dunnettreader + article + democratic_peace_theory   2

Irving Fisher's 1918 Presidential Address to the American Economic Association (Brad DeLong's Grasping Reality...) - May 2014
Irving Fisher: Economists in Public Service: Annual Address of the President: Source: The American Economic Review, Vol. 9, No. 1, Supplement, Papers and Proceedings of the Thirty-First Annual Meeting of the American Economic Association (Mar., 1919), pp. 5-21 Published by: American Economic Association. Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/1813978 -- full text at Brad -- didn't download
article  jstor  intellectual_history  20thC  WWI  entre_deux_guerres  capitalism  democracy  democratic_peace_theory  Germany  nationalism  protectionism  free_trade  labor  wages  inequality  inheritance  profit  entrepreneurs  health_care  social_order  social_insurance  economic_theory  economic_culture  economic_reform  finance_capital  firms-theory  management  managerialism  EF-add 
may 2014 by dunnettreader
Edgar Kiser, Kriss A. Drass and William Brustein: Ruler Autonomy and War in Early Modern Western Europe (1995)
JSTOR: International Studies Quarterly, Vol. 39, No. 1 (Mar., 1995), pp. 109-138 -- Following Kant, many scholars have argued that rulers often benefit more from war than do their subjects, and thus that rulers with more autonomy from subjects will initiate more wars. They usually test this argument by focusing on whether democratic states are less prone to initiate wars than autocracies, and generally find little or no relationship. These are not adequate tests of the general argument, since they turn both ruler autonomy and the interests of actors into rough dichotomies (democracy vs. autocracy, rulers' interests vs. interests of all subjects), and they ignore opportunity costs. This article uses a model of state policy formation based on agency theory to provide a better measure of ruler autonomy by differentiating between institutional autonomy and resource autonomy. We also use a more nuanced specification of the interests of different groups of subjects, taking their opportunity costs into account. This model allows us to derive more precise propositions about the relationship between ruler autonomy and war initiation. An analysis of war in four Western European states (England, France, Sweden, and Spain) between 1400 and 1700, using logit regression and qualitative comparative analysis, provides some support for the central propositions of the theory.
article  jstor  social_theory  IR  democratic_peace_theory  15thC  16thC  17thC  fiscal-military_state  war  Britain  France  Spain  Sweden  EF-add 
august 2013 by dunnettreader

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