dunnettreader + article + community   27

Marcus Agnafors - Quality of Government: Toward a More Complex Definition (2013) | American Political Science Review on JSTOR
Concepts such as "quality of government" and "good governance" refer to a desired character of the exercise of public authority. Recently the interest in good governance, the quality of government, and similar concepts has increased considerably. However, despite this increasing interest and use, an adequate definition of the concept of quality of government has proved difficult to find. This article criticizes recent attempts at such a definition and proposes an alternative, more complex definition that includes moral content and also encompasses a plurality of values and virtues at its core. An acceptable definition of the quality of governance must be consistent with the demands of a public ethos, the virtues of good decision making and reason giving, the rule of law, efficiency, stability, and a principle of beneficence. The article describes these components in detail and the relations among them. - downloaded via iphone to dbox
corruption  governance  comparative_politics  accountability  government-public_communication  jstor  bibliography  article  community  common_good  morality  political_theory  political_culture  downloaded  public_interest  public_reason  deliberation-public  diversity  governance-participation  good_government  rule_of_law 
july 2017 by dunnettreader
W. James Booth - Culture and Continuity: A Response to Alan Patten's "Rethinking Culture: The Social Lineage Account" (2013) | American Political Science Review on JSTOR
Alan Patten's social lineage account of cultural continuity is the most recent effort to provide multicultural theory with a non-essentialist concept of culture, its continuity and loss that meets broadly liberal normative desiderata. In this essay, I argue that it too fails to offer an alternative essentialism, to meet standard liberal normative stipulations, and to construct a theory of continuity sufficient to underpin the present claims of involuntarily incorporated communities. That result is theoretically interesting for it shows the deep intractability of the problems at the core of liberal multiculturalism. - Downloaded via iphone
downloaded  jstor  identity-multiple  community  liberalism  article  multiculturalism  bibliography  political_culture  nationalism  immigration  political_theory  books  essentialism  culture_wars  reviews  cultural_change  political_sociology  minorities  political_science  national_ID 
july 2017 by dunnettreader
Alan Patton - Cultural Preservation and Liberal Values: A Reply to William James Booth (2013) | American Political Science Review on JSTOR
William James Booth elaborates three main challenges to my social lineage account (Patten 2011). Conceptually, he finds the proposal to be question-beginning. Normatively, he thinks that it has objectionable implications. And, substantively, he claims that the proposal is unhelpful, that it fails to explain a case of theoretical importance for multiculturalism. In this reply, I argue that each of these challenges misses the target. The social lineage account continues to offer a promising, nonessentialist basis for normative multiculturalism. - Downloaded via iphone
cultural_change  social_theory  US_politics  indigenous_peoples  US_society  culture_wars  political_sociology  cultural_diversity  minorities  identity-multiple  political_culture  culture  essentialism  political_theory  downloaded  liberalism  multiculturalism  national_ID  article  bibliography  nationalism  political_science  jstor  cultural_transmission  community  US_politics-race  cultural_stability  mass_culture 
july 2017 by dunnettreader
Dmitri N. Shalin - Critical Theory and theh Pragmatist Challenge (1992) | American Journal of Sociology
AJS Volume 98 Number 2 (September 1992): 237-79 -- Habermas's theory breaks with the Continental tradition that has denigrated pragmatism as an Anglo-Saxon philosophy subservient to technocratic capitalism. While Habermas deftly uses pragmatist insights into communicative rationality and democratic ethos, he shows little sensitivity to other facets of pragmatism. This article argues that incorporating the pragmatist perspective on experience and indeterminacy brings a corrective to the emancipatory agenda championed by critical theorists. The pragmatist alternative to the theory of communicative action is presented, with the discussion centering around the following themes: disembodied reason versus embodied reasonableness, determinate being versus indeterminate reality, discursive truth versus pragmatic certainty, rational consensus versus reasonable dissent, transcendental democracy versus democratic transcendence, and rational society versus sane community. -- downloaded via Air to DBOX - added to Evernote
article  downloaded  social_theory  political_philosophy  critical_theory  pragmatism  Habermas  Peirce  James_William  Dewey  democracy  community  public_sphere  public_reason  rationality  experience  indeterminacy  dissent  consensus  public_opinion  cultural_critique  change-social 
september 2016 by dunnettreader
Vincent Citot - Le processus historique de la Modernité et la possibilité de la liberté (universalisme et individualisme) (2005) - Cairn.info
I - Considérations introductives sur l’essence de la modernité
- L’esprit de la modernité : la liberté, l’universalisme et l’individualisme
- Réflexivité, autonomie et indépendance
- Conséquences : les idées d’égalité et de progrès
II - Les origines antiques de la modernité
- Universalisme et individualisme en Grèce antique
- Le stoïcisme : entre hellénisme et christianisme
- Universalisme, égalitarisme et individualisme chrétien
- L’individualisme du droit romain
III - L’avènement de la modernité et la périodisation de l’ère moderne
- Le monde Ancien et le monde Moderne
- La périodisation de la modernité:
1 - La première modernité : de la Renaissance aux Lumières
2 - La seconde modernité : de la fin du XVIIIème siècle aux années 1960
3 - La troisième modernité : entre postmodernité et hypermodernité
Citot Vincent, « Le processus historique de la Modernité et la possibilité de la liberté (universalisme et individualisme). », Le Philosophoire 2/2005 (n° 25) , p. 35-76
individualism  moral_philosophy  Counter-Enlightenment  16thC  Romanticism  history_of_science  politico-theology  autonomy  scholastics  Renaissance  change-social  democracy  republicanism  modernity-emergence  political_philosophy  democracy_deficit  Stoicism  Reformation  Early_Christian  French_Enlightenment  18thC  republics-Ancient_v_Modern  French_Revolution  periodization  Europe-Early_Modern  universalism  downloaded  subjectivity  political_culture  religious_history  article  Ancients-and-Moderns  community  self  German_Idealism  Counter-Reformation  authority  Enlightenment  metaphysics  ancient_Rome  17thC  Cartesians  cosmology  Descartes  ancient_Greece  Locke  modernity  liberty  Hobbes  intellectual_history  bibliography 
february 2016 by dunnettreader
Nicolas Duvoux - Les grammaires de la modernité. Notices bibliographiques autour de trois débats essentiels (2005) - Cairn.info
Plan de l'article
Une clarification sémantique préalable
I - La querelle de la sécularisation et l’interprétation de la modernité
II - Malaise dans la civilisation post-moderne
III - La modernité sortie de la modernité ?
Duvoux Nicolas, « Les grammaires de la modernité. Notices bibliographiques autour de trois débats essentiels», Le Philosophoire 2/2005 (n° 25) , p. 135-152
URL : www.cairn.info/revue-le-philosophoire-2005-2-page-135.htm.
DOI : 10.3917/phoir.025.0135.
Downloaded via iPhone to DBOX
multiculturalism  modernity  psychoanalysis  poststructuralist  social_capital  structuralism  cultural_critique  relativism  modernity-emergence  intellectual_history  identity  French_Enlightenment  constructivism  political_philosophy  subjectivity  alienation  agency-structure  bibliography  social_sciences-post-WWII  classes  community  change-social  phenomenology  mass_culture  popular_culture  secularization  communication  anti-modernity  article  Counter-Enlightenment  downloaded  ideology  Habermas  modernization  mobility  public_sphere  French_intellectuals  political_science  psychology  social_theory  consumerism 
february 2016 by dunnettreader
Symposium on "Democracy Disfigured" - An Answer to My Criticis | Nadia Urbinati - Academia.edu
An answer to my critics in a symposium, organized by John McCormick, held on her book, Democracy Disfigured, by the journal European Political Science, 2015. -- downloaded pdf to Note
article  political_philosophy  democracy  representative_institutions  democracy-direct  political_culture  republicanism  Machiavelli  political_participation  political_discourse  public_opinion  populism  common_good  community  political_nation  downloaded 
august 2015 by dunnettreader
Raymond Boudon - Utilité ou Rationalité (2002) | Scribd
21 page article -- Explains why "rational choice" fails as explanatory theory in lots of collective action, public opinion, game theory, etc. -- domains where decisions to act aren't based exclusively on instrumental, consequentialist, cost-benefit calculative, and egoistic (directly concerned with impact on self) forms of, and context for, reasoning. Boudon finds "rational choice" superior to hand-wavy explanations that are speculative "black boxes" -- e.g. (1) sociobiology or evo-devo that we're hardwired, (2) Kahneman and Tversky heuristics and biases -- fascinating observations but aren't explanatory, (3) social/cultural explanations such as "socialization" which are tautological or a black box that provide no mechanisms that can differentiate situations or variations in outcomes. E.g. in Roman Empire peasants were more likely to remain pagan and soldiers were more likely to be attracted to the new religion. "Socialization" doesn't explain why soldiers raised in the traditional religious milieu and belief system were more likely to change their beliefs. Great examples of how rationality includes cognitive processes dealing with (1) non-instrumental contexts - e.g. identification with communitarian concerns ranging from voting to immigration policies, (2) aligning actions with one's judgment of what's more likely "true" based on core beliefs and how one has learned to evaluate "evidence" [e.g. Swedes are even more likely to reject "lump of labor" than Americans!] (3) axiological reasoning, including norms of fairness that may be fairly universal (e.g. reaction to Antigone, ultimatum game) or specific to a culture (e.g. due process in political application of "rule of law") -- see article for his tripartite classification of rationality and types of cognition that "rational choice" rejects in its definition. He thinks Weber and Adam Smith got there before, and better than, Becker.
article  Scribd  social_theory  mechanisms-social_theory  evolutionary_biology  evo_psych  rational_choice  rationality-economics  rationality-bounded  rationality  reasons  Weber  Smith  Becker_Gary  Simon_Herbert  fairness  community  identity  norms  epistemology-social  game_theory  altruism  cognitive_bias  cognition  cognition-social  democracy  citizens  voting  political_participation  collective_action  political_culture  public_choice  public_opinion  common_good  socialization  social_psychology  cost-benefit  self-interest  self-interest-cultural_basis  self-and-other  EF-add 
april 2015 by dunnettreader
Scott J. Shapiro - What is the Rule of Recognition (and Does it Exist)? [chapter] :: SSRN in THE RULE OF RECOGNITION AND THE U.S. CONSTITUTION, Matthew Adler, Kenneth Himma, eds., Oxford University Press, 2009
Yale Law School, Public Law Working Paper No. 184 -- One of the principal lessons of The Concept of Law is that legal systems are not only comprised of rules, but also founded on them ....we cannot account for the way we talk and think about the law - as an institution which persists over time, imposes duties and confers powers, enjoys supremacy over other kinds of practices, resolves doubts and disagreements about what is to be done in a community and so on - without supposing that it is regulated by what he called the secondary rules of recognition, change and adjudication. -- In Part 1 I try to state Hart's doctrine of the rule of recognition with some precision. -- I also explore in this part whether the US Constitution can be considered the Hartian rule of recognition for the US legal system. In Part 2 I attempt to detail the many roles that the rule of recognition plays within Hart's theory of law. -- In Part 3 I examine three important challenges to Hart's doctrine: 1) the rule is under- and over-inclusive; 2) Hart cannot explain how social practices are capable of generating rules that confer powers and impose duties and hence cannot account for the normativity of law; 3) Hart cannot explain how disagreements about the criteria of legal validity that occur within actual legal systems are possible. In Parts 4 & 5, I address these objections. ...athough Hart's particular account of the rule of recognition is flawed, a related notion should be substituted - roughly, to treat the rule of recognition as a shared plan which sets out the constitutional order of a legal system. As I try to show, understanding the rule of recognition in this new way allows the legal positivist to overcome the challenges lodged against Hart's version while still retaining the power of the original idea. -- downloaded pdf to Note
article  books  SSRN  philosophy_of_law  legal_system  social_theory  social_order  political_order  change-social  institutions  constitutions  constitutional_law  constitutionalism  normativity  norms  obligation  institutional_change  positivism-legal  Hart  Dworkin  Raz  Finnis  US_constitution  conflict_of_laws  natural_law  legal_validity  legal_realism  sociology_of_law  community  planning  downloaded  EF-add 
july 2014 by dunnettreader
Robert Prus - Reconceptualizing the Study of Community Life: Emile Durkheim's "Pragmatism and Sociology" | JSTOR: The American Sociologist, Vol. 40, No. 1/2 (March-June 2009), pp. 106-146
Emile Durkheim may be best known as a structuralist and an empiricist of a distinctively quantitative sort, but a comparatively neglected set of lectures on pragmatism presented by Durkheim just prior to his death suggests that this characterization is only partially justified. Interestingly, whereas Durkheim is critical of pragmatism in some very consequential respects, he not only uses pragmatism to indicate the major shortcomings of rationalist and empiricist approaches to the study of human group life but he also builds on pragmatism as an instructive resource in developing his own thoughts on human knowing and acting. These lectures may help scholars appreciate some of the more enduring tensions in Durkheim's scholarship, but they also reveal some of the inadequacies of contemporary "sociological theory" with respect to both depictions of the scholarship of Emile Durkheim and the more fundamental study of human knowing and acting. -- interesting bibliography for intellectual_history -- downloaded pdf to Note
article  jstor  intellectual_history  social_theory  19thC  20thC  France  Durkheim  epistemology  pragmatism  rationalist  empiricism  social_sciences  action-social  community  quantitative_methods  structuralist  Dewey  bibliography  downloaded  EF-add 
june 2014 by dunnettreader
James Arnt Aune - Modernity as a Rhetorical Problem: Phronēsis, Forms, and Forums in Norms of Rhetorical Culture | JSTOR: Philosophy & Rhetoric, Vol. 41, No. 4 (2008), pp. 402-420
Starting from Thomas Farrell (1993) revival of interest in Aristotelianism, what adjustments are needed in humanistic and social sciences to properly engage an Aristotle for our times -- downloaded pdf to Note
article  jstor  21stC  modernity  Aristotelian  rhetoric  rhetoric-political  political_philosophy  moral_philosophy  community  communitarian  social_theory  political_culture  downloaded  EF-add 
february 2014 by dunnettreader
Special Issue -Living Alone Together [Introduction and key article by Tzvetan Todorov] | JSTOR: New Literary History, Vol. 27, No. 1, Winter, 1996
Issue Introduction - Living Alone Together (pp. 1-14) Tzvetan Todorov and Marilyn Gaddis Rose. *--*--* Replies to Introduction *--* (1) Community and Individuality (pp. 15-24) Patricia H. Werhane. *--* (2) A Reply to Tzvetan Todorov's "Living Alone Together" (pp. 25-34) Frances Ferguson. *--* (3) "Living Together Alone or Together": Commentary on Tzvetan Todorov's "Living Alone Together" (pp. 35-41) Stephen A. Mitchell. *--* (4) [downloaded] Todorov's Otherness (pp. 43-55) Robert Wokler. *--* (5) Misanthropology (pp. 57-72) Gary Saul Morson. *--* (6) Conflict and Sociability in Hegel, Freud, and Their Followers: Tzvetan Todorov's "Living Alone Together" (pp. 73-82) Daniel Burston. *--* (7) Regarding Others (pp. 83-93) Stewart Justman. *--*--* Response *--* The Gaze and the Fray (pp. 95-106) Tzvetan Todorov and Marilyn Gaddis Rose. *--*--* A. Self and Others in Culture. *--* Keeping the Self Intact during the Culture Wars: A Centennial Essay for Mikhail Bakhtin (pp. 107-126) Caryl Emerson. *--* Cultural Dreaming and Cultural Studies (pp. 127-144) Marianne DeKoven. *--* Orality, Literacy, and Their Discontents (pp. 145-159) Denis Donoghue.
journal  article  jstor  intellectual_history  literary_history  lit_crit  literary_theory  human_nature  social_theory  moral_philosophy  psychology  sociability  self  self-love  self-development  bildung  self-and-other  ancient_philosophy  Plato  Platonism  Socrates  Aristotle  Cicero  community  individualism  authenticity  constructivism  Rousseau  Hegel  Freud  conflict  Bakhtin  conversation  dialogue  literacy  EF-add 
february 2014 by dunnettreader
Patrik Aspers - Nietzsche's Sociology | JSTOR: Sociological Forum, Vol. 22, No. 4 (Dec., 2007), pp. 474-499
Downloaded pdf to Note -- large bibliography looks especially interesting re placing Nietzsche's social constructivism in context of 19thC social sciences and emerging discipline of sociology especially in Germany. -- The aim of this article is to present that part of Friedrich Nietzsche's work that is of special interest to sociologists. To do this, I discuss the relationship between Nietzsche's work and the sociology both of today and of his own time. The most important idea is that he saw reality as a social construction. The idea of social construction is related to the beliefs and values, power and interests of the actors. Nietzsche's discussions of power and of the individual vs. the collective are also analyzed.
article  jstor  intellectual_history  social_theory  social_sciences  19thC  Germany  Nietzsche  sociology  Weber  constructivism  belief  values  power  individualism  subject  civil_society  community  bibliography  downloaded  EF-add 
february 2014 by dunnettreader
Dana Villa - Hegel, Tocqueville, and "Individualism" | JSTOR: The Review of Politics, Vol. 67, No. 4 (Autumn, 2005), pp. 659-686
Critics of liberal individualism have pointed out the many failures of "atomism" as a method in social and political philosophy. Their methodological criticisms have a tendency, however, to devolve into repudiations of moral individualism as such. In part, this is due to a misreading of Hegel and Tocqueville, two critics of individualism who nevertheless upheld the importance of individual rights and what Hegel called "freedom of subjectivity." My essay brings these two very different theorists together in order to show how each deliberately dispensed with the ontology inherited from eighteenth-century social contract theory, the better to focus on associational life and public freedom. The end result is not a relapse into the rhetoric of civic republicanism, but a refurbishment of that tradition from the standpoint of modern liberty: the liberty of the individual. This common project links Hegel, the idealist philosopher, and Tocqueville, the liberal-republican, in unexpected but complementary ways. -- over 100 references -- Downloaded pdf to Note
article  jstor  intellectual_history  political_history  political_philosophy  liberalism  individualism  communitarian  community  liberty  18thC  19thC  Hegel  Tocqueville  civil_liberties  republicanism  neo-republicanism  civic_humanism  civil_society  social_contract  bibliography  downloaded  EF-add 
february 2014 by dunnettreader
Neil Brody Miller - "Proper Subjects for Public Inquiry": The First Unitarian Controversy and the Transformation of Federalist Print Culture | JSTOR: Early American Literature, Vol. 43, No. 1 (2008), pp. 101-135
Lots of primary and secondary references - continues debate against seeing Jeffersonians as innovative in using press to expand public sphere and speak for common man but Federakists as reactive and manipulative for similar activity that in fact did more for wider public participation and voice -- episode also sets pattern for triumph of non-sectarian, Trinitarian, evangelical, bible and tract version of Christianity as public sphere religion -- didn't download
article  jstor  political_history  religious_history  public_sphere  18thC  19thC  Early_Republic  New_England  cultural_capital  cultural_authority  civic_virtue  public_opinion  political_participation  politics-and-religion  political_culture  religious_culture  republicanism  publishing  deference  consensus  anti-Trinitarian  Unitarian  Calvinist  Evangelical  religion-established  clergy  education-higher  Federalist  Jeffersonians  political_press  community  elites  elite_culture  cultural_critique  bibliography  EF-add 
january 2014 by dunnettreader
Jeffrey Church - Selfish and Moral Politics: David Hume on Stability and Cohesion in the Modern State | JSTOR: The Journal of Politics, Vol. 69, No. 1 (Feb., 2007), pp. 169-181
In Hume's dialogue with the Hobbesian-Mandevillian "selfish system" of morals, Hume seems to reject its conclusions in morals, but accept them in politics. No skeptic of moral claims like Mandeville, Hume sought to ground objective moral standards in his moral sentiment philosophy, yet, like Mandeville, Hume argued that in political life human beings act based largely on self-interest and a limited generosity. I argue that Hume, however, is ultimately ambivalent about the selfish system's conclusions in politics. He puts forth both a nonmoral and a moral solution to the problem of cohesion in modern liberal states. First, he agrees with the selfish system's nonmoral tactic of channeling the self-interest of citizens through well-constructed institutions toward salutary ends. Second, arguing that the first solution is insufficient for the health of a political regime, Hume seeks to expand the limited moral sense of citizens through moral and aesthetic education and through an empowerment of local politics. Hume's second solution is a means within liberalism to combat its own tendencies toward the dissolution of communal ties and the creation of conditions ripe for the emergence of "sensible knaves." Bibliography -- downloaded pdf to Note
article  jstor  intellectual_history  political_philosophy  moral_philosophy  18thC  Hume-politics  Hume-ethics  self-interest  social_order  commerce-doux  moral_sentiments  civic_virtue  education-civic  community  liberalism  bibliography  downloaded  EF-add 
january 2014 by dunnettreader
Ryan Patrick Hanley - Hume's Last Lessons: The Civic Education of "My Own Life" | JSTOR: The Review of Politics, Vol. 64, No. 4 (Autumn, 2002), pp. 659-685
Hume's concern to promote public virtue is a central element of his philosophical project which deserves more attention than it has received. This article examines one of his most focused efforts at public moralism: his largely forgotten autobiography, "My Own Life". By attending to its account of how Hume employed his vanity and ambition in his pursuit of fame and fortune-and discovered such virtues as temperance, industry, moderation, and independence in the process-it is argued that "My Own Life" was intended to serve as a "mirror-for-citizens" for citizens of modern commercial republics, offering a model of civic virtue and worldly success for them to emulate. To show this Hume's didactic autobiography is compared to that of his friend Benjamin Franklin, which may have served as a model for Hume's. -- didn't download
article  jstor  intellectual_history  political_philosophy  moral_philosophy  18thC  Hume-ethics  Hume-politics  civic_virtue  community  commerce-doux  ambition  Franklin_Ben  bibliography  EF-add 
january 2014 by dunnettreader
Robert A. Manzer - Hume's Constitutionalism and the Identity of Constitutional Democracy | JSTOR: The American Political Science Review, Vol. 90, No. 3 (Sep., 1996), pp. 488-496
Modern constitutional democracy entails a particular kind of political self-understanding that uniquely centers on a constitution. While many recent studies have focused on how constitutional text shapes this self-understanding, little attention has been paid to the implications of different views of constitutional authority. This is a critical consideration, however, because constitutional authority has always been intrinsically fragile within constitutional democracy, and never more so than at present. In this article, I explore the potential of constitutional science to generate a conception of constitutional authority and collective identity. I focus on David Hume's effort to use constitutional science to shape opinion about liberty and the nature of the political community. This analysis also provides a basis for reflecting on the problematic relation of democracy to constitutionalism and on the peculiar problem of constitutional opinion in constitutional democracy. -- extensive bibliography -- didn't download
article  jstor  intellectual_history  political_philosophy  18thC  British_history  Hume  Hume-politics  constitutionalism  democracy  public_opinion  legitimacy  national_ID  community  bibliography  EF-add 
january 2014 by dunnettreader
Alejandro Portes - Social Capital: Its Origins and Applications in Modern Sociology | JSTOR: Annual Review of Sociology, Vol. 24 (1998), pp. 1-24
Cited by over 300 articles in jstor alone! --downloaded pdf to Note -- This paper reviews the origins and definitions of social capital in the writings of Bourdieu, Loury, and Coleman, among other authors. It distinguishes four sources of social capital and examines their dynamics. Applications of the concept in the sociological literature emphasize its role in social control, in family support, and in benefits mediated by extrafamilial networks. I provide examples of each of these positive functions. Negative consequences of the same processes also deserve attention for a balanced picture of the forces at play. I review four such consequences and illustrate them with relevant examples. Recent writings on social capital have extended the concept from an individual asset to a feature of communities and even nations. The final sections describe this conceptual stretch and examine its limitations. I argue that, as shorthand for the positive consequences of sociability, social capital has a definite place in sociological theory. However, excessive extensions of the concept may jeopardize its heuristic value.
article  jstor  social_theory  social_capital  networks  community  downloaded  EF-add 
january 2014 by dunnettreader
Andrés Rodríguez-Pose and Michael Storper - Better Rules or Stronger Communities? On the Social Foundations of Institutional Change and Its Economic Effects | JSTOR: Economic Geography, Vol. 82, No. 1 (Jan., 2006), pp. 1-25
Huge literature review -- didn't download -- Much of the literature on the impact of institutions on economic development has focused on the tradeoffs between society and community as mutually opposed forms of institutional coordination. On the one hand, sociologists, geographers, and some economists have stressed the positive economic externalities that are associated with the development of associational or group life. Most economists, in contrast, hold that the development of communities may be a second-best solution to the development of formal institutions or even have negative effects, such as the promotion of rent-seeking behavior and principal-agent problems. Societal institutions-such as clear, transparent rules and enforcement mechanisms-are held to be universally positive for development. But there are no real-world cases in which only one of the two exists; society and community are always and everywhere in interaction. This interaction, however, has attracted little attention. In this article, society and community are conceived of as complementary forms of organization whose relative balance and interaction shape the economic potential of every territory. Changes in the balance between community and society take place constantly and affect the medium- and long-run development prospects of every territory. The depth and the speed of change depend on a series of factors, such as starting points in the interaction of society and community, the sources and dynamics of change, and the conflict-solving capacities of the preexisting situation.
article  jstor  economic_history  social_history  social_theory  community  society  social_capital  economic_sociology  economic_growth  development  institution-building  rent-seeking  behavioral_economics  institutional_change  institutional_economics  bibliography  EF-add 
january 2014 by dunnettreader

related tags

16thC  17thC  18thC  19thC  20thC  21stC  accountability  action-social  aesthetics  agency-structure  alienation  altruism  ambition  Ancients-and-Moderns  ancient_Greece  ancient_philosophy  ancient_Rome  anti-modernity  anti-Trinitarian  Aristotelian  Aristotle  article  authenticity  authority  autonomy  Bakhtin  Becker_Gary  behavioral_economics  belief  bibliography  bildung  books  Bourdieu  British_history  Burke  Calvinist  Cartesians  change-social  church_history  Church_of_England  Cicero  citizens  citizenship  civic_humanism  civic_virtue  civil_liberties  civil_society  classes  clergy  cognition  cognition-social  cognitive_bias  collective_action  commerce-doux  common_good  communication  communitarian  community  comparative_politics  conflict  conflict_of_laws  consensus  constitutionalism  constitutional_law  constitutions  constructivism  consumerism  conversation  cooperation  corruption  cosmology  cosmopolitanism  cost-benefit  Counter-Enlightenment  Counter-Reformation  critical_theory  cultural_authority  cultural_capital  cultural_change  cultural_critique  cultural_diversity  cultural_history  cultural_stability  cultural_transmission  culture  culture_wars  deference  deliberation-public  democracy  democracy-direct  democracy_deficit  Descartes  development  Dewey  dialogue  dissent  dissenters  diversity  downloaded  Durkheim  Dworkin  Early_Christian  Early_Republic  ecclesiology  economic_growth  economic_history  economic_sociology  education-civic  education-higher  EF-add  elites  elite_culture  empiricism  Enlightenment  Enlightenment-conservative  enthusiasm  epistemology  epistemology-social  essentialism  Europe-Early_Modern  Evangelical  evolutionary_biology  evo_psych  excommunication  experience  fairness  Federalist  Finnis  France  Franklin_Ben  French_Enlightenment  French_intellectuals  French_Revolution  Freud  game_theory  gender  Germany  German_Idealism  good_government  governance  governance-participation  government-public_communication  groups-cohesion  groups-exclusion  groups-identity  Habermas  Hart  Hegel  hierarchy  history_of_science  Hobbes  human_nature  human_rights  Hume  Hume-ethics  Hume-politics  identity  identity-multiple  ideology  idolatry  immigration  indeterminacy  indigenous_peoples  individualism  institution-building  institutional_change  institutional_economics  institutions  intellectual_history  James_William  Jeffersonians  journal  jstor  Kant-ethics  legal_realism  legal_system  legal_validity  legitimacy  liberalism  liberty  literacy  literary_history  literary_theory  liturgy  lit_crit  Locke  Machiavelli  masculinity  masses-fear_of  mass_culture  mechanism  mechanisms-social_theory  medicine  memory  metaphysics  minorities  mobility  modernity  modernity-emergence  modernization  morality  morality-divine_command  moral_philosophy  moral_sentiments  multiculturalism  nationalism  national_ID  natural_law  neo-republicanism  neoliberalism  networks  New_England  Nietzsche  normativity  norms  obligation  patriotism  Peirce  periodization  phenomenology  philosophy_of_law  planning  Plato  Platonism  politeness  political_culture  political_discourse  political_history  political_nation  political_order  political_participation  political_philosophy  political_press  political_science  political_sociology  political_theory  politico-theology  politics-and-religion  popular_culture  popular_politics  populism  positivism-legal  poststructuralist  power  power-knowledge  pragmatism  Price_Richard  print_culture  psychoanalysis  psychology  public_choice  public_disorder  public_interest  public_opinion  public_reason  public_sphere  publishing  quantitative_methods  rationalist  rationality  rationality-bounded  rationality-economics  rational_choice  rational_religion  Raz  reasons  reception  Reformation  relativism  religion-established  religious_belief  religious_culture  religious_history  religious_imagery  religious_practices  Renaissance  rent-seeking  representative_institutions  republicanism  republics-Ancient_v_Modern  reviews  Revolution_Principles  rhetoric  rhetoric-political  Romanticism  Rousseau  rule_of_law  scepticism  scholastics  science-and-religion  science-public  scientific_method  Scientific_Revolution  Scribd  secularism  secularization  self  self-and-other  self-control  self-development  self-examination  self-fashioning  self-interest  self-interest-cultural_basis  self-love  Simon_Herbert  Smith  sociability  socialization  social_capital  social_contract  social_history  social_order  social_psychology  social_sciences  social_sciences-post-WWII  social_theory  society  sociology  sociology_of_law  sociology_of_religion  Socrates  soteriology  spirituality  SSRN  status  Stoicism  structuralism  structuralist  subject  subjectivity  sublime  theology  Tocqueville  tradition  Unitarian  universalism  US_constitution  US_politics  US_politics-race  US_society  values  voting  Weber 

Copy this bookmark:



description:


tags: