dunnettreader + article + counter-revolution   8

Koenraad W. Swart - "Individualism" in the Mid-19thC (1826-1860) | JSTOR - Journal of the History of Ideas (1962)
"Individualism" in the Mid-Nineteenth Century (1826-1860), Koenraad W. Swart, Journal of the History of Ideas, Vol. 23, No. 1 (Jan. - Mar., 1962), pp. 77-90 -- very useful tracing of how many ways it was used, first to attack and then to celebrate -- downloaded pdf to Note
article  jstor  intellectual_history  individualism  cultural_history  political_philosophy  political_economy  religious_culture  19thC  British_history  France  liberalism  French_Revolution  counter-revolution  Counter-Enlightenment  Romanticism  laisser-faire  bibliography  downloaded 
october 2015 by dunnettreader
Marc BELISSA - REPENSER L'ORDRE EUROPÉEN (1795-1802). DE LA SOCIÉTÉ DES ROIS AUX DROITS DES NATIONS | JSTOR: Annales historiques de la Révolution française, No. 343 (Janvier/Mars 2006), pp. 163-166
Brief summary of thesis defended 2005, l'Université Paris I Sorbonne - surprise, surprise, Lucien Bély on his committee with the notion of the 18thC as the last stage of the société des princes and the French Revolution forcing the end of the dynastic wars -- though focus is on the period of the Directoire and Napoleon up through Amiens, he places it in the context of the European dynastic system as structured by the Peace of Utrecht -- highlights an interdisciplinary approach -- downloaded pdf to Note
article  jstor  thesis  18thC  1790s  1800s  Europe  Europe-19thC  balance_of_power  French_Revolution  IR  IR_theory  Westphalia  sovereignty  dynasties  nation-state  diplomatic_history  political_culture  counter-revolution  Jacobins  republicanism  Europe-federalism  Peace_of_Utrecht  société_des_princes  national_interest  intellectual_history  political_philosophy  France  French_politics  French_Revolutionary_Wars  Directoire  monarchy  social_order  legal_system  international_law  international_system  natural_law  citizenship  subjects  property  elites  political_economy  economic_culture  political_participation  downloaded  EF-add 
january 2015 by dunnettreader
Jeremy Waldron - The Decline of Natural Right [chapter] (2009) :: SSRN in THE CAMBRIDGE HISTORY OF NINETEENTH CENTURY PHILOSOPHY, Allen Wood and Songsuk Susan Hahn, eds., Cambridge University Press
NYU School of Law, Public Law Research Paper No. 09-38 -- What happened to the doctrine of natural right in the 19thC? We know that it flourished in the 17thC and 18thC. We know that something like it - the doctrine of human rights and new forms of social contract theory - flourished again in the second half of the 20thC and continues to flourish in the 21stC. In between there was a period of decline and hibernation - ... in which to invoke natural right was always to invite intellectual ridicule and accusations of political irresponsibility. Thus article asks: How far can the decline of natural right in the 19thC be attributed to the reaction against the revolution in France? How far it was the effect of independent streams of thought, like positivism and historicism? Why was radical thought so ambivalent about natural right throughout the 19thC, and why was socialist thought in particular inclined to turn its back on it? As a framework for thought, natural right suffered a radical decline in the social and political sciences. But things were not so clear in jurisprudence, and natural right lived on to a much riper old age in the writings of some prominent economists. What is it about this theory that allowed it to survive in these environments, when so much of the rest of intellectual endeavor in the 19thC was toxic or inhospitable to it. Finally, I shall ask how far American thought represents an exception to all of this. Why and to what extent did the doctrine survive as a way of thinking in the United States, long after it had lost its credibility elsewhere. -- downloaded pdf to Note
article  SSRN  intellectual_history  18thC  19thC  philosophy_of_law  philosophy_of_social_science  natural_law  natural_rights  human_rights  counter-revolution  historicism  positivism  legal_theory  nationalism  national_interest  conservatism  socialism  social_contract  relativism  revolutions  1848_revolutions  French_Revolution  anticlerical  Bentham  Burke  Hume  Jefferson  Kant  Locke  Marx  Mill  Savigny  Spencer_Herbert  George_Henry  US_society  American_exceptionalism  liberalism  social_theory  social_sciences  Social_Darwinism  social_order  mass_culture  political_participation  bibliography  downloaded  EF-add 
july 2014 by dunnettreader
Jonathan Den Hartog - Trans-Atlantic Anti-Jacobinism: Reaction and Religion | Project MUSE - Early American Studies: An Interdisciplinary Journal Volume 11, Issue 1, Winter 2013 pp. 133-145
This article identifies an important transnational political ideology and identity in the Atlantic world in the 1790s-1810s: trans-Atlantic Anti-Jacobinism. Opposition to the French Revolution, although present in individual nations, gained force and variety through connections forged between individuals from the European Continent to Great Britain, Canada, and the United States. Lines of communication that were formed through the practices of writing and printing, correspondence, diplomacy, and travel kept the movement unified against a common enemy. The two most salient elements of this Anti-Jacobinism were concerns over political reaction and religion or, stated differently, vigorous defenses of the established political order and the received religious belief, Protestant or Catholic Christianity. Interlocked, these two main concerns of Anti-Jacobins inspired active response. Ironically, a desire to defend individual nations, political arrangements, and faith traditions led to a political alignment that crossed national boundaries and bound individuals together in a common cause. The formation and operation of Anti-Jacobinism thus occurred simultaneously on subnational and supranational levels, demonstrating the multiple valences of political opinion in the Age of Revolutions. -- paywall
article  Project_MUSE  paywall  18thC  19thC  political_history  political_culture  politics-and-religion  political_press  counter-revolution  Counter-Enlightenment  anti-Jacobin  networks-information  networks-policy  diplomatic_history  Atlantic  public_sphere  EF-add 
june 2014 by dunnettreader
ANTHONY PAGE - RATIONAL DISSENT, ENLIGHTENMENT, AND ABOLITION OF THE BRITISH SLAVE TRADE | JSTOR: The Historical Journal, Vol. 54, No. 3 (SEPTEMBER 2011), pp. 741-772
Following British abolition of the slave trade in 1807, the origins and nature of popular abolitionism have been much debated among historians. Traditionally, religion was seen as the driving force, with an emphasis on the role of Quakers and evangelicals, whilst in the twentieth century social historians began to stress the importance of economic and social change. This article revises both interpretations by helping to recover and analyse the abolitionism of enlightened Rational Dissenters. Legal inequality and their 'rational piety' encouraged heterodox Dissenters to become active in a wide range of reformist causes. Owing to evangelical dominance in the nineteenth century, however, the role of Rational Dissenters was marginalized in histories of abolitionism. Recovering Rational Dissenting abolitionism underlines the importance of religion in the campaign against the slave trade. Since Rational Dissent was to a large extent a religion of the commercial classes, this article also sheds light on the hotly debated relationship between capitalism and abolition. -- extensive bibliography on jstor information page -- paywall Cambridge journals -- a return to Clark's view of radical dissent as revolutionary force in Ancien Regime Britain
article  jstor  paywall  historians-and-religion  revisionism  intellectual_history  religious_history  religious_culture  politics-and-religion  18thC  British_history  British_politics  Atlantic  West_Indies  American_colonies  slavery  dissenters  Radical_Enlightenment  Price_Richard  Priestley  abolition  radicals  reform-political  reform-social  merchants  capitalism  middle_class  ClarkJonathan  Evangelical  conservatism  counter-revolution  bibliography  EF-add 
june 2014 by dunnettreader
John Seed - The Spectre of Puritanism: Forgetting the 17thC in Hume's "History of England" | JSTOR: Social History, Vol. 30, No. 4 (Nov., 2005), pp. 444-462
The seventeenth century was not finished in eighteenth-century England. The ghosts of the 'Great Rebellion' continued to haunt Hanoverian England as political groupings struggled for some kind of control of representations of the past. One of the explicit purposes of Hume's "History of England" (1752-64) was to exorcize these ghosts of the past and to delegitimize the political memories of Whigs, Tories and Jacobites, churchmen and dissenters. This article focuses on the account of the puritans in the "History of England." In significant ways this contravenes Hume's own agenda. Out of his anti-puritan history there emerges the negative figure of the radical political intellectual which was subsequently appropriated by Burke and by wider forces of political reaction in England in the 1790s. Far from escaping the obsolete antagonisms of the past which continued to shape Hanoverian political hostilities, Hume in his "History of England" contributed to their reproduction and even intensification from the 1770s. -- begins by contrasting Bolingbroke's upfront treatment of the power of collective memory to enflame party conflict with Hume's attempt to reframe the memories themselves -- downloaded pdf to Note
article  jstor  17thC  18thC  1770s  1790s  British_history  British_politics  historiography-18thC  Hume-historian  Hume-politics  Bolingbroke  Dissertation_on_Parties  Remarks_on_History_of_England  history_of_England  historians-and-politics  historiography-Whig  counter-revolution  Counter-Enlightenment  dissenters  Whigs-Radicals  Burke  French_Revolution  downloaded  EF-add 
may 2014 by dunnettreader
Daniel I. O'Neill - Burke on Democracy as the Death of Western Civilization | JSTOR: Polity, Vol. 36, No. 2 (Jan., 2004), pp. 201-225
This essay concerns Edmund Burke's view of the civilizing process. It begins by developing Burke's revision of Scottish Enlightenment historiography from the perspective of his own earlier treatise on aesthetics. Here, the argument is that Burke saw Western civilization as guaranteed by two institutions, the "sublime" church and the "beautiful" nobility, that jointly produced the requisite level of "habitual social discipline" in the masses necessary for the "natural aristocracy" to govern. The article's central argument is that Burke saw the Revolutionaries' destruction of these two institutions, and especially their subsequent attempt to replace them with political democracy undergirded by policies of social and cultural democratization, as marking the literal end of Western civilization itself. -- downloaded pdf to Note
article  jstor  intellectual_history  political_philosophy  18thC  British_politics  French_Revolution  counter-revolution  Burke  Western_civ  aesthetics  sublime  Church_of_England  religion-established  religious_culture  nobility  aristocracy  aristocracy-natural  domination  hierarchy  social_order  deference  political_culture  governing_class  elites  democracy  political_participation  morality-conventional  moral_sentiments  Scottish_Enlightenment  civilizing_process  manners  politeness  downloaded  EF-add 
february 2014 by dunnettreader

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