dunnettreader + article + antiquaries   10

Philip Connell - British Identities and the Politics of Ancient Poetry in Later 18thC England (2006) | The Historical Journal on JSTOR
The Historical Journal, Vol. 49, No. 1 (Mar., 2006), pp. 161-192 - This article examines the scholarly recovery and popular reception of 'ancient poetry' in later eighteenth-century England, with a view to elucidating the relationship between cultural primitivism and more overtly politicized discourses of national identity. The publication of the poems of Ossian, in the early 1760s, gave a new prominence to the earliest cultural productions of Celtic antiquity, and inspired the attempts of English literary historians, such as Thomas Percy and Thomas Warton, to provide an alternative 'Gothic' genealogy for the English literary imagination. However, both the English reception of Ossian, and the Gothicist scholarship of Percy and Warton, were complicated by the growing strength of English radical patriotism. As popular political discourse assumed an increasingly insular preoccupation with Saxon liberties and ancient constitutional rights, more conservative literary historians found their own attempts to ground English poetic tradition in some form of Gothic inheritance progressively compromised. The persistence of ancient constitutionalism as a divisive element of English political argument thus curtailed the ability of Gothicist literary scholarship to function as an effective vehicle for English cultural patriotism.
article  jstor  18thC  English_lit  literary_history  British_history  British_politics  politics-and-literature  political_culture  political_discourse  Gothic  ancient_constitution  liberty  radicals  conservatism  antiquity  antiquaries  history_of_England  popular_culture  high_culture  downloaded 
july 2016 by dunnettreader
MARTHA VANDREI - A VICTORIAN INVENTION? THOMAS THORNYCROFT'S ‘BOADICEA GROUP’ AND THE IDEA OF HISTORICAL CULTURE IN BRITAIN | The Historical Journal - Volume 57 / Issue 02 / June 2014, pp 485-508 - Abstract - Cambridge Journals Online -
King's College London -- DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1017/S0018246X14000119, Published online: 08 May 2014 -- This article examines the figure of Boudica (or Boadicea), with a specific focus on Thomas Thornycroft's Westminster Bridge statue, and on the work of the seventeenth-century antiquary, Edmund Bolton. By synthesizing historiography which investigates the idea of ‘historical culture’ in the modern and early modern periods, this article attempts to bridge chronological and generic divisions which exist in the study of the history of history. It argues that to fully understand the genealogy of popular historical ideas like Boudica, it is imperative that historians of such subjects take a longue-durée approach that situates individual artists and writers, and the historical-cultural works they produce, within their broader political, cultural, and social contexts while simultaneously viewing these works as part of a long, discursive process by which the past is successively reinterpreted. As a consequence, this article eschews an analysis of Boudica which labels her an ‘imperial icon’ for Victorian Britons, and argues that the relationship between contemporary context and the re-imagined past is not as straightforward as it might initially appear. -- paywall -- may be interesting for development of Britannia imagery relevant to Bolingbroke and Patriots
article  paywall  find  historiography  historiography-17thC  historiography-18thC  historiography-19thC  cultural_history  antiquaries  British_history  British_politics  national_ID  art_history  literary_history  political_culture  Victorian  usable_past  iconography  periodization  Britannia  patriotism  Patriots  British_Empire  imperialism  EF-add 
august 2014 by dunnettreader
Roger Chartier - History, Time, and Space | Republics of Letters - Volume 2, Issue 2 (March 2011)
Downloaded pdf to Note - looks like specifically commissioned historiography reflections after "crisis of history" in 1980s and 1990s - very useful Continental view with helpful ftnts - lead article in issue but doesn't deal with the Forum - read and annotated
article  historiography  cultural_history  microhistory  global_history  periodization  geography  circulation-people  nation-state  narrative  rhetoric  fiction  White_Hayden  Foucault  Annales  Ricoeur  human_nature  comparative_anthropology  comparative_history  historical_sociology  historical_change  evidence  verisimilitude  antiquaries  historiography-18thC  bibliography  downloaded  EF-add 
january 2014 by dunnettreader
Peter Burke: Images as Evidence in Seventeenth-Century Europe | JSTOR: Journal of the History of Ideas, Vol. 64, No. 2 (Apr., 2003), pp. 273-296
Deals with the transition from antiquarianism to archaeology and debates over use of material remains as historical evidence. Builds on work of Momigliano and Haskell (History and its images - bookshelf? ) -- downloaded pdf to Note
article  jstor  intellectual_history  historiography  17thC  antiquaries  archaeology  epistemology  art_history  evidence  antiquity  ancient_Rome  ancient_history  ancient_religions  Early_Christian  Egypt  downloaded  EF-add 
december 2013 by dunnettreader
Peter Milker: The Ancient Constitution and the Genealogist: Momigliano, Pocock, and Peiresc’s Origines Murensis Monasterii (1618) | Republics of Letters: A Journal for the Study of Knowledge, Politics, and the Arts
Citation: Miller, Peter. “The Ancient Constitution and the Genealogist: Momigliano, Pocock, and Peiresc’s Origines Murensis Monasterii (1618).” Republics of Letters: A Journal for the Study of Knowledge, Politics, and the Arts 1, no. 1 (May 1, 2009): http://rofl.stanford.edu/node/37. -- in "Rethinking the Republic of Letters" -- downloaded pdf to Note -- Momigliano’s essay,was actually not a history of antiquarianism. Its point was to seek an anti-relativist platform for historical scholarship that could be deployed to counter the kind of racist obscurantism that passed as radical skepticism in the 1930s. By focusing on the history of classical scholarship and largely ignoring the beginnings of medieval historical scholarship, it was also relatively simple for Momigliano to present his scholars as more-or-less apolitical, above the fray. He closes the essay by arguing that perhaps the greatest legacy of the antiquarian was an “ethical” one, quoting Mabillon on the need for a “coeur dégagé des passions.” But yet his was a political argument, albeit with a small “p” because his target was a politics of relativism and nihilism. What follows is really a small sketch towards what it might have looked like if Pocock had met Momigliano at the Warburg Institute in 1950, or really grappled with his great essay in the years that followed—but with one important change. What I propose by the term “genealogist” is to go a step towards redefining early modern antiquarianism, not so much away from the Classical world that was so dear to Momigliano, and so important for the many art historians who have mostly been responsible for returning antiquarianism to the scholarly agenda in the last decade or so, as towards the middle ages.
article  intellectual_history  historiography  17thC  18thC  antiquaries  ancient_history  ancient_Greece  ancient_Rome  medieval_history  scepticism  historians-and-state  historians-and-religion  Pocock  downloaded  EF-add 
september 2013 by dunnettreader
Bianca Chen: Digging for Antiquities with Diplomats: Gisbert Cuper (1644-1716) and his Social Capital | Republics of Letters: A Journal for the Study of Knowledge, Politics, and the Arts
Citation: Chen, Bianca. “Digging for Antiquities with Diplomats: Gisbert Cuper (1644-1716) and his Social Capital.” Republics of Letters: A Journal for the Study of Knowledge, Politics, and the Arts 1, no. 1 (May 1, 2009): http://rofl.stanford.edu/node/36. -- in "Rethinking the Republic of Letters" issue -- downloaded pdf to Note -- Gisbert Cuper’s career and his rise to fame allow us to examine the working practices of the Republic of Letters and reconsider how to judge a scholar’s merits in a historical context other than our own. First appointed professor of history and rhetoric at a provincial Athenaeum in Deventer (1668), Cuper subsequently became Rector of the institute (1672), burgomaster (mayor) of the city (1674), a delegate of the city to the meetings of the provincial States (the States of Overijssel), a delegate of the province to the States General of the Dutch Republic (1681-1694) and finally, for that highest governing body, a commissioner in the field during the War of the Spanish Succession (1706)...... This article will examine how the concurrence of politics and letters was important for the advancement of scholarship and how it led to the perception of Cuper as a particularly significant cultural intermediary in the Republic of Letters. I will refer to the concept of social capital to emphasize the importance of networks of patronage and the exchange of services within any community, including within the Republic of Letters. Explicitly stressing the value of correspondence to the Republic of Letters in general and to Cuper in particular, I will pay special attention to his large and diverse network of correspondents from different backgrounds. Ultimately this article seeks to demonstrate how successfully Cuper bridged the world of politics and letters by employing his social capital for the sake of learning and the subsequent benefits for his reputation in the Republic of Letters.
article  intellectual_history  political_history  cultural_history  political_culture  intelligentsia  Republic_of_Letters  Enlightenment  social_capital  networks  patronage  correspondence  diplomacy  diplomats  politicians  status  antiquaries  Dutch  War_of_Spanish_Succession  Peace_of_Utrecht  downloaded  EF-add 
september 2013 by dunnettreader
Jacob Soll: Jean-Baptiste Colbert’s Republic of Letters | Republics of Letters: A Journal for the Study of Knowledge, Politics, and the Arts
Citation: Soll, Jacob. “Jean-Baptiste Colbert’s Republic of Letters.” Republics of Letters: A Journal for the Study of Knowledge, Politics, and the Arts 1, no. 1 (May 1, 2009): http://rofl.stanford.edu/node/28. -- in "Rethinking the Republic of Letters" -- downloaded pdf to Note -- Few figures better represent the world of scholarship at the turn of the seventeenth century than Bernard de Montfaucon, the French maurist monk and antiquarian who lived from 1655–1741..... Montfaucon wrote what was to become the central work on antiquarianism at the beginning of the Enlightenment: L'antiquité expliquée et représentée en figures (1719–24), which attempted to catalogue and show in engravings all known ancient sculptures and carvings. He also wrote on the collection of ancient manuscripts. For his work, Montfaucon was complimented by Bossuet and made royal confessor. Indeed, he represents a world of ecclesiastical scholarship, in the strain of Dom Jean Mabillon, that mixed antiquarianism, ecclesiastical scholarship and loyal service to royal power......[ Gave eulogy for Foucault who] began his career as Jean-Baptiste Colbert’s administrative assistant. In the early days working for Colbert, Foucault did not share information amongst public scholars. In fact, he was known for seizing books, and for the coerced conversions of Protestant nobles. And as he did this dirty work for the state, he learned and gained a taste for antiquarianism.The case of Foucault opens the door onto an aspect of the Republic of Letters that has been little discussed: the role of the state and coercive political power in relation to the phenomenon of the Republic of Letters.
article  intellectual_history  political_history  political_culture  religious_culture  intelligentsia  scholarship  clerisy  Republic_of_Letters  17thC  18thC  antiquaries  historians-and-state  historians-and-religion  church_history  religious_history  ancient_history  philology  Biblical_criticism  Bible-as-history  French_government  Colbert  intellectual_freedom  Bossuet  academies  Académie_des_Inscriptions  patronage  downloaded  EF-add 
september 2013 by dunnettreader
Alfred Hiatt: Alfred Hiatt: Diplomatic Arts: Hickes against Mabillon in the Republic of Letters (2009)
JSTOR: Journal of the History of Ideas, Vol. 70, No. 3 (Jul., 2009), pp. 351-373 -- disputes re documentary evidence standards in Republic of Letters between French and Continental followers of Mabillon and English scholars -- downloaded pdf to Note
article  jstor  17thC  18thC  Enlightenment  historiography  historians  antiquaries  evidence  Republic_of_Letters  downloaded  EF-add 
august 2013 by dunnettreader

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