dunnettreader + article + 21stc   73

(URL is a pff) Greg Clark & Neil Cummins - Surnames and Social Mobility, Human Nature (2015)
Surnames and Social Mobility
Gregory Clark1 Neil Cummins2
To what extent do parental characteristics explain child social outcomes? Typically, parent-child correlations in socioeconomic measures are in the range 0.2-0.6. Surname evidence suggests, however, that the intergenerational correlation of overall status is much higher. This paper shows, using educational status in England 1170-2012 as an example, that the true underlying correlation of social status is in the range 0.75-0.85. Social status is more strongly inherited even than height. This correlation is constant over centuries, suggesting an underlying social physics surprisingly immune to government intervention. Social mobility in England in 2012 is little greater than in pre-industrial times. Surname evidence in other countries suggests similarly slow underlying mobility rates.
KEYWORDS: Social Mobility, intergenerational correlation, status inheritance
Downloaded via iPhone to DBOX
status  Europe-Early_Modern  article  downloaded  surnames  statistics  17thC  British_history  16thC  mobility  Industrial_Revolution  19thC  inheritance  demography  21stC  20thC  18thC  medieval_history 
february 2017 by dunnettreader
Palley, Rochon and Vernengo » The Relevance of Keynes’s General Theory after 80 years - Review of Keynesian Economics 2016
Thomas Palley, Louis-Philippe Rochon and Matías Vernengo -- The Relevance of Keynes’s General Theory after 80 years -- This year marks two important anniversaries in macroeconomics: the 80th anniversary of the publication of Keynes’s The General Theory of Employment, Interest and Money, and the 70th anniversary of Keynes’s premature death, at the age of 63. To mark these anniversaries, the first issue of the fourth year of the Review of Keynesian Economics is dedicated to Keynes -' downloaded pdf to Note
article  economic_theory  intellectual_history  20thC  21stC  Keynesianism  Keynes  downloaded 
february 2016 by dunnettreader
Céline Spector - Charles Taylor, philosophe de la culture (career review) - La Vie des idées - 8 avril 2014
Charles Taylor n’a cessé de critiquer l’individualisme des sociétés modernes. La politique de la reconnaissance qu’il prône entend respecter la singularité de chacun et son inscription dans une communauté morale ou politique – quitte à accorder une importance excessive aux convictions religieuses. -- downloaded pdf to Note
article  intellectual_history  20thC  21stC  Taylor_Charles  individualism  modernity  secularism  religious_belief  religious_culture  downloaded 
december 2015 by dunnettreader
Joel Mokyr, Chris Vickers, and Nicolas L. Ziebarth - The History of Technological Anxiety and the Future of Economic Growth: Is This Time Different? | AEAweb: Journal of Economic Perspectives, 29(3): 31-50
Technology is widely considered the main source of economic progress, but it has also generated cultural anxiety throughout history. The developed world is now suffering from another bout of such angst. Anxieties over technology can take on several forms, and we focus on three of the most prominent concerns. First, there is the concern that technological progress will cause widespread substitution of machines for labor, which in turn could lead to technological unemployment and a further increase in inequality in the short run, even if the long-run effects are beneficial. Second, there has been anxiety over the moral implications of technological process for human welfare, broadly defined. While, during the Industrial Revolution, the worry was about the dehumanizing effects of work, in modern times, perhaps the greater fear is a world where the elimination of work itself is the source of dehumanization. A third concern cuts in the opposite direction, suggesting that the epoch of major technological progress is behind us. Understanding the history of technological anxiety provides perspective on whether this time is truly different. We consider the role of these three anxieties among economists, primarily focusing on the historical period from the late 18th to the early 20th century, and then compare the historical and current manifestations of these three concerns. - downloaded pdf to Note
article  economic_history  technology  18thC  20thC  21stC  Industrial_Revolution  change-economic  change-social  unemployment  labor_history  robotics  AI  political_economy  economic_culture  economic_growth  labor_share  labor-service_sector  downloaded 
september 2015 by dunnettreader
Jeet Heer - Sex, Economics, and Austerity | The American Prospect - 2013
John Maynard Keynes was the sexiest economist who ever lived. This might seem like half-hearted praise since in our mind’s eye the typical economist appears as… On the decades of right-wing attacks on Keynes and Keynesianism using sexual "immorality" as linked to purported moral failings of Keynes' policy responses from Versailles onward.
article  Instapaper  intellectual_history  intellectual_history-distorted  20thC  21stC  Keynes  Keynesianism  economic_history  economic_theory  macroeconomics  Great_Depression  right-wing  neoconservatism  fiscal_policy  budget_deficit  austerity  economics-and-morality  from instapaper
august 2015 by dunnettreader
Knowledge, Virtue and the Research University | chad wellmon - September 22, 2014
Published in The Hedgehog Review -- Recently, a broad literature has chronicled, diagnosed, and attempted to solve what many have referred to as a “crisis” in higher education. Some authors tie the purported crisis to an out- of-touch faculty or lackadaisical students, while others blame a conservative or liberal political culture or the public’s general distrust of univer- sities. Amidst all of these anxious arguments, however, we can discern four basic types. -- downloaded pdf to Note
article  US_society  21stC  humanities  university  university-contemporary  disciplines  specialization  education-higher  humanities-finance  instrumentalist  knowledge  knowledge_economy  knowledge_workers  human_capital  downloaded 
july 2015 by dunnettreader
Arthur Goldhammer - The Old Continent Creaks | Democracy Journal: Summer 2015
not so long ago (the EU) was praised by some as a model of ingenious institutional innovation and cooperative transnational governance, while simultaneously denounced by others as an insidious instrument for subjecting ostensibly democratic states to the imperious dictates of capitalism in its latest “neoliberal” form? For 2 generations after World War II, memories of the devastating consequences of nationalism trumped economic rivalries, giving technocrats maneuvering room to devise continental strategies for economic growth that nevertheless enabled member states to maintain sufficient control over social policy to satisfy voter demands. For decades, this arrangement held.By the mid-1980s, however, enormous changes in the global economy forced the European Community to reinvent itself in order to remain competitive. The original balance between national sovereignty and technocratic government at the European level was altered, limiting the ability of member states to set their own economic policy. But today’s convergent crises raise the question of whether the European Union that replaced the European Community needs to reinvent itself yet again. And if so, is reinvention possible at a time when many Europeans, and especially those for whom World War II is a distant memory, feel that the EU is exacerbating nationalist enmities rather than calming them? -- downloaded pdf to Note
article  Europe  20thC  21stC  EU  EU_governance  technocracy  nation-state  nationalism  regional_blocs  sovereignty  democracy_deficit  political_participation  opposition  globalization  competition-interstate  Eurozone  economic_policy  fiscal_policy  monetary_policy  sovereign_debt  downloaded 
july 2015 by dunnettreader
Frederick Schauer - The Path-Dependence of Legal Positivism (Symposium - Jurisprudence and (Its) History) | Virginia Law Review - 101 Va. L. Rev. 957 (2015)
My aim in this Article is to focus on the history of thinking about law in the context of 3 topics (..) to show that the continuous development of the theory of legal positivism, however useful it may have been or may still be, has possibly caused us to ignore other aspects of what was originally part of the positivist picture. (..)The first of these dimensions is the relationship between legal theory and legal reform. (..) that an account of the nature of law might be developed not simply as an aid to understanding or accurate description, but instead as a way of facilitating reform of law itself or reform of how a society understands the idea of law. Second, legal positivism, at the time of its late 19thC (or perhaps even earlier) origins, was focused on the importance of coercion, force, and sanctions as central components of law. But as with the creation of legal theories for the purpose of legal reform, this emphasis on the coercive side of law has also been banished to a kind of jurisprudential purgatory, for reasons and with consequences that deserve further examination. The third lost element of earlier versions of legal positivism is its focus on judicial decision making and the role of judges. Modern legal positivists, for whom 1961 is all too often the beginning of useful thought about the nature of law, do not, with few exceptions, consider theories of judicial decision making to be a necessary or even important part of the positivist perspective. But it was not always so. -- downloaded pdf to Note
article  intellectual_history  intellectual_history-distorted  18thC  19thC  20thC  21stC  philosophy_of_law  jurisprudence  legal_theory  legal_system  political_philosophy  legal_reform  institutional_change  institutions  judiciary  judicial_review  law_enforcement  criminal_justice  punishment  coercion  authority  obligation  policymaking  political_change  social_theory  social_sciences  positivism-legal  positive_law  positivism  justice  Study_and_Uses  downloaded 
july 2015 by dunnettreader
Dan Priel - Toward Classical Legal Positivism (Symposium - Jurisprudence and (Its) History) | Virginia Law Review - 101 Va. L. Rev. 987 (2015)
I have two major aims: (1) set the historical record straight(...) Hobbes’s and Bentham’s work that seeks to understand their views on law not by isolating it from the rest of their wide-ranging body of work, but by understanding their jurisprudential work as part of a broader project. (2) My main aim is to contribute to contemporary jurisprudential debates and to suggest that the largely neglected approach of earlier positivists is superior to the view held by most contemporary legal positivists. (...) to what extent it is useful for us to call Hobbes and Bentham “legal positivists.” My answer to this question consists of three interrelated points. The first is that we draw an explicit link between their ideas and the view that (some time later) would come to be known as “positivism,” roughly the view that the methods of the “human sciences” are essentially the same as those of the natural sciences. The second point is that the classical legal positivists’ decisive break with natural law ideas prevalent in their day is to be found exactly here, in their views about metaphysics and nature. The third point is that this aspect of their work has been, in my view regrettably, abandoned by contemporary legal positivists. Though all three points are related, in this Article I will say relatively little about the first point, as I discussed it in greater detail elsewhere. -- downloaded pdf to Note
article  philosophy_of_law  jurisprudence  political_philosophy  intellectual_history  intellectual_history-distorted  17thC  18thC  19thC  20thC  21stC  Hobbes  Bentham  natural_law  natural_rights  positivism-legal  analytical_philosophy  metaphysics  natural_philosophy  nature  human_nature  scientific_method  social_theory  social_sciences  positivism  positive_law  Methodenstreit  methodology-quantitative  epistemology  sociology_of_knowledge  downloaded 
july 2015 by dunnettreader
Jeffrey A. Pojanowski - Positivism(s): A Commentary on Priel's "Toward Classical Legal Positivism" | Virginia Law Review - 101 Va. L. Rev. 1023 (2015)
Anglo-American jurisprudence, before it insulated itself in conceptual analysis and defined itself in opposition to broader questions, was properly a “sociable science,” to use Professor Postema’s phrase from his symposium article. And, in part due to the exemplars of history, so it may become again. By drawing on Bentham and Hobbes, Professor Dan Priel’s Toward Classical Positivism points forward toward more fruitful methods of jurisprudence while illuminating the recent history and current state of inquiry. His article demonstrates the virtues and promise of a more catholic approach to jurisprudence. It also raises challenging questions about the direction to take this rediscovered path, and I am not sure I always agree with his suggested answers. Any misgivings I have about Priel’s particular approach, however, do not diminish my appreciation; I find even the points of disagreement to be live and meaningful, and that itself is refreshing. -- downloaded pdf to Note
article  philosophy_of_law  jurisprudence  political_philosophy  intellectual_history  intellectual_history-distorted  17thC  18thC  19thC  20thC  21stC  Hobbes  Bentham  natural_law  natural_rights  positivism-legal  analytical_philosophy  metaphysics  natural_philosophy  nature  human_nature  scientific_method  social_theory  social_sciences  positivism  positive_law  Methodenstreit  methodology-quantitative  epistemology  sociology_of_knowledge  downloaded 
july 2015 by dunnettreader
Eva Botella-Ordinas & Domingo Centenero de Arce & Antonio Terrasa Lozano, « Une tradition hispanique de démocratie locale. Les cabildos abiertos du XVIe siècle à nos jours » | La Vie des idées - Oct 2011
« Occupe la place ! », scandent les Indignés. Selon trois historiens, ce recours aux assemblées locales s’ancre dans une tradition hispanique puissante et ancienne. Les formes locales de républicanisme participatif auraient persisté depuis le Moyen-âge, malgré les efforts constants pour les réduire. -- downloaded pdf to Note
article  political_history  political_culture  Spain  Spanish_Empire  comparative_history  republicanism  democracy  democracy_deficit  political_participation  social_history  social_order  local_government  local_politics  radicals  revolutions  Europe-Early_Modern  Enlightenment  French_Revolution  Europe-19thC  medieval_history  16thC  17thC  18thC  19thC  20thC  21stC  downloaded  EF-add 
january 2015 by dunnettreader
Eva Botella-Ordinas - La démocratie directe de la Puerta del Sol | La Vie des idées - May 2011
This article written within a week of the events in Spain, with a focus on the debates on the left in Spain re what a "republicanism" entails. Another article at the same time focused more on the history of democracy and various forms of political participation in Spain from the Early Modern era onwards. The follow up in the Fall of 2011 was a series of articles covering political philosophy, political sociology of social movements and more discussion of the history of democracy in Spain, including a response to this analysis of flavors of republicanism by José Luis Martí and Félix Ovejero (mentioned in this article) and another article by Botella-Ordinas with 2 other historians. -- Pourquoi les Espagnols se mobilisent-ils en occupant les places des grandes villes ? Dans ce texte écrit sur le vif, une historienne de la pensée politique ouvre le débat. Elle montre que le mouvement du 15M s’appuie sur l’expérience de pratiques démocratiques autonomes mises en place par les centres sociaux autogérés. Elle signale aussi le fossé grandissant, au sein de la gauche espagnole, entre deux visions du républicanisme et de la participation démocratique. -- Ce texte est précédé d’une chronique écrite par un autre historien de l’Université Autonome de Madrid, Juan Luis Simal, qui permet de replacer les événements de la semaine dernière dans leur contexte. -- downloaded pdf to Note
article  political_philosophy  republicanism  Spain  21stC  socialism  parties  social_movements  democracy  democracy_deficit  political_participation  Pettit  Great_Recession  austerity  1-percent  Eurozone  international_finance  political  economy  institutions  downloaded  EF-add 
january 2015 by dunnettreader
Florencia Peyrou - La longue histoire de la démocratie espagnole | La Vie des idées - May 2011
Les mobilisations actuelles pour une « vraie démocratie » en Espagne s’ancrent-elles dans une culture démocratique plus ancienne qu’il n’y paraît ? Florencia Peyrou revient sur l’histoire du républicanisme espagnol : elle le compare aux autres mouvements radicaux et républicains européens, et montre à la fois sa radicalité, ses apports et ses contradictions. La Vie des Idées publie également deux témoignages sur le mouvement social actuel, qui font écho aux débats passés entre démocratie directe et démocratie représentative en Espagne : La démocratie directe de la Puerta del Sol, par Eva Botella-Ordinas, article précédé d’une chronique du 15M par Juan Luis Simal. -- downloaded pdf to Note
article  political_history  political_culture  Spain  Spanish_Empire  comparative_history  republicanism  democracy  democracy_deficit  political_participation  social_history  social_order  local_government  local_politics  radicals  revolutions  Enlightenment  French_Revolution  Europe-19thC  20thC  21stC  downloaded  EF-add 
january 2015 by dunnettreader
Hilde Eliassen Restad - Old Paradigms in History Die Hard in Political Science: US Foreign Policy and American Exceptionalism | JSTOR: American Political Thought, Vol. 1, No. 1 (Spring 2012), pp. 53-76
Most writers agree that domestic ideas about what kind of country the United States is affect its foreign policy. In the United States, this predominant idea is American exceptionalism, which in turn is used to explain US foreign policy traditions over time. This article argues that the predominant definition of American exceptionalism, and the way it is used to explain US foreign policy in political science, relies on outdated scholarship within history. It betrays a largely superficial understanding of American exceptionalism as an American identity. This article aims to clarify the definition of American exceptionalism, arguing that it should be retained as a definition of American identity. Furthermore, it couples American exceptionalism and US foreign policy differently than what is found in most political science literature. It concludes that American exceptionalism is a useful tool in understanding US foreign policy, if properly defined. -- extensive bibliography of both historians and IR theorists -- downloaded pdf to Note
article  jstor  17thC  18thC  19thC  20thC  21stC  political_culture  US_history  American_Revolution  American_colonies  Puritans  American_exceptionalism  national_ID  nation-state  US_foreign_policy  IR_theory  IR-domestic_politics  IR  Founders  Manifest_Destiny  multilateralism  international_law  Jefferson  imperialism  republicanism  bibliography  downloaded  EF-add 
january 2015 by dunnettreader
Mark Elliott Budnitz - The Development of Consumer Protection Law, the Institutionalization of Consumerism, and Future Prospects and Perils (2010) :: SSRN
Georgia State University College of Law -- Georgia State University Law Review, Vol. 26, No. 4, p. 1147, 2010 -- The article examines major developments in the statutes, regulations and Supreme Court cases that have regulated consumer financial services since 1969. Major victories and defeats in the battle for laws protecting consumers are described. Consumer protection law is analyzed within the context of consumerism and its role as a movement for social change and law reform. The article describes the development of a permanent organizational structure for engaging in consumer law reform. This development has resulted in the institutionalization of consumerism and its values have become embedded in society’s values, better ensuring its survival. Finally, the article explores the prospects of the continued development of strong consumer protection law and the perils it faces in the future. -- Number of Pages in PDF File: 64 - Keywords: consumer protection, consumers, financial services, consumer protection law, consumerism, social change, reform, consumer law, legal history. -- didn't download
article  SSRN  US_legal_system  political_culture  legal_history  20thC  21stC  business-norms  business-and-politics  consumer_protection  consumerism  financial_system  financial_access  financial_regulation  reform-legal  reform-finance  SCOTUS  financial_innovation  EF-add 
november 2014 by dunnettreader
Jack A. Goldstone - The New Population Bomb: The Four Megatrends That Will Change the World | JSTOR: Foreign Affairs, Vol. 89, No. 1 (January/February 2010), pp. 31-43
UN predicts global population will level off by 2050 at approximately 9.15 billion from a bit under 7 billion today. Assuming we can avoid environmental catastrophe, the big demographic shifts will be more than half the population will be in cities and the growth will have been concentrated in younger cohorts of less developed regions, especially countries with low quality health, education and infrastructure, lack of economic opportunities to absorb the youth population (especially young, easily radicalized males) with the current wealthy economies both relatively older and smaller, requiring immigration to maintain growth and income levels. These trends will require a wholesale makeover in global governance. -- didn't download
article  jstor  21stC  global_economy  global_system  global_governance  population  demography  economic_growth  political_sociology  IR  OECD_economies  emerging_markets 
october 2014 by dunnettreader
Hyeng-Joon Park - Korea’s Post-1997 Restructuring: An Analysis of Capital as Power | forthcoming in Review of Radical Political Economics (2015) pp. 1-44 | bnarchives
This paper aims to transcend current debates on Korea’s post-1997 restructuring, which rely on a dichotomy between domestic industrial capital and foreign financial capital, by adopting Nitzan and Bichler’s capital-as-power perspective. Based on this approach, the paper analyzes Korea’s recent political economic restructuring as the latest phase in the evolution of capitalist power and its transformative regimes of capital accumulation. -- Keywords: differential accumulation dominant capital chaebols transnationalization strategic sabotage -- Subjects: BN State & Government, BN Institutions, BN Power, BN International & Global, BN Region - Asia, BN Business Enterprise, BN Value & Price, BN Crisis, BN Production, BN Conflict & Violence, BN Money & Finance, BN Distribution, BN Comparative, BN Capital & Accumulation, BN Policy, BN Class, BN Labour, BN Growth -- downloaded from author's blog to Note
article  international_political_economy  capital_as_power  globalization  Korea  East_Asia  20thC  21stC  economic_history  1990s  2000s  2010s  Asian_crisis  Asia_Pacific  international_finance  FDI  finance_capital  financialization  emerging_markets  oligopoly  chaebols  crony_capitalism  industry  production  capitalism  capitalism-systemic_crisis  capitalization  accumulation  distribution-income  distribution-wealth  cross-border  trade  productivity-labor_share  class_conflict  labor_share  Labor_markets  unions  violence  economic_growth  sabotage-by_business  business-and-politics  business-norms  power-asymmetric  public_policy  public_goods  corporate_finance  corporate_ownership  investment  banking  political_culture  economic_culture  economic_reform  economic_policy  democracy  opposition  downloaded  EF-add 
october 2014 by dunnettreader
Issue TOC - THE RESILIENCY OF THE NATION-STATE IN SCHOLARSHIP AND IN FACT | JSTOR: Review (Fernand Braudel Center), Vol. 34, No. 3, 2011
Introduction: "Globalization" and the Nation-State in the Modern World-System (pp. 253-258) - Denis O'Hearn and Thomas M. Wilson. *--* Nationalism in a Post-Hegemonic Era (pp. 259-283) - Richard Lachmann. *--* The State of States in International Organizations: From the WHO to the Global Fund (pp. 285-310) - Nitsan Chorev, Tatiana Andia Rey and David Ciplet. *--* On the Study of Social Optics: Foucault, Counter-Surveillance, and the Political Underground in Northern Peru (pp. 311-331) - David Nugent -- lots of interesting bibliography
article  journal  jstor  20thC  21stC  economic_history  political_history  political_economy  international_political_economy  cultural_history  globalization  global_governance  global_economy  global_system  global_history  social_theory  political_sociology  political_culture  political_nation  nation-state  national_ID  elites  elite_culture  MNCs  international_organizations  international_system  international_finance  IR_theory  IR-domestic_politics  hegemony  Foucault  IFIs  world_systems  bibliography  EF-add 
september 2014 by dunnettreader
Mark S. Mizruchi - Berle and Means Revisited: The Governance and Power of Large U.S. Corporations | JSTOR: Theory and Society, Vol. 33, No. 5 (Oct., 2004), pp. 579-617
In The Modern Corporation and Private Property (1932), Berle and Means warned of the concentration of economic power brought on by the rise of the large corporation and the emergence of a powerful class of professional managers, insulated from the pressure not only of stockholders, but of the larger public as well. In the tradition of Thomas Jefferson, Berle and Means warned that the ascendance of management control and unchecked corporate power had potentially serious consequences for the democratic character of the United States. Social scientists who drew on Berle and Means in subsequent decades presented a far more benign interpretation of the rise of managerialism, however. For them, the separation of ownership from control actually led to an increased level of democratization in the society as a whole. Beginning in the late 1960s, sociologists and other social scientists rekindled the debate over ownership and control, culminating in a series of rigorous empirical studies on the nature of corporate power in American society. In recent years, however, sociologists have largely abandoned the topic, ceding it to finance economists, legal scholars, and corporate strategy researchers. In this article, I provide a brief history of the sociological and finance/legal/strategy debates over corporate ownership and control. I discuss some of the similarities between the two streams of thought, and I discuss the reasons that the issue was of such significance sociologically. I then argue that by neglecting this topic in recent years, sociologists have failed to contribute to an understanding of some of the key issues in contemporary business behavior. I provide brief reviews of four loosely developed current perspectives and then present an argument of my own about the changing nature of the U.S. corporate elite over the past three decades. I conclude with a call for sociologists to refocus their attention on an issue that, however fruitfully handled by scholars in other fields, cries out for sociological analysis. -- downloaded pdf to Note
article  jstor  economic_history  intellectual_history  20thC  21stC  US_economy  US_politics  political_economy  political_sociology  economic_sociology  law-and-finance  law-and-economics  capitalism  corporations  MNCs  corporate_governance  corporate_finance  capital_markets  shareholder_value  shareholders  principal-agent  management  managerialism  corporate_citizenship  corporate_control_markets  corporate_law  M&A  business-and-politics  business-norms  power  power-asymmetric  status  interest_groups  lobbying  regulation  bibliography  downloaded  EF-add 
september 2014 by dunnettreader
Claire Célérier, Adrien Matray - Unbanked households: Evidence of supply-side factors | vox 23 September 2014
There is an urgent need to understand why many households in the US do not hold a bank account. This column argues that supply-side factors – standard bank practices that ration certain households – play a role in this. The evidence comes from the staggered interstate branching deregulation after 1994 that provides an exogenous shock on bank competition. Further findings suggest that access to bank accounts improves access to credit without translating into higher ratios of debt to income. -- increased competition made a substantial difference in reducing unbanked, especially of blacks that the cozy locals seem not to have seen as prospective customers
article  economic_history  20thC  21stC  US_economy  banking  competition-financial_sector  financial_sector_development  financial_innovation  financial_access 
september 2014 by dunnettreader
Suzanne J. Konzelmann - The political economics of austerity | Cambridge Journal of Economics 2013
Birkbeck, University of London. -- The 2007/08 financial crisis has reignited the debate about economic austerity. With the aim of understanding why a government would pursue such a policy in the current context of persistent economic recession, this article traces the social, political and economic developments that have together shaped the evolution of ideas about austerity, from the earliest theorising by the classical political economists some 300 years ago. Throughout the historical narrative, important analytical themes revolve around the arguments used to justify austerity—notably appeals to ethics and morality (reinforced by misleading analogies drawn between government budgets and the accounts of firms and households). These include concerns about inflation and the observed relationship between inflation and unemployment; ‘Ricardian equivalence’ and ‘non-Keynesian’ effects of austerity; and the correlation between public debt levels and economic growth. The class analytics of austerity—who bears the burden of austerity and who benefits—and the process by which alternative ideas penetrate the mainstream and reconstitute the conventional wisdom are also important analytical themes. -- downloaded pdf to Note
article  intellectual_history  political_economy  economic_theory  economic_sociology  economic_policy  17thC  18thC  19thC  20thC  21stC  Great_Recession  austerity  business_cycles  business-and-politics  ideology  macroeconomics  fiscal_policy  monetary_policy  inflation  unemployment  moral_economy  historical_sociology  class_conflict  public_opinion  public_finance  sovereign_debt  economic_growth  debt  debtors  creditors  intermediation  Labor_markets  downloaded  EF-add 
september 2014 by dunnettreader
A. W. Moore and Peter Sullivan - Ineffability and Nonsense (debate) | JSTOR: Proceedings of the Aristotelian Society, Supplementary Volumes, Vol. 77 (2003), pp. 169-193+195-223
[A. W. Moore] There are criteria of ineffability whereby, even if the concept of ineffability can never serve to modify truth, it can sometimes (non-trivially) serve to modify other things, specifically understanding. This allows for a reappraisal of the dispute between those who adopt a traditional reading of Wittgenstein's Tractatus and those who adopt the new reading recently championed by Diamond, Conant, and others. By maintaining that what the nonsense in the Tractatus is supposed to convey is ineffable understanding, rather than ineffable truth, we can do considerable justice to each of these readings. We can also do considerable justice to the Tractatus. /// [Peter Sullivan] Moore proposes to cut between 'traditional' and 'new' approaches to the Tractatus, suggesting that Wittgenstein's intention is to convey, through the knowing use of nonsense, ineffable understanding. I argue, first, that there is indeed room for a proposal of Moore's general kind. Secondly, though, I question whether Moore's actual proposal is not more in tune with Wittgenstein's later thought than with the attitude of the Tractatus. -- nearly 200 references -- should provide an overview of the Old vs New Wittgenstein positions, who's who and background for Moore's modern metaphysics book (kindle) -- downloaded pdf to Note
article  jstor  intellectual_history  20thC  21stC  metaphysics  philosophy_of_science  Logical_Positivism  philosophy_of_language  Wittgenstein  bibliography  downloaded  EF-add 
august 2014 by dunnettreader
Kevin Cahill - Ethics and the "Tractatus": A Resolute Failure | JSTOR: Philosophy, Vol. 79, No. 307 (Jan., 2004), pp. 33-55
He's in the New Wittgenstein camp. Very useful development of themes across the New Wittgenstein crowd, distinguishing PI from Tractatus and why Wittgenstein came to see the Tractatus as a failure, not only in method, but in still being wedded to the intellectualizing impulse of philosophy, to elaborate the world as it really is by unlocking the central problem. His ethical objectives in the Tractatus have been developed by New Wittgenstein proponents, with analogies to Kierkegaard, St Paul and Augustine. -- read online, didn't download
article  jstor  20thC  21stC  philosophy_of_language  moral_philosophy  dogmatism  analytical_philosophy  Wittgenstein  Frege  Russell_Bertrand  Kierkegaard  Paul  Augustine  logic  Logical_Positivism  syntax  language-bad_metaphysics  language_games  concepts  propositions  predicate  bibliography  EF-add 
august 2014 by dunnettreader
Walter Ott - LOCKE'S EXCLUSION ARGUMENT | JSTOR: History of Philosophy Quarterly, Vol. 27, No. 2 (APRIL 2010), pp. 181-196
A different take on Locke's superaddition argument re thinking matter that would align him with materialism that treats mental events as mere epiphenomenal, neither identity with physical, nor supervenience -- downloaded pdf to Note
article  jstor  intellectual_history  17thC  20thC  21stC  mind  mind-body  consciousness  soul  materialism  determinism  Locke  thinking_matter  downloaded  EF-add 
august 2014 by dunnettreader
Michael LeBuffe - SPINOZISTIC PERFECTIONISM | JSTOR: History of Philosophy Quarterly, Vol. 27, No. 4 (OCTOBER 2010), pp. 317-333
Perfectionism seems to imply simply capable of improvement -- explains Spinoza's Ethics as differing from the virtue ethics sort as not based on something like the essence of humans -- the article gives an outline of what he thinks are the attractive features of Spinoza's moral_philosophy disentangled from some of the more obscure or less plausible parts of Spinoza's system, while recognizing that since Spinoza is a super systematic philosopher, some of his metaphysical concepts are key to his moral_philosophy, which LeBuffe attempts to spell out -- downloaded pdf to Note
article  jstor  intellectual_history  17thC  20thC  21stC  moral_philosophy  moral_psychology  human_nature  virtue_ethics  virtue  good  hedonistic  happiness  improvement  perfectibility  Spinoza  morality-conventional  morality-objective  perspectivism  bibliography  downloaded  EF-add 
august 2014 by dunnettreader
Jeremy Waldron - Political Political Theory: An Oxford Inaugural Lecture (2012) :: SSRN
NYU School of Law, Public Law Research Paper No. 12-26 -- "Inaugural Lecture" for the Chichele Professorship of Social and Political Theory. -- Political theorists study (1) political virtue, (2) political processes and institutions, and (3) political ideals (like justice, liberty, and equality). Since the time of Hume, Madison, and Kant, it has been thought that (2) is more important than (1), because maybe we can set up institutions that work for the general good whatever the state of virtue of the people... But in the revival of political philosophy heralded by Rawls in 1971, there has been great emphasis on (3) and not nearly enough on (2)... particularly in the UK. Chichele chair -holders G.A. Cohen and Isaiah Berlin focused almost exclusively on (3) -- with Berlin announcing that political philosophy was really just the study of "the ends of life." -- I argue for a reorientation of political theory teaching and scholarship back towards institutions -- particularly the normative evaluation of the political process and the exploration of institutional principles like democracy, representation, bicameralism, the rule of law, the separation of powers, federalism and so on. ..these issues should not be left to empirical or comparative politcial science, because they raise important and complex questions of evaluation that may be sold short by the pragmatic and consequentialist emphasis of empirical and comparative work. But political theory should respect the empirical study of institutions more than it does, and it should dovetail the normative and evaluative work that political theory involves with the understanding of institutions, processes, and practices that political science generates. -- downloaded pdf to Note
article  SSRN  intellectual_history  18thC  19thC  20thC  21stC  political_philosophy  political_science  human_nature  social_theory  institutions  government-forms  governmentality  constitutions  constitutionalism  constitutional_law  institution-building  institutional_change  political_change  political_participation  political_culture  Arendt  Berlin_Isaiah  Hume  Hume-politics  Hume-historian  comparative_history  political_order  legitimacy  democracy  separation-of-powers  checks-and-balances  legislature  executive  judicial_review  justice  civic_virtue  dignity  egalitarian  rule_of_law  citizenship  education-civic  federalism  social_process  socialization  civil_liberties  Founders  Madison  downloaded  EF-add 
july 2014 by dunnettreader
Brian Leiter - The Demarcation Problem in Jurisprudence: A New Case for Skepticism :: SSRN - Oxford Journal of Legal Studies, Vol. 32, No. 1, Spring 2012
Legal philosophers have been preoccupied with specifying the differences between two systems of normative guidance - law and morality. Positivists such as Kelsen, Hart, and Raz propose a solution to this “Demarcation Problem” according to which the legal validity of a norm can not depend on its being morally valid, either in all or at least some possible legal systems. The proposed analysis purports to specify the essential and necessary features of law.... Yet the concept of law is an “artifact concept,” that is, a concept that picks out a phenomenon that owes its existence to human activities. Artifact concepts, even simple ones like “chair,” are notoriously resistant to analyses in terms of their essential attributes, precisely because they are hostage to human ends and purposes, and also can not be individuated by their natural properties. 20th-century philosophy of science dealt with a kindred Demarcation Problem: ...how to demarcate science from pseudo-science or nonsense. -- they sought to identify the essential properties of a human artifact (namely, science). They failed, and spectacularly so, which led some philosopher to wonder, “Why does solving the Demarcation Problem matter?” This essay develops the lessons for legal philosophy -- lest we want to become embroiled in pointless Fullerian speculations about the effects of jurisprudential doctrines on behavior, it is time to abandon the Demarcation Problem in jurisprudence. -- downloaded pdf to Note
article  SSRN  philosophy_of_law  20thC  21stC  Logical_Positivism  linguistic_turn  concepts  analytical_philosophy  essentialism  natural_kinds  modal_logic  moral_philosophy  moral_psychology  legal_system  positivism-legal  psychologism  natural_law  epistemology-social  epistemology-moral  Carnap  Hempel  Popper  Fuller  Hart  Kelsen  Raz  Finnis  normativity  moral_sentiments  reason-passions  reasons-internalism  reasons-externalism  downloaded  EF-add 
july 2014 by dunnettreader
Scott J. Shapiro - The "Hart-Dworkin" Debate: A Short Guide for the Perplexed (2007) :: SSRN
Scott J. Shapiro, Yale University - Law School -- U of Michigan Public Law Working Paper No. 77 -- Since the appearance in 1967 of "The Model of Rules I," Ronald Dworkin's seminal critique of H.L.A. Hart's theory of legal positivism, countless books and articles have been written either defending Hart against Dworkin's objections or defending Dworkin against Hart's defenders. My purpose in this essay is not to declare an ultimate victor; rather it is to identify precisely the core issue around which the debate is organized. -- I think that there is an important unity to the Hart-Dworkin debate that can be described in a relatively straightforward manner. I suggest that the debate is organized around one of the most profound issues in the philosophy of law, namely, the relation between legality and morality. Dworkin's basic strategy throughout the course of the debate has been to argue that, in one form or another, legality is ultimately determined not by social facts alone, but by moral facts as well. This contention directly challenges, and threatens to undermine, the positivist picture about the nature of law.... The Hart-Dworkin debate, ... I describe how Dworkin modified his critique to circumvent the responses of Hart's followers, thereby inaugurating a new phase in the debate. Virtually no attention, however, has been paid to this latter challenge, which is especially surprising given that none of the previous positivistic defenses are helpful against it. I then sketch out a possible response positivists might offer to this extremely powerful objection. -- No of Pages: 55 -- Keywords: Jurisprudence, Hart, Dworkin, Legal Positivism, Natural Law, Interpretation -- downloaded pdf to Note
article  SSRN  philosophy_of_law  20thC  21stC  legal_theory  legal_realism  positivism-legal  positive_law  natural_law  normativity  moral_philosophy  morality-conventional  sociology_of_law  Dworkin  Hart  downloaded  EF-add 
july 2014 by dunnettreader
Kenneth R. Westphal - Enlightenment Fundamentals: Rights, Responsibilities & Republicanism | Diametros
Kenneth R. Westphal is Professorial Fellow in the School of Philosophy, University of East Anglia (Norwich), and currently Visiting Professor of Philosophy at the Martin-Luther-Universität Halle Wittenberg. -- This essay re-examines some key fundamentals of the Enlightenment regarding individual rights, responsibilities and republicanism which deserve and require re-emphasis today, insofar as they underscore the character and fundamental importance of mature judgment, and how developing and fostering mature judgment is a fundamental aim of education. These fundamentals have been clouded or eroded by various recent developments, including mis-guided educational policy and not a little scholarly bickering. Clarity about these fundamentals is more important today than ever. Sapere aude! -- Keywords - Hobbes Hume Rousseau Kant Hegel, rational justification, mature judgment, moral constructivism, realism objectivity rights responsibilities republicanism media culture, Euthyphro question, natural law, Dilemma of the Criterion -- downloaded pdf to Note
article  moral_philosophy  political_philosophy  intellectual_history  17thC  18thC  19thC  British_history  French_Enlightenment  Germany  German_Idealism  voluntarism  obligation  morality-conventional  morality-objective  natural_rights  civil_liberties  civil_society  civic_virtue  Hobbes  Hume  Hume-ethics  Hume-politics  Rousseau  Kant  Kant-ethics  Hegel  judgment-political  public_sphere  media  political_culture  values  education-civic  education-higher  bibliography  downloaded  EF-add  21stC  Dewey  Quine  Sellars  analytical_philosophy  academia  professionalization 
july 2014 by dunnettreader
John Higley - Democratic Elitism and Western Political Thought [2009] | JSTOR: Historical Social Research / Historische Sozialforschung, Vol. 37, No. 1 (139) (2012), pp. 351-366
Many political thinkers have viewed democratic elitism as closing a democratic road they believe is or should be open-ended. Their view of democratic possibilities reflects the auspicious circumstances of Western societies during the past several centuries and especially since World War II. However, it involves a conflation of liberal and democratic values. I examine why and how this has occurred, and I argue that liberal and democratic values must be more clearly separated in today's dangerous world. In step with Schumpeter, democracy must be regarded as a method or instrumental value that in some but by no means all circumstances promotes the ultimate liberal value of actively individualistic free people. -- downloaded pdf to Note
article  jstor  political_philosophy  intellectual_history  20thC  21stC  elites  democracy  liberalism  post-WWII  post-Cold_War  institution-building  institutional_change  political_change  political_participation  political_culture  ruling_class  oligarchy  competition-political  political_science  utopian  downloaded  EF-add 
june 2014 by dunnettreader
Robert J. Antonio - After Postmodernism: Reactionary Tribalism | JSTOR: American Journal of Sociology, Vol. 106, No. 1 (July 2000), pp. 40-87
Revived Weimar‐era “radical conservatism” and fresh “New Right” and “paleoconservative” theories offer a radical cultural critique of global capitalism and liberal democracy. Expressing a broader retribalization and perceived failure of modernization, their defense of communal particularity attacks the multicultural nation‐state, liberal rights, and universal citizenship. This essay links reactionary tribalism to a recurrent 20th‐century theoretical tendency, the “total critique of modernity”—a fusion of oversimplified Nietzschean and Weberian ideas. Historically, total critique has promoted convergence between right and left, such as the current overlapping facets of “radical conservatism” and “strong‐program postmodernism.” Total critique counters the “historicist” method of “internal critique” and the “communication model” characteristic of reflexive social theory. The discussion uncovers the mediating role of social theory in the problematic relationship of science and partially disenchanted public spheres in plural, democratic cultures. -- 200+ references! -- in postmodernism includes range of "end of" thinkers from left and right, and the overlaps between far right and some of the postmodern cultural left -- downloaded pdf to Note
article  jstor  intellectual_history  19thC  20thC  21stC  cultural_history  modernity  irrational  Germany  Weimar  Nazis  Heidegger  Nietzsche  Schmitt  Strauss  neo-Hegelian  right-wing  cultural_pessimism  Leftist  Marxist  historicism  cultural_critique  Habermas  Dewey  pragmatism  liberalism  democracy  patriarchy  nationalism  ethnic_ID  universalism  citizenship  nation-state  multiculturalism  bibliography  downloaded  EF-add 
may 2014 by dunnettreader
Rekha Mirchandani - Postmodernism and Sociology: From the Epistemological to the Empirical | JSTOR: Sociological Theory, Vol. 23, No. 1 (Mar., 2005), pp. 86-115
This article investigates the place of postmodernism in sociology today by making a distinction between its epistemological and empirical forms. During the 1980s and early 1990s, sociologists exposited, appropriated, and normalized an epistemological postmodernism that thematizes the tentative, reflective, and possibly shifting nature of knowledge. More recently, however, sociologists have recognized the potential of a postmodern theory that turns its attention to empirical concerns. Empirical postmodernists challenge classical modern concepts to develop research programs based on new concepts like time-space reorganization, risk society, consumer capitalism, and postmodern ethics. But they do so with an appreciation for the uncertainty of the social world, ourselves, our concepts, and our commitment to our concepts that results from the encounter with postmodern epistemology. Ultimately, this article suggests that understanding postmodernism as a combination of these two moments can lead to a sociology whose epistemological modesty and empirical sensitivity encourage a deeper and broader approach to the contemporary social world. -- giant bibliography that covers all the French theorists and reactions to them across disciplines from philosophy, history, sociology_of_knowledge, social_theory, cultural studies etc. -- looks interesting more as intellectual_history than for her recommendations, which appears to be extracting the common sense parts of postmodern critique while dumping the extravagance-- downloaded pdf to Note
article  jstor  intellectual_history  20thC  21stC  post-WWII  post-Cold_War  modernity  Enlightenment_Project  postmodern  sociology_of_knowledge  social_theory  constructivism  epistemology-social  metaethics  capitalism  consumerism  scientism  positivism  bibliography  downloaded  EF-add 
may 2014 by dunnettreader
Manuel García-Carpintero - Qualia That It Is Right to Quine | JSTOR: Philosophy and Phenomenological Research, Vol. 67, No. 2 (Sep., 2003), pp. 357-377
Dennett (1988) provides a much discussed argument for the nonexistence of qualia, as conceived by philosophers like Block, Chalmers, Loar and Searle. My goal in this paper is to vindicate Dennett's argument, construed in a certain way. The argument supports the claim that qualia are constitutively representational. Against Block and Chalmers, the argument rejects the detachment of phenomenal from information-processing consciousness; and against Loar and Searle, it defends the claim that qualia are constitutively representational in an externalist understanding of this. The core of the argument is contained in section 3. In the first part, I contrast a minimal conception of qualia, relative to which their existence is not under dispute, with the sort of view to which I will object. In the second part I set the stage by presenting the facts about (minimal) qualia on which a Dennett-like argument can be based. -- lit survey of debate -- didn't download
article  jstor  20thC  21stC  analytical_philosophy  ontology  mind  mind-body  consciousness  qualia  representation-metaphysics  Quine  Dennett  EF-add 
february 2014 by dunnettreader
Nathan Stemmer - On universals: an extensionalist alternative to Quine's resemblance theory | JSTOR: Journal for General Philosophy of Science / Zeitschrift für allgemeine Wissenschaftstheorie, Vol. 38, No. 1 (April, 2007), pp. 75-90
The notion of similarity plays a central role in Quine's theory of Universals and it is with the help of this notion that Quine intends to define the concept of kind which also plays a central role in the theory. But as Quine has admitted, his attempts to define kinds in terms of similarities were unsuccessful and it is mainly because of this shortcoming that Quine's theory has been ignored by several philosophers (see, e.g., Armstrong, D. M. (1978a). Nominalism and realism: Universals and Scientific realism (Vol. I). Cambridge: Cambridge University Press). In the present paper, I propose an alternative framework that accounts for the phenomena that Quine intends to explain with his resemblance theory. The framework agrees with Quine's austere ontology; in particular, it does not assume the existence of properties and of possible worlds. (I will mention below Quine's reason for rejecting properties and possible worlds. For a theory of Universals that assumes possible worlds, see, e.g., Rodriguez-Pereyra, G. (2002). Resemblance nominalism: A solution to the problem of Universals. Oxford: Clarendon Press.) Moreover, the framework is extensionalist since the abstract entities it assumes are classes and these can be individuated extensionally, for classes are identical if their members are identical. Finally, I will refute some of the objections to Quine's approach that have been raised by Armstrong and Oliver [(1996). The metaphysics of properties. Mind, 105, 1-80.] and I will argue that, contrary to what has been claimed by Oliver in a comment on Lewis [(1986). On the plurality of worlds. Oxford: Blackwell.], Quine is able to specify an important set of sparse properties. -- looks helpful re the reemergence of old metaphysics re ontology -- didn't download
article  jstor  intellectual_history  20thC  21stC  Quine  metaphysics  ontology  analytical_philosophy  universals  nominalism  kinds  possible_worlds  properties  EF-add 
february 2014 by dunnettreader
Eric Steinhart - Royce's Model of the Absolute | JSTOR: Transactions of the Charles S. Peirce Society, Vol. 48, No. 3 (Spring 2012), pp. 356-384
At the end of the 19th century, Royce uses the mathematical ideas of his day to describe the Absolute as a self-representative system. Working closely with Royce's texts, I will develop a model of the Absolute that is both more thoroughly formalized and that is stated in contemporary mathematical language. As I develop this more formal model, I will show how structures found within it are similar to structures widely discussed in current analytic metaphysics. The model contains structures found in the recent analytic metaphysics of modality; it contains Democritean worlds as defined by Quine; it contains Turing-computable sequences; and it contains networks of interacting software objects as defined by Dennett. Much of the content of recent analytic metaphysics is already implicit in Royce's study of the Absolute. Far from being an obsolete system of historical interest only, Royce's metaphysics is remarkably relevant today. -- paywall
article  jstor  paywall  intellectual_history  19thC  20thC  21stC  Royce  idealism  analytical_philosophy  metaphysics  modality  networks  systems-self-representative  Absolute  Quine  Dennett  Democritus  EF-add 
february 2014 by dunnettreader
James Arnt Aune - Modernity as a Rhetorical Problem: Phronēsis, Forms, and Forums in Norms of Rhetorical Culture | JSTOR: Philosophy & Rhetoric, Vol. 41, No. 4 (2008), pp. 402-420
Starting from Thomas Farrell (1993) revival of interest in Aristotelianism, what adjustments are needed in humanistic and social sciences to properly engage an Aristotle for our times -- downloaded pdf to Note
article  jstor  21stC  modernity  Aristotelian  rhetoric  rhetoric-political  political_philosophy  moral_philosophy  community  communitarian  social_theory  political_culture  downloaded  EF-add 
february 2014 by dunnettreader
Terry Eagleton - The Contradictions of Postmodernism | JSTOR: New Literary History, Vol. 28, No. 1 (Winter, 1997), pp. 1-6
Culture or historicism or the marginalized aren't inherently radical left - as likely to be appropriated or constituted by reactionaries -- culturisn as reductionist as biologism etc. -- downloaded pdf to Note
article  jstor  20thC  21stC  social_theory  culture  cultural_history  new_historicism  New_Left  postmodern  post-colonial  conservatism  culture_wars  Marxist 
february 2014 by dunnettreader
Jim Stone - Skepticism as a Theory of Knowledge | JSTOR: Philosophy and Phenomenological Research, Vol. 60, No. 3 (May, 2000), pp. 527-545
Bringing something like mitigated skepticism up to date with brains in vats and conditional truths in possible worlds. In addition to external world he deals with induction and knowledge of the past -- Skepticism about the external world may very well be correct, so the question is in order: what theory of knowledge flows from skepticism itself? The skeptic can give a relatively simple and intuitive account of knowledge by identifying it with indubitable certainty. Our everyday `I know that p' claims, which typically are part of practical projects, deploy the ideal of knowledge to make assertions closely related to, but weaker than, knowledge claims. The truth of such claims is consistent with skepticism; various other vexing problems don't arise. In addition, even if no claim about the world outside my mind can be more probable than its negation, the project of pure scientific research remains well motivated.
article  jstor  epistemology  analytical_philosophy  21stC  scepticism  Hume  Hume-causation  downloaded  EF-add 
february 2014 by dunnettreader
Chad Lavin - Fear, Radical Democracy, and Ontological Methadone | JSTOR: Polity, Vol. 38, No. 2 (Apr., 2006), pp. 254-275
Given recent social and political transformations as well as our cultural landscape's dominance by narratives of threat and victimization, it is understandable that fear has occupied an ever-expanding role in our lives. Although these instabilities and insecurities have inspired a resurgence of various explanatory and mollifying fundamentalisms, radical democrats suggest that the conditions of this "postmetaphysical" age might instead facilitate unprecedented commitments to democracy. As such, radical democrats welcome the very conditions of contingency that contemporary citizen-subjects tend to find so frightening. In attacking the drive towards fundamentalism that they identify in various ideologies from Islam through liberalism, radical democrats betray an inattention to the functional consolation they offer. If fundamentalisms are opiates, radical democrats offer a prescription for addiction treatment that few have any interest in taking. -- very interesting bibliography -- downloaded pdf to Note
article  jstor  21stC  political_philosophy  liberalism  fundamentalism  identity  identity_politics  globalization  finance_capital  fear  democracy  political_participation  political_culture  Rorty  bibliography  downloaded  EF-add 
february 2014 by dunnettreader
Mark Bevir - Historical Understanding and the Human Sciences [eScholarship] (2007)
Looks like this is the introductory article for a 2007 issue of the Journal of the Philosophy of History in which Bevir also contributed a separate article (on national histories? ) Starts with verstehen and then puts it into post-positivist context. Downloaded pdf to Note
article  eScholarship  intellectual_history  19thC  20thC  21stC  historiography  philosophy_of_history  philosophy_of_social_science  verstehen  interpretivism  hermeneutics  postanalytic_philosophy  anti-foundationalism  epistemology-history  epistemology-social  downloaded  EF-add 
february 2014 by dunnettreader
Wendy Brown - Political Theory Is Not a Luxury: A Response to Timothy Kaufman-Osborn's "Political Theory as a Profession" | JSTOR: Political Research Quarterly, Vol. 63, No. 3 (SEPTEMBER 2010), pp. 680-685
In "Political Theory as a Profession," Timothy Kaufman-Osborn calls for political theorists to shed attachments to political science subfields. This call inadequately reckons with the perils to political theory posed by the combined contemporary forces of scientization and neoliberalization in knowledge. Focusing on these perils, the author argues for the strategic preservation of the political theory subfield. However, this preservation will not be advanced by intensified professionalization or a turn toward market applicability. Paradoxically, the survival of political theory rests in resisting professional and neoliberal metrics and reaching for publicly legible and compelling intellectual purposes.
article  jstor  21stC  neoliberalism  scientism  university-contemporary  humanities  public_goods  education-higher  political_philosophy  political_science  social_sciences-post-WWII  intelligentsia  anti-intellectual  managerialism  efficiency  EF-add 
february 2014 by dunnettreader
Robert D. Hume - The Aims and Limits of Historical Scholarship | JSTOR: The Review of English Studies, New Series, Vol. 53, No. 211 (Aug., 2002), pp. 399-422
Between Quine, analytic epistemology, philosophy of language and postmodern historians, Hume is likely to have some thoughtful remarks -- downloaded pdf to Note
article  jstor  21stC  historiography  literary_history  downloaded  EF-add 
january 2014 by dunnettreader
AHR Forum: Geoff Eley's "A Crooked Line: From Cultural History to History of Society" (2005) | JSTOR: The American Historical Review, Vol. 113, No. 2, Apr., 2008
Eley dismayed by cultural turn from social history. One article by William Sewell who isn't eager to return to the "totalizing" ambitions of social history. A South Asia historian agrees that important things are lost with cultural_history dominating -- particularly comparative, scale (spatial and temporal) and subjects especially important for postcolonial, eg political economy.
journal  article  jstor  historiography  20thC  21stC  social_history  cultural_history  postmodern  post-colonial  EF-add 
january 2014 by dunnettreader
John P. McCormick - Machiavelli's Political Trials and "The Free Way of Life" | JSTOR: Political Theory, Vol. 35, No. 4 (Aug., 2007), pp. 385-411
This essay examines the political trials through which, according to Machiavelli's "Discourses", republics should punish magistrates and prominent citizens who threaten or violate popular liberty. Unlike modern constitutions, which assign indictments and appeals to small numbers of government officials, Machiavelli's neo-Roman model encourages individual citizens to accuse corrupt or usurping elites and promotes the entire citizenry as political jury and court of appeal. Machiavellian political justice requires, on the one hand, equitable, legal procedures that serve all citizens by punishing guilty parties and discouraging retaliatory reprisals, including foreign intervention. On the other hand, frankly acknowledging the power disparities that exist in every republic, Machiavelli outlines how political trials enable pro-plebeian magistrates and populist reformers to thwart patrician-generated smear campaigns and oligarchic conspiracies. -- downloaded pdf to Note
article  jstor  intellectual_history  political_philosophy  16thC  21stC  Machiavelli  republicanism  neo-Roman  oligarchy  impeachment  corruption  accountability  rule_of_law  tribune  populism  class_conflict  political_participation  downloaded  EF-add 
january 2014 by dunnettreader
John P. McCormick - Machiavelli against Republicanism: On the Cambridge School's "Guicciardinian Moments" | JSTOR: Political Theory, Vol. 31, No. 5 (Oct., 2003), pp. 615-643
Scholars loosely affiliated with the "Cambridge School" (e.g., Pocock, Skinner, Viroli, and Pettit) accentuate rule of law, common good, class equilibrium, and non-domination in Machiavelli's political thought and republicanism generally but underestimate the Florentine's preference for class conflict and ignore his insistence on elite accountability. The author argues that they obscure the extent to which Machiavelli is an anti-elitist critic of the republican tradition, which they fail to disclose was predominantly oligarchic. The prescriptive lessons these scholars draw from republicanism for contemporary politics reinforce rather than reform the "senatorial," electorally based, and socioeconomically agnostic republican model (devised by Machiavelli's aristocratic interlocutor, Guicciardini, and refined by Montesquieu and Madison) that permits common citizens to acclaim but not determine government policies. Cambridge School textual interpretations and practical proposals have little connection with Machiavelli's "tribunate," class-specific model of popular government elaborated in The Discourses, one that relies on extra-electoral accountability techniques and embraces deliberative popular assemblies.
article  jstor  intellectual_history  political_philosophy  historiography  16thC  21stC  Machiavelli  republicanism  civic_humanism  civic_virtue  oligarchy  elites  populism  public_opinion  popular_politics  political_participation  neo-Roman  class_conflict  accountability  tribune  Guiccidarini  Cambridge_School  rule_of_law  common_good  non-domination  liberty  downloaded  EF-add 
january 2014 by dunnettreader
Eileen Appelbaum, Rose Batt, Ian Clark - Financial Capitalism and Employment Relations: Evidence from Breach of Trust and Implicit Contracts in Private Equity Buyouts - 2013 - | Wiley Online Library
British Journal of Industrial Relations
Across Boundaries: The Global Challenges Facing Workers and Employment Research 50th Anniversary Special Issue
Volume 51, Issue 3, pages 498–518, September 2

An increasing share of the economy is organized around financial capitalism, where capital market actors actively manage their claims on wealth creation and distribution to maximize shareholder value. Drawing on four case studies of private equity buyouts, we challenge agency theory interpretations that they are ‘welfare neutral’ and show that an alternative source of shareholder value is breach of trust and implicit contracts. We show why management and employment relations scholars need to investigate the mechanisms of financial capitalism to provide a more accurate analysis of the emergence of new forms of class relations and to help us move beyond the limits of the varieties of capitalism approach to comparative institutional analysis.
article  Wiley  21stC  finance_capital  financialization  private_equity  firms-theory  corporate_governance  corporate_finance  Labor_markets  labor 
september 2013 by dunnettreader
Gunther Hellmann ed. --Forum - Pragmatism and International Relations (2009)
JSTOR: International Studies Review, Vol. 11, No. 3 (Sep., 2009), pp. 638-662 -- contributions by Gunther Hellmann, Helena Rytövuori-Apunen, Jörg Friedrichs, Rudra Sil, Markus Kornprobst and Patrick Thaddeus Jackson -- Wiley paywall -- Hellmann, G. (2009), Pragmatism and International Relations. International Studies Review, 11: 638–662. doi: 10.1111/j.1468-2486.2009.00889.x -- jstor has all the references
article  Wiley  jstor  social_theory  social_sciences-post-WWII  pragmatism  Dewey  IR  21stC  bibliography  EF-add 
september 2013 by dunnettreader
Karin Knorr Cetina and Urs Bruegger: Global Microstructures: The Virtual Societies of Financial Markets (2002)
JSTOR: American Journal of Sociology, Vol. 107, No. 4 (January 2002), pp. 905-950 -- downloaded pdf to Note -- very heavily cited -- references and footnotes indicate research placed in theory, concepts and method debates -- Using participant‐observation data, interviews, and trading transcripts drawn from interbank currency trading in global investment banks, this article examines regular patterns of integration that characterize the global social system embedded in economic transactions. To interpret these patterns, which are global in scope but microsocial in character, this article uses the term “global microstructures.” Features of the interaction order, loosely defined, have become constitutive of and implanted in processes that have global breadth. This study draws on Schutz in the development of the concept of temporal coordination as the basis for the level of intersubjectivity discerned in global markets. This article contributes to economic sociology through the analysis of cambist (i.e., trading) markets, which are distinguished from producer markets, and by positing a form of market coordination that supplements relational or network forms of coordination.
article  jstor  social_theory  economic_sociology  institutional_economics  markets  networks  sociology_of_knowledge  financial_system  globalization  capital_markets  FX  money_market  20thC  21stC  lit_survey  downloaded  EF-add 
september 2013 by dunnettreader
Anton Oleinik: On Universal versus Specific Categories of Network Capitalism: A Reply to V. Barnett's Note (2004)
JSTOR: Journal of Economic Issues, Vol. 38, No. 4 (Dec., 2004), pp. 1040-1046 -- downloaded pdf to Note -- see earlier article on network capitalism and later article on distrust and Russian "market economy"
article  jstor  social_theory  political_economy  networks  capitalism  markets  institutional_economics  economic_history  19thC  20thC  21stC  Russia  Russian_economy  downloaded  EF-add 
september 2013 by dunnettreader
Rick Tilman: Colin Campbell on Thorstein Veblen on Conspicuous Consumption (2006)
JSTOR: Journal of Economic Issues, Vol. 40, No. 1 (Mar., 2006), pp. 97-112 -- downloaded pdf to Note
article  jstor  social_theory  economic_history  consumerism  status  Veblen  20thC  21stC  downloaded  EF-add 
september 2013 by dunnettreader
Robin Douglass - Montesquieu and Modern Republicanism - 2012 - Political Studies - Wiley Online Library
Douglass, R. (2012), Montesquieu and Modern Republicanism. Political Studies, 60: 703–719. doi: 10.1111/j.1467-9248.2011.00932.x -- In this article I explore Montesquieu's discussion of republics and the constitution of England in order to question the extent to which he should be accorded a central place in a tradition of modern republicanism. This involves challenging Paul Rahe's recent thesis that Montesquieu thought both that monarchy was not at all suited to modernity and that England was a republic all along. By stressing the importance of honour and ambition I argue that the liberty that Montesquieu thought exemplified in the English constitution was, in large part, secured by its monarchical principle. Moreover, by eschewing the relevance of political virtue for modern commercial societies, Montesquieu set his own proposals out in opposition to the prevalent French republican discourse of his time; thus it is highly problematic to view him as having proposed a republic for the moderns. The article also serves to disentangle Montesquieu's understanding of political liberty from his analysis of republics in order to refute the idea that he provides support for a distinctively republican conception of liberty as non-domination. This undermines the republican critique of liberalism set forth by Philip Pettit, which is further challenged by considering the affinities between Montesquieu's and Constant's conceptions of liberty. Many commentators have argued that Montesquieu repudiated classical republicanism, yet on the reading advanced in this article it is equally problematic to view him as a modern republican.
article  Wiley  intellectual_history  political_philosophy  18thC  21stC  Montesquieu  republicanism  civic_virtue  commerce  monarchy  honor  find  EF-add  English_constitution 
september 2013 by dunnettreader
Paul Carrese: Montesquieu's Complex Natural Right and Moderate Liberalism: The Roots of American Moderation (2004)
JSTOR: Polity, Vol. 36, No. 2 (Jan., 2004), pp. 227-250 -- looks more interesting for bibliography than for analysis -- The diversity in twentieth-century scholarship on Montesquieu's The Spirit of Laws helps to confirm his own appreciation for complexity, synthesis, and balance in both political theory and practice. This is the overlooked meaning of "moderation," the key to his labyrinthine masterwork. His liberalism sought to capture the multiple dimensions of politics and the equilibrium, or moderation, in nature and human nature. Moderation informs his constitutionalism of balanced powers but also a natural right encompassing individual interest and humane sympathy for fellows. Reading the entire work, as Montesquieu requests, reveals that moderation and complexity provide its very plan and coherence-from its title, to its six-part structure, to its balancing of philosophy with humane letters. His natural right emphasizes tranquillity and political moderation, tempering modern liberalism with classical and medieval elements. Montesquieu's synthesis of such alternatives, and of the individual and social dimensions of our nature, also lends perspective on recent liberal theory and its critics. Both Rawlsian and communitarian concerns are better served by a tradition of theory that comprehends both, and which better captures the complexity of American political thought.
article  jstor  political_philosophy  18thC  20thC  21stC  Montesquieu  Rawls  communitarian  liberalism  bibliography  EF-add 
september 2013 by dunnettreader
Sharon Stanley: Retreat from Politics: The Cynic in Modern Times (2006)
JSTOR: Polity, Vol. 39, No. 3 (Jul., 2007), pp. 384-407 -- downloaded pdf to Note -- from her dissertation dealing with cynicism in the Enlightenment and postmodernism
article  jstor  intellectual_history  cultural_history  political_culture  cynicism  aesthetics  psychology  18thC  20thC  21stC  Enlightenment  French_Enlightenment  Diderot  downloaded  EF-add 
august 2013 by dunnettreader
John V. Pickstone: Sketching Together the Modern Histories of Science, Technology, and Medicine (2011)
JSTOR: Isis, Vol. 102, No. 1 (March 2011), pp. 123-133 -- roundup and looking forward article in issue Focus: Between and Beyond “Histories of Science” and “Histories of Medicine” -- downloaded pdf to Note -- This essay explores ways to “write together” the awkwardly jointed histories of “science” and “medicine”—but it also includes other “arts” (in the old sense) and technologies. It draws especially on the historiography of medicine, but I try to use terms that are applicable across all of science, technology, and medicine (STM). I stress the variety of knowledges and practices in play at any time and the ways in which the ensembles change. I focus on the various relations of “science” and “medicine,” as they were understood for a succession of periods—from mainly agricultural societies, through industrial societies, to our biomedical present—trying to sketch a history that encompasses daily practices and understandings as well as major conceptual and technical innovations. The model is meant to facilitate inquiry across topics and across times, including those to come.
article  jstor  historiography  sociology_of_knowledge  history_of_science  medicine  technology  biology  chemistry  physiology  natural_philosophy  mathematics  communication  IT  evolution  university  academies  education  industry  Industrial_Revolution  Renaissance  Enlightenment  Scientific_Revolution  15thC  16thC  17thC  18thC  19thC  20thC  21stC 
august 2013 by dunnettreader
Symposium: The Growth of the Financial Sector - JSTOR: The Journal of Economic Perspectives, Vol. 27, No. 2, Spring 2013
The Growth of Finance (pp. 3-28)  Robin Greenwood and David Scharfstein..... Finance: Function Matters, Not Size (pp. 29-49)  John H. Cochrane..... Moore's Law versus Murphy's Law: Algorithmic Trading and Its Discontents (pp. 51-72)  Andrei A. Kirilenko and Andrew W. Lo..... An International Look at the Growth of Modern Finance (pp. 73-96)  Thomas Philippon and Ariell Reshef..... Asset Management Fees and the Growth of Finance (pp. 97-108)  Burton G. Malkiel
article  jstor  financial_system  financial_regulation  financial_crisis  financialization  institutional_economics  capital_markets  money_market  banking  international_finance  political_economy  international_political_economy  20thC  21stC  Great_Recession  EF-add 
august 2013 by dunnettreader
Bagehot was a Shadow Banker: Shadow Banking, Central Banking, and the Future of Global Finance by Perry Mehrling, Zoltan Pozsar, James Sweeney, Daniel H. Neilson :: SSRN
Superb analysis

At the heart of both the modern shadow banking system and the 19th century banking system described by Walter Bagehot is the wholesale money market, with the central bank providing a liquidity backstop. We characterize shadow banking as “money market funding of capital market lending” and construct a model of such a system with dealers making markets and setting prices for funding and risk. Using this model, we describe the secular expansion of the market-based credit system and its rapid collapse during the global financial crisis. The model also clarifies the economic functions of the market-based credit system, the role of the central bank in such a system, and the global character of US dollar funding markets.
Number of Pages in PDF File: 21
Downloaded pdf to Note
article  financial_system  19thC  20thC  21stC  shadow_banking  capital_markets  financial_regulation  financial_crisis  central_banks  banking  downloaded  EF-add 
august 2013 by dunnettreader

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