dunnettreader + article + city_states   6

Special Issue in Memory of Charles Tilly (1929–2008): Cities, States, Trust, and Rule - Contents | JSTOR: Theory and Society, Vol. 39, No. 3/4, May 2010
1 - Cities, states, trust, and rule: new departures from the work of Charles Tilly - Michael Hanagan and Chris Tilly [d-load] *-* 2 - Cities, states, and trust networks: Chapter 1 of 'Cities and States in World History' - Charles Tilly [d-load] *-* 3 - Unanticipated consequences of "humanitarian intervention": The British campaign to abolish the slave trade, 1807-1900 - Marcel van der Linden [d-load] *-* 4 - Is there a moral economy of state formation? Religious minorities and repertoires of regime integration in the Middle East and Western Europe, 600-1614 - Ariel Salzmann [d-load] *-* 5 - Inclusiveness and exclusion: trust networks at the origins of European cities - Wim Blockmans [d-load] *-* 6 - Colonial legacy of ethno-racial inequality in Japan - Hwaji Shin. *-* 7 - Legacies of empire? - Miguel Angel Centeno and Elaine Enriquez. *-* 8 - Cities and states in geohistory - Edward W. Soja [d-load] *-* 9 - From city club to nation state: business networks in American political development - Elisabeth S. Clemens [d-load] *-* 10 - Irregular armed forces, shifting patterns of commitment, and fragmented sovereignty in the developing world - Diane E. Davis *-* 11 - Institutions and the adoption of rights: political and property rights in Colombia - Carmenza Gallo *-* 12 - Taking Tilly south: durable inequalities, democratic contestation, and citizenship in the Southern Metropolis - Patrick Heller and Peter Evans *-* 13 - Industrial welfare and the state: nation and city reconsidered - Smita Srinivas *-* 14 - The forms of power and the forms of cities: building on Charles Tilly - Peter Marcuse [d-load] *-* 15 - Was government the solution or the problem? The role of the state in the history of American social policy
journal  article  jstor  social_theory  political_sociology  contention  social_movements  change-social  historical_sociology  nation-state  cities  city_states  urban_politics  urban_elites  urbanization  urban_development  economic_sociology  institutions  institutional_change  property_rights  civil_liberties  civil_society  political_participation  political_culture  inequality  class_conflict  development  colonialism  abolition  medieval_history  state-building  religious_culture  politics-and-religion  MENA  Europe-Early_Modern  Reformation  networks-business  US_history  US_politics  US_economy  welfare_state  power-asymmetric  power-symbolic  elites  elite_culture  imperialism  empires  trust  networks-social  networks-religious  networks  14thC  15thC  16thC  17thC  18thC  19thC  20thC  geohistory  moral_economy  military_history  militia  guerrillas  mercenaires  sovereignty  institution-building 
october 2014 by dunnettreader
James Hankins - Exclusivist Republicanism and the Non-Monarchical Republic | JSTOR: Political Theory, Vol. 38, No. 4 (August 2010), pp. 452-482
The idea that a republic is the only legitimate form of government and that non-elective monarchy and hereditary political privileges are by definition illegitimate is an artifact of late eighteenth century republicanism, though it has roots in the "godly republics" of the seventeenth century. It presupposes understanding a republic (respublica) to be a non-monarchical form of government. The latter definition is a discursive practice that goes back only to the fifteenth century and is not found in Roman or medieval sources. This article explains how the definition emerged in Renaissance Italy. -- downloaded pdf to Note
article  jstor  intellectual_history  political_philosophy  political_history  political_culture  antiquity  Roman_Empire  Roman_Republic  concepts-change  Renaissance  15thC  16thC  17thC  18thC  English_Civil_War  French_Revolution  American_Revolution  republicanism  republics-Ancient_v_Modern  city_states  monarchy  limited_monarchy  Absolutism  Old_Testament  downloaded  EF-add 
february 2014 by dunnettreader
J. G. A. Pocock: The Atlantic Republican Tradition: The Republic of the Seven Provinces | Republics of Letters: A Journal for the Study of Knowledge, Politics, and the Arts
Citation: Pocock, J. G. A.. “The Atlantic Republican Tradition: The Republic of the Seven Provinces.” Republics of Letters: A Journal for the Study of Knowledge, Politics, and the Arts2, no. 1 (December 15, 2010): http://rofl.stanford.edu/node/72. In "Limits of the Atlantic Republican Tradition" issue -- downloaded pdf to Note-- Hence the debate between ancient and modern liberty, to be found in Britain a century before it was taken up by Benjamin Constant. It was a debate by no means uniquely British, but in the form it took in Britain a class of free landholders, whose history could be traced back through Gothic to classic and Greco-Roman times, played a crucial role. The image of the republic, it needs repeating, was not presented as a norm to be imitated; it was a bench­mark for the interpretation of history, for measuring the gains and losses of movement away from it. This narrative, shaped by a succession of historians from Bruni to Robertson, developed concurrently with a “philosophic” history of human (but European) society, based on the stadial sequence from hunter-gatherers to merchants and capitalists and culminating in the political economy of Adam Smith. In this complex historiography, the role of medieval leagues of merchant republics, Lombard, Hanseatic, and Dutch, was important but problematic; and it is here that the anglophone and Atlantic reader, rightly or wrongly, finds the key to the problem of Dutch republican thought.
article  16thC  17thC  18thC  intellectual_history  political_history  political_culture  historiography  lessons-of-history  republicanism  Machiavelli  Britain  British_politics  American_colonies  American_Revolution  Dutch  city_states  Holy_Roman_Empire  commerce  trade  landed_interest  burghers  oligarchy  corruption  civic_virtue  William_III  Queen_Anne  George_III  tyranny  Stadholder  republics-Ancient_v_Modern  downloaded  EF-add 
september 2013 by dunnettreader
Thomas Maissen: Why Did the Swiss Miss the Machiavellian Moment? History, Myth, Imperial and Constitutional Law in the Early Modern Swiss Confederation | Republics of Letters: A Journal for the Study of Knowledge, Politics, and the Arts
Citation: Maissen, Thomas. “Why Did the Swiss Miss the Machiavellian Moment? History, Myth, Imperial and Constitutional Law in the Early Modern Swiss Confederation.”Republics of Letters: A Journal for the Study of Knowledge, Politics, and the Arts 2, no. 1 (December 15, 2010): http://rofl.stanford.edu/node/74. -- in "Limits of Atlantic Republican Tradition" -- downloaded pdf to Note-- Didn’t the Swiss share the need that stimulated contemporary Dutch authors like the brothers de la Court, who discovered the Florentine republic as a model in order to conceive and legitimatize republican government against the house of Orange? Both federations originated in a revolt against the Habsburgs; both achieved formal independence from the Holy Roman Empire in 1648, through the Peace of Westphalia; and in spite of important Catholic minorities, both were bastions of the Reformed Church considered already then and even more by twentieth-century researchers to be a hotbed of republicanism. But Zwingli and Calvin were not republicans. What mattered for them was having the right faith, not a precise political constitution. 
article  intellectual_history  political_philosophy  political_culture  republicanism  Swiss  Calvinist  militia  mercenaires  Machiavelli  15thC  16thC  17thC  18thC  Holy_Roman_Empire  France  Savoy  city_states  downloaded  EF-add 
september 2013 by dunnettreader
AHR Forum - Hans Baron's Renaissance Humanism - JSTOR: The American Historical Review, Vol. 101, No. 1, Feb., 1996
Articles -- Introduction: Hans Baron's Renaissance Humanism (pp. 107-109)  Ronald Witt -**- The Crisis after Forty Years (pp. 110-118)  Ronald Witt -**- Baron's Machiavelli and Renaissance Republicanism (pp. 119-129)  John M. Najemy -**- The Historical Petrarch (pp. 130-141)  Craig Kallendorf -**- Hans Baron's Renaissance Humanism: A Comment (pp. 142-144)  Werner Gundersheimer
article  jstor  intellectual_history  historiography  political_philosophy  humanism  Renaissance  14thC  15thC  16thC  Italy  Petrarch  Machiavelli  republicanism  city_states  political_culture  cultural_history  EF-add 
september 2013 by dunnettreader

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