innovation  agriculture  urbanization  wages  labor_history  manufacturing  productivity  export-led  Industrial_Revolution  proto-industry  downloaded  EF-add 
january 2015 by dunnettreader
Derek Hirst - Bodies and Interests: Toleration and the Political Imagination in the Later 17thC | JSTOR: Huntington Library Quarterly, Vol. 70, No. 3 (September 2007), pp. 401-426
Religious fragmentation threatened the notion of a unitary body politic, and conservative Anglicans in the Restoration exploited the organic figure to excoriate dissenters. While scriptural patterns drew the godly too to that trope, its ecclesiastical implications often left them parsing uncomfortably as they urged concessions. In this article Derek Hirst argues that they were largely rescued from such parsing by the new discourse of “interest.” When the promise of trade was taking the court by storm, Independents and Presbyterians had much to gain in re-imagining the polity more pluralistically in terms of interest; Locke too was part of this process. But though the general drift is clear, partisan circumstance could occasion surprising cross-currents, in England and Ireland alike. -- Keywords body politic, religious toleration, John Owen, discourse of “interest”, John Locke -- downloaded pdf to Note
article  jstor  17thC  British_history  British_politics  politics-and-religion  economic_history  political_economy  religious_history  religious_culture  religion-established  dissenters  High_Church  merchants  trade  Restoration  tolerance  political_philosophy  political_order  political_nation  interest-discourse  body_politic  Locke  Locke-religion  court_culture  colonialism  tariffs  Presbyterians  Independents  Ireland  Church_of_England  Anglican  Church_of_Ireland  Ulster  Catholics-Ireland  Catholics-England  downloaded  EF-add 
october 2014 by dunnettreader
Hyeng-Joon Park - Korea’s Post-1997 Restructuring: An Analysis of Capital as Power | forthcoming in Review of Radical Political Economics (2015) pp. 1-44 | bnarchives
This paper aims to transcend current debates on Korea’s post-1997 restructuring, which rely on a dichotomy between domestic industrial capital and foreign financial capital, by adopting Nitzan and Bichler’s capital-as-power perspective. Based on this approach, the paper analyzes Korea’s recent political economic restructuring as the latest phase in the evolution of capitalist power and its transformative regimes of capital accumulation. -- Keywords: differential accumulation dominant capital chaebols transnationalization strategic sabotage -- Subjects: BN State & Government, BN Institutions, BN Power, BN International & Global, BN Region - Asia, BN Business Enterprise, BN Value & Price, BN Crisis, BN Production, BN Conflict & Violence, BN Money & Finance, BN Distribution, BN Comparative, BN Capital & Accumulation, BN Policy, BN Class, BN Labour, BN Growth -- downloaded from author's blog to Note
article  international_political_economy  capital_as_power  globalization  Korea  East_Asia  20thC  21stC  economic_history  1990s  2000s  2010s  Asian_crisis  Asia_Pacific  international_finance  FDI  finance_capital  financialization  emerging_markets  oligopoly  chaebols  crony_capitalism  industry  production  capitalism  capitalism-systemic_crisis  capitalization  accumulation  distribution-income  distribution-wealth  cross-border  trade  productivity-labor_share  class_conflict  labor_share  Labor_markets  unions  violence  economic_growth  sabotage-by_business  business-and-politics  business-norms  power-asymmetric  public_policy  public_goods  corporate_finance  corporate_ownership  investment  banking  political_culture  economic_culture  economic_reform  economic_policy  democracy  opposition  downloaded  EF-add 
october 2014 by dunnettreader
William M. Dugger and William Waller - Radical Institutionalism: From Technological to Democratic Instrumentalism | JSTOR: Review of Social Economy, Vol. 54, No. 2 (SUMMER 1996), pp. 169-189
This article explains the nature and significance of radical institutionalism. Radical institutionalism does not represent a break with the institutionalist paradigm, but an attempt to move it beyond its outmoded, Ayresian philosophical foundation. Radical institutionalism involves the introduction of three new elements into the contemporary stream of institutionalist works. These three new elements include an emphasis on Veblenian fundamentals, a shift in research interests, and a reconsideration of the philosophical foundations of inquiry. -- useful bibliography of generations of institutionalist theorists -- downloaded pdf to Note
article  jstor  social_theory  intellectual_history  economic_theory  economic_history  institutional_economics  epistemology-social  sociology_of_knowledge  capitalism  corporations  welfare_state  democracy  Veblen  class_conflict  financialization  ruling_class  postmodern  Post-Keynesian  epistemology  critical_realism  bibliography  downloaded  EF-add 
october 2014 by dunnettreader
Issue TOC - THE RESILIENCY OF THE NATION-STATE IN SCHOLARSHIP AND IN FACT | JSTOR: Review (Fernand Braudel Center), Vol. 34, No. 3, 2011
Introduction: "Globalization" and the Nation-State in the Modern World-System (pp. 253-258) - Denis O'Hearn and Thomas M. Wilson. *--* Nationalism in a Post-Hegemonic Era (pp. 259-283) - Richard Lachmann. *--* The State of States in International Organizations: From the WHO to the Global Fund (pp. 285-310) - Nitsan Chorev, Tatiana Andia Rey and David Ciplet. *--* On the Study of Social Optics: Foucault, Counter-Surveillance, and the Political Underground in Northern Peru (pp. 311-331) - David Nugent -- lots of interesting bibliography
article  journal  jstor  20thC  21stC  economic_history  political_history  political_economy  international_political_economy  cultural_history  globalization  global_governance  global_economy  global_system  global_history  social_theory  political_sociology  political_culture  political_nation  nation-state  national_ID  elites  elite_culture  MNCs  international_organizations  international_system  international_finance  IR_theory  IR-domestic_politics  hegemony  Foucault  IFIs  world_systems  bibliography  EF-add 
september 2014 by dunnettreader
Mark S. Mizruchi - Berle and Means Revisited: The Governance and Power of Large U.S. Corporations | JSTOR: Theory and Society, Vol. 33, No. 5 (Oct., 2004), pp. 579-617
In The Modern Corporation and Private Property (1932), Berle and Means warned of the concentration of economic power brought on by the rise of the large corporation and the emergence of a powerful class of professional managers, insulated from the pressure not only of stockholders, but of the larger public as well. In the tradition of Thomas Jefferson, Berle and Means warned that the ascendance of management control and unchecked corporate power had potentially serious consequences for the democratic character of the United States. Social scientists who drew on Berle and Means in subsequent decades presented a far more benign interpretation of the rise of managerialism, however. For them, the separation of ownership from control actually led to an increased level of democratization in the society as a whole. Beginning in the late 1960s, sociologists and other social scientists rekindled the debate over ownership and control, culminating in a series of rigorous empirical studies on the nature of corporate power in American society. In recent years, however, sociologists have largely abandoned the topic, ceding it to finance economists, legal scholars, and corporate strategy researchers. In this article, I provide a brief history of the sociological and finance/legal/strategy debates over corporate ownership and control. I discuss some of the similarities between the two streams of thought, and I discuss the reasons that the issue was of such significance sociologically. I then argue that by neglecting this topic in recent years, sociologists have failed to contribute to an understanding of some of the key issues in contemporary business behavior. I provide brief reviews of four loosely developed current perspectives and then present an argument of my own about the changing nature of the U.S. corporate elite over the past three decades. I conclude with a call for sociologists to refocus their attention on an issue that, however fruitfully handled by scholars in other fields, cries out for sociological analysis. -- downloaded pdf to Note
article  jstor  economic_history  intellectual_history  20thC  21stC  US_economy  US_politics  political_economy  political_sociology  economic_sociology  law-and-finance  law-and-economics  capitalism  corporations  MNCs  corporate_governance  corporate_finance  capital_markets  shareholder_value  shareholders  principal-agent  management  managerialism  corporate_citizenship  corporate_control_markets  corporate_law  M&A  business-and-politics  business-norms  power  power-asymmetric  status  interest_groups  lobbying  regulation  bibliography  downloaded  EF-add 
september 2014 by dunnettreader
Claire Célérier, Adrien Matray - Unbanked households: Evidence of supply-side factors | vox 23 September 2014
There is an urgent need to understand why many households in the US do not hold a bank account. This column argues that supply-side factors – standard bank practices that ration certain households – play a role in this. The evidence comes from the staggered interstate branching deregulation after 1994 that provides an exogenous shock on bank competition. Further findings suggest that access to bank accounts improves access to credit without translating into higher ratios of debt to income. -- increased competition made a substantial difference in reducing unbanked, especially of blacks that the cozy locals seem not to have seen as prospective customers
article  economic_history  20thC  21stC  US_economy  banking  competition-financial_sector  financial_sector_development  financial_innovation  financial_access 
september 2014 by dunnettreader
David H. Ciscel - The Living Wage Movement: Building a Political Link from Market Wages to Social Institutions | JSTOR: Journal of Economic Issues, Vol. 34, No. 2 (Jun., 2000), pp. 527-535
Plus çà change - even in the good times of the 1990s boom, low wages were not keeping up with maintaining minimum living standards without supplemental government assistance -- Looks at attempts in late 1990s to build political pressure for an increased minimum wage - already the low end service sector was seeing growing between their stagnant wages and growing GNP, with gains going to upper cohorts. Special issues already including (1) service sector jobs with lots of women, so degraded status, (2) outsourcing of jobs that would have been low end civil service, reducing both pay and benefits plus job security. Gives a history of the periodic movements for defining minimum wage levels to incorporate the costs of reproducing the labor force, from health care, child care, nutrition etc. Early 20thC movement was for a "family wage" pushed by unions, but problems for feminists that the focus on family defined women's roles in the home as part of determining what employment should produce as base compensation for maintaining the family, with women's work uncompensated. Short article, didn't download
article  jstor  economic_history  political_economy  economic_culture  US_economy  20thC  Progressive_Era  1990s  wages  wages-minimum  women-work  feminism  feminist_economics  unions  inequality  Democrats  productivity-labor_share  gender_gap  alliances-political  movements-political  US_politics  poor-working  poverty 
september 2014 by dunnettreader
Jonathan E. Leightner - Asia's Financial Crisis, Speculative Bubbles, and Under-Consumption Theory | JSTOR: Journal of Economic Issues, Vol. 34, No. 2 (Jun., 2000), pp. 385-392
He looks at Asian high savings rates (and global imbalances) in 1990s and returns to Mummery& Hobson theory of under-consumption from late 19thC -- Mummery, A. F., and J. A. Hobson. The Physiology of Industry: Being an Exposure of Certain Fallacies in Existing Theories of Economics. London: J. Murray, 1889, reprint Fairfield, N.J.: Augustus M. Kelley Publishers -- His doctoral work looks to have focused on comparative growth patterns and importance of balanced growth of social and economic classes in providing consumer demand that pushes new technology and productivity gains -- dangers of inequality and benefits of more equal distribution -- Leightner, Jonathan E. "The Compatibility of Growth and Increased Equality: Evidence from Thailand, the United Kingdom, Sweden, and South Africa." Unpublished part of Ph.D. diss -- short article, didn't download
article  jstor  economic_history  political_economy  1990s  Asian_crisis  international_political_economy  international_finance  financial_crisis  consumer_demand  inequality  savings  global_imbalance  economic_growth  economic_theory  19thC  Victorian  demand-side  development  bubbles  speculative_finance  EF-add 
september 2014 by dunnettreader
Khan, B. - An Economic History of Copyright in Europe and the United States | EH.Net Encyclopedia, edited by Robert Whaples. March 16, 2008
The US created a utilitarian market-based model of intellectual property grants which created incentives for invention, with the primary objective of increasing social welfare and protecting the public domain. The checks and balances of interest group lobbies, the legislature and the judiciary worked effectively as long as each institution was relatively well-matched in terms of size and influence. However, a number of scholars are concerned that the political influence of corporate interests, the vast number of uncoordinated users over whom the social costs are spread, and international harmonization of laws have upset these counterchecks, leading to over-enforcement at both the private and public levels. International harmonization with European doctrines introduced significant distortions in the fundamental principles of US copyright and its democratic provisions. One of the most significant of these changes was also one of the least debated: compliance with the precepts of the Berne Convention accorded automatic copyright protection to all creations on their fixation in tangible form. This rule reversed the relationship between copyright and the public domain that the US Constitution stipulated. According to original US copyright doctrines, the public domain was the default, and copyright a limited exemption to the public domain; after the alignment with Berne, copyright became the default, and the rights of the public and of the public domain now merely comprise a limited exception to the primacy of copyright. The pervasive uncertainty that characterizes the intellectual property arena today leads risk-averse individuals and educational institutions to err on the side of abandoning their right to free access rather than invite challenges and costly litigation. Many commentators are also concerned about other dimensions of the globalization of intellectual property rights, such as the movement to emulate European grants of property rights in databases, which has the potential to inhibit diffusion and learning.
article  economic_history  publishing  property  property_rights  legal_history  legal_system  IP  regulation-harmonization  natural_rights  natural_law  copyright  patents  US_constitution  15thC  16thC  17thC  18thC  19thC  20thC  international_law  France  French_Revolution  censorship  British_history  authors  artists  playwrights  democracy  knowledge_economy  Internet  globalization  global_economy  digital_humanities  transparency  open_access  scientific_culture  science-public  education  R&D  education-higher  common_law  civil_code  civil_society  civic_humanism  US_legal_system 
september 2014 by dunnettreader
PHILIP LOFT -- POLITICAL ARITHMETIC AND THE ENGLISH LAND TAX IN THE REIGN OF WILLIAM III. (2013). | The Historical Journal, 56, pp 321-343. - Cambridge Journals Online - Abstract
PHILIP LOFT - University College London -- This article explores the role of the method of political arithmetic and political arithmeticians in the changing methods of raising finance during the Nine Years War. It discusses the actions of parliament-men in committees and their interaction with reports containing data, and the influence of projectors on the decision to introduce, and later abandon, the pound rate. Throughout this period, political arithmeticians were active participants, providing data, advice, and schemes to the treasury and parliament, and when they were not, ‘country’ MPs, in particular, were active in calling for data and leading its cross-examination. This article suggests that debates on public finance did not occur along party lines, with ‘county communities’ given fresh presence by the quantification of the inequality of the land tax burden. Political arithmetic is shown to have played an important role in the processes and negotiations that occurred over the setting of taxation policy in the ‘long eighteenth century’. -* I thank Julian Hoppit for his generous encouragement and comments on this article. Thanks also to Clare Jackson, Andrew Preston and the anonymous reviewers. - available for download - to Note
article  17thC  18thC  British_history  British_politics  economic_history  political_economy  Glorious_Revolution  William_III  Nine_Years_War  taxes  landed_interest  land_tax  fiscal_policy  fiscal-military_state  political_arithmetick  Parliament  House_of_Commons  Parliamentary_supremacy  Country_Party  oversight-legislature  public_finance  public_policy  partisanship  Whig_Junto  Tories  Whigs-opposition  sovereign_debt  downloaded  EF-add 
august 2014 by dunnettreader
WILLIAM A. PETTIGREW and GEORGE W. VAN CLEVE -- PARTING COMPANIES: THE GLORIOUS REVOLUTION, COMPANY POWER, AND IMPERIAL MERCANTILISM. (2014). | The Historical Journal, 57, pp 617-638. Cambridge Journals Online - Abstract
WILLIAM A. PETTIGREW - University of Kent and GEORGE W. VAN CLEVE - Seattle University School of Law --This article revisits the late seventeenth-century histories of two of England's most successful overseas trading monopolies, the East India and Royal African Companies. It offers the first full account of the various enforcement powers and strategies that both companies developed and stresses their unity of purpose in the seventeenth century. It assesses the complex effects that the ‘Glorious Revolution’ had on these powers and strategies, unearthing much new material about the case law for monopoly enforcement in this critical period and revising existing accounts that continue to assert the Revolution's exclusively deregulating effects and that miss crucial subtleties in the case law and related alterations in company behaviour. It asks why the two companies parted company as legal and political entities and offers an explanation that connects the fortunes of both monopoly companies to their public profile and differing constituencies in the English empire and the varying non-European political contexts in which they operated. -- * We warmly thank Michael R. T. Macnair for his indispensable advice and assistance regarding matters of seventeenth-century English law and are grateful to Clive Holmes for encouraging us to look into these issues and to Simon Douglas and Jeffrey Hackney for initial help in doing so. Paul Halliday, Daniel Hulsebosch, and Philip J. Stern provided helpful responses to specific research queries.
article  paywall  find  17thC  British_history  British_politics  economic_history  Glorious_Revolution  mercantilism  monopolies  trading_companies  East_India_Company  Royal_African_Co  colonialism  slavery  piracy  competition  parties  London  legal_history  judiciary  commercial_law  interest_groups  Whig_Junto  Tories  James_II  William_III  Parliament  institutional_economics  North-Weingast  regulation  West_Indies  ports  shipping  trade-policy  entrepôts  exports  imports  luxury_goods  consumers  EF-add 
august 2014 by dunnettreader
ALEXIS D. LITVINE, review essay - THE INDUSTRIOUS REVOLUTION, THE INDUSTRIOUSNESS DISCOURSE, AND THE DEVELOPMENT OF MODERN ECONOMIES (2014) | The Historical Journal, 57, pp 531-570. - Cambridge Journals Online - Abstract
ALEXIS D. LITVINE - Trinity College, Cambridge -- The idea of industriousness has been an ever-recurring issue since Max Weber launched it as a putative explanation of the advent of economic modernity. The notion of ‘industrious revolution’ has provoked a renewed flourishing of publications focusing on this issue. Although most historians agree on the emergence of industriousness in seventeenth-century Europe, there is no consensus regarding the chronology, hence the real causes, of this mental and discursive shift. This article emphasizes the problematic role played by literary evidences in these social and cultural models of diffusion of new consumer values and desires. It then establishes the timing of the emergence of the ‘industriousness discourse’ using an original approach to diffusion based both on the quantitative analysis of very large corpora and a close reading of seventeenth-century economic pamphlets and educational literature. It concludes first that there was not one but several competing discourses on industriousness. It then identifies two crucial hinges which closely match the chronology proposed by Allen and Muldrew, but refutes that championed by de Vries and McCloskey. The industrious revolution as described by these authors would have happened both too late to fit its intellectual roots and too early to signal the beginning of a ‘consumer revolution’. -- * I am extremely grateful to Peter Mandler, Craig Muldrew, participants in the Early Modern Economic and Social History seminar, and two anonymous referees, for their comments on previous versions of this article. I am also indebted to Andrew Hardie, Jean-Baptiste Michel, and Paul Schaffner for allowing me to use their data and to Billy Janitsch, Andreas Vlachos, and Andrew Wilson for technical assistance.
article  paywall  find  historiography  17thC  Europe-Early_Modern  Great_Divergence  economic_history  intellectual_history  cultural_history  social_order  consumerism  Industrial_Revolution  industriousness  virtue  discourse  bourgeoisie  modernity-emergence  education  values  publishing  readership  Protestant_Ethic  EF-add 
august 2014 by dunnettreader
Jonathan Israel - “Radical Enlightenment” – Peripheral, Substantial, or the Main Face of the Trans-Atlantic Enlightenment (1650-1850) | Diametros
“Radical Enlightenment” and “moderate Enlightenment” are general categories which, it has become evident in recent decades, are unavoidable and essential for any valid discussion of the Enlightenment broadly conceived (1650-1850) and of the revolutionary era (1775-1848). Any discussion of the Enlightenment or revolutions that does not revolve around these general categories, first introduced in Germany in the 1920s and taken up in the United States since the 1970s, cannot have any validity or depth either historically or philosophically. “Radical Enlightenment” was neither peripheral to the Enlightenment as a whole, nor dominant, but rather the “other side of the coin” an inherent and absolute opposite, always present and always basic to the Enlightenment as a whole. Several different constructions of “Radical Enlightenment” have been proposed by the main innovators on the topic – Leo Strauss, Henry May, Günter Mühlpfordt, Margaret Jacob, Gianni Paganini, Martin Mulsow, and Jonathan Israel – but, it is argued here, the most essential element in the definition is the coupling, or linkage, of philosophical rejection of religious authority (and secularism - the elimination of theology from law, institutions, education and public affairs) with theoretical advocacy of democracy and basic human rights. -- Keywords - Enlightenment Radical Enlightenment moderate Enlightenment democracy aristocracy universal education equality emancipation republicanism mixed government poverty economic oppression crypto-radicalism positivism American revolution -- downloaded pdf to Note
article  intellectual_history  political_history  political_culture  politics-and-religion  historiography  economic_history  political_economy  17thC  18thC  19thC  Enlightenment  Radical_Enlightenment  French_Enlightenment  religious_culture  authority  anticlerical  Absolutism  secularism  democracy  natural_rights  civil_liberties  egalitarian  American_Revolution  French_Revolution  1848_revolutions  Spinozism  education  aristocracy  poverty  Ancien_régime  mixed_government  tolerance  positivism  natural_law  domination  republicanism  republics-Ancient_v_Modern  natural_philosophy  British_history  Dutch  Germany  Atlantic  American_colonies  Early_Republic  Republic_of_Letters  bibliography  downloaded  EF-add 
july 2014 by dunnettreader
Claire Judde de Larivière - The 'Public' and the 'Private' in 16thC Venice: From Medieval Economy to Early Modern State | JSTOR: Historical Social Research / Historische Sozialforschung, Vol. 37, No. 4 (142) (2012), pp. 76-94
This article analyses the Venetian public galleys' expeditions during the sixteenth century, as a case study for understanding the relationships between patricians and the State, and the way in which the 'public' and the 'private' roles were reorganized in the late Middle Ages. Going further the explanations usually given, the article tries to explain the decline of the public galleys, and emphasizes the symbolic, cultural, political and ideological factors that had also led to the abandonment of public navigation. It seeks to reintegrate economic considerations, practices, actions and actors into their social, political and ideological contexts, and thus avoids isolating economic phenomena and economic thinking from their political background. Doing so, it argues that the abandonment of public navigation in Venice was the corollary of the gradual differentiation between the State and the ruling class that was typical of the earliest stages of modernity. -- interesting bibliography ranging from Frederic Lane to Craig Muldrew -- downloaded pdf to Note
article  jstor  economic_history  16thC  Venice  shipping  public_goods  public_enterprise  private_enterprise  elites  stratification  privatization  capitalism  imperialism  political_culture  economic_culture  elite_culture  political_economy  Renaissance  modernity-emergence  social_order  public_finance  financial_economics  financial_innovation  common_good  republicanism  republics-Ancient_v_Modern  mercantilism  empire-and_business  downloaded  EF-add 
june 2014 by dunnettreader
Claude Diebolt - The Stakes of Cliometrics in Ancient History | JSTOR: Historical Social Research / Historische Sozialforschung, Vol. 36, No. 3 (137) (2011), pp. 350-361
C According to Finley, markets and economic motivations played little, if any, role in ancient economies. Status and civic ideology governed the allocation of scarce resources. Hence, the application of economic theory to the ancient economy was at best a futile exercise and at worst a source of grave misunderstandings. Temin's contributions lead to other conclusions and, as in the myth of Sisyphus, the boulder seems again to be at the bottom of the hill! My feeling is that the Gordian knot remains the same now as over the past decades: should cliometrics be used in the social sciences/humanities in general, and ancient history especially? -- didn't download
article  jstor  ancient_history  ancient_Greece  ancient_Rome  economic_history  markets  capitalism  cliometrics 
june 2014 by dunnettreader
Faustine Perrin - Unified Growth Theory: An Insight | JSTOR: Historical Social Research / Historische Sozialforschung, Vol. 36, No. 3 (137) (2011), pp. 362-372
The Unified Growth Theory is receiving increasing attention from growth theorists since the seminal work of Galor and Weil (1999, 2000). These authors emphasize the need for a unified theory of growth that could account for the transition from Malthusian Stagnation to the Modern Growth Regime (1999). This interest is motivated by the lack of explanation and knowledge regarding the historical evolution of the relationship among population growth, technological change and the standard of living. This paper gives an overview of the Unified Growth Theory, its determinants and its implications. -- didn't download
article  jstor  economic_history  economic_growth  historical_sociology  demography  Malthusian  Malthus  technology  Great_Divergence 
june 2014 by dunnettreader
N. Draper - The City of London and Slavery: Evidence from the First Dock Companies, 1795-1800 | JSTOR: The Economic History Review, New Series, Vol. 61, No. 2 (May, 2008), pp. 432-466
Through analysing the composition of the founding shareholders in the West India and London Docks, this article explores the connections between the City of London and the slave economy on the eve of the abolition of the slave trade. It establishes that over one-third of docks investors were active in slave-trading, slave-ownership, or the shipping, trading, finance, and insurance of slave produce. It argues that the slave economy was neither dominant nor marginal, but instead was fully integrated into the City's commercial and financial structure, contributing materially alongside other key sectors to the foundations of the nineteenth-century City. -- huge bibliography -- downloaded pdf to Note
article  jstor  political_economy  economic_history  17thC  18thC  British_history  British_politics  Atlantic  West_Indies  American_colonies  slavery  abolition  London  ports  trade  merchants  planters  investors  shipping  finance_capital  insurance  City  City_politics  Industrial_Revolution  bibliography  downloaded  EF-add 
june 2014 by dunnettreader
A. M. C. Waterman - Economics as Theology: Adam Smith's Wealth of Nations | JSTOR: Southern Economic Journal, Vol. 68, No. 4 (Apr., 2002), pp. 907-921
Adam Smith's Wealth of Nations may be read as a work of natural theology similar in general style to Newton's Principia. Smith's ambiguous use of the word "nature" and its cognates implies an intended distinction between a positive sense in which "natural" means "necessary" and a normative sense in which "natural" means "right." The "interest" by which humans are motivated is "natural" in the first sense, but it may not bring about social outcomes that are "natural" in the second sense. It will do so only if the social institutions within which agents seek their own "interest" are well formed. Smith provides a large-scale, quasi-historical account of the way in which well-formed institutions gradually develop as unintended consequences of private "interest." In so doing, he provides a theodicy of economic life that is cognate with St. Augustine's theodicy of the state as remedium peccatorum. -- interesting bibliography -- downloaded pdf to Note
article  jstor  intellectual_history  theology  political_economy  18thC  Scottish_Enlightenment  Smith  theodicy  institutions  political_culture  economic_culture  economic_history  stadial_theories  self-interest  Augustine  natural_religion  moral_philosophy  moral_sentiments  commerce-doux  common_good  bibliography  downloaded  EF-add 
may 2014 by dunnettreader
John A. Shedd - Legalism over Revolution: The Parliamentary Committee for Indemnity and Property Confiscation Disputes, 1647-1655 | JSTOR: The Historical Journal, Vol. 43, No. 4 (Dec., 2000), pp. 1093-1107
Royalists of the Civil War period readily employed the English legal system to recover lost estates, even at the nadir of their political fortunes, namely the years just after the king's defeat. Rather than accept the verdict of a war lost, royalist and Catholic `delinquents' successfully sought their own verdicts at law against former tenants for rents on lands that had been confiscated by parliament. The radical MPs staffing the Indemnity Committee respected the principles of due process of law and, ironically, given the fact that the committee's purpose was to protect parliament's supporters, upheld royalist claims to confiscated lands, thereby assisting the law courts in thwarting parliament's plan to repay war debts with rents collected from losers' property. So pervasive was the legalistic mindset in both the courts and the Indemnity Committee that royalists received favourable rulings against many on the winning side of the conflict, including famous leaders such as Sir William Brereton. -- downloaded pdf to Note
article  jstor  legal_history  economic_history  political_history  political_economy  17thC  British_history  British_politics  English_Civil_War  Interregnum  property_rights  landowners  Royalists  Catholics-England  Parliamentarians  property-confiscations  legal_culture  economic_culture  political_culture  sovereign_debt  due_process  civil_liberties  judiciary  downloaded  EF-add 
may 2014 by dunnettreader
Christine Churches - Business at Law: Retrieving Commercial Disputes from 18thC Chancery | JSTOR: The Historical Journal, Vol. 43, No. 4 (Dec., 2000), pp. 937-954
Recent work on the records of civil litigation in the central courts of Westminster has refined and extended our knowledge of levels of litigation and the types of dispute pursued at law in early modern England. This article discusses two interrelated business disputes at the port of Whitehaven in the first half of the eighteenth century pursued by two of its prominent merchants, both frequent litigants in a period when litigation overall was declining, and suggests some reasons for that decline. It matches the formal court records of King's Bench, Common Pleas, and Chancery with some illuminating, often acerbic, private correspondence, thereby exploring the process and background of litigation, and demonstrating how a third party could influence the conduct and direction of the disputes, while himself remaining almost invisible in the formal legal record. -- downloaded pdf to Note
article  jstor  legal_history  economic_history  17thC  18thC  British_history  litigation  Chancery  judiciary  equity  commerce  commercial_law  common_law  downloaded  EF-add 
may 2014 by dunnettreader
Şevket Pamuka1 and Maya Shatzmiller - Plagues, Wages, and Economic Change in the Islamic Middle East, 700–1500 | The Journal of Economic History - Cambridge Journals Online
This study establishes long-term trends in the purchasing power of the wages of unskilled workers and develops estimates for GDP per capita for medieval Egypt and Iraq. Wages were heavily influenced by two long-lasting demographic shocks, the Justinian Plague and the Black Death and the slow population recovery that followed. As a result, they remained above the subsistence minimum for most of the medieval era. We also argue that the environment of high wages that emerged after the Justinian Plague contributed to the Golden Age of Islam by creating demand for higher income goods.
article  paywall  economic_history  economic_culture  demography  Islamic_civilization  medieval_history  Medieval  plague  Labor_markets  consumers  wages  EF-add 
march 2014 by dunnettreader
Larry Neal - Integration of International Capital Markets: Quantitative Evidence from the Eighteenth to Twentieth Centuries | JSTOR: The Journal of Economic History, Vol. 45, No. 2 (Jun., 1985), pp. 219-226
The integration of capital markets is usually tested with an interest rate arbitrage model even though much different financial assets must be compared. This paper compares prices of identical assets that are traded simultaneously in two or more markets. The range, average level, and time series pattern of the differences can be used to infer threshold levels, transaction cost levels, and the efficiency of arbitrage operations, respectively. Examples are given for financial crises from 1745 to 1907, using prices from the London, Amsterdam, Paris, and New York stock exchanges. These show European capital markets to be well integrated by mid-eighteenth century. -- didn't download -- I expect the data is worked into his later books etc
article  jstor  economic_history  finance_capital  capital_markets  18thC  19thC  British_history  capital_flows  FX  financial_crisis  interest_rates  international_finance  EF-add 
february 2014 by dunnettreader
Robert A. Black and Claire G. Gilmore - Crowding Out during Britain's Industrial Revolution | JSTOR: The Journal of Economic History, Vol. 50, No. 1 (Mar., 1990), pp. 109-131
Contrary to earlier assertions, the historical data for Britain do confirm a (lagged) crowding-out effect during the Industrial Revolution. Heavy government borrowing after 1793 for the wars with France raised interest rates. These results are confirmed with nominal-interest-rate equations rather than with real-rate equations, which impose restrictive assumptions about the adjustment of nominal rates to inflation expectations. We see no reason to abandon the neoclassical, factor-allocation model of saving and investment in favor of a theory asserting that firms accumulate capital for investment independently of household saving decisions. -- 2nd article in to and fro with Mirowski -- didn't download
article  jstor  economic_history  finance_capital  sovereign_debt  crowding_out  capital_markets  fiscal-military_state  Industrial_Revolution  British_history  18thC  19thC  capital_flows  savings  investment  interest_rates  EF-add 
february 2014 by dunnettreader
Carol E. Heim and Philip Mirowski - Interest Rates and Crowding-Out During Britain's Industrial Revolution | JSTOR: The Journal of Economic History, Vol. 47, No. 1 (Mar., 1987), pp. 117-139
Available evidence on interest rates and government borrowing during Britain's industrial revolution, while limited, does not support the idea that war spending crowded out private investment. This article demonstrates the importance of using data on net receipts from borrowing, rather than changes in government debt. Weaknesses of the crowding-out model concerning capital markets and investment, openness of the economy, and full employment are identified for the historical case. The case raises broader issues of whether conceptions of saving and investment based in neoclassical supply-constrained models are as appropriate as theories of capital accumulation. -- 1st in series of back and forth articles -- didn't download
article  jstor  economic_history  finance_capital  sovereign_debt  crowding_out  capital_markets  fiscal-military_state  Industrial_Revolution  18thC  19thC  British_history  UK_Government  interest_rates  international_finance  capital_flows  savings  investment  EF-add 
february 2014 by dunnettreader
Jeffrey G. Williamson - The Impact of the Irish on British Labor Markets During the Industrial Revolution | JSTOR: The Journal of Economic History, Vol. 46, No. 3 (Sep., 1986), pp. 693-720
The Irish immigrations during the First Industrial Revolution serve to complicate any assessment of Britain's economic performance up to the 1850s. This paper estimates the size of the Irish immigrations and explores its impact on real wages, rural-urban migration, and industrialization. Using a general equilibrium model, the paper finds that the Irish did not play a significant role in accounting for rising inequality, lagging real wages, or rapid industrialization. -- didn't download
article  jstor  economic_history  social_history  18thC  19thC  British_history  Ireland  immigration  Labor_markets  Industrial_Revolution  EF-add 
february 2014 by dunnettreader
Mark Bevir and Frank Trentmann - Markets in Historical Contexts: Ideas, Practices, and Governance [eScholarship] (2004)
This article has been accepted for publication in Markets in Historical Contexts: Ideas and Politics in the Modern World following peer review. The definitive copyedited, typeset version (Markets in Historical Contexts: Ideas and Politics in the Modern World, and: Financial Missionaries to the World: The Politics and Culture of Dollar Diplomacy, 1900-1930 (review) Journal of World History - Volume 16, Number 4, December 2005, pp. 505-515) is available online at: muse.jhu.edu/journals/journal_of_world_hist -- downloaded pdf to Note
article  eScholarship  economic_history  economic_sociology  economic_culture  political_economy  historiography  markets  trade  capital_flows  investment  imperialism  ideology  ideas-social_theory  downloaded  EF-add 
february 2014 by dunnettreader
John Wells and Douglas Wills - Revolution, Restoration, and Debt Repudiation: The Jacobite Threat to England's Institutions and Economic Growth | JSTOR: The Journal of Economic History, Vol. 60, No. 2 (Jun., 2000), pp. 418-441
This study provides an empirical test of North and Weingast's theory of British capital-market development after the Glorious Revolution. The evidence is consistent with the hypotheses that institutional innovation in the 1690s led to the dramatic growth in London capital markets, and that threats to these institutions caused financial turmoil. We also find the economic motivation for these innovations to be consistent with the work of Ekelund and Tollison. -- they fell for Whig propaganda
article  jstor  economic_history  finance_capital  17thC  18thC  British_politics  North-Weingast  Jacobites  sovereign_debt  interest_rates  institutional_economics  public_choice  interest_groups  Whigs-oligarchy  Bank_of_England  Tories  Hanoverian_Succession  James_III  monied_interest  downloaded  EF-add 
january 2014 by dunnettreader
Nathan Sussman and Yishay Yafeh - Institutional Reforms, Financial Development and Sovereign Debt: Britain 1690-1790 | JSTOR: The Journal of Economic History, Vol. 66, No. 4 (Dec., 2006), pp. 906-935
We revisit the evidence on the relations between institutions, the cost of government debt, and financial development in Britain (1690-1790) and find that interest rates remained high and volatile for four decades after the Glorious Revolution, partly due to wars and instability; British interest rates co-moved with those in Holland; Debt per capita remained lower in Britain than in Holland until around 1780; and Britain did not borrow at lower rates than European countries with more limited protection of property rights. We conclude that, in the short run, institutional reforms are not rewarded by financial markets. -- reasonably up to date bibliography on institutional_economics, behavioral_economics, financial markets (Shleifer et al), emerging markets, economic history of 17thC 18thC 19thC re industrial revolution, crowding_out and public finance -- downloaded pdf to Note
article  jstor  economic_history  political_history  finance_capital  capital_markets  capital_flows  sovereign_debt  17thC  18thC  British_history  Dutch  France  public_finance  taxes  interest_rates  institutional_economics  institutional_change  North-Weingast  constitutionalism  Absolutism  behavioral_economics  emerging_markets  international_finance  bibliography  downloaded  EF-add 
january 2014 by dunnettreader
Stefan E. Oppers - The Interest Rate Effect of Dutch Money in 18thC Britain | JSTOR: The Journal of Economic History, Vol. 53, No. 1 (Mar., 1993), pp. 25-43
An early piece in the financial markets, behavioral_economics, crowding_out debates -- It is generally recognized that the Dutch played a major part in financing British government deficits from the 1720s to the late 1770s. This article argues that even though the Dutch continued to hold large amounts of British debt after 1780, they stopped supplying new capital to the British and started a modest repatriation of some of their previous investments. A comparative econometric study of 3 percent consol yields during the two deficit-inducing wars Britain fought between 1750 and 1795 shows that as a result British interest rates became much more sensitive to increases in government borrowing. -- see bibliography of both primary and secondary literature -- didn't download
article  jstor  economic_history  finance_capital  18thC  British_history  Dutch  sovereign_debt  capital_markets  capital_flows  interest_rates  North-Weingast  crowding_out  French_Revolutionary_Wars  American_Revolution  public_finance  bibliography  EF-add 
january 2014 by dunnettreader
Michael J. Braddick - Popular Politics and Public Policy: The Excise Riot at Smithfield in February 1647 and Its Aftermath | JSTOR: The Historical Journal, Vol. 34, No. 3 (Sep., 1991), pp. 597-626
Historiographical split between those who see excise protests as political instability and economic historians who love excise taxes for all the revenue it brings in - need a better approach to linking public protest and policies -- part of Braddick program on public finance and where policies actually played out so useful historiography and bibliography-- didn't download
article  jstor  political_history  social_history  economic_history  political_culture  public_finance  public_disorder  popular_politics  political_economy  17thC  British_politics  excise  taxes  riots  Charles_I  English_Civil_War  crowds  protests  bibliography  EF-add 
january 2014 by dunnettreader
L. Stuart Sutherland - Lord Shelburne and East India Company Politics, 1766-9 | JSTOR: The English Historical Review, Vol. 49, No. 195 (Jul., 1934), pp. 450-486
Over 100 references -- contrasts (1) the 2nd half of his public career (to Peace of Paris) during which he, like Chatham as a rebel Whig under George II, maintained connections with radicals especially in London with (2) 1st part of his career that was more akin to the Foxes and their connections to the monied interests and City finance. Bowen a half century later picks up on Dame Lucy's hints of insider trading and market manipulation -- didn't download
article  jstor  political_history  economic_history  politics-and-money  18thC  1760s  East_India_Company  Clive  Shelburne  monied_interest  capital_markets  EF-add 
january 2014 by dunnettreader
Julian Hoppit - Political Arithmetic in Eighteenth-Century England | JSTOR: The Economic History Review, New Series, Vol. 49, No. 3 (Aug., 1996), pp. 516-540
With regard to public policy, in late seventeenth-century Britain there was a remarkable development of social statistics, what Petty called 'political arithmetic'. The general view, however, is that this new approach ended early in the eighteenth century only to be rediscovered by the early Victorian statistical movement. In fact, through the eighteenth century public policy continued to be considered partly in quantitative terms. This article explores some of the dimensions and peculiarities of this varied and extensive political arithmetic. -- downloaded pdf to Note
article  jstor  economic_history  political_history  18thC  British_politics  political_arithmetick  UK_economy  UK_Government  Parliament  public_policy  public_opinion  political_press  economic_growth  wages  prices  trade  fiscal_policy  sovereign_debt  fiscal-military_state  taxes  Excise_Crisis  luxury  UK_government-colonies  downloaded  EF-add 
january 2014 by dunnettreader
Tom Arkell - Illuminations and Distortions: Gregory King's Scheme Calculated for the Year 1688 and the Social Structure of Later Stuart England | JSTOR: The Economic History Review, New Series, Vol. 59, No. 1 (Feb., 2006), pp. 32-69
Compare with Geoffrey Holmes critique of King's estimates in 1970s -- This critique of King's well-known Scheme of the social order in 1688 examines his purposes, the Scheme's evolutionary process, and the taxation data (hearth, poll, window, and marriage duty) that King used to construct it, before contrasting his conclusions with recent research. His social hierarchy emerges as a rather crude and backward-looking stereotype based on too many intelligent guesses, with his treatment of the poorer families being least satisfactory. Overall, King's population totals appear sound, his national income estimate low, and various mean household sizes and family and children's totals unreliable. -- didn't download
article  jstor  economic_history  social_history  demography  population  classes  lower_orders  British_history  political_arithmetick  UK_Government  17thC  18thC  EF-add 
january 2014 by dunnettreader
« earlier      
per page:    204080120160

related tags

14thC  15thC  16thC  17thC  18thC  19thC  20thC  21stC  1680s  1690s  1700s  1710s  1745_rebellion  1760s  1848_revolutions  1990s  2000s  2010s  abolition  Absolutism  Academia.edu  accumulation  Africa  agrarian_capitalism  Agrarian_Laws  agriculture  agriculture-markets  agriculture-productivity  agriculture-surplus  AI  alliances-political  altruism  American_colonies  American_Revolution  ancient_Greece  ancient_history  ancient_Rome  Ancien_régime  Anglican  Anglo-Spanish  anthropology  anticlerical  Arabian_Peninsula  architecture  aristocracy  article  artists  Asia  Asian_crisis  Asia_Pacific  Atlantic  Augustine  austerity  Australia  Austrian_economics  authority  authors  balance_of_payments  banking  bankruptcy  Bank_of_England  behavioral_economics  benevolence  Berkeley  bibliography  birth_control  birth_rates  Black_Death  Board_of_Trade  body_politic  Bolingbroke  books  bookshelf  bourgeoisie  Bretton_Woods  Britain  British-French_attitudes  British_Empire  British_Empire-constitutional_structure  British_Empire-military  British_foreign_policy  British_history  British_Navy  British_politics  Brydges  bubbles  Bubble_Act  budget_deficit  business-and-politics  business-ethics  business-norms  business_cycles  business_history  business_influence  business_practices  Cantillon  capital  capitalism  capitalism-alternatives  capitalism-systemic_crisis  capitalization  capital_as_power  capital_controls  capital_flows  capital_markets  Catholics-England  Catholics-Ireland  censorship  center-periphery  centralization  Central_Asia  central_banks  Central_Europe  central_government  chaebols  Chancery  change-economic  change-social  charity  Charles_I  Charles_II  China  church_history  Church_of_England  Church_of_Ireland  Cicero  circulation-ideas  circulation-news  circulation-people  City  City_politics  civic_humanism  civic_virtue  civil_code  civil_liberties  civil_society  classes  classical_economics  class_conflict  clientelism  climate-adaptation  cliometrics  Clive  cognition-social  collective_memory  colonialism  commerce  commerce-doux  commercial_law  commodities  commons  common_good  common_law  community  comparative_economics  competition  competition-financial_sector  competition-interstate  competitiveness  competiveness-labor  connected_history  constitutionalism  constitutional_regime  constructivism  consumerism  consumers  consumer_demand  consumption  contracts  convergence-econimic  copyright  corporate_citizenship  corporate_control_markets  corporate_finance  corporate_governance  corporate_law  corporate_ownership  corporations  corporatism  corruption  country_house  Country_Party  court_culture  credit  creditors  critical_realism  crony_capitalism  cross-border  crowding_out  crowds  Crown_finance  CSR  cultural_capital  cultural_history  culture-comparative  currency  cycles  dearth  death_rates  debt  default  deficit_finance  demand-side  democracy  Democrats  demography  development  digital_humanities  diplomacy-  diplomatic_history  diplomats  discourse  display  dissenters  distribution-income  distribution-wealth  domination  downloaded  due_process  Dutch  early_modern  Early_Republic  Eastern_Europe  East_Asia  East_India_Company  ECB  economics-and-morality  economic_culture  economic_decline  economic_growth  economic_history  economic_models  economic_policy  economic_reform  economic_sociology  economic_theory  economy-structure  education  education-higher  EF-add  egalitarian  Egypt  elites  elite_culture  emerging_markets  emotions  empire-and_business  empires  enclosure  energy  energy-intensity  energy-markets  energy-transition  England  English_Civil_War  Enlightenment  entrepreneurs  entrepôts  entre_deux_guerres  environment  epistemology  epistemology-social  equilibrium  equity  eScholarship  EU  EU-elections  EU-fiscal_policy  EU-Parliament  EU-parties  EU-regulation  Eurocrsis  Europe-19thC  Europe-Early_Modern  Europe-federalism  European_integration  Eurozone  EU_governance  evolution-as-model  evolution-social  excise  Excise_Crisis  Exclusion_Crisis  export-led  exports  fairness  family  fashion  FDI  feminism  feminist_economics  fertility  feudalism  finance_capital  financialization  financial_access  financial_crisis  financial_economics  financial_innovation  financial_instiutions  financial_regulation  financial_repression  financial_sector_development  financial_system  find  firms-theory  fiscal-military_state  fiscal_policy  fiscal_space  foreign_policy  Foucault  France  freedom  freedom_of_movement  free_trade  French_Enlightenment  French_government  French_Revolution  French_Revolutionary_Wars  FSU  FX  FX-misalignment  FX-rate_management  GDP  GDP-per_capita  gender_gap  Germany  gift  globalization  global_economy  global_governance  global_history  global_imbalance  global_system  Glorious_Revolution  gold_standard  governing_class  government-forms  governmentality  government_finance  government_officials  Great_Depression  Great_Divergence  Great_Recession  Grotius  guilds  Hanoverian_Succession  haute_bourgeoisie  Hayek  health_care  hegemony  Heilbroner  heritable_jurisdictions  heroes  High_Church  historical_sociology  historiography  history-and-social_sciences  history_of_science  homo_economicus  House_of_Commons  housing  human_capital  Hume  ideas-social_theory  ideology  IFIs  immigration  imperialism  imports  improvement  incentives  indentured_labor  Independents  India  India-British_Empire  Indian_Ocean  individualism  industrialization  Industrial_Revolution  industriousness  industry  inequality  inequality-opportunity  inequality-wealth  inflation  information  information-asymmetric  information-markets  infrastructure  inheritance  Innovation  Instapaper  institution-building  institutional_change  institutional_economics  institutions  insurance  intellectual_history  intellectual_history-distorted  interest-discourse  interest_groups  interest_rates  international_economics  international_finance  international_law  international_monetary_system  international_organizations  international_political_economy  international_system  Internet  Interregnum  investment  investment-government  investors  invisible_hand  IP  IR  IR-domestic_politics  Iran  Ireland  Ireland-English_exploitation  Irish_migration  IR_theory  Islam  Islamic_civilization  Islamic_empires  Italy  Jacobites  James_I  James_II  James_III  journal  jstor  judiciary  justice  Keynes  Keynesianism  Kindleberger  Kirk  knowledge_economy  Korea  labor  labor-service_sector  labor_force_structure  labor_history  Labor_markets  labor_share  laisser-faire  landed_interest  landowners  land_tax  Latin_America  law-and-economics  law-and-finance  Law_John  legal_culture  legal_history  legal_system  leisure  liberalism  libertarianism  liberty  lineage  links  literacy  litigation  lit_survey  living_standards  lobbying  local_government  Locke  Locke-2_Treatises  Locke-religion  London  Louis_XIV  lower_orders  luxury  luxury_goods  M&A  Maastricht  macroeconomics  Malthus  Malthusian  management  managerialism  Mandeville  manners  manufacturing  marginalists  maritime_history  markets  markets_in_everything  market_fundamentalism  marriage  marriage-age  Marx  mass_culture  mathematization  Mathusian_checks  medicine  Medieval  medieval_history  Mediterranean  memoirs  MENA  mercantilism  merchants  Methodenstreit  methodology  middle_class  military-industrial_complex  military_history  Mississippi_Company  mixed_government  MNCs  mobility  modernity-emergence  modernization  monetary_policy  monetary_theory  monetary_union  money  money_market  money_supply  money_velocity  monied_interest  monopolies  moral_economy  moral_philosophy  moral_sentiments  movements-political  Mughals  Napoleonic_Wars  Napoleonic_Wars-impact  nation-state  national_ID  natural_law  natural_philosophy  natural_religion  natural_rights  Navigation_Acts  neo-colonialism  neoclassical_economics  neoconservatism  networks  New_Zealand  Nietzsche  Nine_Years_War  non-state_actors  norms  North-Weingast  North_Africa  North_America  OECD_economies  oligopoly  ontology-social  open_access  opposition  Ottomans  Ottoman_Empire  oversight-legislature  paper  Paris  Parlement  Parliament  Parliamentarians  Parliamentary_supremacy  parties  partisanship  patents  patronage  paywall  Peace_of_Utrecht  Petty_William  philosophy_of_science  philosophy_of_social_science  Physiocrats  piracy  plague  plantations  planters  playwrights  Pocock  Polanyi_Karl  politeness  political_arithmetick  political_culture  political_economy  political_history  political_nation  political_order  political_participation  political_philosophy  political_press  political_sociology  politics-and-money  politics-and-religion  poor-working  Poor_Laws  Pope  popular_politics  population  ports  Portugal  positivism  post-Cold_War  Post-Keynesian  post-WWII  postmodern  poverty  power  power-asymmetric  pre-WWI  Presbyterians  prices  principal-agent  private_enterprise  privatization  privileges-corporate  production  productivity  productivity-labor_share  profit  progress  Progressive_Era  property  property-confiscations  property_rights  Protestants-Ireland  Protestant_Ascendancy  Protestant_Ethic  protests  proto-industry  provinces  public_choice  public_disorder  public_enterprise  public_finance  public_goods  public_opinion  public_policy  public_sphere  publishing  Puritans  Queen_Anne  R&D  Radical_Enlightenment  readership  real_economy  real_estate  reason  reform-economic  reform-legal  reform-political  Regency-France  regulation  regulation-harmonization  religion-established  religious_culture  religious_history  Renaissance  rent-seeking  representative_institutions  republicanism  republics-Ancient_v_Modern  Republic_of_Letters  reputation  research  Restoration  reviews  revisionism  Rhineland  Ricardo  right-wing  riots  risk_management  robotics  Roman_Empire  Roman_law  Roman_Republic  Royalists  Royal_African_Co  rule_of_law  ruling_class  Russia  Russian_economy  sabotage-by_business  Safavid_Empire  Samuelson  sanitation  savings  science-public  scientific_culture  Scotland  Scottish_Enlightenment  Scottish_history  secularism  segregation  self-interest  Sente  services  settler_colonies  shareholders  shareholder_value  Shelburne  shipping  slavery  slavery-law  SMEs  Smith  sociability  social_capital  social_history  social_order  social_sciences  social_sciences-post-WWII  social_theory  society  sociology_of_knowledge  sociology_of_science  South_Sea_Crisis  sovereign_debt  Spanish_Empire  spatial  speculative_finance  Spinozism  SROs  stadial_theories  standard-of-living  state-building  statistics  stats  status  Stoicism  stratification  sugar  supply_chains  Swift  tariffs  taxes  tax_collection  technology  technology-adoption  technology_transfer  textiles  theodicy  theology  Three_Kingdoms  tolerance  Tories  trade  trade-agreements  trade-policy  trade-theory  trade_deficits  trading_companies  transaction_costs  transition_economies  transparency  transport  travel  trust  UK_economy  UK_Government  UK_government-colonies  Ulster  unemployment  unions  urban  urbanization  urban_elites  urban_politics  US_constitution  US_economy  US_history  US_legal_system  US_politics  values  Veblen  Venice  Victorian  violence  virtue  wages  wages-minimum  War_of_Spanish_Succession  welfare  welfare_state  West_Indies  Whigs  Whigs-oligarchy  Whigs-opposition  Whig_Junto  Wiley  William_III  women-property  women-work  world_systems 

Copy this bookmark:



description:


tags: