dunnettreader + ancient_religions   23

BBC Radio 4 - Living With The Gods - Downloads
Neil MacGregor explores the role and expression of shared beliefs in communities around the world. Produced in partnership with the British Museum.
audio  religious_culture  religion  symbols-religious  religious_history  sociology_of_religion  religious_art  comparative_religion  religious_practices  religious_imagery  ancient_religions 
december 2017 by dunnettreader
Martin Mulsow - Ambiguities of the Prisca Sapientia in Late Renaissance Humanism (2004) | JHI on JSTOR
Journal of the History of Ideas, Vol. 65, No. 1 (Jan., 2004), pp. 1-13 -- the assertion of a concordance between these early philosophies and their accordance with Christianity-in the sense of a Christian Platonism- implied the synthesis of fragementary philosophemes into a fully developed doctrine (...)
This program was formulated in a variety of ways during the 16th-17thC with differing protagonists and with diverse aims. Thus one could supplement the genealogy in a cabalist vein, introduce biblical characters such as Solomon or Moses, or (as was done by Bruno) use it to contest Christian doctrine. The genealogy could be read as culminating in various notable modem figures such as for example, Paracelsus. Aristotle could be included or excluded from it, depending on whether one wanted to assimilate the Aristotelian tradition or to distance oneself from it; and one could leave the end of this genealogical lineage open in order to exhort the necessity of a scientific and moral reform.
(...) the question of what became of this program during the late Renaissance, when two developments took place simultaneously: on the one hand, the utopia of the prisca sapientia set about to conquer the field formerly reserved to the Aristotelians, namely, natural philosophy; on the other hand, the first doubts arose about the overall validity of the historical-philological foundation of the program, especially the dating of the works of Hermes Trismegistus. -- downloaded pdf to Note
article  jstor  intellectual_history  15thC  16thC  17thC  natural_philosophy  Neoplatonism  Aristotelian  Kabbalah  alchemy  prisca_sapientia  Hermes_Trismegistus  Bible-as-history  chronology  ancient_philosophy  ancient_religions  Moses  ancient_Egypt  Renaissance  philology  downloaded 
may 2016 by dunnettreader
Plutarch (bio) - Livius.org
Plutarch of Chaeronea (46-c.122): influential Greek philosopher and author, well known for his biographies and his moral treatises.
ancient_Rome  biography  ancient_philosophy  ancient_history  ancient_religions  Plutarch  ancient_Greece 
august 2015 by dunnettreader
Livius - Articles on ancient history
Common categories
Roman Empire (1052)
Byzantium (345)
Greece (248)
Museums (196)
Persia (186)
Hellenistic (180)
Roman Republic (137)
Germania Inferior (136)
Greater Iran (84)
Anatolia (80)
ancient_religions  Latin_lit  Mediterranean  ancient_Near_East  ancient_history  art_history  Roman_Empire  ancient_India  Persia  ancient_Israel  ancient_Egypt  Byzantine  Roman_Republic  website  ancient_Rome  archaeology  Greek_lit  ancient_Greece 
august 2015 by dunnettreader
Jew and Judean: A Forum on Politics and Historiography in the Translation of Ancient Texts - Forum ebook | The Marginalia Review of Books [LA Review of Books] August 2014
Have scholars erased the Jews from Antiquity? -- Adele Reinhartz’s essay in MRB on June 24 set off a vibrant discussion in the comments section and in the MRB editors’ inboxes. The range of responses to the piece dotted the spectrum from full support to indignation, proving that a sizable readership wanted to debate these ideas further. The forum is released today only two months after the Reinhartz essay thanks to the good will and the efficiency of the participants. The essays, beginning with Reinhartz’s original piece and concluding with her response to the collection, investigate the political and historiographical considerations involved in the translation of ancient texts, in particular how modern translators and historians ought to deal with the translation of the Greek word ioudaios (Ἰουδαῖος). -- Along with the forum, MRB is excited to release an e-book version of the discussion free for our readers. -- downloaded pdf to Note
ebooks  religious_history  philology  antiquity  ancient_religions  ancient_Israel  ancient_Greece  ancient_Rome  Hellenism  Judaism  Judaism-2nf_Temple  national_ID  religious_culture  translation  Greek_lit  koine  sociology_of_religion  politics-and-religion  religious_lit  downloaded 
june 2015 by dunnettreader
Elaine Fantham - Ovid's Metamorphoses (2004) | Oxford University Press
Oxford Approaches to Classical Literature (Series Editors: Kathleen Coleman and Richard Rutherford) introduces individual works of Greek and Latin literature to readers who are approaching them for the first time. Each volume sets the work in its literary and historical context, and aims to offer a balanced and engaging assessment of its content, artistry, and purpose. A brief survey of the influence of the work upon subsequent generations is included to demonstrate its enduring relevance and power. All quotations from the original are translated into English. Ovid's Metamorphoses have been seen as both the culmination of and a revolution in the classical epic tradition, transferring narrative interest from war to love and fantasy. This introduction considers how Ovid found and shaped his narrative from the creation of the world to his own sophisticated times, illustrating the cruelty of jealous gods, the pathos of human love, and the imaginative fantasy of flight, monsters, magic, and illusion. Elaine Fantham introduces the reader not only to this marvelous and complex narrative poem, but to the Greek and Roman traditions behind Ovid's tales of transformation and a selection of the images and texts that it inspired.
books  kindle-available  Latin_lit  literary_history  Ovid  ancient_Rome  epic  poetry  ancient_Greece  Greek_lit  ancient_religions  gods-antiquity  imitation  influence-literary 
june 2015 by dunnettreader
Peter K. J. Park - Africa, Asia, and the History of Philosophy: Racism in the Formation of the Philosophical Canon 1780-1830 | SUNY Pess 2013
... a penetrating account of a crucial period in the development of philosophy as an academic discipline. (..) a number of European philosophers influenced by Kant began to formulate the history of philosophy as a march of progress from the Greeks to Kant—(..) supplanted existing accounts beginning in Egypt or W. Asia at a time when European interest in Sanskrit and Persian lit was flourishing. Not without debate, these traditions were ultimately deemed outside the scope of philosophy and relegated to the study of religion. Park uncovers this debate and recounts the development of an exclusionary canon of philosophy in the decades of the late 18thC and early 19thC. To what extent was this exclusion of Africa and Asia a result of the scientization of philosophy? To what extent was it a result of racism? (..)the most extensive description available of Gérando’s Histoire comparée des systèmes de philosophie, F. Schlegel’s lectures on the history of philosophy, Ast’s and Rixner’s systematic integration of Africa and Asia into the history of philosophy, and the controversy between Hegel and the theologian Tholuck over “pantheism.” 1. The Kantian School and the Consolidation of Modern Historiography of Philosophy -- 2. The Birth of Comparative History of Philosophy: Joseph-Marie de Gérando’s Histoire comparée des systèmes de philosophie -- 3. India in Friedrich Schlegel’s Comparative History of Philosophy -- 4. The Exclusion of Africa and Asia from the History of Philosophy: The Formation of the Kantian Position -- 5. Systematic Inclusion of Africa and Asia under Absolute Idealism: Friedrich Ast’s and Thaddä Anselm Rixner’s Histories of Philosophy -- 6. Absolute Idealism Reverts to the Kantian Position: Hegel’s Exclusion of Africa and Asia -- 7. The Comparative History of Philosophy in August Tholuck’s Polemic against Hegel -- downloaded excerpt
books  intellectual_history  intellectual_history-distorted  18thC  19thC  philosophy  ancient_Greece  ancient_India  Sanskrit  Persia  religious_history  historiography-18thC  historiography-19thC  Kant  Schlegel  German_Idealism  Hegel  German_scholarship  philohellenism  ancient_history  ancient_religions  history_of_science  biology  racism  Africa  Asia  Enlightenment  comparative_religion  pantheism  philology  teleology  cosmopolitanism  colonialism  comparative_history  comparative_anthropology  philosophical_anthropology  human_nature  downloaded 
may 2015 by dunnettreader
Dan Edelstein, ed. - The Super-Enlightenment: Daring to Know Too Much | Voltaire Foundation -Jan 2010
Historians of 18thC thought have implied a clear distinction between mystical or occult writing, often termed ‘illuminist’, and better-known forms of Enlightenment thinking and culture. But where are the boundaries of ‘enlightened’ human understanding? (..the.) contributors (..) put forward a completely new way of configuring these seemingly antithetical currents of thought, and identify a grey area that binds the two, a ‘Super-Enlightenment’. (..) exploring the social, religious, artistic, political and scientific dimensions of the Super-Enlightenment, contributors demonstrate the co-existence of apparent opposites: the enlightened and the esoteric, empiricism and imagination, history and myth, the secretive and the public, mysticism and science. The Enlightenment can no longer be seen as a sturdy, homogeneous movement defined by certain core beliefs, but one which oscillates between opposing poles in its social practices, historiography and even its epistemology: between daring to know, and daring to know too much. ** Dan Edelstein, Introduction to the Super-Enlightenment -- I. What limits of understanding? ** Peter Reill, The hermetic imagination in the high and late Enlightenment ** David Bates, Super-epistemology ** Jessica Riskin, Mr Machine and the imperial me -- II. The arts of knowing ** Liana Vardi, Physiocratic visions ** Anthony Vidler, For the love of architecture: Claude-Nicolas Ledoux and the Hypnerotomachia ** Fabienne Moore, The poetry of the Super-Enlightenment: the theories and practices of Cazotte, Chassaignon, Mercier, Saint-Martin and Bonneville -- III. Sacred societies ** Natalie Bayer, What do you seek from us? Wisdom? Virtue? Enlightenment? Inventing a Masonic science of man in Russia ** Kris Pangburn, Bonnet’s theory of palingenesis: an ‘Enlightened’ account of personal resurrection? ** Dan Edelstein, The Egyptian French Revolution: antiquarianism, Freemasonry and the mythology of nature ** Tili Boon Cuillé, From myth to religion in Ossian’s France
books  intellectual_history  cultural_history  18thC  Enlightenment  French_Enlightenment  hermeticism  Freemasonry  antiquaries  epistemology  ancient_religions  ancient_Egypt  occult  immortality  myth  religion  comparative_religion  French_lit  poetics  Russia  Physiocrats  laws_of_nature  La_Mettrie  noble_savage  national_origins  antiquity  historiography-18thC 
january 2015 by dunnettreader
Robert Bellah - The renouncers « The Immanent Frame - August 2008
This post is a condensed version of a keynote delivered at a conference "The Axial Age and its Consequences for Subsequent History and the Present" sponsored by the John Templeton Foundation in cooperation with Robert Bellah and Hans Joas. -- After discussing Habermas' theory of a legitimation crisis in the axial civilizations and the critique - political, moral and religious - of the key axial age figures whom he calls "the renouncers" -- The great utopias served for the renouncers as stark contrasts to the actual world, and their vision of that other world could be called “theory” in Plato’s sense. But the very distance they felt from the world to which they returned made possible another kind of “theory,” another kind of seeing—that is, a distant, critical view of the actual world in which they lived. The renouncer sees the world with new eyes: as Plato says of the ones who have returned to the cave, they see the shadows for what they are, not naively as do those who have never left. One could say that the ideological illusion is gone. Once disengaged vision becomes possible then theory can take another turn: it can abandon any moral stance at all and look simply at what will be useful, what can make the powerful and exploitative even more so. -- The axial age gave us “theory” in two senses, and neither of them has been unproblematic ever since. The great utopian visions have motivated some of the noblest achievements of mankind; they have also motivated some of the worst actions of human beings. Theory in the sense of disengaged knowing, inquiry for the sake of understanding, with or without moral evaluation, has brought its own kind of astounding achievements but also given humans the power to destroy their environment and themselves. Both kinds of theoria have criticized but also justified the class society that first came into conscious view in the axial age. They have provided the intellectual tools for efforts to reform and efforts to repress. It is a great heritage. ... It has given us the great tool of criticism. How will we use it? -- downloaded page as pdf to Note
sociology_of_religion  intellectual_history  religious_history  axial_age  cultural_critique  political_philosophy  moral_philosophy  Buddhism  Old_Testament  prophets  China  India  ancient_Greece  ancient_philosophy  Indian_religion  Indian_philosophy  Confuscianism  ancient_religions  Chinese_history  Plato  Plato-Republic  Aristotle  phronesis  utopian  downloaded  EF-add 
november 2014 by dunnettreader
Robert Parker, review - Radcliffe G. Edmonds III, Redefining Ancient Orphism: A Study in Greek Religion (2013) | Bryn Mawr Classical Review 2014.07.13
This learned and intelligent work [seeks] to give us an Orphism without original sin, without, that is, the myth that mankind carries a burden of inherited guilt because they were born from the Titans who devoured the baby Dionysus, son of Persephone. -- His Orphism has no fixed traditions, no central myths, nor could it have them, given the unstable channels through which religious traditions were diffused in the ancient world. --The label ‘Orphic’, he writes, is as vague as ‘New Age’, ‘a set of ideas loosely defined by their distance from mainstream religious activity’. -- Yet he does not jettison ‘Orphism’ completely. If one thinks in terms not of an essence but of Wittgenstein’s family resemblances, the family of Orphic rituals and ideas is marked for Edmonds by (claims to) ‘extraordinary purity, sanctity, antiquity, and strangeness’. -- Suppose one follows Edmonds in removing mankind’s descent from the slayers of Dionysus from our picture of Orphism: what then? We are still left with the extraordinary wild Orphic variants on theogonic myth to try to understand; in particular, the point of the Titans’ crime against the baby Dionysus has become obscure. We are still left with Orphic doctrines of the soul that imply a drastic rejection of accepted Greek views about life in the body. There is still an association with vegetarianism. There is still a descent from Titans which may have left us polluted. -- Orphism surely is exceptional within Greek religion — or perhaps one should rather say ‘early Orphism’, with M.P. Nilsson. The link between books and rites so marked in the early testimonia fades away in the hellenistic period, and Orphism virtually disappears as a distinct and dynamic force in lived religion , until it re-emerges in late antiquity in a quite new form. I cling — habit or obstinacy perhaps — to several aspects of a pre-Edmonds vision of Orphism. But let me stress that this is a lucid, powerful and thoroughly instructive work, a major contribution.
books  reviews  religious_history  religious_culture  ancient_Greece  Hellenism  late_antiquity  Orphism  ritual  sacred_texts  soul  immortality  underworld  ancient_religions  gods-antiquity  purification  original_sin 
july 2014 by dunnettreader
Richard Marshall - Stewart Home’s po-mo homer » 3:AM Magazine
As much an essay on post Kantian (and post Hegelian) German philosophy -- Marxism, materialism, phenomenology hermeneutics, post Kantian, structuralist, poststructuralist, especially Nietzsche and Heidegger -- as on an album of readings of his work by Home. And a further riff on epistemology and varieties of scepticism, including a sort of take on Pyrrhonism as not an extreme version of scepticism. Heidegger's misreading of Nietzsche is of a piece with his embrace of the fascist side of Plato, which was part of Nietzsche's rejection of even the non Socratic Plato. Further long riff on Beiser rejection of Kantian aesthetics in Diotima's Children and the lack of aesthetic criteria after the avant_guard. Home attacks the shallow art world from another direction - mostly as a bourgeois status game.
books  intellectual_history  19thC  20thC  21stC  fate  free_will  gods-antiquity  ancient_religions  myth  tragedy  Nietzsche  Heidegger  epistemology  moral_philosophy  ancient_philosophy  Plato  Homer  pre-Socratics  aesthetics  Kant-aesthetics  avant_guard  materialism  Marxist  EF-add 
march 2014 by dunnettreader
Peter Burke: Images as Evidence in Seventeenth-Century Europe | JSTOR: Journal of the History of Ideas, Vol. 64, No. 2 (Apr., 2003), pp. 273-296
Deals with the transition from antiquarianism to archaeology and debates over use of material remains as historical evidence. Builds on work of Momigliano and Haskell (History and its images - bookshelf? ) -- downloaded pdf to Note
article  jstor  intellectual_history  historiography  17thC  antiquaries  archaeology  epistemology  art_history  evidence  antiquity  ancient_Rome  ancient_history  ancient_religions  Early_Christian  Egypt  downloaded  EF-add 
december 2013 by dunnettreader
Wei Zhu: What is religion in China? A brief history « The Immanent Frame Oct 2013
The complex and ever-changing relationship between the Chinese state and the nation’s religions stretches back thousands of years. While the state never struggled with religious leaders for power, it governed an embedded religiosity in the population, one best described as diffused, non-exclusive, and pluralistic. As a companion to The Immanent Frame’s newly launched series of essays on the state of religion in China, this piece embarks on a brief historical survey, outlining the wide variety of beliefs and practices that religion in China encapsulates, and paying particular attention to the events and philosophies that have shaped the policies of the atheist People’s Republic of China.

Recent years have seen religiosity on the rise at home across all religious traditions, coinciding with politico-religious unrest in places such as Xinjiang and Tibet, as well as issues with superstitious xiejiao (邪教, “evil cults”) such as Falun Gong. This has not gone unnoticed by Chinese leaders like Hu Jintao (former General Secretary/President of China) and Wang Zuoan (current director of SARA), who recognize the role that religion plays in building a “prosperous society” but also its potential for “unrest and antagonism.” With massive domestic socioeconomic changes taking place, as well as China’s growing influence on the global stage, the pressure is on the state—whose policies on religion are arguably still reminiscent of those a hundred years ago—to engage with religion in new and constructive ways.
China  religious_history  religious_culture  ancient_religions  politics-and-religion  19thC  20thC  21stC  Marxism  atheism  EF-add 
october 2013 by dunnettreader

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