dunnettreader + article + 1730s   6

Simon Targett - Government and Ideology during the Age of Whig Supremacy: The Political Argument of Sir Robert Walpole's Newspaper Propagandists | JSTOR: The Historical Journal, Vol. 37, No. 2 (Jun., 1994), pp. 289-317
Contrary to received historical wisdom, Sir Robert Walpole, the pragmatist par excellence, was diverted by political ideas. Thus he invested time and an unprecedented amount of money in political newspapers. This article investigates the primary pro-government newspapers and, as well as identifying the leading circle of political writers sponsored by Walpole, addresses the varied and complex arguments that appeared in their `leading essay' each week for twenty years. After identifying some common but misleading historical representations of Walpolean political thought, the article examines the treatment of three broad philosophical questions - human nature, the origin, nature and extent of government, and political morality - so demonstrating that Walpole's spokesmen were not narrowly pragmatic. Subsequently, the article focuses upon the careful pro-government response to the common charges that Walpole corrupted the political system and betrayed traditional whig values. In doing so, the article highlights the skills of some underrated eighteenth-century political writers and, more importantly, emphasizes the union of government and ideology in Walpolean political thinking. -- very useful references -- Downloaded pdf to Note
article  jstor  intellectual_history  18thC  1720s  1730s  1740s  British_history  British_politics  political_philosophy  moral_philosophy  human_nature  mixed_government  English_constitution  Parliament  Parliamentary_supremacy  partisanship  elections  franchise  political_culture  corruption  government_officials  governing_class  political_economy  political_press  Walpole  Hervey  Whigs-oligarchy  Whigs-opposition  Tories  Craftsman  Bolingbroke  bibliography  downloaded  EF-add 
june 2014 by dunnettreader
JENNIFER BATT - From the Field to the Coffeehouse: Changing Representations of Stephen Duck | JSTOR: Criticism, Vol. 47, No. 4 (FALL 2005), pp. 451-470
Vol. 47, No. 4, Special Issue: Learning to Read in the Long Revolution: New Work on Laboring-Class Poets, Aesthetics, and Politics (FALL 2005) -- covers 2 presentations of Duck, both awkward in their own way - 1. Joseph Spence who thought Duck was an extraordinary individual, and supported his transformation to poet patronized by Queen Caroline, but presents him in his laboring milieu in agriculture Wiltshire 2. Grub-Street Journal report of an encounter with Duck in a Richmond coffeehouse after Queen Caroline had granted him a small house in Richmond - the paper was opposition and often mocked the patronage choices of the court - presenting Duck as a (undeserving? ) fish out of water -- see bibliography of political and literary journals, especially opposition, in 1730s including the Craftsman -- downloaded pdf to Note
article  jstor  18thC  1730s  English_lit  poetry  elite_culture  print_culture  patronage  Queen_Caroline  political_press  literary_journals  Craftsman  opposition  Whigs-oligarchy  Whigs-opposition  high_culture  lower_orders  downloaded  EF-add 
may 2014 by dunnettreader
Andrew C. Thompson - Popery, Politics, and Private Judgement in Early Hanoverian Britain | JSTOR: The Historical Journal, Vol. 45, No. 2 (Jun., 2002), pp. 333-356
This article analyses two dissenting periodicals, the "Occasional Paper" and the "Old Whig". It argues that these periodicals provide an opportunity to reconsider the current priorities in the historiography of eighteenth-century political thought and religious history. Having considered the contexts from which the periodicals emerged and the importance of a perceived growth in catholic proselytizing in the 1730s, it analyses the importance of 'popery' in religious and political discourse. Taken together, popery and private judgement provided the parameters to descibe what was termed 'consistent protestantism' and this was used to defend a particular version of dissent. The protestant aspect to oppositional whiggery has been largely ignored, particularly by those keen to assert the centrality of 'classical republicanism' to opposition language in the early Hanoverian period. This article suggests an alternative account of the transmission of the commonwealth tradition and indicates further lines of inquiry into the evolution of whig ideas. -- downloaded pdf to Note
article  jstor  18thC  1730s  historiography  British_history  British_politics  intellectual_history  religious_history  political_philosophy  commonwealth  Whigs-opposition  anti-Catholic  Absolutism  political_press  political_culture  republicanism  dissenters  Church_of_England  downloaded  EF-add 
may 2014 by dunnettreader
Jessica Warner and Frank Ivis - "Damn You, You Informing Bitch." Vox Populi and the Unmaking of the Gin Act of 1736 | JSTOR: Journal of Social History, Vol. 33, No. 2 (Winter, 1999), pp. 299-330
This study examines the interaction between legislation and popular culture, with a particular emphasis on the extent to which popular resistance undermined enforcement of the Gin Act of 1736. It is argued that popular resistance, while significant, had no effect on policy until members of the middle classes intervened in an attempt to restore the social relations that had existed before the Act took effect. It was only at this point that the Act became a dead letter. In this role members of the middle classes functioned as mediators between two cultures, one plebeian, the other patrician. As such, our findings suggest that the dialectic of plebeian culture and patrician culture, as variously articulated by E.P. Thompson, may be excessively stark, especially when applied to a setting as dense and heterogenous as early Hanoverian London. Our findings also suggest that working men and women in the capital worked and socialized side by side, sometimes as drinking companions, and sometimes as professional informers. -- over 100 references -- Downloaded pdf to Note
article  jstor  social_history  cultural_history  political_history  18thC  British_politics  classes  class_conflict  lower_orders  middle_class  elites  public_policy  Parliament  law_enforcement  London  public_disorder  popular_culture  popular_politics  gin_craze  1730s  riots  moral_economy  bibliography  downloaded  EF-add 
january 2014 by dunnettreader
Jonathan White - The “Slow but Sure Poyson”: The Representation of Gin and Its Drinkers, 1736–1751 | JSTOR: Journal of British Studies, Vol. 42, No. 1 (January 2003), pp. 35-64
It can often seem that William Hogarth's famous Gin Lane (1751) says all that would ever need to be said about the “gin craze” of the early eighteenth century. The engraving has come to be virtually identified with its subject, revealing and circumscribing possible histories within its familiar lines. Yet, Gin Lane appeared at a determinate moment, chronologically marking the end of the gin craze and the culmination of one phase in the history of proletarian drinking. During this phase, as I will argue, there were significant changes in both the social conditions and relations that shaped laboring-class drinking and the ideas through which the propertied classes attempted to understand and control it. That this has not been argued before suggests how many historians have approached this phenomenon as a distinct social problem with fairly simple, basic features. -- downloaded pdf to Note
article  jstor  social_history  cultural_history  political_history  18thC  British_history  British_politics  lower_orders  popular_culture  popular_politics  gin_craze  public_disorder  crime  violence  riots  public_opinion  Parliament  taxes  Whigs-oligarchy  1730s  1740s  Hogarth  bibliography  downloaded  EF-add 
january 2014 by dunnettreader

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