dunnettreader + art_history   70

BBC Radio 4 - Germany: Memories of a Nation, Reichstag
Neil MacGregor, director of the British Museum, explores 600 years of Germany's complex and often challenging history using objects, art, landmarks and literature.
audio  entre_deux_guerres  15thC  German_unification  design  Reformation  20thC  18thC  19thC  Holy_Roman_Empire  Nazis  art_history  Modernism  Weimar  16thC  Bismarck  Europe-Early_Modern  social_history  medieval_history  cultural_history  Germany  post-WWII  17thC 
december 2017 by dunnettreader
Peter S. Wells - How Ancient Europeans Saw the World: Vision, Patterns, and the Shaping of the Mind in Prehistoric Times. (eBook, Paperback 2015 and Hardcover 2012) - Princeton University Press
The peoples who inhabited Europe during the two millennia before the Roman conquests had established urban centers, large-scale production of goods such as pottery and iron tools, a money economy, and elaborate rituals and ceremonies. Yet as Peter Wells argues here, the visual world of these late prehistoric communities was profoundly different from those of ancient Rome's literate civilization and today's industrialized societies. Drawing on startling new research in neuroscience and cognitive psychology, Wells reconstructs how the peoples of pre-Roman Europe saw the world and their place in it. He sheds new light on how they communicated their thoughts, feelings, and visual perceptions through the everyday tools they shaped, the pottery and metal ornaments they decorated, and the arrangements of objects they made in their ritual places--and how these forms and patterns in turn shaped their experience.

How Ancient Europeans Saw the World offers a completely new approach to the study of Bronze Age and Iron Age Europe, and represents a major challenge to existing views about prehistoric cultures. The book demonstrates why we cannot interpret the structures that Europe's pre-Roman inhabitants built in the landscape, the ways they arranged their settlements and burial sites, or the complex patterning of their art on the basis of what these things look like to us. Rather, we must view these objects and visual patterns as they were meant to be seen by the ancient peoples who fashioned them.

Peter S. Wells is professor of anthropology at the University of Minnesota. His many books include Barbarians to Angels: The Dark Ages Reconsidered and The Barbarians Speak: How the Conquered Peoples Shaped Roman Europe (Princeton).

This is a most important book. Wells argues that after 200 BC Eurasia moved generally toward the mass production and consumption of artifacts and that this changed people's relationships with the world, in turn altering the nature of experience. How Ancient Europeans Saw the World is thought-provoking and provocative."--Chris Gosden, author of Prehistory: A Very Short Introduction -- Chapter 1 downloaded to Tab S2
books  kindle-available  downloaded  Bronze_Age  prehistoric  ancient_Rome  barbarians  material_culture  mass-produced_articles  archaeology  art_history  visual_culture  cultural_change  burial_practices  decorative_arts 
august 2016 by dunnettreader
Judith Herrin - Byzantium: The Surprising Life of a Medieval Empire. (Paperback 2009) - Princeton University Press
Avoiding a standard chronological account of the Byzantine Empire's millennium--long history, she identifies the fundamental questions about Byzantium--what it was, and what special significance it holds for us today. Bringing the latest scholarship to a general audience in accessible prose, Herrin focuses each short chapter around a representative theme, event, monument, or historical figure, and examines it within the full sweep of Byzantine history--from the foundation of Constantinople, the magnificent capital city built by Constantine the Great, to its capture by the Ottoman Turks.

She argues that Byzantium's crucial role as the eastern defender of Christendom against Muslim expansion during the early Middle Ages made Europe--and the modern Western world--possible. Herrin captivates us with her discussions of all facets of Byzantine culture and society. She walks us through the complex ceremonies of the imperial court. She describes the transcendent beauty and power of the church of Hagia Sophia, as well as chariot races, monastic spirituality, diplomacy, and literature. She reveals the fascinating worlds of military usurpers and ascetics, eunuchs and courtesans, and artisans who fashioned the silks, icons, ivories, and mosaics so readily associated with Byzantine art.

An innovative history written by one of our foremost scholars, Byzantium reveals this great civilization's rise to military and cultural supremacy, its spectacular destruction by the Fourth Crusade, and its revival and final conquest in 1453. - no ebook - lots of illustrations - Introduction downloaded to Tab S2
books  downloaded  Byzantium  Roman_Empire  medieval_history  elite_culture  religious_history  religious_culture  Islam  Islamic_civilization  Islam-expansion  architecture  architecture-churches  diplomatic_history  military_history  Christendom  Christianity-Islam_conflict  Orthodox_Christianity  Crusades  Constantinople  13thC  14thC  15thC  Ottomans  court_culture  courtiers  ritual  art_history  decorative_arts  popular_culture 
august 2016 by dunnettreader
The Cromartie Fool − Richard Waitt − Online Collection − National Galleries of Scotland
Richard Waitt (Scottish, active 1708 - died 1733) Waitt specialised in portraiture, but began his career as a decorative painter. His first recorded work is a coat of arms for the Earl of Hopetoun. He may have trained in the Edinburgh studio of the painter John Scougal and seems to have produced several different types of painting, notably still life. He married into a family with Jacobite sympathies and possibly left the country, temporarily, after the 1715 Jacobite Rising. He must have returned by 1722, however, when he resumed work for the Clan Grant based in Castle Grant, Strathspey. Waitt's series of portraits formed a unique clan gallery. -- This grinning man holds a kail stock with a burning candle stuck in the top. This helps identify him as the fool or jester of a Scottish laird, who probably presided over Halloween festivities, such as those described in Robert Burns' poetry. Traditionally, unmarried men and women pulled up kail stocks to confirm the character of their future partner. A candle was then stuck into the end to make a torch. This portrait, painted in 1731, was possibly part of a series depicting Scottish clan members. -- also a video clip of gallery director of portraiture on the painting
video  painting  portraits  art_history  Scotland  elite_culture  18thC  Jacobites  1715_uprising  social_order 
may 2016 by dunnettreader
Clip on influence of Italian Grand Tours in Allan Ramsay - BBC Two - The Story of Scottish Art, Episode 2
The ancient world that allowed artist Allan Ramsay to hone his artistic skills and spark a lifelong passion for the place - full program of 4 episodes not available, only clips - this clip is 4+ mn
video  art_history  Scotland  Scottish_Enlightenment  18thC  Grand_Tour  painting  Ramsay_Allan  neoclassical  Rome  ancient_Rome  ancient_Greece 
may 2016 by dunnettreader
The Story of Scottish Art: Allan Ramsay - Blog − National Galleries of Scotland - 14 October 2015
The Story of Scottish Art: Allan Ramsay
by Geraldine Mackay, Digital Content Curator, 14 October 2015
In the second episode of the BBC series The Story of Scottish Art, Lachlan Goudie visits Rome and looks at the impact that repeated trips to Italy had on Allan Ramsay’s work. While filming the series, the BBC made use of the Scottish National Gallery Print Room that houses the national collection of works on paper. We are privileged to have a number of the sketches Ramsay made during his inspirational Grand Tours of Italy. In part of this episode Lachlan heads to Rome, and just as Ramsay did hundreds of years ago, he creates his own souvenir sketch of the Colosseum.
video  art_history  painting  portraits  18thC  Scotland  Scottish_Enlightenment  Grand_Tour  Ramsay_Allan 
may 2016 by dunnettreader
Game of Thrones, from Pixels to Parchment | The Getty Iris
We turn a Hollywood lens on medieval manuscripts, exploring parallels between illumination and TV storytelling If the GoT trailer were Getty manuscripts Death.…
Instapaper  art_history  cultural_history  narrative  narrative-visual  medieval_art  manuscripts  illustrations  illuminations  movies-sets  movies-costumes  from instapaper
may 2016 by dunnettreader
Bernin's "The Ecstasy of Saint Teresa" has been restored -- The History Blog
The Ecstasy of Saint Teresa, a statue by Gian Lorenzo Bernini in the church of Santa Maria della Vittoria in Rome, has received a thorough cleaning and restoration, the first cleaning in 20 years. There were water stains from a leaking window and layers of black grime from dust accumulation, smog and other airborne pollutants. Now the bright white Carrara marble shines like it did when Bernini first polished it in 1652. Restorers also found something previous interventions overlooked: stucco and paint added to part of the travertine base to make it blend into the background of the chapel walls. Those additions have been removed, restoring to the base, which is not the usual geometric pediment but carved to look like a rising swirl of clouds, its original balance.
Pocket  sculpture  art_history  17thC  Bernini  baroque  art_restoration  Counter-Reformation  religious_art  mysticism  Rome  from pocket
february 2016 by dunnettreader
Ada Palmer - Plato essay, #historypix, and the excessively exciting life of Pope Urban VIII - February 2016
Essay with pictures of a spectacular tapestry sequence in a corridor of the Vatican that's a perfect example of patronage, High Baroque, and Counter-Reformation iconography of legitimacy of authority of the Church hierarchy -- advancemeng of (classical) learning, military - new Fortress for Rome - mediator, peacekeeping within Christendom, straight pipeline to the heavens - both pagan and Christian -- a keeper!
Pocket  EF-add  17thC  art_history  Vatican  Rome  Papacy  baroque  iconography  Counter-Reformation  patronage-artistic  Papal_States  from pocket
february 2016 by dunnettreader
Christian Ruby - L'expérience du spectateur, dans le programme « esthétique » humien (2011) - Cairn.info
Nous ne pouvons vouer le xviiie siècle esthétique à la seule théorie kantienne du jugement. Ce siècle produit plusieurs esthétiques, les unes orientées vers le transcendantal, les autres vers l’expérience, notamment. La philosophie de Hume, par exemple, nous permet de poser la question de savoir comment le spectateur empiriste se forme, quelle place il entend occuper dans son opposition aux autres types de spectateurs, et quelles implications esthétiques permettent d’assurer sa supériorité sur eux. Par son empirisme, Hume ne réduit cependant pas la fabrication du goût à la médiation d’humeurs diverses. Il renvoie l’émergence et le développement du gout à une éducation, une formation qui ne sauraient être le fruit que d’une pratique répétée de l’art et de la contemplation de la beauté. -- downloaded via iPhone to DBOX
18thC  cultural_history  Hume-aesthetics  judgment-aesthetics  Hume  aesthetics  article  education  taste  intellectual_history  art_history  empiricism  downloaded 
february 2016 by dunnettreader
Marc Jimenez - La fin de la fin de l'art (2011) - Cairn.info
Décrépitude, déclin, fin, mort, progrès, décadence, dégénérescence (de l’art) ne sont plus des notions fondamentales pour penser la création actuelle. L’art contemporain, depuis plus de trois décennies, brouille les cartes esthétique, historique et idéologique qui déterminaient autrefois les critères de pertinence et de qualité des œuvres d’art. L’art ne disparaît pas, il se dissout dans le « culturel », là où la valeur marchande prévaut sur les valeurs artistique et esthétique. Le capitalisme libéral crée l’art pérenne. Il invente ainsi la fin de la fin de l’art, un art à son image, sans valeurs, sans idéaux, sans perspective humaniste, témoin désabusé de notre époque, parfois violent, excessif, mais peu contestataire, sismographe d’un monde agité et déboussolé. -- downloaded via iPhone to DBOX
elite_culture  judgment-aesthetics  postmodern  Modernism  patronage  aesthetics  popular_culture  consumer_society  declinism  art_history  taste  art-economics  conspicuous_consumption  art_market  artists  cultural_authority  downloaded  cultural_critique  capitalism  article  contemporary_art  avant_guard  cultural_studies 
february 2016 by dunnettreader
Home BRANCH: Britain, Representation, and Nineteenth-Century History
This site, which is intertwined with Romanticism and Victorianism on the Net, provides users with a free, expansive, searchable, reliable, peer-reviewed, copy-edited, easy-to-use overview of the
novels  history_of_science  open_access  lit_crit  2-nations  Romanticism  aesthetics  art_history  intellectual_history  British_Empire  religious_history  website  representation  English_lit  Industrial_Revolution  19thC  digital_humanities  cultural_history  historiography-19thC  literary_history  Victorian  painting  imperialism  orientalism 
january 2016 by dunnettreader
Suzanne L. Marchand - The Rhetoric of Artifacts and the Decline of Classical Humanism: The Case of Josef Strzygowski | JSTOR - History and Theory ( Dec 1994 )
History and Theory, Vol. 33, No. 4, Theme Issue 33: Proof and Persuasion in History (Dec., 1994), pp. 106-130 -- historians have failed to appreciate an important element of historiographical reorientation at the fin de siecle. This second "revolution" in humanistic scholarship challenged the conviction of the educated elite that European culture was rooted exclusively in classical antiquity in part by introducing as evidence non-textual forms of evidence; the testimony of artifacts allowed writers to reach beyond romantic-nationalist histories toward the identification of cultural areas, defined by morphological similarities, and to disrupt the traditional categories of the civilized and the barbaric. -- Austrian art historian, Josef Strzygowski, insistence upon Europe's dependence on Oriental forms and upon the superior historical value of material, over textual, evidence provided critics of philologically-based humanism with 2 argumentative avenues. He also represents a para-academic type, whose rise to power and prestige contributed to the "decline of the German mandarins." -- show how this "decline" is bound up with the waning institutional and popular status of Renaissance humanism - and a corresponding rise of biologistic Germanophilia - in the 2ntellectual milieux he inhabited (Germany and Austria). -- this antihumanist crusade contributed not only to the articulation of racist historiography, but also ... transference of politico-moral legitimacy to a non-elitist, anthropological definition of culture. -- downloaded pdf to Note
article  jstor  intellectual_history  historiography-19thC  historiography-20thC  cultural_history  cultural_authority  philohellenism  Renaissance  humanism  anti-humanism  epistemology-history  orientalism  racialism  anthropology  archaeology  German_scholarship  German_scholars  entre_deux_guerres  art_history  nationalism  Romanticism  national_tale  Aryanism  bibliography  downloaded 
january 2016 by dunnettreader
Louis XIV à Versailles MOOC -October 2015 - February 2016
Le cours se déroulera du 26 octobre au 4 janvier 2016. Il est composé de 7 séquences : (1) Et Louis XIV créa Versailles. (2) Dans la chambre du Roi. (3) Le conseil des ministres. (4) A table et en cuisines. (5) Les « heures rompues » (6) Le Roi des Arts. (7) Fêtes et divertissements
courses  cultural_history  political_history  17thC  France  Louis_XIV  monarchy  Absolutism  Versailles  art_history  architecture  elite_culture  court_culture  courtiers  theater  music_history  French_government 
november 2015 by dunnettreader
Digital Scriptorium
The Digital Scriptorium is a growing image database of medieval and renaissance manuscripts that unites scattered resources from many institutions into an international tool for teaching and scholarly research. As a visual catalog, DS allows scholars to verify with their own eyes cataloguing information about places and dates of origin, scripts, artists, and quality. Special emphasis is placed on the touchstone materials: manuscripts signed and dated by their scribes. DS records manuscripts that traditionally would have been unlikely candidates for reproduction. It fosters public viewing of materials otherwise available only within libraries. Because it is web-based, it encourages interaction between the knowledge of scholars and the holdings of libraries to build a reciprocal flow of information. Digital Scriptorium looks to the needs of a very diverse community of medievalists, classicists, musicologists, paleographers, diplomatists and art historians. At the same time Digital Scriptorium recognizes the limited resources of libraries; it bridges the gap between needs and resources by means of extensive rather than intensive cataloguing, often based on legacy data, and sample imaging.Digital Scriptorium institutional partners have instituted a governance structure to plan jointly for the future of the program, in terms of scope, sustainability, and content.
website  images  Medieval  religious_lit  manuscripts  medieval_history  Latin_lit  art_history 
october 2015 by dunnettreader
Philippe Saunier, review essay - Bourdieu l’hérésiarque on "Manet, une révolution symbolique" - La Vie des idées - 19 mars 2014
Recensé : Pierre Bourdieu, Manet, une révolution symbolique, édition établie par Pascale Casanova, Patrick Champagne, Christophe Charle, Franck Poupeau et Marie-Christine Rivière, Paris, Raisons d’Agir / Seuil, coll. « Cours et Travaux », 2013, 776 p., 32 €. -- transcription des cours donnés en 1998-1999 puis en 1999-2000 par Pierre Bourdieu au Collège de France sur Édouard Manet -- Mots-clés : histoire de l’art | sociologie | révolution | Bourdieu -- La révolution symbolique opérée par Manet exige pour être comprise de rompre avec les représentations traditionnelles de l’histoire de l’art — ce qui implique une autre révolution dans les esprits. Derrière le portrait de Manet se profile un autre hérésiarque : Pierre Bourdieu lui-même. -- downloaded pdf to Note
books  reviews  intellectual_history  art_history  art_criticism  sociology  sociology_of_fields  Bourdieu  19thC  France  elite_culture  change-social  change-intellectual  painting  aesthetics  academies  Manet  Flaubert  artists  author_intention  cultural_history  cultural_change  cultural_critique  cultural_capital  cultural_authority  social_theory  methodology-qualitative  downloaded 
october 2015 by dunnettreader
Livius - Articles on ancient history
Common categories
Roman Empire (1052)
Byzantium (345)
Greece (248)
Museums (196)
Persia (186)
Hellenistic (180)
Roman Republic (137)
Germania Inferior (136)
Greater Iran (84)
Anatolia (80)
ancient_religions  Latin_lit  Mediterranean  ancient_Near_East  ancient_history  art_history  Roman_Empire  ancient_India  Persia  ancient_Israel  ancient_Egypt  Byzantine  Roman_Republic  website  ancient_Rome  archaeology  Greek_lit  ancient_Greece 
august 2015 by dunnettreader
Filippo Titi: Descrizione delle Pitture . . . in Roma (1683, rev'd 1763)
Part of Bill Thayer's transcription of works that help get a sense of the topography of Rome in different eras and that he links to when places are referred to in his translations of texts from antiquity -- [590 pages of printed text, although no images ] Pushing the "topography" envelope rather far, but Filippo Titi's Pitture, Sculture e Architetture esposte al pubblico in Roma (1683, as revised by Giovanni Bottari in 1763) was for many years the standard guide to the monuments of Rome, does indeed cover hundreds of places within the City, and may be considered a primary source on its Baroque art: topography it is, then; and some will find it useful. Includes a linked index to nearly 1000 artists and the works they left in Rome. -- an example of the sort of "guidebook " that Bolingbroke might have used for his Grand Tour
Bolingbroke  17thC  architecture-churches  18thC  architecture  Rome  guidebooks  books  art_history  baroque  etext  painting  Grand_Tour  sculpture  travel  Counter-Reformation 
august 2015 by dunnettreader
What Jane Saw - Prof. Janine Barchas, U of Texas-Austin, Department of English
Representation of exhibition rooms at the British Institution in Pall Mall, London, which was the Shakespeare Museum (not done yet) in 1796 and in 1813 a retrospective of the works of Sir Joshua Reynolds (1723-1792). Many details of the exhibit can be reconstructed from the original 1813 "Catalogue of Pictures," a one-shilling pamphlet purchased by visitors as a guide through the 3 large rooms where hung 141 paintings by Reynolds. Armed with surviving copies of this pamphlet, narrative accounts in nineteenth-century newspapers and books, and precise architectural measurements of the British Institution's exhibit space, this website reconstructs the Reynolds show. Even if Jane Austen had not attended this public exhibit, it would still be well worth reconstructing. The British Institution's show was a star-studded "first" of great magnitude for the art community and a turning point in the history of modern exhibit practices. (...) the first commemorative exhibition devoted to a single artist ever staged by an institution. Although Reynolds, ...did not yet qualify as an Old Master, he was already hailed as the founder of the British School and celebrated as a model for contemporary artists to emulate. The preface to the exhibit catalogue, written by Richard Payne Knight, treats the work of Reynolds as a national treasure in order "to call attention generally to British, in preference to Foreign Art". Knight allows that some of Reynolds' paintings are better than others, likening the show to a pedagogical tool for artists and connoisseurs. He also insists upon the show's modernity, hailing "the genuine excellence of modern" artists over the work of their forbearers. In light of the coverage it received in the popular press and the London crowds that attended, the British Institution's Reynolds exhibit presaged the modern museum blockbuster.
website  18thC  19thC  British_history  art_history  public_sphere  culture_industries  exhibition  London  cultural_history  elite_culture  portraits  Reynolds  Regency-British  Austen 
august 2015 by dunnettreader
Pavement, Piety, and Prophetic Art – By Karla Cavarra Britton - The Marginalia Review of Books
Flora Samuel and Inge Linder-Gaillard, Sacred Concrete: The Churches of Le Corbusier, Birkhäuser, 2013, 230pp., $85 Le Corbusier, the Franco-Swiss architect,…
Instapaper  books  reviews  20thC  art_history  religious_art  architecture  Modernism  sacred  spirituality  architecture-churches  pilgrimage  from instapaper
july 2015 by dunnettreader
The Reith Lectures, Nikolaus Pevsner: The Englishness of English Art: 1955 | BBC Radio 4
Home page for the 7 radio lectures in 1955, from Hogarth and Reynolds, Constable and Blake and onwards through 19thC and 20thC architecture -- how he sees each as illustrating distinctively English "character"
lecture  art_history  British_history  painting  architecture  18thC  19thC  20thC  Hogarth  Reynolds  Blake_William  Constable  landscape  portraits  illustrations  aesthetics  national_ID 
june 2015 by dunnettreader
L'Europe des Lumières - Classiques Garnier - collection directors Michel Delon, Jacques Berchtold et Christophe Martin
De ce qu'on appelle la crise de la conscience européenne à la Révolution française, la littérature et la pensée ont pour espace une Europe, souvent francophone, éprise d'idées nouvelles et d'expérimentations formelles. La collection rend compte de recherches qui sollicitent des disciplines et des méthodes diverses pour mieux connaître et comprendre la vie intellectuelle, scientifique, artistique et littéraire du XVIIIe siècle, ainsi que l'histoire des idées et des représentations. -- From what has been designated as a "crisis of conscience" to the Revolution, literature and thought play in a European space, often French-speaking, entranced by new ideas and formal experiments. The collection covers research which calls on a variety of disciplines and methods in order to better know and understand the intellectual, scientific, artistic and literary life of the 18th century, as well as the history of ideas and representations.
books  18thC  Europe-Early_Modern  Enlightenment  French_Enlightenment  intellectual_history  history_of_science  philosophy_of_science  sociology_of_knowledge  natural_philosophy  art_history  literary_history  Scientific_Revolution  scientific_culture  philosophes  Republic_of_Letters  public_sphere  publishing 
may 2015 by dunnettreader
Michael Schaich, ed. - Monarchy and Religion: The Transformation of Royal Culture in 18thC Europe (2007) - Oxford University Press
OUP/German Historical Institute London Studies of the German Historical Institute London -- 509 pages | 978-0-19-921472-3 | Hardback | This collection of essays is a pioneering survey of the spiritual dimensions of kingship in 18thC Europe. It investigates the role of clergymen in the mechanics of the court, the religious observances of monarchs and their entourages, and the importance of religious images and ceremonial in underpinning royal power. The volume compares the British, French, Russian, and some of the German monarchies in order to allow comparisons to be drawn between different national and especially confessional settings. Based on original research and new source material, the 15 essays by established scholars chart mostly unknown territory. Previous research on the subject has focused on the 16thC and 17thC at the expense of the age of Enlightenment which has widely been regarded as a period of desacralization of monarchy. The essays open up new perspectives on the function of court clerics, conspicuous and internalized forms of aulic devotion, the gendered framing of religion, the purpose of court ritual, and the divide between the public and private spheres of monarchy. Overall the essays maintain that despite the gradual decline of monarchy by divine right, religion still permeated almost all aspects of court life and monarchical representation. The volume thus challenges received wisdom about the disenchantment of kingship and the rise of more rationalized forms of absolutist government during the period between c.1688 and 1789. -- surprise, surprise, leads off with an "ancien régime" essay by JCD Clark
books  cultural_history  religious_history  political_history  political_culture  politics-and-religion  17thC  18thC  Enlightenment  Ancien_régime  secularization  monarchy  monarchy-proprietary  Absolutism  divine_right  court_culture  authority  cultural_authority  cultural_change  gender  religion-established  gender-and-religion  British_history  Glorious_Revolution  Jacobites  courtiers  Jacobite_court  propaganda  art_history  patronage-artistic  William_III  Queen_Anne  Hanoverian_Succession  George_I  George_II  George_III  royal_families  société_des_princes  kingship  Louis_XIV  Louis_XV  Louis_XVI  France  Russia  Holy_Roman_Empire  Catherine_the_Great  Prussia  Frederick_the_Great  Germany  Austria  Spain  ritual 
april 2015 by dunnettreader
Marc Fumaroli -- Le siècle des Lumières et la naissance du "néoclassicisme" | Canal Académie 2011
Interview (mp3) and article by Canal summarizing points he makes in his introductory essay for the exhibition catalog -- Marc Fumaroli intervient ici sur l’exposition "L’Antiquité rêvée: Innovations et résistances au XVIIIe siècle" qui se tient au musée du Louvre du 2 décembre 2010 au 14 février 2011. Elle illustre à travers un choix de plus de 150 œuvres majeures, la naissance du mouvement dit « néoclassique ». Ce retour à l’Antique fut principalement inspiré par la découverte et le retentissement des fouilles des cités antiques d’Herculanum et de Pompeï. Elles révélèrent à la fois la peinture antique et son contexte, le décor et le quotidien de la vie urbaine des anciens Romains. Nous suivons ainsi les grandes périodes correspondant aux trois principales sections de l’exposition du musée du Louvre, à savoir: I – Le RENOUVEAU du goût pour l’Antique 1730-1770 **--** II – RESISTANCES 1760-1790: Néobaroque – Néomaniérisme – Le Sublime **--** III – NEOCLASSICISMES 1770-1790. Avec, dans chaque section, beaucoup de courants et contre-courants. -- web page to Pocket, includes references to the catalog and related publications
intellectual_history  art_history  aesthetics  Renaissance  17thC  18thC  Ancients_v_Moderns  classicism  neoclassical  baroque  Rococo  painting  sculpture  Republic_of_Letters  Enlightenment  antiquity  ancient_Greece  ancient_Rome  archaeology  Pompeii  sublime  Winkleman  cultural_history  historiography-18thC  lifestyle  decorative_arts  books  museums  exhibition  audio  Pocket 
april 2015 by dunnettreader
James Chandler, ed. - The Cambridge History of English Romantic Literature (pbk 2012) | Cambridge University Press
The Romantic period was one of the most creative, intense and turbulent periods of English lit (..) revolution, reaction, and reform in politics, and by the invention of imaginative literature in its distinctively modern form. (..) an engaging account of 6 decades of literary production around the turn of the 19thC. Reflecting the most up-to-date research, (..) both to provide a narrative of Romantic lit and to offer new and stimulating readings of the key texts. (...) the various locations of literary activity - both in England and, as writers developed their interests in travel and foreign cultures, across the world. (..) how texts responded to great historical and social change. (..) a comprehensive bibliography, timeline and index, **--** Choice: 50 years ago, lit studies was awash in big theories of Romanticism, (e.g. M. H. Abrams, Geoffrey Hartman, Harold Bloom); 2 decades later, Marilyn Butler argued that the very label "Romantic" was "historically unsound." This collection suggests that no consensus has yet emerged: instead, the best of the essays suggest continuities with periods before and after. Rather than big theories, (..) kaleidoscopic snapshots of individual genres (the novel, the "new poetry," drama, the ballad, children's literature); larger intellectual currents (Brewer ... on "sentiment and sensibility"); fashionable topics (imperialism, publishing history, disciplinarity); and--most interesting--the varying cultures of discrete localities (London, Ireland, Scotland).(..) an excellent book useful not as a reference resource, (..) but for its summaries of early-21st-century thinking about British lit culture 1770s-1830s. -- downloaded pdfs of front matter and excerpt to Note
books  English_lit  Romanticism  literary_history  literary_language  literary_theory  lit_crit  18thC  19thC  British_history  cultural_history  literature-and-morality  politics-and-literature  French_Revolution-impact  sociology_of_knowledge  Enlightenment  religious_lit  genre  gender_history  historicism  art_history  art_criticism  novels  rhetoric-writing  intellectual_history  morality-conventional  norms  sensibility  social_order  public_sphere  private_life  lower_orders  publishing  publishing-piracy  copyright  British_politics  British_Empire  Scotland  Scottish_Enlightenment  Ireland  Ireland-English_exploitation  landed_interest  landowners-Ireland-Anglo_elite  authors  authors-women  political_culture  elite_culture  aesthetics  subjectivity  self  self-fashioning  print_culture  readership  fashion  credit  poetry  literary_journals  historical_fiction  historical_change  reform-political  reform-social  French_Revolution  anti-Jacobin  Evangelical  literacy  theater  theatre-sentimental  theatre-politics  actors  downloaded 
february 2015 by dunnettreader
Marshall Brown, ed. - The Cambridge History of Literary Criticism: Romanticism, Vol. 5 (pbk 2007) | Cambridge University Press
This latest volume in the celebrated Cambridge History of Literary Criticism addresses literary criticism of the Romantic period, chiefly in Europe. Its seventeen chapters are by internationally respected academics and explore a range of key topics and themes. The book is designed to help readers locate essential information and to develop approaches and viewpoints for a deeper understanding of issues discussed by Romantic critics or that were fundamental to their works. Primary and secondary bibliographies provide a guide for further research. **--** Introduction *-* 1. Classical standards in the Romantic period - Paul H. Fry *-* 2. Innovation and modernity Alfredo De Paz *-* 3. The French Revolution - David Simpson *-* 4. Transcendental philosophy and romantic criticism - David Simpson *-* 5. Nature - Helmut J. Schneider *-* 6. Scientific models - Joel Black *-* 7. Religion and literature - E. S. Shaffer
8. Romantic language theory and the art of understanding - Kurt Mueller-Vollmer *-* 9. The Romantic transformation of rhetoric - David Wellbery *-* 10. Romantic irony - Gary Handwerk *-* 11. Theories of genre - Tilottama Rajan *-* 12. Theory of the novel - Marshall Brown *-* 13. The impact of Shakespeare - Jonathan Arac *-* 14. The vocation of criticism and the crisis of the republic of letters - Jon Klancher *-* 15. Women, gender, and literary criticism - Theresa M. Kelley *-* 16. Literary history and historicism - David Perkins *-* 17. Literature and the other arts - Herbert Lindenberger **--** downloaded pdfs of front matter and excerpt to Note
books  English_lit  Romanticism  literary_history  literary_language  literary_theory  lit_crit  18thC  19thC  British_history  cultural_history  literature-and-morality  politics-and-literature  French_Revolution-impact  sociology_of_knowledge  Enlightenment  religious_lit  genre  gender_history  historicism  art_history  art_criticism  novels  rhetoric  rhetoric-writing  philosophy_of_language  Shakespeare-influence  classicism  modernity  German_Idealism  science-public  reason  irony  professionalization  authors-women  subjectivity  nature  downloaded  EF-add 
february 2015 by dunnettreader
"No, the Internet Is Not Killing Culture" - Evan Kindley on Scott Timberg's Culture Crash: The Killing of the Creative Class | Slate Jan 2015
Scott Timberg’s Culture Crash begins with a harrowing and by now familiar personal narrative of the Great Recession. In 2008, Timberg, an arts reporter for the Los Angeles Times, was laid off, a casualty of the infamous Sam Zell regime; soon after, the bank foreclosed on his family’s house. These back-to-back misfortunes made Timberg worry about more than making ends meet: They shook his faith in the entire enterprise of American creativity. “I saw myself in the third generation of people who had worked in culture without either striking it rich or going broke,” he writes, but such a career path no longer seemed available in the 21st century, and he wanted to understand why. Though there was a temptation to blame the awesome leveling power of the Internet, he concluded that “this was about more than just technology. … Some of the causes were as new as file sharing; others were older than the nation. Some were cyclical, and would pass in a few years; others were structural and would get worse with time.” -- Kindley points out that precarious living of creative workers is the historical norm, and the few decades in the 2nd half of the 20thC during which a reasonably talented, reasonably hard-working writer, artist etc might be able to have a reasonably secure middle class life was the extreme exception. He also shows how Timberg is mostly writing about the bubble he lives in, so doesn't "get" the experiences of even his contemporaries who weren't middle class white males.
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january 2015 by dunnettreader
Amanda Vickery - Those Gorgeous Georgians - Tercentenary Review | academia.edu
Downloaded docx to iPhone -- We tend to associate the Georgian era with glacial calm, tinkling tea cups, and whispering silk dresses, an oasis of elegance and calm between the strife of the Civil War and the grime and class struggle of the Victorians. But this is a pallid Sunday teatime vision of the eighteenth century. Th... - published as article in The Telegraph(?)
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january 2015 by dunnettreader
John Richard Moores - Representations of France and the French in English satirical prints, c. 1740-1832 (2011 PhD thesis) - White Rose Etheses Online - University of York
This thesis explores representations of France and the French in English satirical prints in the period c. 1740-1832. This was an era of rivalry and conflict between the two nations. It has been suggested that hostility towards France at this time contributed to the formation of English, or British, national identity. This coincided with England’s ‘golden age of caricature’. While much of the satirical art produced focussed on France, most studies of this material have dealt with how the English portrayed themselves and each other. Those which have discussed representations of the French have promoted the view that English perceptions of the French were principally hostile. While there is a temptation to employ such prints as evidence of English Francophobia, a closer investigation reveals greater satirical complexities at work which do not simply conceptualise and employ the French ‘Other’ as target of hatred. Informed by war and rivalry, as well as by trade, travel, and cultural exchange, the prints projected some positive characteristics onto the French ‘Other’, they contain varying degrees of sympathy and affinity with the French, and are demonstrative of a relationship more distinct and intimate than that shared with any other nation. At the same time, the prints expose many of the tensions and divisions that existed within Britain itself. French characters were employed to directly attack British political figures, while in other instances domestic anxieties were projected onto images of the French. -- downloaded pdf to Note
thesis  18thC  19thC  British_history  British_politics  France  Anglo-French  satire  cultural_history  social_history  national_ID  francophile  xenophobia  prints  popular_culture  popular_politics  War_of_Austrian_Succession  Seven_Years_War  American_Revolution  French_Revolution  French_Revolutionary_Wars  Napoleonic_Wars  travel  fashion  political_culture  political_press  art_history  caricature  British_Empire  British_foreign_policy  Restoration-France  July_Monarchy  reform-political  anti-Catholic  Catholic_emancipation  émigrés  exiles  ruling_class  bibliography  downloaded  EF-add 
january 2015 by dunnettreader
Rita Felski - "Context Stinks!" | JSTOR: New Literary History, Vol. 42, No. 4 (AUTUMN 2011), pp. 573-591
This essay draws on the work of Bruno Latour to question conventional methods of "historicizing" and "contextualizing" works of art. Context is typically equated with original historical context, and the act of historicizing a text becomes a matter of linking it to other texts and events in the same slice of time. Such historicist approaches, I argue, cannot account for the transtemporal movement of texts, their ability to resonate across different periods, and the ways in which they speak to us now. Moreover, traditional models of context and its correlates (society, power, ideology, etc.) tend to downplay or actively deny the agency of artworks. What if we were to think of these artworks as nonhuman actors who modify states of affairs by making a difference? Such an approach calls on us to recognize the specificity of works of art as well as their sociability and wordliness. Artworks are not heroic actors engaged in endless opposition, subversion, and resistance; rather they are coactors and codependents, enmeshed in multiple attachments and associations that enable them to survive. -- Project MUSE
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october 2014 by dunnettreader
Lloyd Kramer, review - Jonathan P. Ribner, Broken Tablets: The Cult of the Law in French Art from David to Delacroix | JSTOR: The American Historical Review, Vol. 100, No. 2 (Apr., 1995), pp. 530-531
Each successive regime had to sacrilize the regime's law which would provide an important source of regime legitimacy. The book tracks the successive regime representation from the transcendent heroism of the lawgiver in David to the satiric cynicism of the 1830s and 1840s and Damier's caricatures. Important point - the strong theme of universalism in French political thought and constitution making is usually attributed to the Enlightenment or classical Rome - Ribner illustrates the importance instead of the Old Testament and Moses, which produced a range of tensions with the governmental form and political practices of each regime. E, g. Was Napoleon another Moses in giving France the Code Civile, or was Moses a way of critiquing Napoleon and the products of his regime. -- didn't download
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october 2014 by dunnettreader
Alex Ross - The Naysayers: Walter Benjamin, Theodor Adorno, and the critique of pop culture | The New Yorker - September 15 2014
Benjamin, whose dizzyingly varied career skirted the edges of the Frankfurt collective, receives the grand treatment in “Walter Benjamin: A Critical Life” (Harvard), by Howard Eiland and Michael W. Jennings, who earlier edited Harvard’s four-volume edition of Benjamin’s writings. The Frankfurt School never presented a united front.... One zone in which they clashed was that of mass culture. Benjamin saw the popular arena as a potential site of resistance, from which left-leaning artists like Charlie Chaplin could transmit subversive signals. Adorno and Horkheimer viewed pop culture as an instrument of economic and political control, enforcing conformity behind a permissive screen. The “culture industry,” as they called it, offered the “freedom to choose what is always the same.” A similar split appeared in attitudes toward traditional forms of culture: classical music, painting, literature. Benjamin, in his resonant sentence linking culture and barbarism, saw the treasures of bourgeois Europe as spoils in a victory procession, each work blemished by the suffering of nameless millions. -- Between them, Adorno and Benjamin were pioneers in thinking critically about pop culture—in taking that culture seriously as an object of scrutiny, whether in tones of delight, dismay, or passionate ambivalence. The worst that one Frankfurt School theorist could say of another was that his work was insufficiently dialectical. The word “dialectic,” as elaborated in the philosophy of Hegel, causes endless problems for people who are not German, and even for some who are. In a way, it is both a philosophical concept and a literary style. --It “mediates,” to use a favorite Frankfurt School word. And it gravitates toward doubt, demonstrating the “power of negative thinking,” as Herbert Marcuse once put it. Such twists and turns come naturally in the German language, whose sentences are themselves plotted in swerves, releasing their full meaning only with the final clinching action of the verb.-- Although Marx was central to their thought, they were nearly as skeptical of Communist ideology as they were of the bourgeois mind-set that Communism was intended to supplant. “At the very heart of Critical Theory was an aversion to closed philosophical systems,” Martin Jay writes, in his history “The Dialectical Imagination” (1973).
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september 2014 by dunnettreader
Corrado Bologna - Le retour des dieux anciens : Giulio Camillo et Fontainebleau | Italique, V, 2002, p109-138.
Italique [En ligne], V | 2002, mis en ligne le 06 octobre 2009, DOI : 10.4000/italique.152 **--** En ce début de XVIème, après des siècles d’absence, les dieux anciens “sont de retour” à Fontainebleau. Ils tapissent les murs, remplissent les bibliothèques, les salons royaux, les salles sévères des écoles universitaires. Leur présence inaugure une nouvelle mythographie et presque une nouvelle théologie païenne. Ce sont des dieux et des héros élégants, sophistiqués, très différents de ceux que, au milieu des années vingt, un grand élève de Raphaël, Giulio Romano, s’inspirant aux modèles antiques, inscrit de leur naturel de chair toute rosée et déjà flasque, où tant de maniéristes et de baroques trouveront leur inspiration, sur les murs de Palazzo Te à Mantoue. .La censure ecclésiastique et aussi politique déchaînent immédiatement une forte polémique (dont, à la fin du siècle et au terme du Concile de Trente, l’ouvrage de Gabriele Paleotti sanctionnera victorieusement la fin) à l’encontre de ce très heureux moment de paganisme potentiellement absolu, subversif, qui me semble proposer non pas tant un “retour à l’Esprit Classique”, qu’un “retour de l’Esprit Classique”. En songeant davantage et d’abord à la “cour païenne” du roi très chrétien à Fontainebleau plutôt qu’à la Rome “ville sacrée” du grand baroque de Bernin, je parlerais donc d’une « Présence réelle » de la mythologie paganisante que certains grands Italiens entent en France. -- gobs of footnotes and references - downloaded pdf to Note
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september 2014 by dunnettreader
Encyclopedia of the Early Modern World, by the Gale Group, Inc. | Answers.com
The history of Europe from the mid-15th century until the French Revolution. Includes notable events such as wars and revolutions as well as broader processes like the Renaissance and the Enlightenment; biographical information on leading figures; individual national histories; and meaningful developments in the arts, religion, politics, exploration and warfare.
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august 2014 by dunnettreader
Michèle Mendelssohn - Henry James, Oscar Wilde and Aesthetic Culture (2007) - Edinburgh University Press
Challenges critical assumptions about the way Aestheticism responded to anxieties about nationality, sexuality, identity, influence, originality and morality -- This book, the first fully sustained reading of Henry James’s and Oscar Wilde’s relationship, reveals why the antagonisms between both authors are symptomatic of the cultural oppositions within Aestheticism itself. The book also shows how these conflicting energies animated the late 19thC’s most exciting transatlantic cultural enterprise.Richly illustrated and historically detailed, this study of James’s and Wilde’s intricate, decades-long relationship brings to light Aestheticism’s truly transatlantic nature through close readings of both authors’ works, as well as 19thC art, periodicals and rare manuscripts. As Mendelssohn shows, both authors were deeply influenced by the visual and decorative arts, and by contemporary artists such as George Du Maurier and James McNeill Whistler. Henry James, Oscar Wilde and Aesthetic Culture offers a nuanced reading of a complex relationship that promises to transform the way in which we imagine late 19thC British and American literary culture.
books  kindle-available  cultural_history  literary_history  art_history  19thC  British_history  English_lit  US  Atlantic  Aestheticism  James_Henry  Wilde  sexuality  nationalism  national_ID  cosmopolitanism  identity  creativity  moral_reform  painting  theater 
august 2014 by dunnettreader
MARK HEWITSON - ON WAR AND PEACE: GERMAN CONCEPTIONS OF CONFLICT, 1792–1815 (2014). | The Historical Journal, 57, pp 447-483 - Cambridge Journals Online - Abstract
MARK HEWITSON - University College London -- This article re-examines some of the principal portrayals of military conflict in academic treatises and works of art, arguing that the changing visions of war and peace which they presented were indicative of a wider acceptance within critical sections of the various public spheres of the German lands. The majority of recent studies, which have sought to debunk the myth of national ‘wars of liberation’, have tended to overlook the reasons for and ramifications of such shifts. This study shows how contemporary commentators, faced with an unending series of revolutionary and Napoleonic campaigns, gave up any hope of a perpetual peace and accepted, however reluctantly, the necessity of military conflict. Writers', artists', academics', and other publicists' failure to acknowledge the actual conditions of revolutionary and Napoleonic warfare, despite evidence that the nature of combat had altered, meant that conflicts could be viewed as patriotic, heroic, and defensive struggles, which served to simplify the divided loyalties and complicated diplomacy of the Napoleonic era.
article  paywall  18thC  19thC  intellectual_history  cultural_history  Germany  Napoleonic_Wars  revolutions  military_history  diplomatic_history  patriotism  nationalism  German_lit  German_Idealism  Romanticism  art_history  political_press  EF-add 
august 2014 by dunnettreader
MARTHA VANDREI - A VICTORIAN INVENTION? THOMAS THORNYCROFT'S ‘BOADICEA GROUP’ AND THE IDEA OF HISTORICAL CULTURE IN BRITAIN | The Historical Journal - Volume 57 / Issue 02 / June 2014, pp 485-508 - Abstract - Cambridge Journals Online -
King's College London -- DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1017/S0018246X14000119, Published online: 08 May 2014 -- This article examines the figure of Boudica (or Boadicea), with a specific focus on Thomas Thornycroft's Westminster Bridge statue, and on the work of the seventeenth-century antiquary, Edmund Bolton. By synthesizing historiography which investigates the idea of ‘historical culture’ in the modern and early modern periods, this article attempts to bridge chronological and generic divisions which exist in the study of the history of history. It argues that to fully understand the genealogy of popular historical ideas like Boudica, it is imperative that historians of such subjects take a longue-durée approach that situates individual artists and writers, and the historical-cultural works they produce, within their broader political, cultural, and social contexts while simultaneously viewing these works as part of a long, discursive process by which the past is successively reinterpreted. As a consequence, this article eschews an analysis of Boudica which labels her an ‘imperial icon’ for Victorian Britons, and argues that the relationship between contemporary context and the re-imagined past is not as straightforward as it might initially appear. -- paywall -- may be interesting for development of Britannia imagery relevant to Bolingbroke and Patriots
article  paywall  find  historiography  historiography-17thC  historiography-18thC  historiography-19thC  cultural_history  antiquaries  British_history  British_politics  national_ID  art_history  literary_history  political_culture  Victorian  usable_past  iconography  periodization  Britannia  patriotism  Patriots  British_Empire  imperialism  EF-add 
august 2014 by dunnettreader
John Millar, The Origin of the Distinction of Ranks [1771], ed. Aaron Garrett - Online Library of Liberty
John Millar, The Origin of the Distinction of Ranks; or, An Inquiry into the Circumstances which give rise to Influence and Authority in the Different Members of Society, edited and with an Introduction by Aaron Garrett (Indianapolis: Liberty Fund, 2006). 07/11/2014. <http://oll.libertyfund.org/titles/287> -- The Origin of the Distinction of Ranks is one of the major products of the Scottish Enlightenment and a masterpiece of jurisprudence and social theory. Millar developed a progressive account of the nature of authority in society by analyzing changes in subsistence, agriculture, arts, and manufacture. The book is perhaps the most precise and compact development of the abiding themes of the liberal wing of the Scottish Enlightenment. Drawing on Smith’s four-stages theory of history and the natural law’s traditional division of domestic duties into those toward servants, children, and women, Millar provides a rich historical analysis of the ways in which progressive economic change transforms the nature of authority. In particular, he argues that, with the progress of arts and manufacture, authority tends to become less violent and concentrated, and ranks tend to diversify. Millar’s analysis of this historical progress is nuanced and sophisticated; for example, his discussion of servants is perhaps the best developed of the “economic” arguments against slavery. -- 1st edition 1771 - he published 2 more in his lifetime, the latest edition being more "scientific", e.g. removing some references that were less reliable, more speculative, or not in keeping with a more sober tone -- downloaded pdf to Note
books  etexts  18thC  intellectual_history  Enlightenment  Scottish_Enlightenment  stadial_theories  social_order  social_sciences  social_process  change-social  political_economy  art_history  literary_history  civilizing_process  civil_society  family  authority  hierarchy  commerce  industry  trade  progress  slavery  downloaded  EF-add 
july 2014 by dunnettreader
Lord Kames, Elements of Criticism, 2 vols. [1762], ed. Peter Jones - Online Library of Liberty
Henry Home, Lord Kames, Elements of Criticism, Edited and with an Introduction by Peter Jones (Indianapolis: Liberty Fund, 2005). 2 vols. 07/11/2014. <http://oll.libertyfund.org/titles/1860> -- A two volume work on the “science of criticism” by one of the leading figures of the Scottish Enlightenment. Kames argues that criticism of art and literature is a rational science as well as a matter of taste. In volume 1 he explores the nature and causes of the emotions and passions. In volume 2 he explores the principles of rhetoric and literary appreciation, and discusses the formation of our standards of taste.
books  etexts  18thC  intellectual_history  Enlightenment  Scottish_Enlightenment  Kames  aesthetics  lit_crit  literary_history  art_history  art_criticism  human_nature  emotions  passions  psychology  moral_psychology  rhetoric  rhetoric-writing  taste  high_culture  EF-add 
july 2014 by dunnettreader
Leila W. Kinney - Genre: A Social Contract? | JSTOR: Art Journal, Vol. 46, No. 4 (Winter, 1987), pp. 267-277
Vol. 46, No. 4, issue focus - The Political Unconscious in Nineteenth-Century Art (Winter, 1987) - Impressionists, critical support, seen within boulevard culture that was autonomous, if not oppositional, to authoritarianism of the 2nd Empire and its forms of censorship -- didn't download
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may 2014 by dunnettreader
Peter Kivy - The Possessor and the Possessed: Handel, Mozart, Beethoven, and the Idea of Musical Genius (Yale Series in the Philosophy and Theory) | Amazon.com: eBook
The concept of genius intrigues us. Artistic geniuses have something other people don't have. In some cases that something seems to be a remarkable kind of inspiration that permits the artist to exceed his own abilities. It is as if the artist is suddenly possessed, as if some outside force flows through them at the moment of creation. In other cases genius seems best explained as a natural gift. The artist is the possessor of an extra talent that enables the production of masterpiece after masterpiece. This book explores the concept of artistic genius and how it came to be symbolised by three great composers of the modern era: Handel, Mozart, and Beethoven.
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may 2014 by dunnettreader
Peter Kivy - The Seventh Sense: Francis Hutchenson and 18thC British Aesthetics (2003) : Book Depository
The Seventh Sense is the definitive study of the aesthetic theory of the great 18thC philosopher Francis Hutcheson, arguably the founder of the modern discipline of aesthetics, and one of the most important figures of the Scottish Enlightenment. This new edition brings Peter Kivy's seminal work back into print, substantially expanded by the addition of seven essays, which deal primarily with Hutcheson's relation to other thinkers, and his influence on 18thC and early 19thC aesthetics. Part I of The Seventh Sense presents a detailed analysis of Hutcheson's aesthetic theory. Part II traces the considerable influence of Hutcheson's theory up to the early years of the 19thC. Part III is a new and substantial addition to the original work, collecting Peter Kivy's essays on this topic since the first edition appeared, which deal primarily with Hutcheson, David Hume, and Thomas Reid. Philosophers of art, historians of philosophy, and historians working on 18thC European art and culture will find this new edition an invaluable resource.
books  intellectual_history  art_history  art_criticism  18thC  19thC  aesthetics  Hutcheson  Scottish_Enlightenment  Hume  Reid  EF-add 
may 2014 by dunnettreader
Bryn Mawr Classical Review (BMCR) - Home
Bryn Mawr Classical Review (BMCR) (ISSN 1055-7660) publishes timely open-access, peer-reviewed reviews of current scholarly work in the field of classical studies (including archaeology). This site is the authoritative archive of BMCR's publication, from 1990 to the present. Reviews from August 2008 on are also posted on our blog.
website  books  reviews  intellectual_history  literary_history  ancient_history  ancient_philosophy  social_history  cultural_history  economic_history  archaeology  art_history  religious_history  religious_culture  historiography  ancient_Greece  ancient_Rome  Greek_lit  Latin_lit  poetry  theater  Augustan_Rome  pre-Socratics  Plato  Socrates  Aristotle  Hellenism  Cicero  Stoicism  Epicurean  Virgil  Horace  Ovid  Roman_Empire  Roman_Republic  Roman_law 
may 2014 by dunnettreader
Robert E. Wood, review - Vittorio Hösle (ed.), The Many Faces of Beauty // Notre Dame Philosophical Reviews // Feb 2014
This work contains the conference papers from the first of three conferences at the Notre Dame Institute for Advance Study under the direction of Vittorio Hösle. The conferences were focused on what were previously known as three transcendental properties of Being: Beauty, Truth, and Goodness, respectively. The current volume contains the papers from the 2010 conference. -- The work is divided into five parts: 1. Beauty in Mathematics and Nature (four essays), 2. Beauty in the Human Mind and in Society (four essays), 3. Historicity, Interculturality, and the Ugly as Challenges of Aesthetics (three essays), 4. Beauty in the Arts (four essays: on painting, music, literature, and film), and 5. Beauty and God (one essay). Hösle devotes 18 pages to an ample introductory summary of the argument of each of the 16 papers. -- The Many Faces of Beauty provides stimulating approaches to the topic. We have a look at many different art forms and a look at beauty through history from many different perspectives. As we move into and through the twentieth century, there is a defocusing on beauty and a focus upon the sublime. Also, it is unusual to find reaction to Hegel, pro or con, appearing in several of the articles. But there is a new interest in Hegel today, especially in the circles that pronounced him dead. This work should pique that interest.
books  reviews  intellectual_history  aesthetics  beauty  sublime  Kant-aesthetics  Hegel  Neoplatonism  culture  taste  elite_culture  music  music_history  art_history  articles  EF-add 
march 2014 by dunnettreader
Sandra Shapshay, review - Emily Brady, The Sublime in Modern Philosophy: Aesthetics, Ethics, and Nature // Reviews // Notre Dame Philosophical Reviews // University of Notre Dame
Review good on cognitive dimension in Kant compared with Burke about which Shapshay has written zz In this book Emily Brady seeks to 'reassess' and 'reclaim' the concept of the sublime in order to show the continuing relevance of this aesthetic category for debates in contemporary aesthetics and environmental thought. This aim is important, and it is one with which I have great sympathy. In recent years the concept has been used, on the one hand, too liberally by postmodern philosophers who have stretched 'the sublime' beyond conceptual coherence, and, on the other hand, too little by Anglo-American philosophers who have largely forgotten this aesthetic category. ..sublime responses, especially to natural environments, are still with us today, and may be even more frequent than in former times given that "Places that were once distant and inaccessible have become much closer through adventure tourism and the like." In addition, Brady supports the claim that contemporary tastes in landscapes have not changed radically since the 18th century .... -- The book is divided into two roughly equal parts. In Part I, Brady aims to characterize the core meaning of the sublime by tracing its development from the rhetorical sublime of Longinus into a category largely of nature appreciation in the 18th century with the aesthetic theories of Addison, Gerard, Burke, and Alison (in Britain) and Mendelssohn and Kant (in Germany). In Chapter 4 she continues the narrative with subsequent developments of the category of the sublime affected by Schiller, Schopenhauer and British Romanticism. In Part II, Brady considers the relevance of this core meaning of the sublime she derives from the history of aesthetic theory for contemporary aesthetics and environmental thought, taking up the following questions. Can artworks be sublime in a non-derivative sense? What distinguishes the sublime from neighboring categories such as 'grandeur,' 'terrible beauty,' and 'wonder'? How does sublime response compare with an engagement with tragedy? And what is the relevance of the sublime for valuing the environment both aesthetically and ethically?
books  reviews  intellectual_history  21stC  aesthetics  environment  nature  sublime  art_history  art_criticism  18thC  19thC  British_history  German_Idealism  Germany  Addison  Burke  Kant-aesthetics  Schiller  Schopenhauer  Romanticism  Grand_Tour  analytical_philosophy  EF-add 
march 2014 by dunnettreader
Beauty, Art, and Darwin | Roger Sandall (2009)
Review essay of Roger Scruton, Beauty and Denis Dutton, The Art Instinct - both 2009. Very nicely done, though gets a bit cranky about the 1960s with Kristol and Bell. And he's a stitch on Scruton's fatuous attempt to turn Titian's odalesque into conjugal contentment and Manet's into a money grubbing prostitute.
books  reviews  art_history  aesthetics  evo_psych  sexuality  high_culture  Modernism  EF-add 
february 2014 by dunnettreader
Jack Selzer - Kenneth Burke among the Moderns: "Counter-Statement" as Counter Statement | JSTOR: Rhetoric Society Quarterly, Vol. 26, No. 2 (Spring, 1996), pp. 19-49
"Counter-Statement" (Burke's 1st book of essays written from mid 1920s to 1931) - by tracking the modernist elements that Burke incorporated and those he was starting to challenge, within a modernist conversation, this article looks like an quick education in literary_history and criticism from the 19thC esthetes (eg Flaubert, Pater) onwards. -- downloaded pdf to Note
article  jstor  literary_history  cultural_history  lit_crit  19thC  20thC  Burke_Kenneth  esthetes  Modernism  Symbolists  judgment-aesthetics  form-poetic  form-theory  reader_response  fiction  philosophy_of_language  poetry  art_history  art_criticism  music_history  downloaded  EF-add 
february 2014 by dunnettreader
Ronald Paulson - Versions of a Human Sublime - Discussion article for issue: The Sublime and the Beautiful: Reconsiderations | JSTOR: New Literary History, Vol. 16, No. 2 (Winter, 1985), pp. 427-437
(1) From the Sublime to the Political: Some Historical Notes (pp. 213-235) Gary Shapiro. *--* (2) Sociology and the Sublime (pp. 237-249) Judith Huggins Balfe. *--* (3) Plato's Performative Sublime and the Ends of Reading (pp. 251-273) Charles Altieri. *--* (4) Longinus and the Subject of the Sublime (pp. 275-289) Suzanne Guerlac. *--* (5) A Commentary on Suzanne Guerlac's "Longinus and the Subject of the Sublime"(pp. 291-297) Frances Ferguson. *--* (6) Gothic Sublimity (pp. 299-319) David B. Morris. *--* (7) A Grammar of the Sublime, or Intertextuality Triumphant in Church, Turner, and Cole (pp. 321-341) Bryan J. Wolf. *--* (8) Sublime or Ridiculous? Turner and the Problem of the Historical Figure (pp. 343-376) Andrew Wilton. *--* (9) Seascapes of the Sublime: Vernet, Monet, and the Oceanic Feeling (pp. 377-400) Steven Z. Levine. *--* (10) Declensions: D'Annunzio after the Sublime (pp. 401-415) Paolo Valesio and Marilyn Migiel. *--* (11) Fresh Frozen Fenix Random Notes on the Sublime, the Beautiful, and the Ugly in the Postmodern Era (pp. 417-425) Nathaniel Tarn -- downloaded pdf to Note
journal  article  jstor  literary_history  lit_crit  intellectual_history  aesthetics  sublime  antiquity  Longinus  Plato  Plato-poetry  18thC  Gothic-fiction  painting  art_history  art_criticism  20thC  Modernism  avant_guard  postmodern  political_philosophy  downloaded  EF-add 
february 2014 by dunnettreader
Transcendental Aesthetics: The Language of Sense (Chapter 2) - Paul L. Sawyer - Ruskin's Poetic Argument: The Design of the Major Works (1985) | Victorian Web
Focus on Ruskin's first major work, defending Turner. Discusses Ruskin's mode of seeing landscape (Ruskinian sublime), starting with gestalt, then intense attention to detail and connections among them, with third stage the whole again but now informed by the energy in which the details create a whole that is a moment, extended by viewing, of divine nature. Distinguishes a Lockean empiricism that's limited to subject v object and extension by association with a more Aristotelian perception that grasps essences from surface particulars. The sort of hermeneutic circle from whole to parts to transformed whole breaks down a bunch of dualisms. Ruskin rejected the sublime as a useful aesthetic concept - confusion re whether experience of observer or character or feature of the object. Similarly imagination and artistic creativity weren't separately theorized by Ruskin.
books  etexts  19thC  Ruskin  aesthetics  art_history  art_criticism  English_lit  perception  painting  Turner  neoclassical  empiricism  imagination  sublime  Coleridge  Wordsworth 
january 2014 by dunnettreader
Paul L. Sawyer - Ruskin's Poetic Argument: The Design of the Major Works [Preface] | Victorian Web
1985 book, etext on Victorian Web -- this is 1st web page, the Preface
Contents --
Part I: Transcendental Aesthetics
Chapter 1. The Golden Waters
Chapter 2. The Language of Sense
Introduction
Sermons in Paint
Painting in Words

Chapter 3. The Lamp of Power
Introduction
Romantic Italy
"The Soul's Metropolis"

Part II: The Legend of Time

Chapter 4. The Lamp of Love
The Golden Waters
The Mother of Beauty
The Meaning of Architecture

Chapter 5. "Paradise of Cities"
The Plan: History as Typology
History as Nostalgia
The Burning Legends
The Anatomy of Alienation
The Legacy

Chapter 6. The Natural History of the Imagination
The Legend of Time: The Natural History of the Imagination
Poetry: A "Feeling for Reality"
Prophecy and Religion: The Ages of Landscape
Of Mountain Beauty: The Modern Grotesque

Part III: Wealth and Life

Chapter 7. The Economy of Beauty
Wealth and Life: The Economy of Beauty
The Economy of Art
The Organic Body
Treasure
Turner and Veronese

Chapter 8. The Economy of Life
Wealth and Life: The Economy of Beauty
The Prophecy against Mammon
Loving and Owing
The Apotheosis of Justice
The Light of the Body

Part IV: The Structure of Myth

Chapter 9. The Currency of Meaning
At the Middle of the Road
Coins and Words

Chapter 10. The Goddess and the child
The Looking-Glass World
The Firmament of Mind

Part V: Works and Days

Chapter 11. Olympian Lightning
Myth and Science
"Lifeless Seed of Life"
Serpent and Grotesque

Chapter 12. "Ruskin's Apocalypse"

Chapter 13.Time Present and Time Past
books  etexts  lit_crit  literary_history  English_lit  historiography-19thC  Ruskin  art_history  art_criticism  architecture  Gothic_revival  cultural_history  Victorian  Venice  Industrial_Revolution  cultural_critique  poetry  Italy  Romanticism  Coleridge  Carlyle  EF-add 
january 2014 by dunnettreader
Jonathan G. W. Conlin - High Art and Low Politics: A New Perspective on John Wilkes | JSTOR: Huntington Library Quarterly, Vol. 64, No. 3/4 (2001), pp. 356-381
Fascinating for mid to late 18thC issues for both Continental Enlightenment and British thinkers and artists re scope of public sphere and state responsibility for promotion of the arts, its benefits for polite culture including middle classes with polite aspirations -- Wilkes connections with philosophes including Holbach and Diderot -- and how Wilkes wove his political reforms and promotion of arts and industry together. Useful discussion of range of historian takes on Wilkes, who he mobilized, relation with older republican opposition and later dissenters and radical opposition. Hume opposition to Wilkes' anti monarchy and anti aristocracy republicanism leads to different assessment of progress in civilizing arts and role of doux commerce. Each historian seems to put Wilkes in their own narrative resulting in dramatically different assessments of both Wilkes himself and his impact. -- useful references -- Downloaded pdf to Note
article  jstor  political_history  cultural_history  art_history  18thC  French_Enlightenment  British_history  British_politics  George_III  Wilkes  Hume  Diderot  d'Holbach  republics-Ancient_v_Modern  republicanism  opposition  public_sphere  public_opinion  governing_class  political_nation  political_culture  accountability  Parliament  franchise  Septennial_Act  nationalism  national_ID  xenophobia  anti-monarchy  anti-aristocracy  middle_class  merchants  state-roles  Grand_Tour  patriotism  Prussia  Frederick_the_Great  Catherine_the_Great  Walpole  Walpole_Horace  museums  academies  bibliography  enlightened_absolutism  downloaded  EF-add 
january 2014 by dunnettreader
Jeffrey Collins, review essay - Style and Society: Painting in Eighteenth-Century France | JSTOR: Eighteenth-Century Studies, Vol. 41, No. 4 (Summer, 2008), pp. 568-574
Review of (1) Greuze and the Painting of Sentiment by Emma Barker; (2) Nicolas Lancret: Dance before a Fountain by Mary Tavener Holmes and Mark Leonard; (3) Making Up the Rococo: François Boucher and His Critics by Melissa Hyde; (4) Fragonard's Playful Paintings: Visual Games in Rococo Art by Jennifer Milam -- quite interesting on a collection of studies, each of which puts the painter, works, patrons and reception in context of social trends, French literature, Enlightenment philosophy, aesthetics, and political issues. The Fragonard book looks especially delicious. The Barker book addresses "sentiment" with its moral connotations, rather than "sentimentality". The Lancret book deals with initially 1720s and connection with Watteau, fête galant etc. The Boucher book deals with his gender bending and connections with court and salon sociability as well as criticism reflecting anxiety re effeminate luxury etc. -- didn't download paper
books  reviews  jstor  cultural_history  art_history  art_criticism  aesthetics  France  18thC  French_Enlightenment  gender  luxury  charity  aristocracy  court_culture  EF-add 
january 2014 by dunnettreader
Peter Burke: Images as Evidence in Seventeenth-Century Europe | JSTOR: Journal of the History of Ideas, Vol. 64, No. 2 (Apr., 2003), pp. 273-296
Deals with the transition from antiquarianism to archaeology and debates over use of material remains as historical evidence. Builds on work of Momigliano and Haskell (History and its images - bookshelf? ) -- downloaded pdf to Note
article  jstor  intellectual_history  historiography  17thC  antiquaries  archaeology  epistemology  art_history  evidence  antiquity  ancient_Rome  ancient_history  ancient_religions  Early_Christian  Egypt  downloaded  EF-add 
december 2013 by dunnettreader
Laurie Nussdorfer, review essay on 2 books dealing with new cultural history - JSTOR: History and Theory, Vol. 32, No. 1 (Feb., 1993), pp. 74-83
The New Cultural History by Lynn Hunt; Interpretation and Cultural History by Joan H. Pittock; Andrew Wear
Review by: Laurie Nussdorfer -- didn't download paper
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december 2013 by dunnettreader
Review essay: Lawrence E. Klein: (18thC) Time of Progress? (1992)
JSTOR: Journal of British Studies, Vol. 31, No. 3 (Jul., 1992), pp. 294-300 -- Works reviewed: mainly a comparison of two approaches to intellectual and cultural history (1) non-contextual "history of ideas" in The Idea of Progress in Eighteenth-Century Britainby David Spadafora; and (2) contextual, self-fashioning réflexive practice in Breaking and Remaking: Aesthetic Practice in England, 1700-1820 by Ronald Paulson. Klein sees (1) as missing what was really going on in 18thC, and Pauldon's focus on iconoclasm is surely too narrow a view for 18thC compexity. Totalizing theories of analytical categories don't work. ---- also Life in the Georgian City by Dan Cruickshank; Neil Burton; (lots of architecture and building practices, mostly Georgian single-famiky & covered in prior Cruickshank books) --**-- Corruption and Progress: The Eighteenth-Century Debate by Malcolm R. Jack (dreadful)
books  reviews  intellectual_history  cultural_history  Britain  18thC  English_lit  progress  Pope  Swift  art_history  Hogarth  aesthetics  patronage  EF-add 
september 2013 by dunnettreader
Review by: William J. Bouwsma: The Civilization of Europe in the Renaissance by John Hale (1996)
JSTOR: The American Historical Review, Vol. 101, No. 1 (Feb., 1996), p. 172 -- wonderful in richness of detail but stuck in Burkhardt view. Also misses precursors in late medieval nominalism, rhetoric. Leaves out religious reform.
books  bookshelf  reviews  historiography  Renaissance  15thC  16thC  17thC  Italy  art_history  cultural_history 
september 2013 by dunnettreader
Kevin Sharpe: Rebranding Rule: 1660-1720 | Kindle Store
In the climactic part of his three-book series exploring the importance of public image in the Tudor and Stuart monarchies, Kevin Sharpe employs a remarkable interdisciplinary approach that draws on literary studies and art history as well as political, cultural, and social history to show how this preoccupation with public representation met the challenge of dealing with the aftermath of Cromwell's interregnum and Charles II's restoration, and how the irrevocably changed cultural landscape was navigated by the sometimes astute yet equally fallible Stuart monarchs and their successors.
books  British_history  British_politics  cultural_history  religious_history  monarchy  Charles_II  James_II  William_III  Queen_Anne  George_I  Restoration  Exclusion_Crisis  Glorious_Revolution  War_of_Spanish_Succession  Hanoverian_Succession  aristocracy  Parliament  political_economy  political_culture  art_history  English_lit  Whigs  Whig_Junto  Tories  colonialism  IR  EF-add  English_constitution 
july 2013 by dunnettreader

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