dunnettreader + ancient_philosophy   88

Thomas Nail - Lucretius and the immanence of motion | The Immanent Frame - Sept 2017
Lucretius was the first philosopher of immanence. It is he and not Democritus or Epicurus who holds this title. If we want to understand the historical…
Epicurean  ancient_philosophy  Evernote  atomism  immanence  transcendence  materialism  Lucretius  from instapaper
september 2017 by dunnettreader
Ricardo Salles, ed - Metaphysics, Soul, and Ethics in Ancient Thought (2005) - Oxford University Press
Richard Sorabji Bibliography
1. Intellectual autobiography, Richard Sorabji
Metaphysics
2. Intrinsic and relational properties of Atoms in the Democritean ontology, Alexander P. D. Mourelatos
3. Necessitation and Explanation in Philoponus' Aristotelain Physics, Sylvia Berryman
4. A Contemporary Look at Aristotle's Changing Now, Sarah Broadie
5. On the individuation of times and events in orthodox Stoicism, Ricardo Salles
6. Stoic metaphysics at Rome, David Sedley
7. Platonism in the Bible: Numenius of Apamea on Exodus and eternity, Myles Burnyeat
The Senses and the Nature of the Soul
8. Platonic Souls as Persons, A. A. Long
9. Aristotle versus Descartes on the concept of the mental, Charles H. Kahn
10. Perception Naturalized in Aristotle's de Anima, Robert Bolton
11. The Spirit and the letter: Aristotle on perception, V. Caston
12. The discriminating capacity of the soul in Aristotle's theory of learning, Frans A. J. de Haas
13. Alexander of Aphrodisias on the nature and location of vision, Bob Sharples
Ethics
14. Plato's Stoic View of Motivation, Gabriela Roxana Carone
15. The Presence of Socrates and Aristotle in the Stoic Account of Akrasia, Marcelo D. Boeri
16. Extend or identify: Two Stoic Accounts of Altruism, Mary Margaret McCabe
17. Competing Readings of Stoic Emotions, Christopher Gill
18. Were Zeno and Chysippus at odds in analysing emotion?, A. W. Price
19. Seneca on Freedom and Autonomy, Brad Inwood
books  ancient_philosophy  Plato  Aristotle  Stoicism  soul  moral_philosophy  metaphysics  Seneca  Democritus  ancient_Greece  ancient_Rome  Hellenism  mind  Descartes  emotions 
september 2016 by dunnettreader
Stathis Gourgouris - Democracy is a Tragic Regime | Academia.edu - PMLA 129-4, Theories and Methodologies
Begins with Castoriadas analysis and classical Athens - the "tragic" aspect inherent in democracy is a function of hubris - which is a failure of self-limitation - that since democracy is self-authorizing, it has no foundational or transcendent norms, no categorical imperatives - basic situation is that anything *can* be done - but not everything *ought * to be - downloaded to Tab S2
article  downloaded  political_philosophy  democracy  intellectual_history  political_history  ancient_Greece  ancient_philosophy  self-control  self-government  hubris  tragedy  Athens  normativity  norms  moral_philosophy  morality-conventional  morality-divine_command  obligation 
july 2016 by dunnettreader
Matthew Sharpe - Ilsetraut Hadot’s Seneca: ancient philosophy and spiritual direction (2015) | Academia.edu
Abstract: Exegetical and reflective presentation for Sydney conference "In pursuit of wisdom: Ancient Chinese and Greek perspectives on cultivation" on Ilsetraut Hadot's magisterial *Sénèque: Direction Spirituelle et pratique de la philosophie* (2015, Vrin. - Research Interests: Stoicism, Philosophy as Therapy, Roman Stoicism, Philosophy as a way of life, and Pierre Hadot -- downloaded
lecture  ancient_philosophy  Stoicism  Seneca  Hadot  Hadot_  Ilsetraut  philosophy_as_way_of_life  moral_philosophy  cosmology  moral_psychology  Hellenism  books  French_language  reviews  downloaded 
july 2016 by dunnettreader
Matthew Sharpe - [draft slides] Athletes in the Arena: Diderot and his Seneca | Academia.edu
Whereas Seneca's critics argue that his life and alleged compliance with Nero contradicts his Stoic, noble-sounding principles, discrediting the latter; in his two late books on the Stoic, Diderot argues that Seneca's continual attempts to mollify Nero's tyranny betters the philosophy.  Where Diderot's critics reduce the two works on Seneca to veiled attacks on Rousseau, Diderot is critical of those texts wherein Seneca advocated the withdrawal & “leisure of the sage” or the vita contemplativa, while Rome burnt (“Rousseau est la figure moderne et honnie du détachement, qui permet à Diderot de dissocier Sénèque du détachement stoïcien. » (Lojskine 2009))  Whether contra Rousseau or no, Diderot is most attracted—amongst all Seneca's works Diderot examines—to Seneca’s On Benefits, and wants to restore compassion, even justified anger, to Stoicism.  Whether to justify himself for his own naivety in trying to teach Catherine of Russia or not, Diderot defends Seneca’s attempts to mollify Nero, led by De Clementia; he appeals, a la Shaftesbury and others, to Seneca’s “coeur” and compassion, beyond his Stoicism, notably in On Benefits; he criticises Stoic fatalism and appeals to a paraStoic notion of “natural rights” to justify resistance to tyranny; famously celebrating the American revolution as as lesson to all Europe.  So, beneath the "miserable" polemics (Cittion), there remains a good deal of philosophy; beneath the rhetorical smoke, (to use a Stoic-ism) a good deal of theoretical fire.  This paper aims at retrieving this fire, and situating Diderot's mitigated Stoicism as a French avatar of the moral sentimentalist position, with roots in the Stoic idea of oikeosis (and of parental love as the elementary cell of sociablity), as articulated by CIcero. Research Interests: Stoicism, Roman Stoicism, Philosophy of the Enlightenment, and Philosophy as a way of life -- downloaded
paper  Academia.edu  intellectual_history  Enlightenment  18thC  French_Enlightenment  philosophes  ancient_philosophy  ancient_Rome  Hellenism  Stoicism  Seneca  Diderot  Rousseau  moral_philosophy  moral_sentiments  eclecticism  Cicero  emotions  tyranny  Roman_Empire  downloaded 
july 2016 by dunnettreader
Scott Aikin - Citizen Skeptic: Cicero’s Academic Republicanism (pages 275–285) | Symposion. Theoretical and Applied Inquiries in Philosophy and Social Sciences July 2015
ABSTRACT: The skeptical challenge to politics is that if knowledge is in short supply and it is a condition for the proper use of political power, then there is very little just politics. Cicero’s Republicanism is posed as a program for political legitimacy wherein both citizens and their states are far from ideal. The result is a form of what is termed negative conservatism, which shows political gridlock in a more positive light. - Assistant Professor of Philosophy at Vanderbilt University. He works primarily in epistemology and ancient philosophy. He is the author of Epistemology and the Regress Problem (Routledge 2011) and Evidentialism and the Will to Believe (Bloomsbury 2014), and the co-author (with Robert B. Talisse) of Why We Argue (And How We Should) (Routledge, 2014), Reasonable Atheism (Prometheus Books, 2011), and Pragmatism: A Guide for the Perplexed (Continuum Books, 2008). - downloaded via iPhone to Dbox
ancient_Greece  information-asymmetric  public_choice  downloaded  intellectual_history  checks-and-balances  institutions  decision_theory  ancient_philosophy  scepticism-Academic  constitutionalism  ancient_Rome  article  republicanism  epistemology-social  political_philosophy  Roman_Republic  Cicero  political_culture 
may 2016 by dunnettreader
Martin Mulsow - Ambiguities of the Prisca Sapientia in Late Renaissance Humanism (2004) | JHI on JSTOR
Journal of the History of Ideas, Vol. 65, No. 1 (Jan., 2004), pp. 1-13 -- the assertion of a concordance between these early philosophies and their accordance with Christianity-in the sense of a Christian Platonism- implied the synthesis of fragementary philosophemes into a fully developed doctrine (...)
This program was formulated in a variety of ways during the 16th-17thC with differing protagonists and with diverse aims. Thus one could supplement the genealogy in a cabalist vein, introduce biblical characters such as Solomon or Moses, or (as was done by Bruno) use it to contest Christian doctrine. The genealogy could be read as culminating in various notable modem figures such as for example, Paracelsus. Aristotle could be included or excluded from it, depending on whether one wanted to assimilate the Aristotelian tradition or to distance oneself from it; and one could leave the end of this genealogical lineage open in order to exhort the necessity of a scientific and moral reform.
(...) the question of what became of this program during the late Renaissance, when two developments took place simultaneously: on the one hand, the utopia of the prisca sapientia set about to conquer the field formerly reserved to the Aristotelians, namely, natural philosophy; on the other hand, the first doubts arose about the overall validity of the historical-philological foundation of the program, especially the dating of the works of Hermes Trismegistus. -- downloaded pdf to Note
article  jstor  intellectual_history  15thC  16thC  17thC  natural_philosophy  Neoplatonism  Aristotelian  Kabbalah  alchemy  prisca_sapientia  Hermes_Trismegistus  Bible-as-history  chronology  ancient_philosophy  ancient_religions  Moses  ancient_Egypt  Renaissance  philology  downloaded 
may 2016 by dunnettreader
Michael Williams - Skepticism, ancient and modern (2010) | School of Advanced Study, University of London
Professor Michael Williams, ST Lee Visiting Professorial Fellow, School of Advanced Study
Event date:
Tuesday 15 June 2010
School of Advanced Study, University of London
lecture  scepticism  ancient_philosophy  video  intellectual_history 
march 2016 by dunnettreader
Matthew Sharpe - Stoic Virtue Ethics (2014) | Academia.edu - in Handbook of Virtue Ethics
The Handbook of Virtue Ethics, edited by Stan van Hooft et al, Acumen 2014 -- Research Interests: Virtue Ethics, Stoicism, Roman Stoicism, and Apatheia -- downloaded pdf to Note
chapter  Academia.edu  moral_philosophy  intellectual_history  ancient_philosophy  ancient_Greece  ancient_Rome  Stoicism  virtue_ethics  virtue_epistemology  eudaimonia  downloaded  1960s 
march 2016 by dunnettreader
Katja Maria Vogt interview with Richard Marshall - The Pyrrhonian Skeptic | 3 Quarks Daily - Feb 2016
Interview by Richard Marshall. [All images: Jens Haas] Katja Maria Vogt is a specialist in ancient philosophy, ethics, and normative epistemology, and a…
Instapaper  ancient_philosophy  moral_philosophy  epistemology  virtue_epistemology  scepticism  scepticism-Academic  Pyrrhonism  from instapaper
february 2016 by dunnettreader
Robert Pippin - The Unavailability of the Ordinary: Strauss on the Philosophical Fate of Modernity | JSTOR- Political Theory (2003)
Political Theory, Vol. 31, No. 3 (Jun., 2003), pp. 335-358 -- In Natural Right and History Leo Strauss argues for the continuing "relevance " of the classical understanding of natural right. Since this relevance is not a matter of a direct return, or a renewed appreciation that a neglected doctrine is simply true, the meaning of this claim is somewhat elusive. But it is clear enough that the core of Strauss's argument for that relevance is a claim about the relation between human experience and philosophy. Strauss argues that the classical understanding articulates and is continuous with the "lived experience" of engaged participants in political life, the ordinary, and he argues (in a way quite similar to claims in Heidegger) that such an ordinary or everyday point of view has been "lost." The author presents here an interpretation and critique of such a claim. -- downloaded pdf to Note
article  jstor  intellectual_history  political_philosophy  Strauss  modernity  natural_rights  ancient_philosophy  political_culture  Heidegger  liberalism  liberalism-post-WWII  downloaded 
january 2016 by dunnettreader
Kuni Sakamoto - Pierre Gassendi's Reception of Keplerian Ideas | JSTOR Journal of the History of Ideas (Jan 2009)
The German Hercules's Heir: Pierre Gassendi's Reception of Keplerian Ideas -- Journal of the History of Ideas, Vol. 70, No. 1 (Jan., 2009), pp. 69-91 -- big interesting bibliography -- downloaded pdf to Note
article  jstor  intellectual_history  16thC  17thC  ancient_philosophy  natural_philosophy  natural_history  Plato  Aristotle  Pliny_the_Elder  Albert_Magnus  medieval_philosophy  astronomy  astrology  cosmology  Kepler  Gassendi  atomism  generation  divine_intellect  causation  mathematization  bibliography  downloaded 
january 2016 by dunnettreader
John Sellars - Gilles Deleuze and the History of Philosophy ( 2007) | Academia.edu
British Journal for the History of Philosophy 15, 3 (2007) 551-60 -
Research Interests: Gilles Deleuze and Historiography of philosophy -- didn't download
article  Academia.edu  intellectual_history  20thC  post-WWII  France  French_intellectuals  historiography  history_of_philosophy  commentaries  Deleuze  medieval_philosophy  ancient_philosophy 
november 2015 by dunnettreader
John Sellars - Stoic Ontology and Plato's "Sophist" (2010) | Academia.edu
in V. Harte, M.M. McCabe, R.W. Sharples, A. Sheppard, eds, Aristotle and the Stoics Reading Plato, Bulletin of the Institute of Classical Studies, Suppl. 107 (2010), 185-203 -- Keywords: Metaphysics, Plato, and Stoicism -- downloaded pdf to Note
article  Academia.edu  intellectual_history  Stoicism  metaphysics  ancient_philosophy  ancient_Greece  ontology  Being  nothing  ideas-theories  concepts  universals  categories  Plato  Platonism  Seneca  Zenon_of_Citium  commentaries  late_antiquity  ancient_Rome  bibliography  downloaded 
november 2015 by dunnettreader
John Sellars - Seneca's Philosophical Predecessors and Contemporaries (2013) | Academia.edu
in G. Damschen, A. Heil, eds, Brill’s Companion to Seneca (Leiden: Brill, 2013), 97-112. -- Keywords: Stoicism, Seneca, and Roman Philosophy -- downloaded pdf to Note
chapter  Academia.edu  intellectual_history  literary_history  Seneca  Stoicism  Epicurean  Cicero  Lucretius  ancient_philosophy  ancient_Greece  ancient_Rome  Hellenism  Roman_Empire  bibliography  downloaded 
november 2015 by dunnettreader
John Sellars - Plato's Apology of Socrates, A Metaphilosophical Text (2014) | Academia.edu
Philosophy and Literature 38/2 (2014), 433-45 -- Plato’s Apology is not merely an account of Socrates’ trial, it is also a work of metaphilosophy, presenting Socrates’ understanding of the nature and function of philosophy. This is a vital part of the text’s apologetic task, for it is only with reference to Socrates’ understanding of what philosophy is that we can understand, and so justify, his seemingly antisocial behaviour. Plato presents to us Socrates’ metaphilosophy in two ways: via what Socrates says and what he does. This twofold method of presentation is appropriate, if not essential, given the conception of philosophy that Socrates is presented as holding. -- Keywords: Metaphilosophy, Plato, and Socrates -- downloaded pdf to Note
article  Academia.edu  intellectual_history  ancient_philosophy  ancient_Greece  Plato  Socrates  metaphilosophy  philosophy  philosophy-as-way-of-life  dialogue  rhetoric-writing  literary_theory  style-philosophy  downloaded 
november 2015 by dunnettreader
John Sellars, review essay - Renaissance Philosophy (2012) | Academia.edu
Review article on Christopher C. Celenza, ed., Angelo Poliziano’s Lamia: Text, Translation, and Introductory Studies, and S. Clucas, P. J. Forshaw, V. Rees, eds, Laus Platonici Philosophi: Marsilio Ficino and His Influence, for British Journal for the History of Philosophy 20/6 (2012), 1195-1204 -- Keywords: Renaissance Philosophy, Angelo Poliziano, and Marsilio Ficino -- complains that work on Early Modern tends to look at links to medieval and back to anciengs, ignoring Renaissance contributions for much of anything beyond translation (e.g. Ficino just regurgitating Neoplatonism) and these 2 volumes help to see both what was going on philosophically, that humanism wasn't just work on ancient texts, as well as links to Early Moderns. Didn't download
books  reviews  article  Academia.edu  intellectual_history  Renaissance  medieval_philosophy  ancient_philosophy  scholasticism  Aristotelian  Neoplatonism  humanism  Ficino  Poliziano  Cambridge_Platonists  More_Henry  identity  Locke-person 
november 2015 by dunnettreader
John Sellars - Pomponazzi contra Averroes on the Intellect | Academia.edu
British Journal for the History of Philosophy (in press) -- This paper examines Pomponazzi’s arguments against Averroes in his De Immortalitate Animae, focusing on the question whether thought is possible without a body. The first part of the paper will sketch the history of the problem, namely the interpretation of Aristotle’s remarks about the intellect in De Anima 3.4-5, touching on Alexander, Themistius, and Averroes. The second part will focus on Pomponazzi’s response to Averroes, including his use of arguments by Aquinas. It will conclude by suggesting that Pomponazzi’s discussion stands as the first properly modern account of Aristotle’s psychology. -- Keywords: Renaissance Philosophy, Renaissance Aristotelianism, Averroes, and Pietro Pomponazzi -- looks like very helpful overview of interpretations of de Anima from Theophrastus onwards through Renaissance and comparing with some recent readings -- downloaded pdf to Note
article  Academia.edu  intellectual_history  soul  immortality  mind  Aristotle  Aristotelian  ancient_philosophy  ancient_Greece  Hellenism  late_antiquity  medieval_philosophy  Renaissance  Italian_Renaissance  commentaries  Islam-Greek_philosophy  Averroes  Pomponazzi  Ficino  rationalist  empiricism  fideism  bibliography  Peripatetics  De_Anima  downloaded 
november 2015 by dunnettreader
John Sellars - Stoic Cosmopolitanism and Zeno's Republic | Academia.edu
History of Political Thought 28/1 (2007), 1-29 -- Modern accounts of Stoic politics have attributed to Zeno the ideal of an isolated community of sages and to later Stoics such as Seneca a cosmopolitan utopia transcending all traditional States. By returning to the Cynic background to both Zeno's Republic and the Cosmopolitan tradition, this paper argues that the distance between the two is not as great as is often supposed. This account, it is argued, is more plausible than trying to offer a developmental explanation of the supposed transformation in Stoic political thought from isolated community to cosmopolitan utopia. -- Keywords: Stoicism, Cosmopolitanism, Cicero, Cynicism (Ancient Greek Philosophy), and Zenon of Citium -- downloaded pdf to Note
article  Academia.edu  intellectual_history  political_philosophy  moral_philosophy  cosmology  Stoicism  cynicism  Seneca  Zenon_of_Citium  Diogenes_the_Cynic  ancient_philosophy  ancient_Greece  ancient_Rome  Hellenism  cosmopolitanism  Cicero  imperialism  Roman_Empire  Roman_Republic  Plato-Republic  downloaded 
november 2015 by dunnettreader
John Sellars - Aiôn and Chronos: Deleuze and the Stoic Theory of Time (2007) | Academia.edu
[published in Collapse 3 (2007), 177-205] -- Gilles Deleuze outlines a supposedly Stoic dual theory of time: on the one hand there is aiôn, comprising an infinite past and future; on the other there is chronos, the extended present. In the scholarly literature on Stoicism, however, either a single theory is reconstructed or the evidence is dismissed as too thin and incoherent. I offer an explanation for this distance between the Deleuzian and scholarly presentations of the Stoic theory of time. I conclude by answering the question to what extent, if any, the Deleuzian theory of aiôn and chronos deserves to be called Stoic.-- downloaded pdf to Note
article  Academia.edu  intellectual_history  ancient_philosophy  late_antiquity  commentaries  Diogenes_Laertius  Plutarch  Stoicism  time  cosmology  ontology  20thC  Deleuze  poststructuralist  postmodern  downloaded 
november 2015 by dunnettreader
Table of contents - John Sellars, ed. - The Routledge Handbook of the Stoic Tradition (Feb 2016) | Academia.edu
Introduction | Stoicism in Rome | Stoicism in Early Christianity | Plotinus and the Platonic Response to Stoicism | Augustine’s Debt to Stoicism in the Confessions | Boethius and Stoicism | Stoic Themes in Peter Abelard and John of Salisbury | Stoic Influences in the Later Middle Ages | The Recovery of Stoicism in the Renaissance | Stoicism in the Philosophy of the Italian Renaissance | Erasmus, Calvin, and the Faces of Stoicism in Renaissance and Reformation Thought | Justus Lipsius and Neostoicism | Shakespeare and Early Modern English Literature | Medicine of the Mind in Early Modern Philosophy | Stoic Themes in Early Modern French Thought | Spinoza and Stoicism | Leibniz and the Stoics: Fate, Freedom, and Providence | The Epicurean Stoicism of the French Enlightenment | Stoicism and the Scottish Enlightenment | Kant and Stoic Ethics | Stoicism in Nineteenth Century German Philosophy | Stoicism and Romantic Literature | Stoicism in Victorian Culture | Stoicism in America | Stoic Themes in Contemporary Anglo-American Ethics | Stoicism and Twentieth Century French Philosophy | The Stoic Influence on Modern Psychotherapy
books  intellectual_history  Stoicism  ancient_philosophy  Epictetus  Seneca  Early_Christian  late_antiquity  Neoplatonism  Augustine  Abelard  John_of_Salisbury  medieval_philosophy  Renaissance  Italian_Renaissance  Italy  Shakespeare  Shakespeare-influence  Erasmus  Reformation  Calvin  Justus_Lipsius  Neostoicism  philosophy-as-way-of-life  psychology  self  self-examination  self-knowledge  self-development  early_modern  Europe-Early_Modern  16thC  17thC  18thC  19thC  20thC  Spinoza  Leibniz  fate  determinism  Providence  free_will  freedom  French_Enlightenment  Epicurean  Scottish_Enlightenment  Kant-ethics  German_Idealism  German_scholars  neo-Kantian  Romanticism  literary_history  analytical_philosophy  psychoanalysis  phenomenology 
november 2015 by dunnettreader
John Sellars - Shaftesbury, Stoicism, and Philosophy as a Way of Life (2015) | Academia.edu
Publication Name: Sophia (in press) -- This paper examines Shaftesbury’s reflections on the nature of philosophy in his Askêmata notebooks, which draw heavily on the Roman Stoics Epictetus and Marcus Aurelius. In what follows I introduce the notebooks, outline Shaftesbury’s account of philosophy therein, compare it with his discussions of the nature of philosophy in his published works, and conclude by suggesting that Pierre Hadot’s conception of ‘philosophy as a way of life’ offers a helpful framework for thinking about Shaftesbury’s account of philosophy. -- Keywords: Stoicism, Shaftesbury, Philosophy as a way of life, and Pierre Hadot -- downloaded pdf to Note
article  Academia.edu  intellectual_history  17thC  18thC  ancient_philosophy  ancient_Rome  Stoicism  Epictetus  philosophy-as-way-of-life  Marcus_Aurelius  Hadot_Pierre  Shaftesbury  moral_philosophy  psychology  passions  emotions  downloaded 
november 2015 by dunnettreader
John Sellars, Stoics Against Stoics in Cudworth's A Treatise of Freewill (2012) | Academia.edu
British Journal for the History of Philosophy 20/5 (2012), 935-52 -- In his A Treatise of Freewill, Ralph Cudworth argues against Stoic determinism by drawing on what he takes to be other concepts found in Stoicism, notably the claim that some things are ‘up to us’ (ἐφ᾽ ἡμῖν) and that these things are the product of our choice (προαίρεσις). These concepts are central to the late Stoic Epictetus and it appears at first glance as if Cudworth is opposing late Stoic voluntarism against early Stoic determinism. This paper argues that in fact, despite his claim to be drawing on Stoic doctrine, Cudworth uses these terms with a meaning first articulated only later, by the Peripatetic commentator Alexander of Aphrodisias. -- Keywords: Stoicism, Alexander of Aphrodisias, Cambridge Platonism, Epictetus, Freewill and Determinism, and Ralph Cudworth -- downloaded pdf to Note
article  Academia.edu  intellectual_history  Stoicism  ancient_philosophy  Epictetus  determinism  free_will  late_antiquity  Alexander_of_Aphrodisias  Cambridge_Platonists  Cudworth  17thC  18thC  downloaded 
november 2015 by dunnettreader
Montaigne Studies
Home page for Montaigne Project -- once a year journal, searchable text of Essais with different stages of publication indicated, Extensive critical bibliography
scepticism  reception  Montaigne  bibliography  16thC  journals-academic  French_language  French_lit  website  ancient_philosophy  intellectual_history  etexts  literary_history  Wars_of_Religion 
october 2015 by dunnettreader
David Sedley - Lucretius and the Transformation of Greek Wisdom | Classical Literature | Cambridge University Press (hbk 1998)
This book studies the structure and origins of De Rerum Natura (On the nature of things), the great first-century BC poem by Lucretius. By showing how he worked from the literary model set by the Greek poet Empedocles but under the philosophical inspiration of the Greek philosopher Epicurus, the book seeks to characterize Lucretius' unique poetic achivement. It is addressed to those interested both in Latin poetry and in ancient Greek and Roman philosophy. [A later chapter concerns the "imprint" of Theophrastus *--* The appearance of this book is a great event - a first class modern philosopher writing on a major Roman author *--* Nothing of this kind available elsewhere *--* Contains the first ever full-scale reconstruction of Epicurus' great treatise On Nature -- downloaded marketing materials to Note
books  kindle-available  intellectual_history  literary_history  Lucretius  ancient_philosophy  cosmology  religious_belief  ancient_Greece  ancient_Rome  Greek_lit  Latin_lit  Hellenism  Epicurean  atomism  Empedocles  Theophrastus  poetry  rhetoric-moral_basis  epistemology  nature  perception  downloaded 
october 2015 by dunnettreader
Andrea Nightingale and David Sedley, eds. - Ancient Models of Mind: Studies in Human and Divine Rationality | Classical Philosophy | Cambridge University Press (hbk 2010, obk 2015)
In honor of A. A. Long: Publications 1963–2009 -- Table of Contents 1. Plato on aporia and self-knowledge, Andrea Wilson Nightingale -- 2. Cross-examining happiness: reason and community in the Socratic dialogues of Plato Sara Ahbel-Rappe -- 3. Inspiration, recollection, and mimesis in Plato's Phaedrus, Kathryn A. Morgan -- 4. Plato's Theaetetus as an ethical dialogue, David Sedley -- 5. Divine contemplating mind, Allan Silverman -- 6. Aristotle and the history of Skepticism, Alan Code -- 7. Stoic selection: objects, actions, and agents, Stephen White -- 8. Beauty and its relation to goodness in Stoicism, Richard Bett -- 9. How dialectical was Stoic dialectic?, Luca Castagnoli -- 10. Socrates speaks in Seneca, De vita beata 24-28, James Ker -- 11. Seneca's Platonism: the soul and its divine origin, Gretchen Reydams-Schils -- 12. The status of the individual in Plotinus, Kenneth Wolfe -- downloaded marketing materials to Note
books  kindle-available  ancient_philosophy  ancient_Greece  ancient_Rome  Hellenism  Plato  Platonism  Aristotle  Stoicism  Seneca  Plotinus  Neoplatonism  moral_philosophy  epistemology-moral  God-attributes  eudaimonia  aporia  soul  imago_dei  virtue_ethics  virtue  self-knowledge  self-examination  self-development  dialectic  beauty  good  sociability  downloaded 
october 2015 by dunnettreader
Nadeem J. Z. Hussain and Lydia Patton - Friedrich Albert Lange | Stanford Encyclopedia of Philosophy August 2012 revision of original May 2095
Friedrich Albert Lange (b. 1828, d. 1875) was a German philosopher, pedagogue, political activist, and journalist. He was one of the originators of neo-Kantianism and an important figure in the founding of the Marburg school of neo-Kantianism. He also played a significant role in the German labour movement and in the development of social democratic thought. His book, The History of Materialism, was a standard introduction to materialism and the history of philosophy well into the twentieth century. -- 1. Life and Intellectual Career -- 2. Pedagogy -- 3. The Labor Question -- 4. Neo-Kantianism ** 4.1 The Ethical Standpoint of the Ideal ** 4.2 Logic and Scientific Methodology -- downloaded as pdf to Note
intellectual_history  19thC  Germany  German_scholars  Lange_FA  neo-Kantian  Hegelian  German_Idealism  materialism-19thC  materialism  historiography-19thC  philosophy_of_science  epistemology  epistemology-moral  epistemology-naturalism  ancient_philosophy  atomism  logic  scientific_method  socialism  labor  capitalism  Industrial_Revolution  social_democracy  physiology  mind  perception  sensation  Kant-ethics  bibliography 
september 2015 by dunnettreader
Plutarch (bio) - Livius.org
Plutarch of Chaeronea (46-c.122): influential Greek philosopher and author, well known for his biographies and his moral treatises.
ancient_Rome  biography  ancient_philosophy  ancient_history  ancient_religions  Plutarch  ancient_Greece 
august 2015 by dunnettreader
Hadot, Pierre | Internet Encyclopedia of Philosophy
Table of Contents -- 1. Biography **--** 2. Philology and Method **--** 3. Early Work: Plotinus and the Simplicity of Vision **--** 4. What is Ancient Philosophy? -- (a) Philosophical Discourse versus Philosophy -- (b) Philosophy as a Way of Life -- (b) The Figure of Socrates -- (c) The Figure of the Sage **--** 5. Spiritual Practices -- (a) Askesis of Desire -- (b) Premeditation of Death and Evils -- (c) Concentration on the Present Moment -- (d) The View from Above -- (e) Writing as Hypomnemata, and The Inner Citadel **--** 6. The Transformation of Philosophy after the Decline of Antiquity -- (a) The Adoption of Spiritual Practices in Monasticism -- (b) Philosophical Discourse as Handmaiden to Theology and the Natural Sciences -- (c) The Permanence of the Ancient Conception of Philosophy **--** 7. References and Further Reading -- (a) Works in French. -- (b) Works in English. -- (c) Selected Articles on Hadot -- downloaded pdf to Note
intellectual_history  ancient_philosophy  ancient_Greece  Socrates  eudaimonia  Stoicism  Epicurean  spiritual_practices  self-knowledge  self-sufficiency  self-development  self  self-control  passions  emotions  moral_philosophy  moral_psychology  desire  judgment-emotions  meditation  Plotinus  Neoplatonism  transcendence  late_antiquity  monasticism  theology  philosophy_of_religion  natural_philosophy  medieval_philosophy  Hadot_Pierre  French_intellectuals  20thC  21stC  post-WWII  Hellenism  bibliography  downloaded 
august 2015 by dunnettreader
Design Arguments for the Existence of God | Internet Encyclopedia of Philosophy
Table of Contents -- 1. The Classical Versions of the Design Argument -- a. Scriptural Roots and Aquinas's Fifth Way -- b.The Argument from Simple Analogy -- c. Paley's Watchmaker Argument -- d. Guided Evolution **--** 2. Contemporary Versions of the Design Argument. -- a. The Argument from. -- b. Irreducible Biochemical Complexity -- c. The Argument from Biological Information. -- d. The Fine-Tuning Arguments -- (i) The Argument from Suspicious Improbability -- (ii) The Confirmatory Argument. **--** 3. The Scientifically Legitimate Uses of Design Inferences. **--** 4.References and Further Reading -- downloaded pdf to Note
intellectual_history  ancient_philosophy  medieval_philosophy  17thC  18thC  19thC  20thC  philosophy_of_religion  theology  natural_religion  rational_religion  Newtonianism  creation  design-nature  God-existence  God-attributes  Aquinas  analogy  Paley  complexity  cosmology  cosmological-fine-tuning  intelligent_design  creationism  natural_philosophy  evolution  Bible-as-history  bibliography  downloaded 
august 2015 by dunnettreader
Brooke Holmes; W. H. Shearin, eds. - Dynamic Reading: Studies in the Reception of Epicureanism - Oxford University Press
(..) examines the reception history of Epicurean philosophy through a series of eleven case studies, (..). Rather than attempting to separate an original Epicureanism from its later readings and misreadings, this collection studies the philosophy together with its subsequent reception, focusing in particular on the ways in which it has provided terms and conceptual tools for defining how we read and respond to texts, artwork, and the world more generally. *--* Introduction, Brooke Holmes and W. H. Shearin -- 1. Haunting Nepos: Atticus and the Performance of Roman Epicurean Death, W. H. Shearin -- 2. Epicurus's Mistresses: Pleasure, Authority, and Gender in the Reception of the Kuriai Doxai in the Second Sophistic, Richard Fletcher -- 3. Reading for Pleasure: Disaster and Digression in the First Renaissance Commentary on Lucretius, Gerard Passannante -- 4. Discourse ex nihilo: Epicurus and Lucretius in 16thC England, Adam Rzepka -- 5. Engendering Modernity: Epicurean Women from Lucretius to Rousseau, Natania Meeker -- 6. Oscillate and Reflect: La Mettrie, Materialist Physiology, and the Revival of the Epicurean Canonic, James Steintrager -- 7. Sensual Idealism: The Spirit of Epicurus and the Politics of Finitude in Kant and Hölderlin, Anthony Adler -- 8. The Sublime, Today?, Glenn Most -- 9. From Heresy to Nature: Leo Strauss's History of Modern Epicureanism, Benjamin Aldes Wurgaft -- 10. Epicurean Presences in Foucault's The Hermeneutics of the Subject, Alain Gigandet -- 11. Deleuze, Lucretius, and the Simulacrum of Naturalism, Brooke Holmes
books  kindle-available  intellectual_history  Latin_lit  literary_history  ancient_philosophy  ancient_Greece  ancient_Rome  Roman_Republic  Roman_Empire  Epicurean  Lucretius  influence-literary  reception  Renaissance  reader_response  readership  reading  16thC  English_lit  materialism  Enlightenment  French_Enlightenment  La_Mettrie  gender  gender_history  German_Idealism  Kant-aesthetics  Kant  Hölderlin  poetry  sublime  naturalism  Strauss  Foucault  Rousseau  Deleuze  lit_crit  new_historicism  subjectivity  finitude  death  literature-and-morality  literary_theory  postmodern  modernity  modernity-emergence  pleasure 
june 2015 by dunnettreader
Seth Holm - The Specter of Tantalus: Didactic Latency in "De rerum natura" | Project MUSE
From: Transactions of the American Philological Association, Volume 143, Number 2, Autumn 2013, pp. 385-403 | At the end of his third book, Lucretius concludes his arguments against the fear of death and the neurotic desires brought on by this fear with a metaphor that has been difficult for interpreters to fathom: et sitis aequa tenet vitai semper hiantis (3.1084). This paper offers a new reading of this passage as a tacit reference to the myth of Tantalus, which functions as a latent mythological allegory for chronic psychological dissatisfaction. This reading solves local problems of interpretation and, more significantly, provides insight into the didacticism of Lucretius’s sub-surface polemic against myth.
article  Project_MUSE  paywall  intellectual_history  ancient_Rome  ancient_philosophy  Epicurean  Lucretius  myth  allegory 
april 2015 by dunnettreader
Denis Larrivee and Adriana Gini - Neuroplasticity and the Reemergence of Virtue | Frontiers in Human Neuroscience 2014
Opinion ARTICLE - Front. Hum. Neurosci., 18 September 2014 | doi: 10.3389/fnhum.2014.00731 -- Is the philosophical construct of “habitus operativus bonus” compatible with the modern neuroscience concept of human flourishing through neuroplasticity? A consideration of prudence as a multidimensional regulator of virtue - Denis Larrivee1* and Adriana Gini2 - 1Educational Outreach Office, Catholic Diocese of Charleston, Charleston, SC, USA - 2Neuroradiology Division, Neuroscience Department, San Camillo-Forlanini Medical Center, Rome, Italy Unlike ancient Greece where personal virtue was the route to fulfillment, modern man typically seeks to improve human well-being by external means, in a process known as the medicalization of society. The apparent novelty of recent proposals in psychological theory to develop character strength, therefore, lies in their reemphasis on a personal implementation of positive values. Among the factors contributing to a new look at self-determination has been the capacity for the neural substrate to selectively alter itself via neuroplasticity. Indeed, the confluence of past and contemporary thinking may presage a consideration of neurobiological instantiation within which virtuous behavior may be enhanced in accord with principles governing neuroplastic change. But what are virtues and positive traits? And to what extent can these conceptions inform our growing understanding of the neural contribution to human behavior? -- full title is enormous, referring to Aquinas formula and written by at least one author committed to Catholic Thomism - discussion of Aristotle also -- downloaded pdf to Note
article  philosophy  ancient_philosophy  Aristotle  Aquinas  Thomism-21stC  moral_philosophy  mind  habit  neuroscience  cognition  plasticity  prudence  practical_reason  character  virtue  psychology  brain  brain-development  self-development  self-regulation  phronesis  bibliography  downloaded  EF-add 
november 2014 by dunnettreader
Randal Samstag - Sorabji’s Self | Notes from my library
These days we tend to think that Descartes invented the mind/body “problem”, but actually, the notion that the mind, self or soul exists and is an independent entity from the body goes back at least to Augustine, who first maintained that this independent soul couldn’t possibly be mistaken about the existence of itself. In his book, Self, Richard Sorabji maintains that the argument probably goes back further, to Plotinus. Sorabji mostly traces the roots of this argument in Western thinking back to the pre-classical through Hellenistic period of Greek philosophy: (..) But he doesn’t stop there. There is good discussion of Parfit’s Reasons and Persons. He even gives a brief survey of Indian philosophy (..)for a continuation of this story one really needs to follow the path of Sorabji’s University of London and Oxford student Jonardon Garneri in his books The Concealed Art of the Soul and the more recent book of the same name as Sorabji’s, Self. Of which more later. Sorabji’s answer to the question of the self? He is no Cartesian. But he resists the formidable attacks of the Materialists. He is an embodied self man: “By a ‘person’ I mean someone who has psychological states and does things, by a ‘thinker’ someone who has thoughts. This having and doing can be summed up by saying that a person owns psychological states and actions. He or she also owns a body and bodily characteristics. A person is not just a stream of experiences and actions, but the owner of experiences and actions . . .” I find his argument generally convincing, but the finer details of the story are better developed (I think) in his student’s book of the same name.
books  reviews  kindle  intellectual_history  self  soul  mind  mind-body  ancient_philosophy  Hellenism  Neoplatonism  Augustine  Cartesian  Hobbes 
november 2014 by dunnettreader
Xavier Marquez -Cicero and the Stability of States by (2010) :: SSRN
Victoria University of Wellington -- APSA 2009 Toronto Meeting Paper -- History of Political Thought, Vol. 32, No. 3, pp. 397-423, 2011 -- I argue for the originality and interest of Cicero’s views on the stability of political communities. After a survey of ancient ideas on the mixed constitution (the framework for thinking about the stability of political communities in the ancient world), I show how Cicero adapted these ideas to analyze the Roman situation of his time. Cicero’s version of the theory of the mixed constitution is notable for two innovations: an argument that stability is possible even under conditions of high inequality, and an account of constitutional mixture that emphasizes the role of the “monarchic” element in promoting concord and stability and meeting unexpected challenges. I show, however, that this account unfortunately made it clear that the Roman crisis of Cicero’s time was more or less insoluble in ways that would preserve the republic. -- PDF File: 42 pgs -- Keywords: Cicero, History of Political Thought, States, Stability, Plato, Aristotle -- downloaded to Dropbox
article  SSRN  political_philosophy  intellectual_history  ancient_philosophy  ancient_Greece  ancient_Rome  ancient_history  Cicero  Plato  Aristotle  stability  Roman_Republic  government-forms  adaptability  mixed_government  republics-Ancient_v_Modern  republicanism  inequality  class_conflict  limited_monarchy  monarchical_republic  downloaded  EF-add 
november 2014 by dunnettreader
Iakovos Vasiliou interview with Richard Marshall - Plato aims at virtue » 3:AM Magazine
Blurb of his book, Aiming at Virtue in Plato -- This study of Plato's ethics focuses on the concept of virtue. Based on detailed readings of the most prominent Platonic dialogues on virtue, it argues that there is a central yet previously unnoticed conceptual distinction in Plato between the idea of virtue as the supreme aim of one's actions and the determination of which action-tokens or -types are virtuous. Appreciating the 'aiming/determining distinction' provides detailed and mutually consistent readings of the most well-known Platonic dialogues on virtue as well as original interpretations of central Platonic questions. Unlike most examinations of Plato's ethics, this study does not take as its centrepiece the 'eudaimonist framework', which focuses on the relationship between virtue and happiness. Instead, it argues that the dialogues themselves begin with the idea of the supremacy of virtue, examine how that claim can be defended, and address how to determine what constitutes the virtuous action. -- professor at CUNY
books  moral_philosophy  moral_psychology  ancient_philosophy  Plato  Aristotle  eudaimonia  virtue  virtue_ethics  deontology  Williams_Bernard 
november 2014 by dunnettreader
Robert Bellah - The renouncers « The Immanent Frame - August 2008
This post is a condensed version of a keynote delivered at a conference "The Axial Age and its Consequences for Subsequent History and the Present" sponsored by the John Templeton Foundation in cooperation with Robert Bellah and Hans Joas. -- After discussing Habermas' theory of a legitimation crisis in the axial civilizations and the critique - political, moral and religious - of the key axial age figures whom he calls "the renouncers" -- The great utopias served for the renouncers as stark contrasts to the actual world, and their vision of that other world could be called “theory” in Plato’s sense. But the very distance they felt from the world to which they returned made possible another kind of “theory,” another kind of seeing—that is, a distant, critical view of the actual world in which they lived. The renouncer sees the world with new eyes: as Plato says of the ones who have returned to the cave, they see the shadows for what they are, not naively as do those who have never left. One could say that the ideological illusion is gone. Once disengaged vision becomes possible then theory can take another turn: it can abandon any moral stance at all and look simply at what will be useful, what can make the powerful and exploitative even more so. -- The axial age gave us “theory” in two senses, and neither of them has been unproblematic ever since. The great utopian visions have motivated some of the noblest achievements of mankind; they have also motivated some of the worst actions of human beings. Theory in the sense of disengaged knowing, inquiry for the sake of understanding, with or without moral evaluation, has brought its own kind of astounding achievements but also given humans the power to destroy their environment and themselves. Both kinds of theoria have criticized but also justified the class society that first came into conscious view in the axial age. They have provided the intellectual tools for efforts to reform and efforts to repress. It is a great heritage. ... It has given us the great tool of criticism. How will we use it? -- downloaded page as pdf to Note
sociology_of_religion  intellectual_history  religious_history  axial_age  cultural_critique  political_philosophy  moral_philosophy  Buddhism  Old_Testament  prophets  China  India  ancient_Greece  ancient_philosophy  Indian_religion  Indian_philosophy  Confuscianism  ancient_religions  Chinese_history  Plato  Plato-Republic  Aristotle  phronesis  utopian  downloaded  EF-add 
november 2014 by dunnettreader
Kenan Malik - THE DEATH OF GOD AND THE FALL OF MAN | Pandaemonium July 2014
Transcript of talk for Institute of Ideas -- The moral vision of modernity may have been, in other words, nourished by the crumbling of the God-ordained order. It was – it had to be – however, also rooted in faith, but a faith of a different kind – faith that humans were capable of acting rationally and morally without guidance from beyond. It was through the 19thC that religious faith truly began to crumble. But it was also in the 19thC that faith in the human capacity to act without God began also to erode. The optimism that had once suffused the humanist impulse began to ebb away and there began to develop a much darker view of what it meant to be human. By the late 19thC European societies came to experience both a crisis of faith and a ‘crisis of reason’, the beginnings of a set of trends that were to become highly significant in the 20thC – the erosion of Enlightenment optimism, a disenchantment with ideas of progress, a disbelief in concepts of truth, the growth of a much darker view of human nature. -- The death of God, in other words, went hand in hand with what we might call, if we were to continue to use religious symbolism, the Fall of Man. And the Fall of Man transformed the meaning of the Death of God. God is a metaphor for the desire for an authority beyond ourselves to frame our existence and guide our lives, the death of God for the insistence on acting without guidance from beyond. There are two aspects to the death of God. The decline of religious belief and the growth of a new faith in the capacity of humans to act without guidance from beyond. The first has always been overstated. The second has always been undervalued. - frames talk around Anscombe and MacIntyre
intellectual_history  religious_history  cultural_history  18thC  19thC  20thC  morality-Christian  religious_belief  ancient_philosophy  ancient_Greece  pagans  gods-antiquity  monotheism  teleology  human_nature  morality-conventional  morality-objective  progress  Enlightenment  Fin-de-Siècle  humanism  anti-humanism  Counter-Enlightenment  political_philosophy  reason  Anscombe  MacIntyre  tradition  identity  autonomy  individualism  community  communitarian  social_order  change-social  historical_change  historicism  EF-add 
august 2014 by dunnettreader
Devin Henry - "Embryological Models in Ancient Philosophy" by | Phronesis 50.1 (2005): 1-42.
Devin Henry, The University of Western Ontario -- Historically embryogenesis has been among the most philosophically intriguing phenomena. In this paper I focus on one aspect of biological development that was particularly perplexing to the ancients: self-organisation. For many ancients, the fact that an organism determines the important features of its own development required a special model for understanding how this was possible. This was especially true for Aristotle, Alexander, and Simplicius who all looked to contemporary technology to supply that model. However, they did not all agree on what kind of device should be used. In this paper I explore the way these ancients made use of technology as a model for the developing embryo. However, my purpose here is more than just the historical interest of knowing which devices were used by whom and how each of them worked; I shall largely ignore the details of how the various devices actually worked. Instead I shall look at the use of technology from a philosophical perspective. As we shall see, the different choices of device reveal fundamental differences in the way each thinker understood the nature of biological development itself. Thus, the central aim of this paper is to examine, not who used what devices and how they worked, but why they used those particular devices and what they thought their functioning could tell us about the nature of embryological phenomena. -- downloaded pdf to Note
article  intellectual_history  ancient_philosophy  Aristotle  natural_philosophy  history_of_science  ancient_Greece  biology  generation  inheritance  development-biological  embryology  scientific_culture  scientific_method  downloaded  EF-add 
july 2014 by dunnettreader
Devin Henry. "Organismal Natures" | Apeiron: a journal for ancient philosophy and science (2008): 47-74.
Aristotle agrees with the negative conclusion of Galen that the growth and development of living things cannot be due to material forces operating according to chance. For Aristotle, the process of development is structured according to the form of the organism being generated by it. Development ‘follows upon’ the organism’s substantial being and exists for the sake of it rather than vice versa. This confers a certain order and direction on the process that cannot be accounted for in terms of the random motions of atoms or the undirected actions of Love and Strife (Empedocles). He accepts that natural generation involves material-level forces of the sort Democritus proposed; however, he insists that when operating by themselves these undirected causes would only produce a living thing by chance. And generation is far too regular for that. But Aristotle rejects the further inference — endorsed by Galen — that the teleological structure imposed on a developing organism must be traced to an intelligent agent that puts the organism together according to its end like some kind of internalized Demiurge. Nature, Aristotle says, does not deliberate. -- By invoking ‘natures’ as the cause of development, Galen says, Aristotle offers an account which is entirely vacuous. On the other hand, Denis Walsh has recently argued that the concept of Aristotelian natures plays the same role in development as the modern concept of phenotypic plasticity and that in this sense Aristotelian natures have an indispensable role to play contemporary evolutionary biology. -- My aim in this paper is not to defend an Aristotelian approach to modern biology but rather to explore the concept of organismal natures in the context of Aristotle’s teleology. -- downloaded pdf to Note
article  intellectual_history  ancient_philosophy  Aristotle  natural_philosophy  history_of_science  biology  generation  inheritance  development-biological  teleology  design-nature  materialism  Democritus  Empedocles  Galen  forms  evolutionary_biology  downloaded  EF-add 
july 2014 by dunnettreader
Devin Henry - "Aristotle's Pluralistic Realism" | The Monist 94.2 (2011): 198-222
The University of Western Ontario -- In this paper I explore Aristotle’s views on natural kinds and the compatibility of pluralism and realism, a topic that has generated considerable interest among contemporary philosophers. I argue that, when it came to zoology, Aristotle denied that there is only one way of organizing the diversity of the living world into natural kinds that will yield a single, unified system of classification. Instead, living things can be grouped and regrouped into various cross-cutting kinds on the basis of objective similarities and differences in ways that subserve the explanatory context. Since the explanatory aims of zoology are diverse and variegated, the kinds it recognizes must be equally diverse and variegated. At the same time, there are certain constraints on which kinds can be selected. And those constraints derive more from the causal structure of the world than from the proclivities of the classifier (hence the realism). This distinguishes Aristotle’s version of pluralistic realism from those contemporary versions (like Dupré’s “promiscuous realism”) that treat all or most classifications of a given domain as equally legitimate and not just a sub-set of kinds recognized by the science that studies it. By contrast, Aristotle privileges scientifically important kinds on the basis of their role in causal investigations. On this picture natural kinds are those kinds with the sort of causal structure that allows them to enter into scientific explanations. In the final section I argue that Aristotle’s zoology should remain of interest to philosophers and biologists alike insofar as it combines a pluralistic form of realism with a rank-free approach to classification. - didn't download
article  intellectual_history  Aristotle  history_of_science  philosophy_of_science  ancient_philosophy  analytical_philosophy  natural_kinds  classification  species  explanation  causation  biology  animals  EF-add 
july 2014 by dunnettreader
Devin Henry - "The Failure of Evolution in Antiquity" in Blackwell Companion to Ancient Science, Medicine and Technology (2014)
Devin Henry, The University of Western Ontario -- This paper traces the emergence and rejection of evolutionary thinking in antiquity. It examines Empedocles' original theory of evolution and why his ideas failed to gain traction among his predecessors. -- Devin Henry. "The Failure of Evolution in Antiquity" Blackwell Companion to Ancient Science, Medicine and Technology. Ed. Georgia Irby. Blackwell-Wiley, 2014. -- downloaded pdf to Note
intellectual_history  history_of_science  philosophy_of_science  natural_philosophy  biology  ancient_philosophy  ancient_Greece  evolutionary_biology  evolution  time  downloaded  EF-add 
july 2014 by dunnettreader
"THE INTELLIGIBLE CREATOR-GOD AND THE INTELLIGENT SOUL OF THE COSMOS IN" by Jason G. Rheins | Penn Dissertations
Advisors - Charles H. Kahn and Susan Sauvé Meyer, Paul Guyer -- When Plato discusses the World-soul, cosmic intellect (nous), and the Demiurge, he approaches them theologically, i.e. as being the subjects of an account of the nature of the gods, but few works in the last half-century or more have addressed the ‘players’ in Plato’s theology as such. -- I analyze Plato’s various accounts of those divine things that are immanent in the world of change (e.g. the World-soul) and those that are said to be transcendent intelligibles (e.g. the Forms and the Demiurge) in order to determine what Plato’s gods are, and what roles they play in his system. -- The invention of the World-soul is revealed to be Plato’s way of instantiating intellect in the cosmos in order to suit the demands of his natural and moral philosophy, while his esoteric account of the Demiurge resolves any tensions between his immanent theology and his metaphysics, and suggests, semi-literally, the role that timeless, intelligible goodness plays in organizing the sensible world of change. -- Rheins, Jason G., "THE INTELLIGIBLE CREATOR-GOD AND THE INTELLIGENT SOUL OF THE COSMOS IN PLATO’S THEOLOGY AND METAPHYSICS" (2010). Publicly Accessible Penn Dissertations. Paper 184. -- downloaded pdf to Note
intellectual_history  ancient_philosophy  ancient_Greece  religious_history  theology  metaphysics  moral_philosophy  creation  gods-antiquity  God-attributes  God-existence  immanence  transcendence  forms  ideas-theories  Plato  change-metaphysics  cosmology  good  time  timeless  downloaded  EF-add 
july 2014 by dunnettreader
"PROLEGOMENA TO A PROCESS THEORY OF NATURAL LAW" by Mark C. Modak-Truran
Mark C. Modak-Truran, Mississippi College School of Law -- Two contemporary quandaries in legal theory provide an occasion for a revival of interest in natural law theories of law. First, the debate about legal indeterminacy has made it clear that law cannot function autonomously—as a self-contained set of rules—but requires a normative justification of judges’ decisions in hard cases. In addition, Steven D. Smith has persuasively argued that there is an "ontological gap" between the practice of law, which presupposes a classical or religious ontology, and legal theory, which presupposes a scientific ontology (i.e., scientific materialism) that rejects religious ontology. This article demonstrates how the process philosophy of Alfred North Whitehead and the radical empiricism of William James support a new process theory of natural law. Under this theory, judges resolve legal indeterminacy by determining what maximizes the telos beauty—in accordance with the circumstances of the case and the social perfection possible within that society—rather than by relying on fixed, antiquated natural laws. Process natural law also closes the ontological gap by providing an ontology that unifies the moral insights of religion with the insights of modern science. -- Mark C. Modak-Truran. "PROLEGOMENA TO A PROCESS THEORY OF NATURAL LAW" HANDBOOK OF WHITEHEADIAN PROCESS THOUGHT (1st ed). Ed. Michel Weber and Will Desmond. Frankfurt: Ontos Verlag, 2008. 507-536. -- downloaded pdf to Note
philosophy_of_law  political_philosophy  legal_history  legal_theory  natural_law  foundationalism  anti-foundationalism  social_theory  process_theology  laws_of_nature  divine_command  divine_right  legitimacy  authority  Whitehead  James_William  moral_philosophy  materialism  reductionism  science-and-religion  theology  ancient_philosophy  republics-Ancient_v_Modern  pragmatism  legal_indeterminancy  downloaded  EF-add 
july 2014 by dunnettreader
Brian Leiter - Nietzsche Against the Philosophical Canon (2013) :: SSRN
U of Chicago, Public Law Working Paper No. 438 -- Nietzsche views the Western philosophical tradition as organized around a conception of philosophy deriving from Socrates. According to this (loosely) Socratic philosophical canon: (1) Philosophy, as the “love of wisdom,” aims for knowledge of timeless and non-empirical truths, including truths about the good and the right; (2) Knowledge of the truth is the overriding value in philosophy and is also essential for living well; and (3) Philosophical knowledge is acquired through the exercise of reason, understood as a faculty that can operate independently, in whole or in part, of a posteriori evidence. This paper explores Nietzsche's reasons for rejecting this conception of philosophy on each count, especially as developed in his book, Twilight of the Idols. Nietzsche's replacement of metaphysical speculation with psychological diagnosis is compared to Carnap's own critique of metaphysics, and helps explain Carnap's high appraisal of Nietzsche compared to other major figures in post-Kantian German philosophy. Nietzsche's rejection of the traditional philosophical canon is contrasted with that of other critics of the tradition, including Marx, Quine, Heidegger, and Wittgenstein. The reaction against naturalism in recent Anglophone philosophy is offered, finally, as a case study in support of Nietzsche's skepticism about the philosophical canon. --Keywords: Nietzsche, Socrates, Quine, Marx, Heidegger, Wittgenstein, Carnap, meta-philosophy, ethics -- downloaded pdf to Note
paper  SSRN  intellectual_history  19thC  20thC  21stC  ancient_philosophy  moral_philosophy  moral_psychology  human_nature  metaphysics  metaethics  epistemology  truth  good  flourishing  Socrates  post-truth  German_Idealism  Marx  Carnap  Quine  Heidegger  Wittgenstein  canon  ethics  reason  apriori  empiricism  naturalism  scepticism  downloaded  EF-add 
july 2014 by dunnettreader
Natural Law Theory: The Modern Tradition by Brian Bix :: SSRN
Posted 1999 - chapter in OXFORD HANDBOOK OF JURISPRUDENCE AND PHILOSOPHY OF LAW, Jules L. Coleman & Scott Shapiro, eds., Oxford University Press, 2002 -- The works of contemporary Natural Law theorists, including Lon Fuller, Michael Moore, Ronald Dworkin, and John Finnis, are discussed critically and their views are placed within the context of a tradition thousands of years old. In the summary of the broader context, the paper considers the connections and relationships between natural law theory and nature, God, natural rights, law, and legal positivism. The article also includes an extensive (but not exhaustive) bibliography. -- downloaded pdf to Note
chapter  books  SSRN  philosophy_of_law  legal_system  legal_history  intellectual_history  religious_history  ancient_philosophy  medieval_philosophy  Aquinas  moral_philosophy  natural_law  natural_rights  positivism-legal  positive_law  obligation  divine_command  sociology_of_law  nature  natural_religion  bibliography  downloaded  EF-add 
july 2014 by dunnettreader
John Passmore, The Perfectibility of Man ( 3rd edition 2000) - Online Library of Liberty
John Passmore, The Perfectibility of Man (3rd ed.) (Indianapolis: Liberty Fund, 2000). 07/13/2014. <http://oll.libertyfund.org/titles/670> -- A reviewer of the original edition in 1970 of The Perfectibility of Man well summarizes the scope and significance of this renowned work by one of the leading philosophers of the twentieth century: “Beginning with an analytic discussion of the various ways in which perfectibility has been interpreted, Professor Passmore traces its long history from the Greeks to the present day, by way of Christianity, orthodox and heterodox, the Renaissance, the Enlightenment, anarchism, utopias, communism, psychoanalysis, and evolutionary theories of man and society. Both in its broad sweep and in countless supporting reflections, it is a journey through spiritual scenery of the most majestic and exhilarating kind.” Thoroughly and elegantly, Passmore explores the history of the idea of perfectibility – manifest in the ideology of perfectibilism – and its consequences, which have invariably been catastrophic for individual liberty and responsibility in private, social, economic, and political life. -- downloaded pdf to Note
books  etexts  intellectual_history  metaphysics  theology  ancient_philosophy  medieval_philosophy  Early_Christian  Renaissance  Enlightenment  French_Enlightenment  German_Idealism  Romanticism  political_economy  psychoanalysis  utopian  anarchical_society  communism  Enlightenment_Project  evolution-social  evolution-as-model  15thC  16thC  17thC  18thC  19thC  20thC  progress  perfectibility  human_nature  moral_psychology  moral_philosophy  political_philosophy  downloaded  EF-add 
july 2014 by dunnettreader
The Works of John Adams, vol. 4 (Novanglus, Thoughts on Government, Defence of the Constitution) - Online Library of Liberty
John Adams, The Works of John Adams, Second President of the United States: with a Life of the Author, Notes and Illustrations, by his Grandson Charles Francis Adams (Boston: Little, Brown and Co., 1856). 10 volumes. Vol. 4. 07/12/2014. <http://oll.libertyfund.org/titles/2102> -- A 10 volume collection of Adams’ most important writings, letters, and state papers, edited by his grandson. Vol. 4 contains Novanglus [history of the American colonies and their relations with Britain from 1754 to 1774], Thoughts on Government, and Defence of the Constitutions [descriptions of modern and ancient republics (categorized as democratic, aristocratic and, some ancient, as monarchic), and writings on the history and theories of forms of government by ancient and modern historians and philosophers. Lists Dr Swift as well as Hume -must have read 4 Last Years. -- downloaded pdf to Note
books  etexts  18thC  intellectual_history  political_philosophy  Adams_John  ancient_history  ancient_philosophy  ancient_Greece  ancient_Rome  republics-Ancient_v_Modern  government-forms  historians-and-politics  British_history  British_politics  British_Empire-constitutional_structure  British_foreign_policy  Swift  Hume  American_colonies  American_Revolution  George_III  Parliamentary_supremacy  limited_monarchy  English_constitution  UK_government-colonies  British_Empire  downloaded  EF-add 
july 2014 by dunnettreader
David Fordyce The Elements of Moral Philosophy [1754], ed. Thomas Kennedy - Online Library of Liberty
David Fordyce, The Elements of Moral Philosophy, in Three Books with a Brief Account of the Nature, Progress, and Origin of Philosophy, ed. Thomas Kennedy (Indianapolis: Liberty Fund, 2003). 07/11/2014. <http://oll.libertyfund.org/titles/886>
Available in the following formats: -- Fordyce’s Elements of Moral Philosophy was a notable contribution to the curriculum in moral philosophy and was one of the most widely circulated texts in moral philosophy in the second half of the eighteenth century. -- Doddsley published it posthumously (d. 1751) - the basis had served as the Moral Philosophy article in Doddsley's popular "The Preceptor" 1748. Also used for the Moral Philosophy entry in the Encyclopedia Britannica into the 19thC
books  etexts  18thC  intellectual_history  Enlightenment  Scottish_Enlightenment  moral_psychology  moral_philosophy  ancient_philosophy  textbooks  EF-add 
july 2014 by dunnettreader
James Schmidt - Adorno on Kant and Enlightenment (in 1959) | Persistent Enlightenment - June 2014
Re Adorno lectures on Kant 1st Critique - difference between Adorno’s treatment of Kant and ..German histories of philosophy .. which be traced back at least to Hegel, always saw Kant as a thinker who represented a *break* with the Enlightenment. .. By treating Voltaire and Kant united in an attack on “dogmatic” approaches to metaphysics, Adorno advances an interpretation of ..Kant and the Enlightenment that — like Cassirer — stressed the extent to which the Enlightenment was a European movement and that German thinkers were a part of it. ?.German universities were still home to scholars who, between 1933-1945 labored very hard to distinguishn the profound and German Kant from the superficialities of the French Enlightenment, the political stakes ..should not be minimized. ..Adorno concludes that 1st Critique and Candide ..were united in a common endeavor. --"...a catastrophe for the history of German thought ..the cliche that labels enlightenment ‘superficial’ or ‘facile’. ?..the effect of the Romantic, and ultimately theological, belittling of enlightenment was to ensure that much of the enlightened thought that flourished in Germany actually assumed the shape imagined by the obscurantists." -- "..I am ..using the term ‘enlightenment’ in the comprehensive meaning given to it in DofE... to describe the general trend of Western demythologization that may be said to have begun ..with..Xenophanes... ..to demonstrate the presence of anthropomorphism. ?.. objectivity, existence and absolute dignity have been ascribed to a whole series of assertions, doctrines, concepts and ideas of whatever kind, which in reality can be reduced to the products of human beings. ?..what the language of psychology would call mere projections, and since it is merely man that has produced these concepts from within himself they are not entitled to any absolute dignity." This “comprehensive” sense of enlightenment .. provides the project that the 1st Critique allegedly carries forward.
books  Adorno  intellectual_history  Germany  18thC  19thC  20thC  Kant  Voltaire  Enlightenment  Counter-Enlightenment  German_Idealism  Romanticism  Hegel  Enlightenment_Project  Enlightenment-ongoing  anthropomorphism  ancient_Greece  ancient_philosophy  comparative_religion  metaphysics  French_Enlightenment  Leibniz  theodicy  critical_theory  cultural_critique  Marxist  Nazis  bildung  irrational  rationalist  myth  reason  EF-add 
june 2014 by dunnettreader
Peter Kivy - The Possessor and the Possessed: Handel, Mozart, Beethoven, and the Idea of Musical Genius (Yale Series in the Philosophy and Theory) | Amazon.com: eBook
The concept of genius intrigues us. Artistic geniuses have something other people don't have. In some cases that something seems to be a remarkable kind of inspiration that permits the artist to exceed his own abilities. It is as if the artist is suddenly possessed, as if some outside force flows through them at the moment of creation. In other cases genius seems best explained as a natural gift. The artist is the possessor of an extra talent that enables the production of masterpiece after masterpiece. This book explores the concept of artistic genius and how it came to be symbolised by three great composers of the modern era: Handel, Mozart, and Beethoven.
books  kindle-available  music_history  art_history  art_criticism  literary_history  aesthetics  18thC  19thC  creativity  genius  Handel  Mozart  Plato  Longinus  ancient_philosophy  poetry  rhetoric  sublime  EF-add 
may 2014 by dunnettreader
Bryn Mawr Classical Review (BMCR) - Home
Bryn Mawr Classical Review (BMCR) (ISSN 1055-7660) publishes timely open-access, peer-reviewed reviews of current scholarly work in the field of classical studies (including archaeology). This site is the authoritative archive of BMCR's publication, from 1990 to the present. Reviews from August 2008 on are also posted on our blog.
website  books  reviews  intellectual_history  literary_history  ancient_history  ancient_philosophy  social_history  cultural_history  economic_history  archaeology  art_history  religious_history  religious_culture  historiography  ancient_Greece  ancient_Rome  Greek_lit  Latin_lit  poetry  theater  Augustan_Rome  pre-Socratics  Plato  Socrates  Aristotle  Hellenism  Cicero  Stoicism  Epicurean  Virgil  Horace  Ovid  Roman_Empire  Roman_Republic  Roman_law 
may 2014 by dunnettreader
Michael J. Griffin, review - Carlo Natali, D. S. Hutchinson (trans & ed.), Aristotle: His Life and School // Notre Dame Philosophical Reviews // Jan 2014
D. S. Hutchinson has delivered a meticulously edited and revised English translation of Carlo Natali's standard-setting philosophical biography of Aristotle. The result is an outstanding, accessible book that manages to improve on its predecessor, blending narrative concision with a comprehensive appraisal of the sources and shifting gracefully between storytelling, detective work, and institutional history. Intact here are Natali's most important and original findings of 1991: Aristotle's biography culminates in the discovery, defense, and institutionalization of a new way of life, the bios theoretikosor intellectual life, understood not as a vocation ("a Beruf in the Weberian sense,") nor as a contribution to the socialization and education of the young (paideia), but as a personal choice, "a way of giving meaning" to an aristocratic Greek's life by expending scholē (freedom, leisure) on philosophy; the Peripatetic school down to Lyco, then, was a foundation facilitating the pursuit of this way of life on the part of a small community. Natali's helpful treatment of Aristotle's methods of teaching, the importance of books in the Peripatos (ch. 3) and the course of Aristotelian studies since Zeller (ch. 4) are also substantially unchanged, though improved in details, and augmented by a new postscript taking account of developments in scholarship since 1991. This is really an updated and improved edition of the 1991 book in a new language, with the full collaboration of the author and a weighty dose of enhancement and refinement by an editor who is respected as a scholar in his own right.
books  reviews  biography  intellectual_history  ancient_Greece  ancient_philosophy  Aristotle  education  elite_culture  leisure  EF-add 
march 2014 by dunnettreader
Thomas P. Miles, review - John Lippitt and George Pattison (eds.), The Oxford Handbook of Kierkegaard // Notre Dame Philosophical Reviews // Feb 2014
In this prodigious collection, John Lippitt and George Pattison have brought together some of the most established and innovative Kierkegaard scholars. The volume is impressive both for its range and the quality of its contributions. In what follows, I make some general remarks about the volume as a whole and then discuss six of the essays in greater detail.
books  reviews  intellectual_history  19thC  philosophy  theology  Kierkegaard  ancient_philosophy  ancient_Greece 
march 2014 by dunnettreader
Luca Castagnoli, review - Zina Giannopoulou, Plato's Theaetetus as a Second Apology // Notre Dame Philosophical Reviews // March 2014
Reviewer isn't impressed, but the review has useful discussion of Socrates across multiple dialogues and Plato's techniques. -- In this compact monograph Zina Giannopoulou makes a case for the value of 'interweaving' Plato's Apology and Theaetetus, that is, for 'bring[ing] together the two dialogues on the basis of their thematic interconnectedness and . . . argu[ing] for a "mutually enriching reading" of them' (3). This approach clearly aspires to go beyond the uncontroversial acknowledgement of the rich intertextuality and web of philosophical resonances interconnecting virtually all the Platonic works. According to Giannopoulou, Socrates' defence speech in the Apology 'serves as the subtext which informs [Plato's] exploration of knowledge in Theaetetus' (3) and 'offers a dramatically apt and comprehensive framework that unifies the dialogue and explains many of its puzzles' (4). She describes the Theaetetus as 'a philosophically sophisticated elaboration of Apology that successfully differentiates Socrates from the sophists' by 'enacting' their distinction: it represents Socrates as a barren 'mental midwife' (2) who practises the craft of testing and discarding the sophists' inconsistent teachings about knowledge which Theaetetus unreflectively espoused.
books  reviews  ancient_philosophy  ancient_Greece  Plato  Socrates  epistemology  dialectic  Sophists  EF-add 
march 2014 by dunnettreader
Nietzsche and Antiquity (Edited by Paul Bishop) 9781571132826 - Boydell & Brewer
This volume collects a wide-ranging set of essays examining Friedrich Nietzsche's engagement with antiquity in all its aspects. It investigates Nietzsche's reaction and response to the concept of "classicism," with particular reference to his work on Greek culture as a philologist in Basel and later as a philosopher of modernity, and to his reception of German classicism in all his texts. The book should be of interest to students of ancient history and classics, philosophy, comparative literature, and Germanistik. Taken together, these papers suggest that classicism is both a more significant, and a more contested, concept for Nietzsche than is often realized, and it demonstrates the need for a return to a close attention to the intellectual-historical context in terms of which Nietzsche saw himself operating. An awareness of the rich variety of academic backgrounds, methodologies, and techniques of reading evinced in these chapters is perhaps the only way for the contemporary scholar to come to grips with what classicism meant for Nietzsche, and hence what Nietzsche means for us today. The book is divided into five sections -- The Classical Greeks; Pre-Socratics and Pythagoreans, Cynics and Stoics; Nietzsche and the Platonic Tradition; Contestations; and German Classicism -- and constitutes the first major study of Nietzsche and the classical tradition in a quarter of a century.
books  find  intellectual_history  literary_history  cultural_critique  cultural_history  ancient_Greece  Greek_lit  ancient_philosophy  19thC  Germany  historicism  philology  pre-Socratics  Platonism  Plato  Stoicism  German_Idealism  German_lit  moral_philosophy  aesthetics  EF-add 
march 2014 by dunnettreader
Robert J Fogelin : Pyrrhonian Reflections on Knowledge and Justification (1997) : 9780195089875 | Book Depository
This work, written from a neo-Pyrrhonian perspective, is an examination of contemporary theories of knowledge and justification. It takes ideas primarily found in Sextus Empiricus's Outlines of Pyrrhonism, restates them in a modern idiom, and then asks whether any contemporary theory of knowledge meets the challenges they raise. The first part, entitled "Gettier and the Problem of Knowledge," attempts to rescue our ordinary concept of knowledge from those philosophers who have assigned burdens to it that it cannot bear. Properly understood, Fogelin shows that the concept of knowledge is unproblematic. The second part of this study, called "Agrippa and the Problem of Justification," examines Agrippa's contribution to Pyrrhonism, a systematic reduction of its procedures which came to be known as the "Five Modes Leading to the Suspension of Belief." These modes present a completely general procedure for refuting any claim a dogmatist might make. Though largely unnoticed, there is, according to Fogelin, an uncanny resemblance between problems posed by Agrippa's "Five Modes" and those that contemporary epistemologists address under the heading of a theory ofjustification. Fogelin examines the strongest contemporary theories of justification--in both foundationalist and anti-foundationalist forms. The conclusion is that recent philosophical writings on justification have made no significant progress in responding to the Pyrrhonian problems these writings have addressed.
books  epistemology  scepticism  Pyrrhonism  20thC  21stC  analytical_philosophy  ancient_philosophy 
march 2014 by dunnettreader
Richard Marshall - Stewart Home’s po-mo homer » 3:AM Magazine
As much an essay on post Kantian (and post Hegelian) German philosophy -- Marxism, materialism, phenomenology hermeneutics, post Kantian, structuralist, poststructuralist, especially Nietzsche and Heidegger -- as on an album of readings of his work by Home. And a further riff on epistemology and varieties of scepticism, including a sort of take on Pyrrhonism as not an extreme version of scepticism. Heidegger's misreading of Nietzsche is of a piece with his embrace of the fascist side of Plato, which was part of Nietzsche's rejection of even the non Socratic Plato. Further long riff on Beiser rejection of Kantian aesthetics in Diotima's Children and the lack of aesthetic criteria after the avant_guard. Home attacks the shallow art world from another direction - mostly as a bourgeois status game.
books  intellectual_history  19thC  20thC  21stC  fate  free_will  gods-antiquity  ancient_religions  myth  tragedy  Nietzsche  Heidegger  epistemology  moral_philosophy  ancient_philosophy  Plato  Homer  pre-Socratics  aesthetics  Kant-aesthetics  avant_guard  materialism  Marxist  EF-add 
march 2014 by dunnettreader
Vivienne Brown - The Dialogic Experience of Conscience: Adam Smith and the Voices of Stoicism | JSTOR: Eighteenth-Century Studies, Vol. 26, No. 2 (Winter, 1992-1993), pp. 233-260
Lots of Shaftesbury and the Stoics as well as Hutcheson before she gets into TMS. Published right before her book, so undoubtedly covers some of the topics in the book -- though don't know how much Bakhtin was in the book -- downloaded pdf to Note
article  jstor  intellectual_history  ancient_philosophy  18thC  social_theory  moral_philosophy  moral_sentiments  morality-innate  sociability  Stoicism  recognition  self-love  self-and-other  sympathy  conscience  Bakhtin  bibliography  downloaded  EF-add 
february 2014 by dunnettreader
Vivienne Brown - "Rights" in Aristotle's "Politics" and "Nicomachean Ethics"? | JSTOR: The Review of Metaphysics, Vol. 55, No. 2 (Dec., 2001), pp. 269-295
Follows up lengthy debates (especially Review of Metaphysics symposium in mid 1990s) - she argues that rights weren't part of Greek political or ethical theories re justice etc. -- useful for lit survey as well as how she sees Politics and Nicomachean Ethics working together or leaving some things not addressed --didn't download
article  jstor  intellectual_history  political_philosophy  moral_philosophy  ancient_philosophy  ancient_Greece  Aristotle  natural_rights  human_rights  justice  civic_virtue  bibliography  EF-add 
february 2014 by dunnettreader
Special Issue -Living Alone Together [Introduction and key article by Tzvetan Todorov] | JSTOR: New Literary History, Vol. 27, No. 1, Winter, 1996
Issue Introduction - Living Alone Together (pp. 1-14) Tzvetan Todorov and Marilyn Gaddis Rose. *--*--* Replies to Introduction *--* (1) Community and Individuality (pp. 15-24) Patricia H. Werhane. *--* (2) A Reply to Tzvetan Todorov's "Living Alone Together" (pp. 25-34) Frances Ferguson. *--* (3) "Living Together Alone or Together": Commentary on Tzvetan Todorov's "Living Alone Together" (pp. 35-41) Stephen A. Mitchell. *--* (4) [downloaded] Todorov's Otherness (pp. 43-55) Robert Wokler. *--* (5) Misanthropology (pp. 57-72) Gary Saul Morson. *--* (6) Conflict and Sociability in Hegel, Freud, and Their Followers: Tzvetan Todorov's "Living Alone Together" (pp. 73-82) Daniel Burston. *--* (7) Regarding Others (pp. 83-93) Stewart Justman. *--*--* Response *--* The Gaze and the Fray (pp. 95-106) Tzvetan Todorov and Marilyn Gaddis Rose. *--*--* A. Self and Others in Culture. *--* Keeping the Self Intact during the Culture Wars: A Centennial Essay for Mikhail Bakhtin (pp. 107-126) Caryl Emerson. *--* Cultural Dreaming and Cultural Studies (pp. 127-144) Marianne DeKoven. *--* Orality, Literacy, and Their Discontents (pp. 145-159) Denis Donoghue.
journal  article  jstor  intellectual_history  literary_history  lit_crit  literary_theory  human_nature  social_theory  moral_philosophy  psychology  sociability  self  self-love  self-development  bildung  self-and-other  ancient_philosophy  Plato  Platonism  Socrates  Aristotle  Cicero  community  individualism  authenticity  constructivism  Rousseau  Hegel  Freud  conflict  Bakhtin  conversation  dialogue  literacy  EF-add 
february 2014 by dunnettreader
Special Issue on the Thought of Leo Strauss | JSTOR: The Review of Politics, Vol. 53, No. 1, Winter, 1991
The entire issue (12 articles and both book reviews) is on Strauss including noted Straussians of several generations(Tarcov, Pangle, Smith). Downloaded Gunnell on Strauss before the Straussians.
journal  article  jstor  intellectual_history  political_philosophy  ancient_philosophy  medieval_philosophy  Aquinas  Machiavelli  17thC  18thC  American_colonies  Early_Republic  Strauss  EF-add 
february 2014 by dunnettreader
Special section 4 authors, 4 recent readings of Genealogy of Morals | JSTOR: Journal of Nietzsche Studies, No. 35/36, SPRING-AUTUMN 2008
Letter from the Assistant Editor(pp. 86-87) Rebecca Bamford. *--* (1) For Whom the Bell Tolls (pp. 88-105) Daniel Conway. *--* (2) How Does the Ascetic Ideal Function in Nietzsche's Genealogy? (pp. 106-123) Lawrence J. Hatab. *--* (3) Beyond Selflessness in Ethics and Inquiry (pp. 124-140) Christopher Janaway. *--* (4) Nietzsche's Genealogy Revisited(pp. 141-154) David Owen. -- the group of articles looks quite helpful -- didn't download
article  jstor  intellectual_history  moral_philosophy  ancient_philosophy  19thC  Germany  ancient_Greece  Platonism  Nietzsche  Schopenhauer  positivism  Darwinism  asceticism  genealogy-method  morality-conventional  morality-Christian  morality-Nietzche  EF-add 
february 2014 by dunnettreader
Christina Tarnopolsky - Prudes, Perverts, and Tyrants: Plato and the Contemporary Politics of Shame | JSTOR: Political Theory, Vol. 32, No. 4 (Aug., 2004), pp. 468-494
In certain contemporary theories of the politics of shame, shame is considered a pernicious emotion that we need to avoid in, or a salutary emotion that serves as an infallible guide to, democratic deliberation. The author argues that both positions arise out of an inadequate notion of the structure of shame and an oversimplistic opposition between shame and shamelessness. Plato's dialogue, the Gorgias, actually helps to address these problems because it supplies a deeper understanding of the place of shame in democratic politics in ways that address our contemporary dilemmas. It does this first, by avoiding the simple opposition between shame and shamelessness and secondly, by articulating three different kinds of "politics of shame" that can characterize democratic deliberations. Finally, Plato's treatment of shame extends upon contemporary ethical and psychoanalytic notions of shame in ways that are directly relevant to the our contemporary political situation. -- emphasis on ancient Greek, cited in her later article that's more 20thC focused -- didn't download
article  jstor  intellectual_history  political_philosophy  ancient_philosophy  ancient_Greece  Plato  deliberation-public  democracy  judgment-emotions  shame  EF-add 
february 2014 by dunnettreader
Forum: On Sovereignty -TOC | Republics of Letters - Volume 2, Issue 2 (March 2011)
(1) The Sovereign Person in Senecan Political Theory by Peter Stacey. (2) Jean Bodin on Sovereignty by Edward Andrew. (3) On the Indivisibility of Sovereignty by Jens Bartelson. (4) Soft Res Publica: On the Assembly and Disassembly of Courtly Space by Julia Reinhard Lupton. (5) The King’s Virtual Body: Image, Text, and Sovereignty in Edmund Burke’s ‘Reflections on the Revolution in France’ by Craig Carson. (6) The State as a Family: The Fate of Familial Sovereignty in German Romanticism by Adrian Daub. (7) Waiting for Justice: Benjamin and Derrida on Sovereignty and Immanence by James Martel.
journal  articles  ancient_philosophy  Roman_Empire  16thC  18thC  19thC  political_philosophy  political_culture  sovereignty  EF-add 
january 2014 by dunnettreader
Gowdy et al - Economic cosmology and the evolutionary challenge | Journal of Economic Behavior and Organization Special Issue 2013
2nd lead articl5 -- downloaded pdf to Note -- The intellectual histories of economics and evolutionary biology are closely intertwined because both subjects deal with living, complex, evolving systems. Because the subject matter is similar, contemporary evolutionary thought has much to offer to economics. In recent decades theoretical biology has progressed faster than economics in understanding phenomena like hierarchical processes, cooperative behavior, and selection processes in evolutionary change. This paper discusses three very old “cosmologies” in Western thought, how these play out in economic theory, and how evolutionary biology can help evaluate their validity and policy relevance. These cosmologies are: (1) “natural man” as a rational, self-sufficient, egotistical individual, (2) competition among individuals can lead to a well-functioning society, and (3) there exists an ideal optimal state of nature. These correspond to Colander et al. (2004) “holy trinity of orthodox economics”, rationality, greed, and equilibrium. It is argued below that current breakthroughs in evolutionary biology and neuroscience can help economics go beyond these simple cosmologies.

They equate Pope’s Essay (self love and social are the same) with Mandeville Fable of the Bees
paper  journal  intellectual_history  ancient_philosophy  Western_civ  natural_law  cosmology  Providence  self-interest  competition  markets  economic_theory  economic_sociology  economic_culture  evolution-social  biocultural_evolution  evo_psych  evolution-as-model  reason  rationality-economics  rational_choice  downloaded  EF-add  equilibrium  complexity  Smith  Pope  Mandeville 
december 2013 by dunnettreader
Kenan Malik - A BOOK IN PROGRESS [PART 3]: ON STOICISM, FREE WILL & FATE | Pandaemonium April 2011
Nice summary of the Stoic origins of the theodicy, fate,beneficent Providence, and free will tangle - distinction between free will as responsibility and as agency in sense of changing the world - difference in approach to virtue and material condition from Aristotle's aristocratic approach - poor or slave as potentially virtuous
intellectual_history  moral_philosophy  ancient_philosophy  Stoicism  fate  Providence  determinism  free_will  slavery  elites  EF-add 
december 2013 by dunnettreader
Kenan Malik - WHAT DID THE GREEKS EVER DO FOR GOD? | Pandaemonium Dec 2013
Xenophanes (c 570-476 BCE), one of the earliest of the Presocratics, savaged Homer and Hesiod for ‘attributing to the gods everything that men find shameful and reprehensible – stealing, adultery and deceiving one another.’ Humans possessed false ideas of gods because they fashioned them in their own image. So, ‘Ethiopians say their gods are flat-nosed and black, and Thracians that theirs have blue eyes and red hair.’ And if horses and cows possessed gods, they would undoubtedly be ‘horse-like gods, cow-like gods’.

There could only be one God, Xenophanes insisted, ‘since it is sacrilege for any of the gods to have a master’. This God could be ‘in no way similar to mortal men in body or in thought’. God must have always existed, for there is nothing superior that could have created Him, and He could not have been created by an inferior being. He is a living being but unlike like organic beings there are no parts in Him. He has no physical contact with anything in the world but ‘remains for ever in the same place, entirely motionless’ and ‘effortlessly, he shakes all things by thinking with his mind.’ This notion of a wholly simple God came to be important in both Islam and Christianity.
theology  ancient_philosophy  ancient_Greece  anthropomorphism  monotheism  polytheism  Plato  Aristotle  cosmology  God-attributes  EF-add 
december 2013 by dunnettreader
Carlos Fraenkel's "Philosophical Religions" Reviewed by Peter Gordon | New Republic
In a remarkable and important book, Carlos Fraenkel characterizes Lessing as one of the late exponents for an intellectual tradition of philosophical religion that stretches as far back as late antiquity. This is a tradition that united pagan thinkers such as Plato with Christians (Origen and Eusebius) and Muslims (Al-Fārābī and Averroes) and Jews (Philo and Maimonides) in a shared philosophical vision, according to which historically distinctive religions should not be understood in the literal sense. They must be interpreted instead in allegorical fashion, so as to grasp their higher and purely rational content. This allegorical content is far from self-evident. But those who are incapable of philosophizing, or have not yet arrived at the requisite intellectual maturity, are not lost: the historical forms of a given religion offer just the sort of moral and political instruction most of us need if we are to conduct our lives with virtue and for the common good. Only the philosopher will understand that the historical forms have an educative function
books  reviews  kindle-available  intellectual_history  ancient_philosophy  Plato  Aristotle  Judaism  Islam  Medieval  theology  Early_Christian  Spinoza  allegory  Biblical_criticism  Bible-as-history  Strauss  Enlightenment  Bolingbroke  monotheism  reason  Neoplatonism  Aquinas  scholastics  Deism  EF-add 
november 2013 by dunnettreader
« earlier      
per page:    204080120160

related tags

15thC  16thC  17thC  18thC  19thC  20thC  21stC  1960s  Abelard  Absolutism  Academia.edu  Adams_John  adaptability  Adorno  aesthetics  Albert_Magnus  alchemy  Alexander_of_Aphrodisias  allegory  American_colonies  American_Revolution  analogy  analytical_philosophy  anarchical_society  ancient_Egypt  ancient_Greece  ancient_history  ancient_Israel  ancient_philosophy  ancient_religions  ancient_Rome  animals  Anscombe  anthropomorphism  anti-foundationalism  anti-humanism  Antiquarianism  antiquity  apologetics  aporia  apriori  Aquinas  archaeology  Aristotelian  Aristotle  article  articles  art_criticism  art_history  asceticism  astrology  astronomy  Athens  atomism  Augustan_Rome  Augustine  authenticity  authority  autonomy  avant_guard  Averroes  axial_age  Bacon  Bakhtin  Bayle  beauty  Being  belles-lettres  Bible-as-history  Biblical_authority  Biblical_criticism  Biblical_exegesis  bibliography  bildung  biocultural_evolution  biography  biology  Bolingbroke  books  Bougainvilliers  Boyle  brain  brain-development  British_Empire  British_Empire-constitutional_structure  British_foreign_policy  British_history  British_politics  Buddhism  Byzantine_Empire  Byzantium  Calvin  Cambridge_Platonists  canon  capitalism  Carnap  Cartesian  categories  causation  change-metaphysics  change-social  chapter  character  checks-and-balances  China  Chinese_history  chronology  Church_Fathers  Cicero  civic_virtue  classification  class_conflict  clergy  cognition  commentaries  communism  communitarian  community  comparative_religion  competition  complexity  concepts  conflict  Confuscianism  conscience  constitutionalism  constructivism  continental_philosophy  conversation  cosmological-fine-tuning  cosmology  cosmopolitanism  Counter-Enlightenment  court_culture  creation  creationism  creativity  critical_theory  Cudworth  cultural_critique  cultural_history  curiosity  cynicism  Darwinism  death  decision_theory  Deism  Deleuze  deliberation-public  democracy  Democritus  deontology  Descartes  design-nature  desire  determinism  development-biological  De_Anima  dialectic  dialogue  Diderot  digital_humanities  Diogenes_Laertius  Diogenes_the_Cynic  divine_command  divine_intellect  divine_right  Donne  downloaded  Early_Christian  early_modern  Early_Republic  eclecticism  economic_culture  economic_history  economic_sociology  economic_theory  education  EF-add  elites  elite_culture  embryology  emotions  Empedocles  empiricism  Encyclopédie  English_constitution  English_lit  enlightened_absolutism  Enlightenment  Enlightenment-ongoing  Enlightenment_Project  enthusiasm  Epictetus  Epicurean  epistemology  epistemology-moral  epistemology-naturalism  epistemology-social  equilibrium  Erasmus  eschatology  esotericism  etexts  ethics  etymology  eudaimonia  Europe-Early_Modern  Evernote  evolution  evolution-as-model  evolution-social  evolutionary_biology  evo_psych  experimental_philosophy  explanation  fate  Fenelon  Fichte  Ficino  fideism  Fin-de-Siècle  find  finitude  flourishing  forms  Foucault  foundationalism  France  Frankfurt_School  freedom  freedom_of_conscience  free_will  French_Enlightenment  French_intellectuals  French_language  French_lit  Freud  Galen  Gassendi  gender  gender_history  genealogy-method  generation  genius  George_III  Germany  German_Idealism  German_lit  German_scholars  German_scholarship  gnostic  God-attributes  God-existence  gods-antiquity  good  government-forms  Greek_lit  Habermas  habit  Hadot  Hadot_  Hadot_Pierre  Handel  Hegel  Hegelian  Heidegger  Hellenism  Heraclitus  hermeneutics  Hermes_Trismegistus  historians-and-politics  historical_change  historicism  historiography  historiography-17thC  historiography-18thC  historiography-19thC  historiography-Renaissance  history_of_philosophy  history_of_science  Hobbes  Homer  Horace  hubris  humanism  human_nature  human_rights  Hume  Hölderlin  ideas-theories  identity  Ilsetraut  imago_dei  immanence  immortality  imperialism  India  Indian_philosophy  Indian_religion  individualism  Industrial_Revolution  inequality  influence-literary  information-asymmetric  inheritance  Instapaper  institutions  intellectual_history  intelligent_design  irrational  IR_theory  Islam  Islam-Greek_philosophy  Italian_Renaissance  Italy  Jacobi  James_William  John_of_Salisbury  journal  journals-academic  jstor  Judaism  judgment-emotions  justice  Justus_Lipsius  Kabbalah  Kant  Kant-aesthetics  Kant-ethics  Kepler  Kierkegaard  kindle  kindle-available  labor  Lange_FA  late_antiquity  Latin_lit  laws_of_nature  La_Mettrie  lecture  legal_history  legal_indeterminancy  legal_system  legal_theory  legitimacy  Leibniz  leisure  Lessing  liberalism  liberalism-post-WWII  libertine  liberty  limited_monarchy  literacy  literary_history  literary_theory  literature-and-morality  lit_crit  Locke  Locke-person  logic  Longinus  Louis_XIV  Lucretius  Machiavelli  MacIntyre  Mandeville  Marcus_Aurelius  markets  Marx  Marxist  materialism  materialism-19thC  mathematization  Medieval  medieval_history  medieval_philosophy  meditation  Mendelssohn  metaethics  metaphilosophy  metaphysics  mind  mind-body  mixed_government  modernity  modernity-emergence  monarchical_republic  monarchy  monasticism  monotheism  Montaigne  Montesquieu  morality-Christian  morality-conventional  morality-divine_command  morality-innate  morality-Nietzche  morality-objective  moral_philosophy  moral_psychology  moral_sentiments  More_Henry  Moses  motion  Mozart  music_history  myth  naturalism  natural_history  natural_kinds  natural_law  natural_philosophy  natural_religion  natural_rights  nature  Nazis  neo-Kantian  Neoplatonism  Neostoicism  neuroscience  Newtonianism  new_historicism  Nietzsche  normativity  norms  nothing  obligation  Old_Testament  ontology  Ottomans  Ovid  pagans  Paley  Papacy  paper  Parliamentary_supremacy  passions  patristic_scholarship  paywall  perception  perfectibility  Peripatetics  phenomenology  philology  philosophes  philosophy  philosophy-as-way-of-life  philosophy_as_way_of_life  philosophy_of_history  philosophy_of_language  philosophy_of_law  philosophy_of_religion  philosophy_of_science  phronesis  physics  physiology  plasticity  Plato  Plato-Republic  Platonism  pleasure  Pliny_the_Elder  Plotinus  Plutarch  poetry  political_culture  political_economy  political_history  political_philosophy  Poliziano  polytheism  Pomponazzi  Pope  positive_law  positivism  positivism-legal  post-truth  post-WWII  postmodern  poststructuralist  practical_reason  pragmatism  pre-Socratics  prisca_sapientia  process_theology  progress  Project_MUSE  prophets  Providence  prudence  psychoanalysis  psychology  public_choice  Pyrrhonism  Quine  raison-d'-état  rationalist  rationality  rationality-economics  rational_choice  rational_religion  readership  reader_response  reading  reason  reception  recognition  reductionism  Reformation  religious_belief  religious_culture  religious_history  Renaissance  republicanism  republics-Ancient_v_Modern  Republic_of_Letters  reviews  rhetoric  rhetoric-moral_basis  rhetoric-writing  Romanticism  Roman_Empire  Roman_law  Roman_Republic  Rousseau  Royal_Society  Saint_Simon  scepticism  scepticism-Academic  scholarship  scholasticism  scholastics  Schopenhauer  science-and-religion  scientific_culture  scientific_method  Scottish_Enlightenment  self  self-and-other  self-control  self-development  self-examination  self-government  self-interest  self-knowledge  self-love  self-regulation  self-sufficiency  Seneca  sensation  Shaftesbury  Shakespeare  Shakespeare-influence  shame  slavery  Smith  sociability  socialism  social_democracy  social_history  social_order  social_theory  sociology_of_law  sociology_of_religion  Socrates  Sophists  soteriology  soul  sovereignty  species  Spinoza  Spinozism  spiritual_practices  SSRN  stability  status  Stoicism  Strauss  style-philosophy  subjectivity  sublime  Suda  Swift  sympathy  teleology  textbooks  theater  theodicy  theology  Theophrastus  Thomism-21stC  Thucydides  time  timeless  tradition  tragedy  transcendence  truth  tyranny  UK_government-colonies  universals  utopian  video  Virgil  virtue  virtue_epistemology  virtue_ethics  Voltaire  Wars_of_Religion  website  Western_civ  Whitehead  Williams_Bernard  Wittgenstein  Zenon_of_Citium  érudits 

Copy this bookmark:



description:


tags: