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CAROLYN POLIZZOTTO -- WHAT REALLY HAPPENED AT THE WHITEHALL DEBATES? A NEW SOURCE (2014). | The Historical Journal, 57, pp 33-51. - Cambridge Journals Online - Abstract
CAROLYN POLIZZOTTO - The University of Western Australia -- A variant transcription of one of the Whitehall Debates has been identified among the Clarke papers. Located in volume 16 of the Worcester MSS, it records the latter part of the longest debate, on 14 December 1648, concerning the Second Agreement of the People. The fair copy of this debate by army secretary William Clarke (in volume 65 of the Worcester MSS) was previously believed to be the only surviving record. The new source provides additional text, clarifies obscure passages, and is generally easier to understand. Historians now have the advantage of another account of the meeting, which reveals its importance more fully. Although the Levellers’ Agreement was never to be implemented, the Whitehall Debates took place between Pride's Purge and the trial and execution of Charles I. The variant therefore sheds new light on the thinking of the army command and its advisers both religious and lay at this time of unprecedented constitutional crisis. It also provides the first documentary evidence that the army debates at Putney (1647) and Whitehall (1648–9) were not recorded by Clarke alone, but by a team of at least three secretaries. -* For their invaluable advice in the preparation of this article, I would like to express my gratitude to Dr Clive Holmes and Prof. Ian Gentles. Dr Joanna Parker, Librarian, Worcester College, Oxford, and the staff of the Scholars’ Centre in the University of Western Australia Library, especially Azra Tulic
article  paywall  17thC  British_history  British_politics  English_Civil_War  Levellers  New_Model_Army  English_constitution  religious_history  godly_persons  Puritans  Independents  radicals  primary_sources  manuscripts  EF-add 
august 2014 by dunnettreader
John Coffey - Puritanism and Liberty Revisited: The Case for Toleration in the English Revolution - JSTOR: The Historical Journal, Vol. 41, No. 4 (Dec., 1998), pp. 961-985
In recent years historians have grown sceptical about attempts to trace connections between puritanism and liberty. Puritans, we are told, sought a godly society, not a pluralistic one. The new emphasis has been salutary, but it obscures the fact that a minority of zealous Protestants argued forcefully for the toleration of heresy, blasphemy, Catholicism, non-Christian religions, and even atheism. During the English revolution, a substantial number of Baptists, radical Independents, and Levellers insisted that the New Testament paradigm required the church to be a purely voluntary, non-coercive community in the midst of a pluralistic society governed by a `merely civil' state. Although their position was not without its ambiguities, it constituted a startling break with the Constantinian assumptions of magisterial Protestantism. -- downloaded pdf to Note
article  jstor  historiography  revisionism  religious_history  intellectual_history  political_philosophy  17thC  British_history  British_politics  Puritans  English_Civil_War  Interregnum  Protectorate  godly_persons  Parliamentarians  republicanism  Cromwell  Levellers  tolerance  religion-established  religious_belief  religious_culture  church_history  New_Testament  apostolic_succession  Early_Christian  theocracy  heterodoxy  pluralism  civil_liberties  civil_religion  bibliography  downloaded  EF-add 
june 2014 by dunnettreader
Samuel Dennis Glover - The Putney Debates: Popular versus Élitist Republicanism | JSTOR: Past & Present, No. 164 (Aug., 1999), pp. 47-80
Disagrees with Worden and others who don't see Levellers and civil war radicals as source of republicanism - traces influence of ancient historians, radicals during Dutch Revolt etc on mid 17thC English radical republicanism - extensive bibliography - downloaded pdf to Note
article  jstor  intellectual_history  political_philosophy  17thC  British_history  British_politics  English_Civil_War  Interregnum  Dutch_Revolt  republics-Ancient_v_Modern  republicanism  radicals  Levellers  Cromwell  Tacitus  Machiavelli  commonwealth  bibliography  downloaded  EF-add 
june 2014 by dunnettreader
David Zaret - Petitions and the "Invention" of Public Opinion in the English Revolution | JSTOR: American Journal of Sociology, Vol. 101, No. 6 (May, 1996), pp. 1497-1555
Current accounts of the capitalist and Protestant origins of the democratic public sphere are inconsistent and speculative. This empirical account explains the transition in political communication from norms of secrecy to appeals to public opinion. Popular communicative change in the English Revolution anticipated, in practice, the democratic theory of the public sphere when printing transformed a traditional instrument of communication-the petition. Petitions had medieval origins and traditions that upheld norms of secrecy and privilege in political communication. Economic and technical properties of printing-namely, heightened commercialism and the capacity to reproduce texts-demolished these norms by changing the scope and content of communication by petition. This practical innovation appears in all factions in the revolution. But among radical groups, the political use of printed petitions led to novel theories and to democratic speculation on constitutional provisions that would ensure the authority of public opinion in politics. This analysis contradicts key assumptions on communicative change that fuel pessimistic assessments of the modern public sphere in post-modernism and critical theory. -- downloaded pdf to Note
article  jstor  historiography  public_sphere  social_process  change-social  17thC  British_history  British_politics  English_Civil_War  mixed_government  public_opinion  democracy  arcana_imperii  political_culture  social_order  printing  print_culture  communication  political_press  political_participation  petitions  radicals  commonwealth  Levellers  postmodern  critical_theory  bibliography  downloaded  EF-add  English_constitution 
may 2014 by dunnettreader
Edmund Leites - Conscience, Leisure, and Learning: Locke and the Levellers | JSTOR: Sociological Analysis, Vol. 39, No. 1 (Spring, 1978), pp. 36-61
In 1962, C. B. Macpherson challenged conventional interpretations of the thought of both John Locke and the English Leveller movement of the 1640s. In the years since the publication of his book, his interpretations have received much acute criticism. Some critics have ably attacked his reading of John Locke; others, his view of the Leveller movement. But the doubtfulness of Macpherson's interpretation has not led his critics to seriously reexamine the question of whether Locke and the Levellers share a common vision. I shall do this, and shall broaden the context of interpretation to include more than their political views. -- developing implications of conscience and character in moral judgment vs casuistry and deference to learned authority -- Putney debates with Ireton re extent of suffrage analyzed for broader implications -- didn't download
article  jstor  intellectual_history  moral_philosophy  political_philosophy  17thC  British_politics  Levellers  Locke  egalitarian  casuistry  conscience  character  bibliography  EF-add 
january 2014 by dunnettreader

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