dunnettreader + ancient_rome   76

Jeffrey Edward Green - Rawls and the Forgotten Figure of the Most Advantaged: In Defense of Reasonable Envy toward the Superrich (2013) | American Political Science Review on JSTOR
This article aims to correct the widespread imbalance in contemporary liberal thought, which makes explicit appeal to the "least advantaged" without parallel attention to the "most advantaged" as a distinct group in need of regulatory attention. Rawls's influential theory of justice is perhaps the paradigmatic instance of this imbalance, but I show how a Rawlsian framework nonetheless provides three justifications for why implementers of liberal justice—above all, legislators—should regulate the economic prospects of a polity's richest citizens: as a heuristic device for ensuring that a system of inequalities not reach a level at which inequalities cease being mutually advantageous, as protection against excessive inequalities threatening civic liberty, and as redress for a liberal society's inability to fully realize fair equality of opportunity with regard to education and politics. Against the objection that such arguments amount to a defense of envy, insofar as they support policies that in certain instances impose economic costs on the most advantaged with negative or neutral economic impact on the rest of society, I attend to Rawls's often overlooked distinction between irrational and reasonable forms of envy, showing that any envy involved in the proposed regulation of the most advantaged falls within this latter category. - downloaded via iphone to dbox
politics-and-money  political_participation  inequality-wealth  regulatory_capture  political_philosophy  political_culture  tax_havens  Early_Republic  inequality  estate_tax  intellectual_history  inheritance  republicanism  Plato-Republic  elites-political_influence  Jefferson  Harrington  crony_capitalism  Europe-Early_Modern  fairness  article  Aristotle  social_capital  social_theory  Rawls  social_democracy  Machiavelli  Plato  inequality-opportunity  jstor  bibliography  ancient_Rome  regulation  justice  liberalism  egalitarian  regulatory_avoidance  interest_groups  legitimacy  deliberative_democracy  political_history  class_conflict  downloaded  education-elites  social_order  elites-self-destructive  Roman_Republic  ancient_Greece  republics-Ancient_v_Modern 
july 2017 by dunnettreader
Ricardo Salles, ed - Metaphysics, Soul, and Ethics in Ancient Thought (2005) - Oxford University Press
Richard Sorabji Bibliography
1. Intellectual autobiography, Richard Sorabji
Metaphysics
2. Intrinsic and relational properties of Atoms in the Democritean ontology, Alexander P. D. Mourelatos
3. Necessitation and Explanation in Philoponus' Aristotelain Physics, Sylvia Berryman
4. A Contemporary Look at Aristotle's Changing Now, Sarah Broadie
5. On the individuation of times and events in orthodox Stoicism, Ricardo Salles
6. Stoic metaphysics at Rome, David Sedley
7. Platonism in the Bible: Numenius of Apamea on Exodus and eternity, Myles Burnyeat
The Senses and the Nature of the Soul
8. Platonic Souls as Persons, A. A. Long
9. Aristotle versus Descartes on the concept of the mental, Charles H. Kahn
10. Perception Naturalized in Aristotle's de Anima, Robert Bolton
11. The Spirit and the letter: Aristotle on perception, V. Caston
12. The discriminating capacity of the soul in Aristotle's theory of learning, Frans A. J. de Haas
13. Alexander of Aphrodisias on the nature and location of vision, Bob Sharples
Ethics
14. Plato's Stoic View of Motivation, Gabriela Roxana Carone
15. The Presence of Socrates and Aristotle in the Stoic Account of Akrasia, Marcelo D. Boeri
16. Extend or identify: Two Stoic Accounts of Altruism, Mary Margaret McCabe
17. Competing Readings of Stoic Emotions, Christopher Gill
18. Were Zeno and Chysippus at odds in analysing emotion?, A. W. Price
19. Seneca on Freedom and Autonomy, Brad Inwood
books  ancient_philosophy  Plato  Aristotle  Stoicism  soul  moral_philosophy  metaphysics  Seneca  Democritus  ancient_Greece  ancient_Rome  Hellenism  mind  Descartes  emotions 
september 2016 by dunnettreader
Lemin Wu - Home - If Not Malthusian, Then Why? A Darwinian Explanation of the Malthusian Trap (July 2015)
His site with links to other work, CV etc - This paper shows that the Malthusian mechanism alone cannot explain the pre-industrial stagnation of living standards. Improvement in luxury technology, if faster than improvement in subsistence technology, would have kept living standards growing. The Malthusian trap is essentially a puzzle of balanced growth between the luxury sector and the subsistence sector. The author argues that balanced growth is caused by group selection in the form of biased migration. It is proven that a tiny bit of bias in migration can suppress a strong growth tendency. The theory re-explains the Malthusian trap and the prosperity of ancient market economies such as Rome and Sung. It also suggests a new set of factors triggering modern economic growth. - work up of his dissertation at Berkeley -- downloaded via Air, attached to Evernote
paper  economic_history  economic_growth  ancient_Rome  Chinese_history  Sung_dynasty  ancient_China  Malthusian_trap  demography  technology  agriculture  markets  elites  luxury  standard-of-living  migration  downloaded 
september 2016 by dunnettreader
Peter S. Wells - How Ancient Europeans Saw the World: Vision, Patterns, and the Shaping of the Mind in Prehistoric Times. (eBook, Paperback 2015 and Hardcover 2012) - Princeton University Press
The peoples who inhabited Europe during the two millennia before the Roman conquests had established urban centers, large-scale production of goods such as pottery and iron tools, a money economy, and elaborate rituals and ceremonies. Yet as Peter Wells argues here, the visual world of these late prehistoric communities was profoundly different from those of ancient Rome's literate civilization and today's industrialized societies. Drawing on startling new research in neuroscience and cognitive psychology, Wells reconstructs how the peoples of pre-Roman Europe saw the world and their place in it. He sheds new light on how they communicated their thoughts, feelings, and visual perceptions through the everyday tools they shaped, the pottery and metal ornaments they decorated, and the arrangements of objects they made in their ritual places--and how these forms and patterns in turn shaped their experience.

How Ancient Europeans Saw the World offers a completely new approach to the study of Bronze Age and Iron Age Europe, and represents a major challenge to existing views about prehistoric cultures. The book demonstrates why we cannot interpret the structures that Europe's pre-Roman inhabitants built in the landscape, the ways they arranged their settlements and burial sites, or the complex patterning of their art on the basis of what these things look like to us. Rather, we must view these objects and visual patterns as they were meant to be seen by the ancient peoples who fashioned them.

Peter S. Wells is professor of anthropology at the University of Minnesota. His many books include Barbarians to Angels: The Dark Ages Reconsidered and The Barbarians Speak: How the Conquered Peoples Shaped Roman Europe (Princeton).

This is a most important book. Wells argues that after 200 BC Eurasia moved generally toward the mass production and consumption of artifacts and that this changed people's relationships with the world, in turn altering the nature of experience. How Ancient Europeans Saw the World is thought-provoking and provocative."--Chris Gosden, author of Prehistory: A Very Short Introduction -- Chapter 1 downloaded to Tab S2
books  kindle-available  downloaded  Bronze_Age  prehistoric  ancient_Rome  barbarians  material_culture  mass-produced_articles  archaeology  art_history  visual_culture  cultural_change  burial_practices  decorative_arts 
august 2016 by dunnettreader
Matthew Sharpe - [draft slides] Athletes in the Arena: Diderot and his Seneca | Academia.edu
Whereas Seneca's critics argue that his life and alleged compliance with Nero contradicts his Stoic, noble-sounding principles, discrediting the latter; in his two late books on the Stoic, Diderot argues that Seneca's continual attempts to mollify Nero's tyranny betters the philosophy.  Where Diderot's critics reduce the two works on Seneca to veiled attacks on Rousseau, Diderot is critical of those texts wherein Seneca advocated the withdrawal & “leisure of the sage” or the vita contemplativa, while Rome burnt (“Rousseau est la figure moderne et honnie du détachement, qui permet à Diderot de dissocier Sénèque du détachement stoïcien. » (Lojskine 2009))  Whether contra Rousseau or no, Diderot is most attracted—amongst all Seneca's works Diderot examines—to Seneca’s On Benefits, and wants to restore compassion, even justified anger, to Stoicism.  Whether to justify himself for his own naivety in trying to teach Catherine of Russia or not, Diderot defends Seneca’s attempts to mollify Nero, led by De Clementia; he appeals, a la Shaftesbury and others, to Seneca’s “coeur” and compassion, beyond his Stoicism, notably in On Benefits; he criticises Stoic fatalism and appeals to a paraStoic notion of “natural rights” to justify resistance to tyranny; famously celebrating the American revolution as as lesson to all Europe.  So, beneath the "miserable" polemics (Cittion), there remains a good deal of philosophy; beneath the rhetorical smoke, (to use a Stoic-ism) a good deal of theoretical fire.  This paper aims at retrieving this fire, and situating Diderot's mitigated Stoicism as a French avatar of the moral sentimentalist position, with roots in the Stoic idea of oikeosis (and of parental love as the elementary cell of sociablity), as articulated by CIcero. Research Interests: Stoicism, Roman Stoicism, Philosophy of the Enlightenment, and Philosophy as a way of life -- downloaded
paper  Academia.edu  intellectual_history  Enlightenment  18thC  French_Enlightenment  philosophes  ancient_philosophy  ancient_Rome  Hellenism  Stoicism  Seneca  Diderot  Rousseau  moral_philosophy  moral_sentiments  eclecticism  Cicero  emotions  tyranny  Roman_Empire  downloaded 
july 2016 by dunnettreader
Scott Aikin - Citizen Skeptic: Cicero’s Academic Republicanism (pages 275–285) | Symposion. Theoretical and Applied Inquiries in Philosophy and Social Sciences July 2015
ABSTRACT: The skeptical challenge to politics is that if knowledge is in short supply and it is a condition for the proper use of political power, then there is very little just politics. Cicero’s Republicanism is posed as a program for political legitimacy wherein both citizens and their states are far from ideal. The result is a form of what is termed negative conservatism, which shows political gridlock in a more positive light. - Assistant Professor of Philosophy at Vanderbilt University. He works primarily in epistemology and ancient philosophy. He is the author of Epistemology and the Regress Problem (Routledge 2011) and Evidentialism and the Will to Believe (Bloomsbury 2014), and the co-author (with Robert B. Talisse) of Why We Argue (And How We Should) (Routledge, 2014), Reasonable Atheism (Prometheus Books, 2011), and Pragmatism: A Guide for the Perplexed (Continuum Books, 2008). - downloaded via iPhone to Dbox
ancient_Greece  information-asymmetric  public_choice  downloaded  intellectual_history  checks-and-balances  institutions  decision_theory  ancient_philosophy  scepticism-Academic  constitutionalism  ancient_Rome  article  republicanism  epistemology-social  political_philosophy  Roman_Republic  Cicero  political_culture 
may 2016 by dunnettreader
Clip on influence of Italian Grand Tours in Allan Ramsay - BBC Two - The Story of Scottish Art, Episode 2
The ancient world that allowed artist Allan Ramsay to hone his artistic skills and spark a lifelong passion for the place - full program of 4 episodes not available, only clips - this clip is 4+ mn
video  art_history  Scotland  Scottish_Enlightenment  18thC  Grand_Tour  painting  Ramsay_Allan  neoclassical  Rome  ancient_Rome  ancient_Greece 
may 2016 by dunnettreader
Kenneth Harl - The Barbarian Empires of the Steppes | The Great Courses
36 lectures - list price $320
- the video version is a must in order to follow the names of groups, locations and movements
A few bothered by mispronunciation and a lot of ahs - but most reviewers very enthusiastic - and replaying lectures to get all the info. Counters a few complaints that it's too superficial, or that it pays too much attention to the sedentary civilizations that were affected - the last complaint seems to miss the very purpose of the course.
Byzantium  Eastern_Europe  military_history  Central_Asia  empires  government-forms  medieval_history  military_tactics  Egypt  Persia  ancient_Rome  nomadic_invasions  cultural_history  Ghengis_Khan  trade  video  Eurasia  Roman_Empire  government-revenues  Ottomans  Iraq  Chinese_history  Black_Sea  Islamic_civilization  Atilla_the_Hun  ancient_history  India  Iran  China  late_antiquity  Sufis  Mamluks  cultural_exchange  military_technology  Golden_Horde  Turcic_tribes  Han_China  MENA  religious_history  Mongols  Tamerlane  Caliphate  courses  Buddhism  cultural_transmission  trade-policy  empires-tributary  barbarians  steppes 
april 2016 by dunnettreader
Plutarch through the ages - conference videos (May 2013) | Warburg Institute, School of Advanced Study, University of London
This conference addressed the uses of Plutarch's historical and philosophical works by late antique, medieval and early modern scholars, writers and artists. Speakers: Ewen Bowie (Oxford), Roberto Guerrini (Siena), Constanze Güthenke (Princeton), Edith Hall (King's College London), Judith Mossmann (Nottingham), Frances Muecke (Sydney), John North (Institute of Classical Studies), Marianne Pade (Danish Institute Rome), Chris Pelling (Oxford), Alberto Rigolio (Oxford), Fred Schurink (Northumbria), Frances Titchener (Utah State), Rosie Wyles (King's College London), Sophia Xenophontos (Cyprus) and Alexei Zadorojnyi (Liverpool) **--** Thursday 23 May 2013 - Plutarch's revival in late Byzantium: the case of Theodore Metochites - From Francesco Barbaro to Angelo Poliziano: Plutarch's Roman Questions in the fifteenth century - John Whethamstede and Plutarch - Additional Lives: Hannibal, Scipio and Epaminondas - Plutarch, the Institutio Traiani, and the Social Dynamics of Philosophy in Renaissance England *^--** Friday 24 May 2013 - Plutarch in Scotland - Plutarco, Poussin e l’arte barocca - After Exemplarity: a Map of Plutarchan Scholarship - Plutarch à la Russe: Ancient Heroism and Russian Ideology in Tolstoy’s War and Peace - Plutarch’s Gracchi on the French, English and Irish stages, 1792-1852: From Revolution to Corn Laws and Famine - Welcomed with open arms: Plutarch and the modern Prometheus - Concluding Remarks
Plutarch  class_conflict  Europe-19thC  reception  historiography-19thC  Roman_Empire  video  ancient_Rome  biography  lecture  historiography  Roman_Republic  emulation  historiography-18thC  historiography-antiquity  historiography-17thC  political_history  historiography-Renaissance  Renaissance  translation  19thC  ancient_Greece  intellectual_history  usable_past  humanism  Greek_lit  history_as_examples  conference  Study_and_Uses  medieval_lit  medieval_philosophy  Byzantium 
march 2016 by dunnettreader
Zack Beauchamp - This video shows what ancient Rome actually looked like - Vox - Feb 2016
The video was created by Rome Reborn, an academic research project whose central mission is to create a full model of Rome at its greatest heights, working in conjunction with the Khan Academy. The goal is to take historical depictions of the city and create a true-to-life model of every period of Roman development, ranging from 1000 BC to 552 AD. This isn't just a cool pastime; it's useful for everyone from historians to filmmakers looking to capture what the city actually looked like. In the video, Indiana University professor Bernard Frischer (who leads the Rome Reborn project) explains that they chose to use 320 AD for this visualization because it was "the peak of Rome's urban development." Ten years later, the emperor, Constantine, moved the capital to Constantinople
video  ancient_Rome  cities  infrastructure  Roman_Empire  urbanization  archaeology 
march 2016 by dunnettreader
Matthew Sharpe - Stoic Virtue Ethics (2014) | Academia.edu - in Handbook of Virtue Ethics
The Handbook of Virtue Ethics, edited by Stan van Hooft et al, Acumen 2014 -- Research Interests: Virtue Ethics, Stoicism, Roman Stoicism, and Apatheia -- downloaded pdf to Note
chapter  Academia.edu  moral_philosophy  intellectual_history  ancient_philosophy  ancient_Greece  ancient_Rome  Stoicism  virtue_ethics  virtue_epistemology  eudaimonia  downloaded  1960s 
march 2016 by dunnettreader
Philippe de Doze - Horace et la question idéologique à Rome : considérations sur un itinéraire politique - Revue Historique (2012) - Cairn.info
Horace combattit dans les rangs des républicains avant de devenir, en apparence au moins, l’un des plus fervents partisans d’Auguste et du régime impérial. Cette volte-face idéologique ne manque pas de surprendre. Sans doute parce que nous accordons aux idéologies une place qui n’était pas la leur dans le monde romain. En réalité, jamais Horace n’eut le sentiment de se renier. Il a seulement changé de protecteurs après la défaite de ses amis républicains, fait un pari sur l’avenir en s’attachant à un nouveau réseau, celui des vainqueurs. Et loin d’avoir été manipulé par le nouveau régime, loin d’être devenu son porte-parole, il a, par ses vers, tenté de l’influencer, adoptant par là même la posture de l’intellectuel. -- recently published his thesis dealing with politics of Augustan Age literature - paywall
article  ancient_Rome  poetry  Roman_Republic  Horace  Latin_lit  patronage  French_language  paywall  Augustus  literary_history  politics-and-literature 
february 2016 by dunnettreader
Vincent Citot - Le processus historique de la Modernité et la possibilité de la liberté (universalisme et individualisme) (2005) - Cairn.info
I - Considérations introductives sur l’essence de la modernité
- L’esprit de la modernité : la liberté, l’universalisme et l’individualisme
- Réflexivité, autonomie et indépendance
- Conséquences : les idées d’égalité et de progrès
II - Les origines antiques de la modernité
- Universalisme et individualisme en Grèce antique
- Le stoïcisme : entre hellénisme et christianisme
- Universalisme, égalitarisme et individualisme chrétien
- L’individualisme du droit romain
III - L’avènement de la modernité et la périodisation de l’ère moderne
- Le monde Ancien et le monde Moderne
- La périodisation de la modernité:
1 - La première modernité : de la Renaissance aux Lumières
2 - La seconde modernité : de la fin du XVIIIème siècle aux années 1960
3 - La troisième modernité : entre postmodernité et hypermodernité
Citot Vincent, « Le processus historique de la Modernité et la possibilité de la liberté (universalisme et individualisme). », Le Philosophoire 2/2005 (n° 25) , p. 35-76
individualism  moral_philosophy  Counter-Enlightenment  16thC  Romanticism  history_of_science  politico-theology  autonomy  scholastics  Renaissance  change-social  democracy  republicanism  modernity-emergence  political_philosophy  democracy_deficit  Stoicism  Reformation  Early_Christian  French_Enlightenment  18thC  republics-Ancient_v_Modern  French_Revolution  periodization  Europe-Early_Modern  universalism  downloaded  subjectivity  political_culture  religious_history  article  Ancients-and-Moderns  community  self  German_Idealism  Counter-Reformation  authority  Enlightenment  metaphysics  ancient_Rome  17thC  Cartesians  cosmology  Descartes  ancient_Greece  Locke  modernity  liberty  Hobbes  intellectual_history  bibliography 
february 2016 by dunnettreader
Aude Doody - Pliny's "Natural History: Enkuklios Paideia" and the Ancient Encyclopedia | JSTOR - Journal of the History of Ideas (Jan 2009)
Journal of the History of Ideas, Vol. 70, No. 1 (Jan., 2009), pp. 1-21 -- interesting re expectations when use encyclopedia to think about the work - comparisons with other "desire for universal knowledge" authors, compilers etc -- didn't download
article  jstor  intellectual_history  antiquity  genre  encyclopedia  ancient_Greece  ancient_Rome  Hellenism  Greek_lit  Latin_lit  natural_philosophy  natural_history  philosophy_of_science  epistemology  Pliny_the_Elder  Varro 
january 2016 by dunnettreader
Gerard Passannante - Homer Atomized: Francis Bacon and the Matter of Tradition (2009) | JSTOR - ELH
ELH, Vol. 76, No. 4 (Winter, 2009), pp. 1015-1047 -- extensive primary and secondary bibliography from Renaissance philology through Montaigne, Bacon, Vico and 18thC German challenges to Homeric "authorship" as well as ancient literary tradition, epistemology, cosmology and physics - Stoics, Epicureans -- downloaded pdf to Note
article  jstor  intellectual_history  literary_history  historiography  cosmology  epistemology  philology  natural_philosophy  ancient_Greece  ancient_Rome  Hellenism  Homer  atomism  Stoicism  Epicurean  Cicero  Lucretius  authors  author_intention  text_analysis  time  void  chance  Renaissance  humanism  Erasmus  17thC  18thC  scepticism  Montaigne  Bacon  Vico  Nietzsche  tradition  cultural_transmission  knowledge  bibliography  downloaded 
november 2015 by dunnettreader
John Sellars - Stoic Ontology and Plato's "Sophist" (2010) | Academia.edu
in V. Harte, M.M. McCabe, R.W. Sharples, A. Sheppard, eds, Aristotle and the Stoics Reading Plato, Bulletin of the Institute of Classical Studies, Suppl. 107 (2010), 185-203 -- Keywords: Metaphysics, Plato, and Stoicism -- downloaded pdf to Note
article  Academia.edu  intellectual_history  Stoicism  metaphysics  ancient_philosophy  ancient_Greece  ontology  Being  nothing  ideas-theories  concepts  universals  categories  Plato  Platonism  Seneca  Zenon_of_Citium  commentaries  late_antiquity  ancient_Rome  bibliography  downloaded 
november 2015 by dunnettreader
John Sellars - Seneca's Philosophical Predecessors and Contemporaries (2013) | Academia.edu
in G. Damschen, A. Heil, eds, Brill’s Companion to Seneca (Leiden: Brill, 2013), 97-112. -- Keywords: Stoicism, Seneca, and Roman Philosophy -- downloaded pdf to Note
chapter  Academia.edu  intellectual_history  literary_history  Seneca  Stoicism  Epicurean  Cicero  Lucretius  ancient_philosophy  ancient_Greece  ancient_Rome  Hellenism  Roman_Empire  bibliography  downloaded 
november 2015 by dunnettreader
John Sellars - Stoic Cosmopolitanism and Zeno's Republic | Academia.edu
History of Political Thought 28/1 (2007), 1-29 -- Modern accounts of Stoic politics have attributed to Zeno the ideal of an isolated community of sages and to later Stoics such as Seneca a cosmopolitan utopia transcending all traditional States. By returning to the Cynic background to both Zeno's Republic and the Cosmopolitan tradition, this paper argues that the distance between the two is not as great as is often supposed. This account, it is argued, is more plausible than trying to offer a developmental explanation of the supposed transformation in Stoic political thought from isolated community to cosmopolitan utopia. -- Keywords: Stoicism, Cosmopolitanism, Cicero, Cynicism (Ancient Greek Philosophy), and Zenon of Citium -- downloaded pdf to Note
article  Academia.edu  intellectual_history  political_philosophy  moral_philosophy  cosmology  Stoicism  cynicism  Seneca  Zenon_of_Citium  Diogenes_the_Cynic  ancient_philosophy  ancient_Greece  ancient_Rome  Hellenism  cosmopolitanism  Cicero  imperialism  Roman_Empire  Roman_Republic  Plato-Republic  downloaded 
november 2015 by dunnettreader
John Sellars - Shaftesbury, Stoicism, and Philosophy as a Way of Life (2015) | Academia.edu
Publication Name: Sophia (in press) -- This paper examines Shaftesbury’s reflections on the nature of philosophy in his Askêmata notebooks, which draw heavily on the Roman Stoics Epictetus and Marcus Aurelius. In what follows I introduce the notebooks, outline Shaftesbury’s account of philosophy therein, compare it with his discussions of the nature of philosophy in his published works, and conclude by suggesting that Pierre Hadot’s conception of ‘philosophy as a way of life’ offers a helpful framework for thinking about Shaftesbury’s account of philosophy. -- Keywords: Stoicism, Shaftesbury, Philosophy as a way of life, and Pierre Hadot -- downloaded pdf to Note
article  Academia.edu  intellectual_history  17thC  18thC  ancient_philosophy  ancient_Rome  Stoicism  Epictetus  philosophy-as-way-of-life  Marcus_Aurelius  Hadot_Pierre  Shaftesbury  moral_philosophy  psychology  passions  emotions  downloaded 
november 2015 by dunnettreader
David Sedley - Lucretius and the Transformation of Greek Wisdom | Classical Literature | Cambridge University Press (hbk 1998)
This book studies the structure and origins of De Rerum Natura (On the nature of things), the great first-century BC poem by Lucretius. By showing how he worked from the literary model set by the Greek poet Empedocles but under the philosophical inspiration of the Greek philosopher Epicurus, the book seeks to characterize Lucretius' unique poetic achivement. It is addressed to those interested both in Latin poetry and in ancient Greek and Roman philosophy. [A later chapter concerns the "imprint" of Theophrastus *--* The appearance of this book is a great event - a first class modern philosopher writing on a major Roman author *--* Nothing of this kind available elsewhere *--* Contains the first ever full-scale reconstruction of Epicurus' great treatise On Nature -- downloaded marketing materials to Note
books  kindle-available  intellectual_history  literary_history  Lucretius  ancient_philosophy  cosmology  religious_belief  ancient_Greece  ancient_Rome  Greek_lit  Latin_lit  Hellenism  Epicurean  atomism  Empedocles  Theophrastus  poetry  rhetoric-moral_basis  epistemology  nature  perception  downloaded 
october 2015 by dunnettreader
Andrea Nightingale and David Sedley, eds. - Ancient Models of Mind: Studies in Human and Divine Rationality | Classical Philosophy | Cambridge University Press (hbk 2010, obk 2015)
In honor of A. A. Long: Publications 1963–2009 -- Table of Contents 1. Plato on aporia and self-knowledge, Andrea Wilson Nightingale -- 2. Cross-examining happiness: reason and community in the Socratic dialogues of Plato Sara Ahbel-Rappe -- 3. Inspiration, recollection, and mimesis in Plato's Phaedrus, Kathryn A. Morgan -- 4. Plato's Theaetetus as an ethical dialogue, David Sedley -- 5. Divine contemplating mind, Allan Silverman -- 6. Aristotle and the history of Skepticism, Alan Code -- 7. Stoic selection: objects, actions, and agents, Stephen White -- 8. Beauty and its relation to goodness in Stoicism, Richard Bett -- 9. How dialectical was Stoic dialectic?, Luca Castagnoli -- 10. Socrates speaks in Seneca, De vita beata 24-28, James Ker -- 11. Seneca's Platonism: the soul and its divine origin, Gretchen Reydams-Schils -- 12. The status of the individual in Plotinus, Kenneth Wolfe -- downloaded marketing materials to Note
books  kindle-available  ancient_philosophy  ancient_Greece  ancient_Rome  Hellenism  Plato  Platonism  Aristotle  Stoicism  Seneca  Plotinus  Neoplatonism  moral_philosophy  epistemology-moral  God-attributes  eudaimonia  aporia  soul  imago_dei  virtue_ethics  virtue  self-knowledge  self-examination  self-development  dialectic  beauty  good  sociability  downloaded 
october 2015 by dunnettreader
Plutarch • Parallel Lives | LacusCurtius
The Text on LacusCurtius -- The translation is that of the Loeb Classical Library edition (Cambridge, MA and London), by Bernadotte Perrin. Dating in its entirety back to before 1923, it is in the public domain. (Details here on the copyright law involved.)
biography  etext  Plutarch  ancient_Greece  ancient_Rome  ancient_history 
august 2015 by dunnettreader
Plutarch (bio) - Livius.org
Plutarch of Chaeronea (46-c.122): influential Greek philosopher and author, well known for his biographies and his moral treatises.
ancient_Rome  biography  ancient_philosophy  ancient_history  ancient_religions  Plutarch  ancient_Greece 
august 2015 by dunnettreader
Livius - Articles on ancient history
Common categories
Roman Empire (1052)
Byzantium (345)
Greece (248)
Museums (196)
Persia (186)
Hellenistic (180)
Roman Republic (137)
Germania Inferior (136)
Greater Iran (84)
Anatolia (80)
ancient_religions  Latin_lit  Mediterranean  ancient_Near_East  ancient_history  art_history  Roman_Empire  ancient_India  Persia  ancient_Israel  ancient_Egypt  Byzantine  Roman_Republic  website  ancient_Rome  archaeology  Greek_lit  ancient_Greece 
august 2015 by dunnettreader
Pier Giovanni Guzzo - Pompéi italique et sa structuration urbaine - Techniques et économies de la Méditerranée antique - Collège de France - 24 novembre 2014
Pier Giovanni Guzzo -- Professeur, ancien surintendant de l'archéologie de l'Emilie-Romagne de la Calabre, de Pompéi et de Naples, Membre du conseil de direction de l'Istituto Nazionale di Archeologia e Storia dell'Arte -- 24 novembre 2014 16:00 -- Conférencier invité -- Salle 2 - Marcelin Berthelot
video  lecture  Collège_deFrance  archaeology  ancient_Rome  Pompeii  economic_history  urbanization  Mediterranean  ancient_history  antiquity  antiquity-economics  historical_sociology 
august 2015 by dunnettreader
Jew and Judean: A Forum on Politics and Historiography in the Translation of Ancient Texts - Forum ebook | The Marginalia Review of Books [LA Review of Books] August 2014
Have scholars erased the Jews from Antiquity? -- Adele Reinhartz’s essay in MRB on June 24 set off a vibrant discussion in the comments section and in the MRB editors’ inboxes. The range of responses to the piece dotted the spectrum from full support to indignation, proving that a sizable readership wanted to debate these ideas further. The forum is released today only two months after the Reinhartz essay thanks to the good will and the efficiency of the participants. The essays, beginning with Reinhartz’s original piece and concluding with her response to the collection, investigate the political and historiographical considerations involved in the translation of ancient texts, in particular how modern translators and historians ought to deal with the translation of the Greek word ioudaios (Ἰουδαῖος). -- Along with the forum, MRB is excited to release an e-book version of the discussion free for our readers. -- downloaded pdf to Note
ebooks  religious_history  philology  antiquity  ancient_religions  ancient_Israel  ancient_Greece  ancient_Rome  Hellenism  Judaism  Judaism-2nf_Temple  national_ID  religious_culture  translation  Greek_lit  koine  sociology_of_religion  politics-and-religion  religious_lit  downloaded 
june 2015 by dunnettreader
Brooke Holmes; W. H. Shearin, eds. - Dynamic Reading: Studies in the Reception of Epicureanism - Oxford University Press
(..) examines the reception history of Epicurean philosophy through a series of eleven case studies, (..). Rather than attempting to separate an original Epicureanism from its later readings and misreadings, this collection studies the philosophy together with its subsequent reception, focusing in particular on the ways in which it has provided terms and conceptual tools for defining how we read and respond to texts, artwork, and the world more generally. *--* Introduction, Brooke Holmes and W. H. Shearin -- 1. Haunting Nepos: Atticus and the Performance of Roman Epicurean Death, W. H. Shearin -- 2. Epicurus's Mistresses: Pleasure, Authority, and Gender in the Reception of the Kuriai Doxai in the Second Sophistic, Richard Fletcher -- 3. Reading for Pleasure: Disaster and Digression in the First Renaissance Commentary on Lucretius, Gerard Passannante -- 4. Discourse ex nihilo: Epicurus and Lucretius in 16thC England, Adam Rzepka -- 5. Engendering Modernity: Epicurean Women from Lucretius to Rousseau, Natania Meeker -- 6. Oscillate and Reflect: La Mettrie, Materialist Physiology, and the Revival of the Epicurean Canonic, James Steintrager -- 7. Sensual Idealism: The Spirit of Epicurus and the Politics of Finitude in Kant and Hölderlin, Anthony Adler -- 8. The Sublime, Today?, Glenn Most -- 9. From Heresy to Nature: Leo Strauss's History of Modern Epicureanism, Benjamin Aldes Wurgaft -- 10. Epicurean Presences in Foucault's The Hermeneutics of the Subject, Alain Gigandet -- 11. Deleuze, Lucretius, and the Simulacrum of Naturalism, Brooke Holmes
books  kindle-available  intellectual_history  Latin_lit  literary_history  ancient_philosophy  ancient_Greece  ancient_Rome  Roman_Republic  Roman_Empire  Epicurean  Lucretius  influence-literary  reception  Renaissance  reader_response  readership  reading  16thC  English_lit  materialism  Enlightenment  French_Enlightenment  La_Mettrie  gender  gender_history  German_Idealism  Kant-aesthetics  Kant  Hölderlin  poetry  sublime  naturalism  Strauss  Foucault  Rousseau  Deleuze  lit_crit  new_historicism  subjectivity  finitude  death  literature-and-morality  literary_theory  postmodern  modernity  modernity-emergence  pleasure 
june 2015 by dunnettreader
Maggie Kilgour - Milton and the Metamorphosis of Ovid (2012) | Oxford University Press
Milton and the Metamorphosis of Ovid contributes to our understanding of the Roman poet Ovid, the Renaissance writer Milton, and more broadly the transmission and transformation of classical traditions through history. It examines the ways in which Milton drew on Ovid's oeuvre, as well as the long tradition of reception that had begun with Ovid himself, and argues that Ovid's revision of the past, and especially his relation to Virgil, gave Renaissance writers a model for their own transformation of classical works. Throughout his career Milton thinks through and with Ovid, whose stories and figures inform his exploration of the limits and possibilities of creativity, change, and freedom. Examining this specific relation between two very individual and different authors, Kilgour also explores the forms and meaning of creative imitation. Intertexuality was not only central to the two writers' poetic practices but helped shape their visions of the world. While many critics seek to establish how Milton read Ovid, Kilgour debates the broader question of why does considering how Milton read Ovid matter? How do our readings of this relation change our understanding of both Milton and Ovid; and does it tell us about how traditions are changed and remade through time?
books  kindle-available  Latin_lit  literary_history  Ovid  ancient_Rome  epic  poetry  Renaissance  English_lit  influence-literary  imitation  Virgil 
june 2015 by dunnettreader
Ronald Mellor - Tacitus' Annals (2010) | Oxford University Press
Tacitus' Annals is the central historical source for first-century C.E. Rome. It is prized by historians since it provides the best narrative material for the reigns of Tiberius, Claudius, and Nero, as well as a probing analysis of the imperial system of government. But the Annals should be seen as far more than an historical source, a mere mine for the reconstruction of the facts of Roman history. While the Annals is a superb work of history, it has also become a central text in the western literary, political, and even philosophical traditions - from the Renaissance to the French and American revolutions, and beyond. This volume attempts to enhance the reader's understanding of how this book of history could have such a profound effect. Chapters will address the purpose, form, and method of Roman historical writing, the ethnic biases of Tacitus, and his use of sources. Since Tacitus has been regarded as one of the first analysts of the psychopathology of political life, the book will examine the emperors, the women of the court, and the ambitious entourage of freedmen and intellectuals who surround every Roman ruler. The final chapter will examine the impact of Tacitus' Annals since their rediscovery by Boccaccio in the 14th century.
books  kindle-available  historiography-antiquity  historians-and-politics  Tacitus  Latin_lit  ancient_Rome  Roman_Empire  political_culture  political_philosophy  Renaissance  historiography-Renaissance  historiography-17thC  historiography-18thC  oligarchy  Absolutism  raison-d'-état  government-forms 
june 2015 by dunnettreader
Elaine Fantham - Ovid's Metamorphoses (2004) | Oxford University Press
Oxford Approaches to Classical Literature (Series Editors: Kathleen Coleman and Richard Rutherford) introduces individual works of Greek and Latin literature to readers who are approaching them for the first time. Each volume sets the work in its literary and historical context, and aims to offer a balanced and engaging assessment of its content, artistry, and purpose. A brief survey of the influence of the work upon subsequent generations is included to demonstrate its enduring relevance and power. All quotations from the original are translated into English. Ovid's Metamorphoses have been seen as both the culmination of and a revolution in the classical epic tradition, transferring narrative interest from war to love and fantasy. This introduction considers how Ovid found and shaped his narrative from the creation of the world to his own sophisticated times, illustrating the cruelty of jealous gods, the pathos of human love, and the imaginative fantasy of flight, monsters, magic, and illusion. Elaine Fantham introduces the reader not only to this marvelous and complex narrative poem, but to the Greek and Roman traditions behind Ovid's tales of transformation and a selection of the images and texts that it inspired.
books  kindle-available  Latin_lit  literary_history  Ovid  ancient_Rome  epic  poetry  ancient_Greece  Greek_lit  ancient_religions  gods-antiquity  imitation  influence-literary 
june 2015 by dunnettreader
Luca Grillo - Cicero's "De Provinciis Consularibus Oratio" | Oxford University Press
Perhaps no other single Roman speech exemplifies the connection between oratory, politics and imperialism better than Cicero's De Provinciis Consularibus, pronounced to the senate in 56 BC. Cicero puts his talents at the service of the powerful "triumviri" (Caesar, Crassus and Pompey), whose aims he advances by appealing to the senators' imperialistic and chauvinistic ideology. This oration, then, yields precious insights into several areas of late republican life: international relations between Rome and the provinces (Gaul, Macedonia and Judaea); the senators' view on governors, publicani (tax-farmers) and foreigners; the dirty mechanics of high politics in the 50s, driven by lust for domination and money; and Cicero's own role in that political choreography. This speech also exemplifies the exceptional range of Cicero's oratory: the invective against Piso and Gabinius calls for biting irony, the praise of Caesar displays high rhetoric, the rejection of other senators' recommendations is a tour de force of logical and sophisticated argument, and Cicero's justification for his own conduct is embedded in the self-fashioning narrative which is typical of his post reditum speeches. This new commentary includes an updated introduction, which provides the readers with a historical, rhetorical and stylistic background to appreciate the complexities of Cicero's oration, as well as indexes and maps. -- Latin text
books  kindle-available  Cicero  rhetoric  rhetoric-political  Roman_Republic  irony  corruption  Caesar  imperialism  Latin_lit  ancient_history  ancient_Rome 
june 2015 by dunnettreader
Marc Fumaroli -- Le siècle des Lumières et la naissance du "néoclassicisme" | Canal Académie 2011
Interview (mp3) and article by Canal summarizing points he makes in his introductory essay for the exhibition catalog -- Marc Fumaroli intervient ici sur l’exposition "L’Antiquité rêvée: Innovations et résistances au XVIIIe siècle" qui se tient au musée du Louvre du 2 décembre 2010 au 14 février 2011. Elle illustre à travers un choix de plus de 150 œuvres majeures, la naissance du mouvement dit « néoclassique ». Ce retour à l’Antique fut principalement inspiré par la découverte et le retentissement des fouilles des cités antiques d’Herculanum et de Pompeï. Elles révélèrent à la fois la peinture antique et son contexte, le décor et le quotidien de la vie urbaine des anciens Romains. Nous suivons ainsi les grandes périodes correspondant aux trois principales sections de l’exposition du musée du Louvre, à savoir: I – Le RENOUVEAU du goût pour l’Antique 1730-1770 **--** II – RESISTANCES 1760-1790: Néobaroque – Néomaniérisme – Le Sublime **--** III – NEOCLASSICISMES 1770-1790. Avec, dans chaque section, beaucoup de courants et contre-courants. -- web page to Pocket, includes references to the catalog and related publications
intellectual_history  art_history  aesthetics  Renaissance  17thC  18thC  Ancients_v_Moderns  classicism  neoclassical  baroque  Rococo  painting  sculpture  Republic_of_Letters  Enlightenment  antiquity  ancient_Greece  ancient_Rome  archaeology  Pompeii  sublime  Winkleman  cultural_history  historiography-18thC  lifestyle  decorative_arts  books  museums  exhibition  audio  Pocket 
april 2015 by dunnettreader
Seth Holm - The Specter of Tantalus: Didactic Latency in "De rerum natura" | Project MUSE
From: Transactions of the American Philological Association, Volume 143, Number 2, Autumn 2013, pp. 385-403 | At the end of his third book, Lucretius concludes his arguments against the fear of death and the neurotic desires brought on by this fear with a metaphor that has been difficult for interpreters to fathom: et sitis aequa tenet vitai semper hiantis (3.1084). This paper offers a new reading of this passage as a tacit reference to the myth of Tantalus, which functions as a latent mythological allegory for chronic psychological dissatisfaction. This reading solves local problems of interpretation and, more significantly, provides insight into the didacticism of Lucretius’s sub-surface polemic against myth.
article  Project_MUSE  paywall  intellectual_history  ancient_Rome  ancient_philosophy  Epicurean  Lucretius  myth  allegory 
april 2015 by dunnettreader
Branko Milanovic: Can Black Death explain the Industrial Revolution? | globalinequality - Jan 11 2015
re presentation by a young scholar at Santa Fe suggesting that Why England (and Dutch) due to higher wages in Northern Europe post Black Death in contrast with South where non market repression or property arrangements were able to push adjustment costs inti agricultural workers without impact on wage rates. Milanovic compares with other theoretical approaches ie Pomerantz, Acemoglu & Robinson, Robert Allen etc. Link to 2007 paper by Pamuk Milanovic thinks may be 1st work to seriously look at differential impact of Black Death on northern & southern Europe as distinct from the common story if Western vs Central and Eastern Europe.
economic_history  Great_Divergence  Industrial_Revolution  Black_Death  North-Weingast  landowners  demography  economic_sociology  labor  agriculture  wages  productivity  colonialism  medieval  14thC  15thC  16thC  17thC  18thC  institutional_economics  capital  capitalism  China  Japan  ancient_Rome  slavery  bibliography 
january 2015 by dunnettreader
Gustave Flaubert - Oeuvres (pdfs) | Ichiro Miyazawa at Kyoto University of Foreign Studies
Œuvres de jeunesse numérisées en mode image par Ichiro Miyazawa, site de Kyoto University of Foreign Studies -- via Centre Flaubert at U of Rouen -- the Kyoto site has pdfs of Flaubert's main works as well, but is linked for its extensive set of etexts of minor works and studies -- Les soirées d'étude, Narrations et discours, Mort du duc de Guise, Deux mains sur une couronne, Un parfum à sentir, Chronique normande du Xe siècle, La Femme du monde, Un secret de Philippe le Prudent, roi d'Espagne, La Peste à Florence, Bibliomanie, Rage et impuissance, La Dernière Heure, Une leçon d'histoire naturelle : genre Commis, La Main de fer, Rêve d'enfer, Passion et vertu, Agonies, Ivre et mort, Mémoires d'un fou, Étude sur Rabelais, Les Funérailles du Docteur Mathurin, Mademoiselle Rachel, Souvenirs, notes et pensées intimes, Novembre.
website  etexts  Flaubert  19thC  French_lit  fiction  literary_history  ancient_Rome  France  Wars_of_Religion  15thC  16thC  medieval_history  Rabelais 
january 2015 by dunnettreader
Colin Kidd - Civil Theology and Church Establishments in Revolutionary America | JSTOR: The Historical Journal, Vol. 42, No. 4 (Dec., 1999), pp. 1007-1026
The discourse of America's founding generation, it is now widely recognized, was rich and variegated in its composition, drawing upon the commonwealth tradition, the English common law, Montesquieu, Locke, Scottish moral philosophy, and the classics. These sources yield significant clues as to how eighteenth-century Americans viewed religious liberty and church-state relations, subjects of the First Amendment to the Constitution. Supplementing the work of legal historians on the religious provisions of the early state constitutions, the study of political ideas suggests the parameters of the eighteenth-century debate over the effects which various types of religious belief and ecclesiastical establishment had upon manners and institutions. It also reveals the ideological underpinnings of the apparently inconsistent legal provisions for religion at the state level, and, far from settling the elusive question of `original intent', highlights the nature of the divisions within the founding generation. -- downloaded pdf to Note
article  jstor  intellectual_history  political_philosophy  moral_philosophy  theology  religious_history  church_history  religious_culture  religion-established  civil_religion  civil_liberties  tolerance  US_constitution  17thC  18thC  British_history  British_politics  US_history  Founders  bill_of_rights  ancient_Rome  ancient_Greece  Commonwealthmen  Locke-religion  Hutcheson  Smith  Montesquieu  civic_virtue  republicanism  republics-Ancient_v_Modern  US_legal_system  US_politics  downloaded  EF-add 
january 2015 by dunnettreader
Xavier Marquez -Cicero and the Stability of States by (2010) :: SSRN
Victoria University of Wellington -- APSA 2009 Toronto Meeting Paper -- History of Political Thought, Vol. 32, No. 3, pp. 397-423, 2011 -- I argue for the originality and interest of Cicero’s views on the stability of political communities. After a survey of ancient ideas on the mixed constitution (the framework for thinking about the stability of political communities in the ancient world), I show how Cicero adapted these ideas to analyze the Roman situation of his time. Cicero’s version of the theory of the mixed constitution is notable for two innovations: an argument that stability is possible even under conditions of high inequality, and an account of constitutional mixture that emphasizes the role of the “monarchic” element in promoting concord and stability and meeting unexpected challenges. I show, however, that this account unfortunately made it clear that the Roman crisis of Cicero’s time was more or less insoluble in ways that would preserve the republic. -- PDF File: 42 pgs -- Keywords: Cicero, History of Political Thought, States, Stability, Plato, Aristotle -- downloaded to Dropbox
article  SSRN  political_philosophy  intellectual_history  ancient_philosophy  ancient_Greece  ancient_Rome  ancient_history  Cicero  Plato  Aristotle  stability  Roman_Republic  government-forms  adaptability  mixed_government  republics-Ancient_v_Modern  republicanism  inequality  class_conflict  limited_monarchy  monarchical_republic  downloaded  EF-add 
november 2014 by dunnettreader
John Emerich Edward Dalberg, Lord Acton, The History of Freedom and Other Essays, ed. John Neville Figgis and Reginald Vere Laurence (London: Macmillan, 1907). - Online Library of Liberty
Acton never completed his projected History of Liberty. We do have however several collections of his writings such as this one which contains 2 chapters from this planned history – on liberty in antiquity and Christianity – and many book reviews where one can piece together Acton’s approach to the writing of such a history. This volume consists of articles reprinted from the following journals: The Quarterly Review, The English Historical Review, The Nineteenth Century, The Rambler, The Home and Foreign Review, The North British Review, The Bridgnorth Journal. *--* CHRONICLE. *-* INTRODUCTION. *-* I: THE HISTORY OF FREEDOM IN ANTIQUITY. *-* II: THE HISTORY OF FREEDOM IN CHRISTIANITY. *-* III: SIR ERSKINE MAY’S DEMOCRACY IN EUROPE. *-* IV: THE MASSACRE OF ST. BARTHOLOMEW. *-* V: THE PROTESTANT THEORY OF PERSECUTION *-* VI: POLITICAL THOUGHTS ON THE CHURCH. *-* VII: INTRODUCTION TO L. A. BURD’S EDITION OF IL PRINCIPE BY MACHIAVELLI. *-* VIII: MR. GOLDWIN SMITH’S IRISH HISTORY. *-* IX: NATIONALITY. *-* X: DÖLLINGER ON THE TEMPORAL POWER. *-* XI: DÖLLINGER’S HISTORICAL WORK. *-* XII: CARDINAL WISEMAN AND THE HOME AND FOREIGN REVIEW. *'* XIII: CONFLICTS WITH ROME. *-* XIV: THE VATICAN COUNCIL. *-* XV: A HISTORY OF THE INQUISITION OF THE MIDDLE AGES. By Henry Charles Lea. *-* XVI: THE AMERICAN COMMONWEALTH. By James Bryce. *-* XVII: HISTORICAL PHILOSOPHY IN FRANCE AND FRENCH BELGIUM AND SWITZERLAND. By Robert Flint. -- downloaded kindle version of html
books  etexts  Liberty_Fund  downloaded  intellectual_history  historiography  political_philosophy  political_history  political_culture  liberty  Christianity  Christendom  antiquity  ancient_Greece  ancient_Rome  ancient_history  democracy  Reformation  persecution  Counter-Reformation  Inquisition  Wars_of_Religion  Bartholomew_Day_massacre  Huguenots  Protestants  national_ID  nationalism  Machiavelli  historiography-19thC  US_constitution  US_government  US_politics 
september 2014 by dunnettreader
The Oxford Companion to Military History, ed. Richard Holmes: | Answers.com
The Oxford Companion to Military History, edited by Richard Holmes, Oxford University Press -- A complete overview of military history from classical times to the present, The Oxford Companion to Military History is an essential guide to how the world has been shaped by conflict. Entries on key topics such as intelligence, propaganda, peacekeeping and women in the military, are included, with over 70 maps showing the course of famous battles and campaigns.
books  etexts  military_history  military  war  ancient_history  ancient_Rome  Roman_Empire  medieval_history  Europe-Early_Modern  Military_Revolution  propaganda  maritime_history  IR 
august 2014 by dunnettreader
Alexander U. Bertland - The Significance of Tacitus in Vico's Idea of History | JSTOR: Historical Reflections / Réflexions Historiques, Vol. 22, No. 3 (Fall 1996), pp. 517-535
Suggests Vico found in Tacitus a 3 stage cycle that concludes with "the barbarism of reflection" though in Vico's own narrative he doesn't make the link explicit but slides over the decline and fall of the Roman Empire -- downloaded pdf to Note - in separate folder for the papers from this special issue
article  jstor  intellectual_history  philosophy_of_history  Vico  Tacitus  historiography-18thC  ancient_history  ancient_Greece  ancient_Rome  Roman_Empire  cycles  stadial_theories  declinism  downloaded  EF-add 
august 2014 by dunnettreader
Karl Marx - The Difference Between the Democritean and Epicurean Philosophy of Nature. with an Appendix - Doctoral Dissertation of Karl Marx | marxists.org
Written: March 1841; - First Published: 1902; -- Source: Marx-Engels Collected Works Volume 1; -- Publisher: Progress Publishers; -- Transcription/Markup: Andy Blunden; -- Online Version: Brian Baggins (marxists.org) 2000.
etexts  19thC  ancient_Greece  ancient_Rome  intellectual_history  Marx  Hegel  natural_philosophy  cosmology  atomism  laws_of_nature  Democritus  Epicurean  EF-add 
july 2014 by dunnettreader
Flavius Philostratus, On Heroes - trans. Ellen Bradshaw Aitken and Jennifer K. Berenson Maclean | The Center for Hellenic Studies
In addition to the Introduction by the translators, there's an important "Preliminaries" to Philostratus's On Heroes by Casey Dué and Gregory Nagy - who have taught courses on ancient heroes at Harvard for years. Nagy has a book (kindle-available) and MOOC Ancient Heroes in 24 Hours, in which Philostratus is an important late antiquity (3rdC AD) source
books  etexts  ancient_history  ancient_Greece  ancient_Rome  Roman_Empire  religious_history  religious_culture  pagans  heroes  Achilles  Homer  EF-add 
july 2014 by dunnettreader
Betty Rose Nagle, review - William Fitzgerald, How to Read a Latin Poem: If You Can’t Read Latin Yet (2013) | Bryn Mawr Classical Review 2014.01.07
This engagingly written and cleverly organized book contains sophisticated discussions of a wide range of poets, periods, and genres, primarily in the form of close readings of the Latin originals. By what means, and how successfully, does its author accommodate that hypothetical Latinless reader? He does not do this by dumbing anything down; these are readings from which the proficient can profit, too. The poets and works included come mostly from the “greatest hits” list, but there are some unorthodox choices as well, such as Sulpicia in the chapter on love poetry, several Priapea included with Catullus and Martial in a chapter on invective, and Persius as the featured satirist. The first two chapters treat antithetical topics (love, hate); the middle two treat respectively a collection (Horace’s Odes) and a corpus (Virgil’s works) written during the same period; the fifth treats another pair of contemporaries, the Neronians Petronius [actually Lucan?] and Seneca; and the sixth, thematic again, pairs Lucretius and Ovid as philosophical and narrative “science fiction.” There is also an introduction for his readers, cleverly followed by a “Prelude” discussing two poems addressed to their readers, and a brief “Epilogue,” using Hadrian’s animula as a bridge to a few comments about the very different poetry of Christian hymns. Ancillaries include a pronunciation guide, suggestions for further reading, a glossary of terms, an index of names and topics, and another of poems. -- Oxford University Press - only hdbk on amazon.com - ebook available on Google_Books for c $20 - is OUP having a kindle fight? From Google preview, looks fabulous
books  reviews  buy  Google_Books  Latin_lit  Horace  Virgil  Ovid  Seneca  Lucretius  satire  Augustan_Rome  politics-and-literature  ancient_Rome  Roman_Empire  poetry  EF-add 
july 2014 by dunnettreader
The Works of John Adams, vol. 4 (Novanglus, Thoughts on Government, Defence of the Constitution) - Online Library of Liberty
John Adams, The Works of John Adams, Second President of the United States: with a Life of the Author, Notes and Illustrations, by his Grandson Charles Francis Adams (Boston: Little, Brown and Co., 1856). 10 volumes. Vol. 4. 07/12/2014. <http://oll.libertyfund.org/titles/2102> -- A 10 volume collection of Adams’ most important writings, letters, and state papers, edited by his grandson. Vol. 4 contains Novanglus [history of the American colonies and their relations with Britain from 1754 to 1774], Thoughts on Government, and Defence of the Constitutions [descriptions of modern and ancient republics (categorized as democratic, aristocratic and, some ancient, as monarchic), and writings on the history and theories of forms of government by ancient and modern historians and philosophers. Lists Dr Swift as well as Hume -must have read 4 Last Years. -- downloaded pdf to Note
books  etexts  18thC  intellectual_history  political_philosophy  Adams_John  ancient_history  ancient_philosophy  ancient_Greece  ancient_Rome  republics-Ancient_v_Modern  government-forms  historians-and-politics  British_history  British_politics  British_Empire-constitutional_structure  British_foreign_policy  Swift  Hume  American_colonies  American_Revolution  George_III  Parliamentary_supremacy  limited_monarchy  English_constitution  UK_government-colonies  British_Empire  downloaded  EF-add 
july 2014 by dunnettreader
Claude Diebolt - The Stakes of Cliometrics in Ancient History | JSTOR: Historical Social Research / Historische Sozialforschung, Vol. 36, No. 3 (137) (2011), pp. 350-361
C According to Finley, markets and economic motivations played little, if any, role in ancient economies. Status and civic ideology governed the allocation of scarce resources. Hence, the application of economic theory to the ancient economy was at best a futile exercise and at worst a source of grave misunderstandings. Temin's contributions lead to other conclusions and, as in the myth of Sisyphus, the boulder seems again to be at the bottom of the hill! My feeling is that the Gordian knot remains the same now as over the past decades: should cliometrics be used in the social sciences/humanities in general, and ancient history especially? -- didn't download
article  jstor  ancient_history  ancient_Greece  ancient_Rome  economic_history  markets  capitalism  cliometrics 
june 2014 by dunnettreader
Stuart Elden, 2013 The Birth of Territory, reviewed by Gerry Kearns | Society and Space - Environment and Planning D
The Birth of Territory interrogates texts from various dates to see if they describe rule as the legal control over a determined space. Time after time we learn that a set of political writings that concern land, law, terrain, sovereignty, empire, or related concepts do not articulate a fully-fledged notion of territory. We may end up asking like the proverbial kids in the back of the car: “Are we there yet.” Elden is certainly able to show that earlier formulations are reworked in later periods, as with the discussion of Roman law in the medieval period; there is a lot in the political thought of each period, however, that relates to land and power but does not get reworked in later times. This means that what really holds many of the chapters together is that they are studies of how land and power were discussed at that time, and that is not so very far from taking land and power as quasi-universals. In fact, there is probably a continuum between categories that have greater or lesser historical specificity, rather than there being a clear distinction between the two. Yet, I must admit that this singular focus gives a welcome coherence to the book for all that it seems to discard large parts of the exposition as not required for later chapters. -- see review for Elden views on Westphalia and HRE contra Teschke ; review references classic and recent works on geography, terrain, law,mapping
books  reviews  kindle-available  intellectual_history  historiography  geography  bibliography  political_history  legal_history  ancient_Greece  ancient_Rome  Roman_Empire  ancient_history  Early_Christian  late_antiquity  Augustine  Papacy  Holy_Roman_Empire  feudalism  Italy  medieval_history  Renaissance  city_states  citizenship  sovereignty  territory  maps  landowners  property  Roman_law  exiles  Absolutism  16thC  17thC  Wars_of_Religion  France  Germany  British_history  Ireland  Irish-Gaelic  IR  IR_theory  colonialism  legal_theory  legitimacy  EF-add 
june 2014 by dunnettreader
Duncan Bell - From Ancient to Modern in Victorian Imperial Thought | JSTOR: The Historical Journal, Vol. 49, No. 3 (Sep., 2006), pp. 735-759
This article argues that during the closing decades of the nineteenth century a significant group of British imperial thinkers broke with the long-standing conventions of political thought by deliberately eschewing the inspiration and intellectual authority provided by the examples of the ancient empires. While the early Victorian colonial reformers had looked to the template of Greece, and while many later Victorians compared the empire in India with the Roman empire, numerous proponents of Greater Britain (focusing on the settler colonies, and associated in particular with the movement for imperial federation) looked instead to the United States. I argue that the reason for this innovation, risky in a culture obsessed with the moral and prudential value of precedent and tradition, lies in contemporary understandings of history. Both Rome and Greece, despite their differences, were thought to demonstrate that empires were ultimately self-dissolving; as such, empires modelled on their templates were doomed to eventual failure, whether through internal decay or the peaceful independence of the colonies. Since the advocates of Greater Britain were determined to construct an enduring political community, a global Anglo-Saxon polity, they needed to escape the fate of previous empires. They tried instead to insert Greater Britain into a progressive narrative, one that did not doom them to repeat the failures of the past. -- looks fascinating -- didn't download
article  jstor  intellectual_history  19thC  British_history  British_politics  British_Empire  historiography-19thC  imperialism  empires  ancient_Greece  ancient_Rome  imperial_overreach  rise_and_fall  progress  Anglo-Saxon_empire  Victorian  EF-add 
may 2014 by dunnettreader
Bryn Mawr Classical Review (BMCR) - Home
Bryn Mawr Classical Review (BMCR) (ISSN 1055-7660) publishes timely open-access, peer-reviewed reviews of current scholarly work in the field of classical studies (including archaeology). This site is the authoritative archive of BMCR's publication, from 1990 to the present. Reviews from August 2008 on are also posted on our blog.
website  books  reviews  intellectual_history  literary_history  ancient_history  ancient_philosophy  social_history  cultural_history  economic_history  archaeology  art_history  religious_history  religious_culture  historiography  ancient_Greece  ancient_Rome  Greek_lit  Latin_lit  poetry  theater  Augustan_Rome  pre-Socratics  Plato  Socrates  Aristotle  Hellenism  Cicero  Stoicism  Epicurean  Virgil  Horace  Ovid  Roman_Empire  Roman_Republic  Roman_law 
may 2014 by dunnettreader
Catherine Connors, review - Elaine Fantham, Lucan, De Bello Civili Book II | Bryn Mawr Classical Review 04.03.04 (1992)
Elaine Fantham, Lucan, De Bello Civili Book II. Cambridge: Cambridge Greek and Latin Classics, 1992. Pp. x + 244. $59.95 (hb). $22.95 (pb). ISBN 0-521-41010-X (hb). ISBN 0-521-42241-8 (pb). Reviewed by Catherine Connors, University of Washington.
books  reviews  ancient_Rome  Latin_lit  Roman_Republic  poetry  epic 
april 2014 by dunnettreader
Michèle Lowrie, review - Kirk Freudenberg, The Walking Muse: Horace on the Theory of Satire | Bryn Mawr Classical Review 04.03.05 (1993)
Kirk Freudenberg, The Walking Muse: Horace on the Theory of Satire. Princeton: Princeton University Press, 1993. ISBN 0-691-03166-5. -- Reviewed by Michèle Lowrie, New York University. -- very interesting review including schools of Roman literary criticism
books  reviews  ancient_Rome  Latin_lit  Horace  poetry  satire  EF-add 
april 2014 by dunnettreader
Richard Bett - Nietzsche and the Romans (2011) | Project MUSE
From: The Journal of Nietzsche Studies - Issue 42, Autumn 2011 - pp. 7-31 | 10.1353/nie.2011.0023 - Nietzsche interested especially in Horace and in his later work Petronius - Bolingbroke's favorites
article  Project_MUSE  find  intellectual_history  19thC  ancient_Rome  Horace  Latin_lit  Bolingbroke  EF-add 
march 2014 by dunnettreader
NADIA URBINATI - Competing for Liberty: The Republican Critique of Democracy | JSTOR: The American Political Science Review, Vol. 106, No. 3 (August 2012), pp. 607-621
Freedom as non-domination has acquired a leading status in political science. As a consequence of its success, neo-roman republicanism also has achieved great prominence as the political tradition that delivered it. Yet despite the fact that liberty in the Roman mode was forged not only in direct confrontation with monarchy but against democracy as well, the relationship of republicanism to democracy is the great absentee in the contemporary debate on non-domination. This article brings that relationship back into view in both historical and conceptual terms. It illustrates the misrepresentations of democracy in the Roman tradition and shows how these undergirded the theory of liberty as non-domination as a counter to politial equality as a claim to taking part in imperium. In so doing it brings to the fore the "liberty side" of democratic citizenship as the equal rights of all citizens to exercise their political rights, in direct or indirect form. -- see bibliography on jstor information page -- paywall Cambridge
article  jstor  intellectual_history  political_philosophy  political_history  antiquity  ancient_Greece  ancient_Rome  Roman_Republic  republicanism  democracy  citizens  domination  political_participation  concepts-change  neo-republicanism  Europe-Early_Modern  17thC  18thC  Harrington  Sidney  commonwealth  common_good  representative_institutions  liberty-positive  liberty  bibliography  EF-add 
february 2014 by dunnettreader
Ryan Balot - Polybius' Advice to the Imperial Republic | JSTOR: Political Theory, Vol. 38, No. 4 (August 2010), pp. 483-509
Polybius' Histories, written in the mid—second century BC, offers an authoritative account of Rome's rise to uncontested imperial supremacy. The work has been highly influential among political thinkers because of its theory of the "mixed constitution." This essay proposes to return Polybius' mixed constitution to its proper location within the narrative of the Histories. This interpretative approach enables us to appreciate Polybius' frequently neglected emphasis on the connections between republican politics and Roman imperial power. These connections shed light on recent developments in republican political theory. They also lead to an investigation of the didactic purposes of the author, who intended to educate the Roman aristocracy in the virtues necessary for exercising hegemonic power successfully in the ancient Mediterranean world. -- downloaded pdf to Note
article  jstor  intellectual_history  political_philosophy  ancient_history  ancient_Rome  ancient_Greece  Roman_Republic  imperialism  Polybius  mixed_government  military_history  Mediterranean  hegemony  republicanism  IR-domestic_politics  IR_theory  downloaded  EF-add 
february 2014 by dunnettreader
Edward Rosenheim, Jr. - The Text and Context of Swift's "Contests and Dissentions" | JSTOR: Modern Philology, Vol. 66, No. 1 (Aug., 1968), pp. 59-74
"A Discourse of the Contests and Dissentions between the Nobles and the Commons in Athens and Rome with the Consequences They Had upon Both Those States" -- Review of Frank Ellis edition for Clarendon Press, 1967 -- downloaded pdf to Note
books  reviews  jstor  intellectual_history  17thC  18thC  British_history  British_politics  English_lit  politics-and-literature  Swift  ancient_Rome  ancient_Greece  downloaded  EF-add 
january 2014 by dunnettreader
Kristoffer Neville: Gothicism and Early Modern Historical Ethnography | JSTOR: Journal of the History of Ideas, Vol. 70, No. 2 (Apr., 2009), pp. 213-234
Downloaded pdf to Note -- claims that most attention has been on Scandinavia, especially the Swedish court in 16thC and 17thC. Article extends inquiry to other parts of Europe that were beginning to claim ancient Gothic heritage - eg Poland, Grotius re Batavia etc
article  jstor  16thC  17thC  Europe-Early_Modern  Sweden  Poland  Dutch  Germany  Holy_Roman_Empire  Spain  Leibniz  linguistics  language-history  historiography  ethnography  nationalism  Goths  Gothic_constitution  ancient_Rome  Roman_Empire  downloaded  EF-add 
december 2013 by dunnettreader
Peter Burke: Images as Evidence in Seventeenth-Century Europe | JSTOR: Journal of the History of Ideas, Vol. 64, No. 2 (Apr., 2003), pp. 273-296
Deals with the transition from antiquarianism to archaeology and debates over use of material remains as historical evidence. Builds on work of Momigliano and Haskell (History and its images - bookshelf? ) -- downloaded pdf to Note
article  jstor  intellectual_history  historiography  17thC  antiquaries  archaeology  epistemology  art_history  evidence  antiquity  ancient_Rome  ancient_history  ancient_religions  Early_Christian  Egypt  downloaded  EF-add 
december 2013 by dunnettreader
Ronald Syme, review essay - Fasti Consolari dell' Impero Romano 30 BC-613 AD by Attilio Degrassi | JSTOR: The Journal of Roman Studies, Vol. 43 (1953), pp. 148-161
I Fasti Consolari dell' Impero Romano dal 30 Av anti Christo al 613 Dopo Christo by Attilio Degrassi
Review by: Ronald Syme

Didn't download the paper
Interesting discussion of what can be learned or inferred about the governance structures, politics of the Principate and Empire from the Fasti themselves and triangulating with other sources
article  jstor  ancient_Rome  Augustan_Rome  political_history  historiography-antiquity  EF-add 
december 2013 by dunnettreader
Simon Goldhill, review: Tim Duff, Plutarch's Lives: Exploring Virtue and Vice | Bryn Mawr Classical Review 2000.10.08
Tim Duff, Plutarch's Lives: Exploring Virtue and Vice. Oxford: Oxford University Press, 2000. Pp. 444. ISBN 0-19-815058-X. £55.00. -- Reviewed by Simon Goldhill, King's College, Cambridge -- ..... He does not aim to put Plutarch back on his pedestal as the paradigm of classical learning, but he does want to read Plutarch's Lives seriously, as coherent texts in themselves and as key documents of the early Greek negotiation of the Roman Empire. He is building here on the work of Christopher Pelling and Simon Swain in particular, and his book length study offers an intelligent, controlled, and scholarly development of his central claims.. ... Plutarch was for many generations an author who provided moral inspiration, ethical education and narratives to live by. Duff, for all his talk of moralizing programmes, does not seem comfortable with this legacy. Unlike recent scholars of Plato and Aristotle (especially in political theory), Duff does not seek to find an agenda for the modern reader in Plutarch, nor does he extensively engage with that heritage. Plutarch, for Duff, is a good read, but not good for you to read. Perhaps it is our collective embarrassment at the dodgy moralizing use of classics that conspires to keep Plutarch obscure. But I suspect that not to engage more directly with that aspect of Plutarch's work sells his power short. The force of his prose to move, to teach, to inspire generations of readers should be re-explored and not forgotten nor embarrassedly ignored (however nobly motivated such embarrassment is). Duff has done a good job in giving a solid basis for the study of Plutarch's Lives, but Plutarch also need to be treated with a bit more passion if his star is going to rise again.
books  reviews  ancient_history  ancient_Greece  ancient_Rome  Roman_Empire  literary_history  moral_philosophy  biography  Plutarch  EF-add 
december 2013 by dunnettreader
William W. Batstone: The Antithesis of Virtue: Sallust's "Synkrisis" and the Crisis of the Late Republic |JSTOR: Classical Antiquity, Vol. 7, No. 1 (Apr., 1988), pp. 1-29
How to interpret the contrasting praise of virtues of Caesar and Cato rhetorically (Sallust objective of effect on reader) and "philosophically" (Sallust's assessment of Republic's historical situation, weaknesses, fault lines as reflected in his treatment of the two contrasting ideologies, goals, virtues etc of Caesar and Cato) -- downloaded pdf to Note
article  jstor  ancient_history  ancient_Rome  historiography-antiquity  Roman_Republic  Latin_lit  rhetoric  downloaded  EF-add 
december 2013 by dunnettreader
Stoa | Welcome to the Suda On Line (SOL)
The Suda (or Stronghold): a massive 10th century Byzantine Greek historical encyclopedia of the ancient Mediterranean world, covering the whole of Greek and Roman antiquity and also including Biblical and Christian material.

Preserved in several medieval manuscripts, it has been edited and published several times since the end of the 14th century in traditional hard-copy scholarly editions, most recently that of Ada Adler (Teubner, 5 volumes: 1928-1938, reprinted 1971). The Suda On Line (SOL) project, begun in 1998 as part of the Stoa Consortium, opens up this stronghold of information by means of a freely accessible, keyword-searchable database, with English translations, notes, bibliography, and links to other electronic resources. With contributions (as Translators and/or Editors) from more than two hundred people worldwide, the SOL reached the landmark of all entries being translated and “vetted” (edited) to a usable standard on July 21, 2014. But more can, and will, be done.
website  ancient_philosophy  medieval_history  digital_humanities  ancient_Rome  Roman_Empire  Byzantium  ancient_Greece  etexts  Byzantine_Empire  Suda 
october 2013 by dunnettreader
Peter Milker: The Ancient Constitution and the Genealogist: Momigliano, Pocock, and Peiresc’s Origines Murensis Monasterii (1618) | Republics of Letters: A Journal for the Study of Knowledge, Politics, and the Arts
Citation: Miller, Peter. “The Ancient Constitution and the Genealogist: Momigliano, Pocock, and Peiresc’s Origines Murensis Monasterii (1618).” Republics of Letters: A Journal for the Study of Knowledge, Politics, and the Arts 1, no. 1 (May 1, 2009): http://rofl.stanford.edu/node/37. -- in "Rethinking the Republic of Letters" -- downloaded pdf to Note -- Momigliano’s essay,was actually not a history of antiquarianism. Its point was to seek an anti-relativist platform for historical scholarship that could be deployed to counter the kind of racist obscurantism that passed as radical skepticism in the 1930s. By focusing on the history of classical scholarship and largely ignoring the beginnings of medieval historical scholarship, it was also relatively simple for Momigliano to present his scholars as more-or-less apolitical, above the fray. He closes the essay by arguing that perhaps the greatest legacy of the antiquarian was an “ethical” one, quoting Mabillon on the need for a “coeur dégagé des passions.” But yet his was a political argument, albeit with a small “p” because his target was a politics of relativism and nihilism. What follows is really a small sketch towards what it might have looked like if Pocock had met Momigliano at the Warburg Institute in 1950, or really grappled with his great essay in the years that followed—but with one important change. What I propose by the term “genealogist” is to go a step towards redefining early modern antiquarianism, not so much away from the Classical world that was so dear to Momigliano, and so important for the many art historians who have mostly been responsible for returning antiquarianism to the scholarly agenda in the last decade or so, as towards the middle ages.
article  intellectual_history  historiography  17thC  18thC  antiquaries  ancient_history  ancient_Greece  ancient_Rome  medieval_history  scepticism  historians-and-state  historians-and-religion  Pocock  downloaded  EF-add 
september 2013 by dunnettreader
Paul Schuurman : Determinism and Causal Feedback Loops in Montesquieu's Explanations for the MilitaryRise and Fall of Rome (2013) | T & F Online
British Journal for the History of Philosophy, Volume 21, Issue 3, 2013, pages 507- 528, Available online: 23 May 2013, DOI: 10.1080/09608788.2013.771612 -- Montesquieu's Considérations sur les causes de la grandeur des Romains et de leur décadence (1733/1734) is a methodological exercise in causal explanation on the meso-level applied to the subject of the military rise and fall of Rome. Rome is described as a system with contingent initial conditions that have a strong path-determining effect. Contingent and plastic initial configurations become highly determining in their subsequent operation, thanks to self-reinforcing feedback loops. Montesquieu's method seems influenced by the ruthless commitment to efficient causality and the reductionism of seventeenth-century mechanicist philosophy; but in contrast to these predecessors, he is more interested in dynamic processes than in unchangeable substances, and his use of efficient causality in the context of a system approach implies a form of holism that is lacking in his predecessors. The formal and conceptual analysis in this article is in many ways complementary with Paul Rahe's recent predominantly political analysis of the Considérations. At the same time, this article points to a problem in the works on the Enlightenment by Jonathan Israel: his account stresses a one-dimensional continuum consisting of Radical, Moderate and Counter-Enlightenment. This invites Israel to place the combined religious, political and philosophical views of each thinker on one of these three points. His scheme runs into trouble when a thinker with moderate religious and political views produces radical philosophical concepts. Montesquieu's Considérations is a case in point.
article  paywall  intellectual_history  18thC  Montesquieu  ancient_Rome  Roman_Republic  Roman_Empire  military_history  lessons-of-history  determinism  causation  social_theory  mechanism  path-dependency  historiography  Enlightenment  Radical_Enlightenment  Counter-Enlightenment  find  EF-add 
september 2013 by dunnettreader
Continental Philosophy of Social Science: Yvonne Sherratt: 9780521670982: (CUP 2006)
Continental Philosophy of Social Science demonstrates the unique and autonomous nature of the continental approach to social science and contrasts it with the Anglo-American tradition. Yvonne Sherratt argues for the importance of an historical understanding of the Continental tradition in order to appreciate its individual, humanist character. Examining the key traditions of hermeneutic, genealogy, and critical theory, and the texts of major thinkers such as Gadamer, Ricoeur, Derrida, Nietzsche, Foucault, the Early Frankfurt School and Habermas, she also contextualizes contemporary developments within strands of thought stemming back to Ancient Greece and Rome.

Anthony Pagden recommends re Enlightenment Project
books  intellectual_history  social_theory  ancient_Greece  ancient_Rome  ancient_philosophy  19thC  20thC  Germany  France  Nietzsche  hermeneutics  phenomenology  Frankfurt_School  postmodern  Foucault  Habermas 
july 2013 by dunnettreader

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