dunnettreader + anglo-irish_constitution + national_id   3

Neil Davidson - The Origins Of Scottish Nationhood (Pluto Critical History Series) (2000) 144 pages | pbk (9780745316086): : Books amazon.com
The traditional view of the Scottish nation holds that it first arose during the Wars of Independence from England in the 13thC & 14thC. Although Scotland was absorbed into Britain in 1707, Scottish identity is supposed to have remained alive through separate institutions of religion, education, and the legal system. Davidson argues otherwise. The Scottish nation did not exist before 1707. The Scottish national consciousness we know today was not preserved by institutions carried over from the pre-Union period, but arose after and as a result of the Union, for only then were the material obstacles to nationhood – most importantly the Highland/Lowland divide – overcome. This Scottish nation was constructed simultaneously with and as part of the British nation, and the 18thC Scottish bourgeoisie were at the forefront of constructing both. The majority of Scots entered the Industrial Revolution with a dual national consciousness, but only one nationalism, which was British. The Scottish nationalism which arose in Scotland during the 20thC is therefore not a revival of a pre-Union nationalism after 300 years, but an entirely new formation. -- Customer review - Davidson refutes Linda Colley's idealist thesis that Protestantism, Francophobia, monarchism and empire formed the British nation. The first three of these were ideas, present, yes, but not formative. Empire was external to Britain, and so it was never part of people's experience of becoming British or Scottish. Scotland was a full partner, not a junior partner in the British (not English) Empire, unlike Ireland. The experience of becoming the workshop of the world formed Britain as a nation, creating our culture and identity. Industry, making things, and organising in our Britain-wide trade unions (which Davidson barely mentions) made us British. -- not on kindle
books  amazon.com  find17thC  18thC  Scotland  British_history  1707_Union  national_ID  nationalism  bourgeoisie  Industrial_Revolution  British_Empire  British_Empire-constitutional_structure  Anglo-Irish_constitution  colonialism  imperialism  history_of_England  Kirk  legal_system  Highlands-Scotland  Lowland-Scotland  Scottish_Enlightenment  Scottish_politics  Britannia 
september 2014 by dunnettreader
Jim Smyth - 'Like Amphibious Animals': Irish Protestants, Ancient Britons, 1691-1707 | JSTOR: The Historical Journal, Vol. 36, No. 4 (Dec., 1993), pp. 785-797
Ireland in the 1690s was a protestant state with a majority catholic population. These protestants sometimes described themselves as `the king's Irish subjects' or `the people of Ireland', but rarely as `the Irish', a label which they usually reserved for the catholics. In constitutional and political terms their still evolving sense of identity expressed itself in the assertion of Irish parliamentary sovereignty, most notably in William Molyneux's 1698 pamphlet, The case of Ireland's being bound by acts of parliament in England, stated. In practice, however, the Irish parliament did not enjoy legislative independence, and the political elite was powerless in the face of laws promulgated at Westminster, such as the 1699 woollen act, which were detrimental to its interests. One possible solution to the problem of inferior status lay in legislative union with England or Great Britain. Increasingly in the years before 1707 certain Irish protestant politicians elaborated the economic, constitutional and practical advantages to be gained from a union, but they also based their case upon an appeal to the shared religion and ethnicity of the sovereign's loyal subjects in the two kingdoms. In short the protestants insisted that they were English. This unionist episode thus illustrates the profoundly ambivalent character of protestant identity in late seventeenth-and early eighteenth-century Ireland. -- useful references -- Downloaded pdf to Note -- probably captures Swift's ambivalence including his hostility to Union of 1707 with Scotland and not Ireland
article  jstor  political_history  Ireland  British_politics  national_ID  Protestants-Ireland  Anglo-Irish_constitution  trade-policy  1707_Union  Three_Kingdoms  1690s  1700s  Molyneux  Swift  downloaded  EF-add 
january 2014 by dunnettreader
Jacqueline Hill - Convergence and Conflict in 18thC Ireland | JSTOR: The Historical Journal, Vol. 44, No. 4 (Dec., 2001), pp. 1039-1063
Recent writing shows that eighteenth-century Irish society was both less and more divided than was supposed by Lecky, whose "History of Ireland in the eighteenth century" (now over a century old) dominated so much subsequent historiography. Because Lecky enjoyed access to records that were subsequently destroyed his work will never be entirely redundant, but this article looks at ways in which his views have been and continue to be modified. It surveys the various interpretative models now being used to open up the period, which invite comparisons not merely with England, Scotland, Wales, and colonial America but also with Europe. It also considers how that endlessly fascinating decade, the 1790s, has emerged from the spotlight turned on it by a plethora of bicentenary studies. -- fabulous bibliography of work in last few decades -- downloaded pdf to Note
article  jstor  historiography  18thC  Ireland  political_history  political_culture  religious_history  religious_culture  Anglo-Irish_constitution  Catholics-Ireland  Protestants-Ireland  Whigs-oligarchy  local_government  gentry  penal_laws  Catholic_emancipation  Jacobite-Ireland  Anglican  United_Irishmen  Irish_Rebellion  Union_1800  Britain-invasion  British_foreign_policy  British_Empire  republicanism  patriotism  national_ID  Atlantic  Three_Kingdoms  Ancien_régime  French_Revolution  French_Revolutionary_Wars  American_Revolution  governing_class  government_officials  church_history  bibliography  downloaded  EF-add 
january 2014 by dunnettreader

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