dunnettreader + antiquity   32

Pausanias - Description of Greece: A Pausanias Reader in Progress | Center for Hellenic Studies @ Harvard
Translation of W. H. S. Jones, 1918 (Scroll II with H. A. Ormerod) Edited and Revised by Gregory Nagy (as of 2015.02.15)
antiquity  ancient_Greece  geography  Roman_Empire  Pausanias  etexts  Greek_lit 
november 2016 by dunnettreader
Philip Connell - British Identities and the Politics of Ancient Poetry in Later 18thC England (2006) | The Historical Journal on JSTOR
The Historical Journal, Vol. 49, No. 1 (Mar., 2006), pp. 161-192 - This article examines the scholarly recovery and popular reception of 'ancient poetry' in later eighteenth-century England, with a view to elucidating the relationship between cultural primitivism and more overtly politicized discourses of national identity. The publication of the poems of Ossian, in the early 1760s, gave a new prominence to the earliest cultural productions of Celtic antiquity, and inspired the attempts of English literary historians, such as Thomas Percy and Thomas Warton, to provide an alternative 'Gothic' genealogy for the English literary imagination. However, both the English reception of Ossian, and the Gothicist scholarship of Percy and Warton, were complicated by the growing strength of English radical patriotism. As popular political discourse assumed an increasingly insular preoccupation with Saxon liberties and ancient constitutional rights, more conservative literary historians found their own attempts to ground English poetic tradition in some form of Gothic inheritance progressively compromised. The persistence of ancient constitutionalism as a divisive element of English political argument thus curtailed the ability of Gothicist literary scholarship to function as an effective vehicle for English cultural patriotism.
article  jstor  18thC  English_lit  literary_history  British_history  British_politics  politics-and-literature  political_culture  political_discourse  Gothic  ancient_constitution  liberty  radicals  conservatism  antiquity  antiquaries  history_of_England  popular_culture  high_culture  downloaded 
july 2016 by dunnettreader
Matthew Sharpe - Reading Camus’ Noces via their reception of the Eleusinian mysteries (2016) - Classical Receptions Journal
‘In joy we prepare our lessons’: reading Camus’ Noces via their reception of the Eleusinian mysteries -- Dr Matthew Sharpe teaches philosophy at Deakin University. He is interested in philosophy as a way of life, the history of the reception of classical thought in modernity, and is the author of Camus, Philosophe (Brill, 2015).
Nobel Prize winning author Albert Camus situates his meditations in both the opening and closing essays in his 1937 collection Noces by referring to the classical Eleusinian mysteries centring around the myths of Dionysus and the goddesses Demeter and Persephone. Noces’ closing piece ‘The Desert’ directly evokes the two levels of initiation involved in the classical Eleusinian cult in a way which prompts us to reframe the preceding essays beginning at Tipasa as akin to a single, initiatory trajectory. The kind of ‘love of life’ the opening ‘Nuptials at Tipasa’ had so marvellously celebrated, we are now informed, is not sufficient by itself. The entire round of these four essays, whose framing suggest four seasons (Spring in Tipasa, Summer at Algiers, then Autumn in Florence), are intended by Camus to enact just what the title, Noces, suggests in the context of the mysteries: namely, that hieros gamos or sacred union of man with nature or the gods at the heart of the ancient cults, tied very closely at Eleusis with reverence for the fecundity of nature, reborn each year with the return of Persephone from Hades to her grieving mother Demeter.
article  paywall  classical_reception  reception_history  antiquity  religious_history  mystery_religions  existentialism  French_lit  20thC  entre_deux_guerres  Camus  myth  ancient_Greece 
july 2016 by dunnettreader
Aude Doody - Pliny's "Natural History: Enkuklios Paideia" and the Ancient Encyclopedia | JSTOR - Journal of the History of Ideas (Jan 2009)
Journal of the History of Ideas, Vol. 70, No. 1 (Jan., 2009), pp. 1-21 -- interesting re expectations when use encyclopedia to think about the work - comparisons with other "desire for universal knowledge" authors, compilers etc -- didn't download
article  jstor  intellectual_history  antiquity  genre  encyclopedia  ancient_Greece  ancient_Rome  Hellenism  Greek_lit  Latin_lit  natural_philosophy  natural_history  philosophy_of_science  epistemology  Pliny_the_Elder  Varro 
january 2016 by dunnettreader
Alison V. Scott, review - Joan Coutu, Then and Now: Collecting and Classicism in Eighteenth-Century England. | H-Albion, H-Net Reviews. January, 2016
Focusing on four significant collections of classical sculpture begun in the middle of the 18thC, Then and Now: Collecting and Classicism in Eighteenth-Century England offers a detailed examination of the socio-politics of classical sculpture collecting in eighteenth-century Britain, in the context of shifting ideas about the nature of the English gentleman and his relation to connoisseurship and politics. Joan Coutu argues convincingly for the multilayered and important distinctiveness of the mid-century collections she takes as case studies in this book. On the one hand, they were clearly not “identity-driven and philologically based” in the manner of early 18thC collections, nor did they collapse the temporal distance with the classical world as earlier collections did (p. 7). On the other hand, however, they differed markedly from the famous collections assembled by the likes of Charles Townley, Henry Blundell, and William Petty, 2nd Earl of Shelburne, in the later 18thC. Those tended to emphasize the authentic original and gathered “objects to be admired as samples of another time and another place” in contrast to the mid-century collections that Coutu shows to have functioned as exemplum, “a visible anchor of the classical erudition of the English patriciate” which was actively intended to encourage public virtue in other men -- downloaded pdf to Note
books  reviews  cultural_history  18thC  British_history  gentleman  virtue  classicism  collections  antiquity  antiquaries  elite_culture  history_as_examples  downloaded 
january 2016 by dunnettreader
Pier Giovanni Guzzo - Pompéi italique et sa structuration urbaine - Techniques et économies de la Méditerranée antique - Collège de France - 24 novembre 2014
Pier Giovanni Guzzo -- Professeur, ancien surintendant de l'archéologie de l'Emilie-Romagne de la Calabre, de Pompéi et de Naples, Membre du conseil de direction de l'Istituto Nazionale di Archeologia e Storia dell'Arte -- 24 novembre 2014 16:00 -- Conférencier invité -- Salle 2 - Marcelin Berthelot
video  lecture  Collège_deFrance  archaeology  ancient_Rome  Pompeii  economic_history  urbanization  Mediterranean  ancient_history  antiquity  antiquity-economics  historical_sociology 
august 2015 by dunnettreader
Jew and Judean: A Forum on Politics and Historiography in the Translation of Ancient Texts - Forum ebook | The Marginalia Review of Books [LA Review of Books] August 2014
Have scholars erased the Jews from Antiquity? -- Adele Reinhartz’s essay in MRB on June 24 set off a vibrant discussion in the comments section and in the MRB editors’ inboxes. The range of responses to the piece dotted the spectrum from full support to indignation, proving that a sizable readership wanted to debate these ideas further. The forum is released today only two months after the Reinhartz essay thanks to the good will and the efficiency of the participants. The essays, beginning with Reinhartz’s original piece and concluding with her response to the collection, investigate the political and historiographical considerations involved in the translation of ancient texts, in particular how modern translators and historians ought to deal with the translation of the Greek word ioudaios (Ἰουδαῖος). -- Along with the forum, MRB is excited to release an e-book version of the discussion free for our readers. -- downloaded pdf to Note
ebooks  religious_history  philology  antiquity  ancient_religions  ancient_Israel  ancient_Greece  ancient_Rome  Hellenism  Judaism  Judaism-2nf_Temple  national_ID  religious_culture  translation  Greek_lit  koine  sociology_of_religion  politics-and-religion  religious_lit  downloaded 
june 2015 by dunnettreader
Marc Fumaroli -- Le siècle des Lumières et la naissance du "néoclassicisme" | Canal Académie 2011
Interview (mp3) and article by Canal summarizing points he makes in his introductory essay for the exhibition catalog -- Marc Fumaroli intervient ici sur l’exposition "L’Antiquité rêvée: Innovations et résistances au XVIIIe siècle" qui se tient au musée du Louvre du 2 décembre 2010 au 14 février 2011. Elle illustre à travers un choix de plus de 150 œuvres majeures, la naissance du mouvement dit « néoclassique ». Ce retour à l’Antique fut principalement inspiré par la découverte et le retentissement des fouilles des cités antiques d’Herculanum et de Pompeï. Elles révélèrent à la fois la peinture antique et son contexte, le décor et le quotidien de la vie urbaine des anciens Romains. Nous suivons ainsi les grandes périodes correspondant aux trois principales sections de l’exposition du musée du Louvre, à savoir: I – Le RENOUVEAU du goût pour l’Antique 1730-1770 **--** II – RESISTANCES 1760-1790: Néobaroque – Néomaniérisme – Le Sublime **--** III – NEOCLASSICISMES 1770-1790. Avec, dans chaque section, beaucoup de courants et contre-courants. -- web page to Pocket, includes references to the catalog and related publications
intellectual_history  art_history  aesthetics  Renaissance  17thC  18thC  Ancients_v_Moderns  classicism  neoclassical  baroque  Rococo  painting  sculpture  Republic_of_Letters  Enlightenment  antiquity  ancient_Greece  ancient_Rome  archaeology  Pompeii  sublime  Winkleman  cultural_history  historiography-18thC  lifestyle  decorative_arts  books  museums  exhibition  audio  Pocket 
april 2015 by dunnettreader
Rebecca Walkowitz — Translating the Untranslatable: An Interview with Barbara Cassin | Public Books July 2014
The US version was published earlier this year ... Edited by Emily Apter, Jacques Lezra, and Michael Wood, the 1,300-page Dictionary retains the original introduction, most of the entries, and an orientation toward Europe, but it has also been adjusted and supplemented for US audiences. Apter’s robust preface documents the enormous complexity and scale involved in translating intraduisibles. One of the most provocative and important contributions of the Vocabulaire is its insistence that philosophical concepts, often assumed to be transhistorical and universal, in fact have a history in languages. The editions, adaptations, and translations of the project are important too, however, because they show that philosophical concepts have a history in books as well. The Vocabulaire may be a multilingual project, whose entries collate and compare terms in more than a dozen languages, but the editions are not all multilingual in the same way and for the same reasons. Whereas the Ukrainian editors sought to expand the vocabulary and prestige of their language, their US counterparts were more concerned to acknowledge and mitigate Anglophone dominance. The books are different structurally and economically as well as linguistically. The Ukrainian and Arabic editions have appeared only in parts, while the US edition appears as a whole. In tongues with fewer readers and fewer resources, publishing one part helps to fund a subsequent part. That kind of funding is not necessary for most books published in English. -- Pocket
interview  books  kindle-available  intellectual_history  cultural_history  language-history  language  translation  philosophy  antiquity  publishing  language-national  concepts-change  Pocket 
january 2015 by dunnettreader
Dan Edelstein, ed. - The Super-Enlightenment: Daring to Know Too Much | Voltaire Foundation -Jan 2010
Historians of 18thC thought have implied a clear distinction between mystical or occult writing, often termed ‘illuminist’, and better-known forms of Enlightenment thinking and culture. But where are the boundaries of ‘enlightened’ human understanding? (..the.) contributors (..) put forward a completely new way of configuring these seemingly antithetical currents of thought, and identify a grey area that binds the two, a ‘Super-Enlightenment’. (..) exploring the social, religious, artistic, political and scientific dimensions of the Super-Enlightenment, contributors demonstrate the co-existence of apparent opposites: the enlightened and the esoteric, empiricism and imagination, history and myth, the secretive and the public, mysticism and science. The Enlightenment can no longer be seen as a sturdy, homogeneous movement defined by certain core beliefs, but one which oscillates between opposing poles in its social practices, historiography and even its epistemology: between daring to know, and daring to know too much. ** Dan Edelstein, Introduction to the Super-Enlightenment -- I. What limits of understanding? ** Peter Reill, The hermetic imagination in the high and late Enlightenment ** David Bates, Super-epistemology ** Jessica Riskin, Mr Machine and the imperial me -- II. The arts of knowing ** Liana Vardi, Physiocratic visions ** Anthony Vidler, For the love of architecture: Claude-Nicolas Ledoux and the Hypnerotomachia ** Fabienne Moore, The poetry of the Super-Enlightenment: the theories and practices of Cazotte, Chassaignon, Mercier, Saint-Martin and Bonneville -- III. Sacred societies ** Natalie Bayer, What do you seek from us? Wisdom? Virtue? Enlightenment? Inventing a Masonic science of man in Russia ** Kris Pangburn, Bonnet’s theory of palingenesis: an ‘Enlightened’ account of personal resurrection? ** Dan Edelstein, The Egyptian French Revolution: antiquarianism, Freemasonry and the mythology of nature ** Tili Boon Cuillé, From myth to religion in Ossian’s France
books  intellectual_history  cultural_history  18thC  Enlightenment  French_Enlightenment  hermeticism  Freemasonry  antiquaries  epistemology  ancient_religions  ancient_Egypt  occult  immortality  myth  religion  comparative_religion  French_lit  poetics  Russia  Physiocrats  laws_of_nature  La_Mettrie  noble_savage  national_origins  antiquity  historiography-18thC 
january 2015 by dunnettreader
John Emerich Edward Dalberg, Lord Acton, The History of Freedom and Other Essays, ed. John Neville Figgis and Reginald Vere Laurence (London: Macmillan, 1907). - Online Library of Liberty
Acton never completed his projected History of Liberty. We do have however several collections of his writings such as this one which contains 2 chapters from this planned history – on liberty in antiquity and Christianity – and many book reviews where one can piece together Acton’s approach to the writing of such a history. This volume consists of articles reprinted from the following journals: The Quarterly Review, The English Historical Review, The Nineteenth Century, The Rambler, The Home and Foreign Review, The North British Review, The Bridgnorth Journal. *--* CHRONICLE. *-* INTRODUCTION. *-* I: THE HISTORY OF FREEDOM IN ANTIQUITY. *-* II: THE HISTORY OF FREEDOM IN CHRISTIANITY. *-* III: SIR ERSKINE MAY’S DEMOCRACY IN EUROPE. *-* IV: THE MASSACRE OF ST. BARTHOLOMEW. *-* V: THE PROTESTANT THEORY OF PERSECUTION *-* VI: POLITICAL THOUGHTS ON THE CHURCH. *-* VII: INTRODUCTION TO L. A. BURD’S EDITION OF IL PRINCIPE BY MACHIAVELLI. *-* VIII: MR. GOLDWIN SMITH’S IRISH HISTORY. *-* IX: NATIONALITY. *-* X: DÖLLINGER ON THE TEMPORAL POWER. *-* XI: DÖLLINGER’S HISTORICAL WORK. *-* XII: CARDINAL WISEMAN AND THE HOME AND FOREIGN REVIEW. *'* XIII: CONFLICTS WITH ROME. *-* XIV: THE VATICAN COUNCIL. *-* XV: A HISTORY OF THE INQUISITION OF THE MIDDLE AGES. By Henry Charles Lea. *-* XVI: THE AMERICAN COMMONWEALTH. By James Bryce. *-* XVII: HISTORICAL PHILOSOPHY IN FRANCE AND FRENCH BELGIUM AND SWITZERLAND. By Robert Flint. -- downloaded kindle version of html
books  etexts  Liberty_Fund  downloaded  intellectual_history  historiography  political_philosophy  political_history  political_culture  liberty  Christianity  Christendom  antiquity  ancient_Greece  ancient_Rome  ancient_history  democracy  Reformation  persecution  Counter-Reformation  Inquisition  Wars_of_Religion  Bartholomew_Day_massacre  Huguenots  Protestants  national_ID  nationalism  Machiavelli  historiography-19thC  US_constitution  US_government  US_politics 
september 2014 by dunnettreader
NADIA URBINATI - Competing for Liberty: The Republican Critique of Democracy | JSTOR: The American Political Science Review, Vol. 106, No. 3 (August 2012), pp. 607-621
Freedom as non-domination has acquired a leading status in political science. As a consequence of its success, neo-roman republicanism also has achieved great prominence as the political tradition that delivered it. Yet despite the fact that liberty in the Roman mode was forged not only in direct confrontation with monarchy but against democracy as well, the relationship of republicanism to democracy is the great absentee in the contemporary debate on non-domination. This article brings that relationship back into view in both historical and conceptual terms. It illustrates the misrepresentations of democracy in the Roman tradition and shows how these undergirded the theory of liberty as non-domination as a counter to politial equality as a claim to taking part in imperium. In so doing it brings to the fore the "liberty side" of democratic citizenship as the equal rights of all citizens to exercise their political rights, in direct or indirect form. -- see bibliography on jstor information page -- paywall Cambridge
article  jstor  intellectual_history  political_philosophy  political_history  antiquity  ancient_Greece  ancient_Rome  Roman_Republic  republicanism  democracy  citizens  domination  political_participation  concepts-change  neo-republicanism  Europe-Early_Modern  17thC  18thC  Harrington  Sidney  commonwealth  common_good  representative_institutions  liberty-positive  liberty  bibliography  EF-add 
february 2014 by dunnettreader
James Hankins - Exclusivist Republicanism and the Non-Monarchical Republic | JSTOR: Political Theory, Vol. 38, No. 4 (August 2010), pp. 452-482
The idea that a republic is the only legitimate form of government and that non-elective monarchy and hereditary political privileges are by definition illegitimate is an artifact of late eighteenth century republicanism, though it has roots in the "godly republics" of the seventeenth century. It presupposes understanding a republic (respublica) to be a non-monarchical form of government. The latter definition is a discursive practice that goes back only to the fifteenth century and is not found in Roman or medieval sources. This article explains how the definition emerged in Renaissance Italy. -- downloaded pdf to Note
article  jstor  intellectual_history  political_philosophy  political_history  political_culture  antiquity  Roman_Empire  Roman_Republic  concepts-change  Renaissance  15thC  16thC  17thC  18thC  English_Civil_War  French_Revolution  American_Revolution  republicanism  republics-Ancient_v_Modern  city_states  monarchy  limited_monarchy  Absolutism  Old_Testament  downloaded  EF-add 
february 2014 by dunnettreader
Ronald Paulson - Versions of a Human Sublime - Discussion article for issue: The Sublime and the Beautiful: Reconsiderations | JSTOR: New Literary History, Vol. 16, No. 2 (Winter, 1985), pp. 427-437
(1) From the Sublime to the Political: Some Historical Notes (pp. 213-235) Gary Shapiro. *--* (2) Sociology and the Sublime (pp. 237-249) Judith Huggins Balfe. *--* (3) Plato's Performative Sublime and the Ends of Reading (pp. 251-273) Charles Altieri. *--* (4) Longinus and the Subject of the Sublime (pp. 275-289) Suzanne Guerlac. *--* (5) A Commentary on Suzanne Guerlac's "Longinus and the Subject of the Sublime"(pp. 291-297) Frances Ferguson. *--* (6) Gothic Sublimity (pp. 299-319) David B. Morris. *--* (7) A Grammar of the Sublime, or Intertextuality Triumphant in Church, Turner, and Cole (pp. 321-341) Bryan J. Wolf. *--* (8) Sublime or Ridiculous? Turner and the Problem of the Historical Figure (pp. 343-376) Andrew Wilton. *--* (9) Seascapes of the Sublime: Vernet, Monet, and the Oceanic Feeling (pp. 377-400) Steven Z. Levine. *--* (10) Declensions: D'Annunzio after the Sublime (pp. 401-415) Paolo Valesio and Marilyn Migiel. *--* (11) Fresh Frozen Fenix Random Notes on the Sublime, the Beautiful, and the Ugly in the Postmodern Era (pp. 417-425) Nathaniel Tarn -- downloaded pdf to Note
journal  article  jstor  literary_history  lit_crit  intellectual_history  aesthetics  sublime  antiquity  Longinus  Plato  Plato-poetry  18thC  Gothic-fiction  painting  art_history  art_criticism  20thC  Modernism  avant_guard  postmodern  political_philosophy  downloaded  EF-add 
february 2014 by dunnettreader
Peter Burke: Images as Evidence in Seventeenth-Century Europe | JSTOR: Journal of the History of Ideas, Vol. 64, No. 2 (Apr., 2003), pp. 273-296
Deals with the transition from antiquarianism to archaeology and debates over use of material remains as historical evidence. Builds on work of Momigliano and Haskell (History and its images - bookshelf? ) -- downloaded pdf to Note
article  jstor  intellectual_history  historiography  17thC  antiquaries  archaeology  epistemology  art_history  evidence  antiquity  ancient_Rome  ancient_history  ancient_religions  Early_Christian  Egypt  downloaded  EF-add 
december 2013 by dunnettreader
Dan Edelstein: Humanism, l’Esprit Philosophique, and the Encyclopédie | Republics of Letters: A Journal for the Study of Knowledge, Politics, and the Arts
Citation: Edelstein, Dan. “Humanism, l’Esprit Philosophique, and the Encyclopédie.”Republics of Letters: A Journal for the Study of Knowledge, Politics, and the Arts 1, no. 1 (May 1, 2009): http://rofl.stanford.edu/node/27. -- In "Rethinking the Republic of Letters" issue -- downloaded pdf to Note -- also downloaded attachments (1) Edelstein-Appendix1_citation_index.xls (2) Edelstein-Appendix2_discarded_names.xls (3) Edelstein- Appendix3_Etat_de_Nature_comparison_with_Locke.pdf -- Humanism, in this interpretation, no longer appears in opposition to the Enlightenment, but can be seen to lie at the heart of the philosophical project to diffuse knowledge and “change the common way of thinking.” The classification, extraction, and compilation of texts and ideas had indeed been elevated to an art form, if not a science, by early-modern scholars; their techniques could now serve the philosophical good of disseminating “general Enlightenment [lumières générales].” This important role, however, remained a fairly invisible one, given that a collège education had made humanist practices almost second nature for Enlightenment scholars. In fact, they often did not even seem aware of their debt to the past: 
article  intellectual_history  Enlightenment  French_Enlightenment  16thC  17thC  18thC  humanism  érudits  scholarship  reading  philosophes  Encyclopédie  Diderot  Voltaire  Montesquieu  Republic_of_Letters  ancient_philosophy  antiquity  belles-lettres  French_lit  historiography  Locke  downloaded 
september 2013 by dunnettreader
[no title]
JSTOR: Revue d'Histoire littéraire de la France, 93e Année, No. 5 (Sep. - Oct., 1993), pp. 702-716 -- Diderot issue from roundtable on Neveu de Rameau and Paradoxe sur le comédien downloaded pdf to Note -- Le Paradoxe sur le comédien de Diderot n'est pas une creatio ex nihilo. C'est une variation nouvelle sur un vieux topos de la doctrine rhétorique, Natura et Ars, Ingénium et Judicium, qui concerne l'orator en tant qu'actor aussi bien que l'interprétation du comédien. Diderot renouvelle le topos en introduisant, à la place de la traditionnelle conciliation entre natura et ars, ingenium et judicium, la distinction post-cartésienne moderne entre l'ego rationnel transcendantal et le moi subjectif, ce qui constitue une extension à l'art du comédien de la rhétorique rationaliste des Lumières. Mais la conception cicéronienne traditionnelle est encore bien vivante au XVII e siècle en France. Elle a été réaffirmée avec élégance par Rémond de Saint-Albine dans Le Comédien (1747), ouvrage qui a connu un long et vaste succès en Europe, et dont la doctrine peut être considérée comme l'équivalent "rocaille" de L'Art de l'acteur de Stanislavski. Cet article analyse le contenu de ce livre important et méconnu en opposition avec les théories de Diderot.
article  jstor  theater  actors  rhetoric  antiquity  Cicero  Quintillian  18thC  French_Enlightenment  Cartesian  self  sensibility  mind-body  downloaded  EF-add 
september 2013 by dunnettreader
Kristoffer Neville: Gothicism and Early Modern Historical Ethnography (2009)
JSTOR: Journal of the History of Ideas, Vol. 70, No. 2 (Apr., 2009), pp. 213-234 -- downloaded pdf to Note -- lots of useful references to the historical claims to Biblical origins of different cultural or ethnic groups from 15thC through 17thC - often on basis of resemblance between contemporary place names and ancient references to barbarian groups
article  jstor  historiography  Bible-as-history  ethnography  language  etymology  15thC  16thC  17thC  Sweden  Germany  Holy_Roman_Empire  Habsburgs  genealogy  Netherlands  antiquity  Tacitus  bibliography  downloaded  EF-add 
august 2013 by dunnettreader
Kari Saastamoinen - Pufendorf on Natural Equality, Human Dignity, and Self-Esteem (2010)
Project MUSE - Kari Saastamoinen. "Pufendorf on Natural Equality, Human Dignity, and Self-Esteem."Journal of the History of Ideas 71.1 (2010): 39-62. Project MUSE. Web. 28 Aug. 2013. <http://muse.jhu.edu/>. ?...Downloaded pdf to Note - also available in html. ?... It is often maintained that Samuel Pufendorf founded natural equality on human dignity. This article partly questions this interpretation, maintaining that the dignity Pufendorf attributed to human nature did not indicate the Kantian idea of absolute and incomparable worth but only superiority in relation to other animals. This comparative dignity of humanity implied that all humans are equally obliged to obey natural law, but it did not offer a foundation for the similarity of their innate duties. The latter followed from the fundamental principle of natural law, the duty to maintain sociality, and from observations concerning human self-esteem.

?.... useful links to discussion of other 17thC and 18thC authors as well as centrality of Cicero in working through modern version of rights and duties.
article  Project_MUSE  antiquity  17thC  18thC  intellectual_history  moral_philosophy  political_philosophy  natural_law  natural_rights  equality  obligation  Cicero  Pufendorf  Locke  sociability  self-love  emulation  dignity  downloaded  EF-add 
august 2013 by dunnettreader
Peter Stacey: The Sovereign Person in Senecan Political Theory | Republics of Letters (Stanford): 2011
Citation: Stacey, Peter. “The Sovereign Person in Senecan Political Theory.” Republics of Letters: A Journal for the Study of Knowledge, Politics, and the Arts 2, no. 2 (June 1, 2011): http://rofl.stanford.edu/node/98......Downloaded pdf to Note.......

After observing how the allegorical terms of the relationship between the prince andFortuna are established in resoundingly Senecan terms in Petrarch’s moral and political thought, I turn to investigate how the account subsequently becomes even more embroidered by Florentine humanists....... One aspect of Machiavelli’s assault on the prevailing contentions of the ideology of the Renaissance prince is a systematic and highly subversive reorganization of a set of concepts with which it had become conventional to map out the terms of that relationship. An integral part of this work is the brilliant reconfiguration of the Petrarchan—and ultimately Senecan—imagery with which the traditional relationship had been portrayed;
article  political_philosophy  intellectual_history  antiquity  Roman_Empire  Roman_law  Seneca  Stoicism  mirror_for_princes  Italy  Renaissance  Petrarch  humanism  Machiavelli  Bodin  sovereignty  15thC  16thC  downloaded  EF-add 
august 2013 by dunnettreader

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