dunnettreader + alchemy   14

Martin Mulsow - Ambiguities of the Prisca Sapientia in Late Renaissance Humanism (2004) | JHI on JSTOR
Journal of the History of Ideas, Vol. 65, No. 1 (Jan., 2004), pp. 1-13 -- the assertion of a concordance between these early philosophies and their accordance with Christianity-in the sense of a Christian Platonism- implied the synthesis of fragementary philosophemes into a fully developed doctrine (...)
This program was formulated in a variety of ways during the 16th-17thC with differing protagonists and with diverse aims. Thus one could supplement the genealogy in a cabalist vein, introduce biblical characters such as Solomon or Moses, or (as was done by Bruno) use it to contest Christian doctrine. The genealogy could be read as culminating in various notable modem figures such as for example, Paracelsus. Aristotle could be included or excluded from it, depending on whether one wanted to assimilate the Aristotelian tradition or to distance oneself from it; and one could leave the end of this genealogical lineage open in order to exhort the necessity of a scientific and moral reform.
(...) the question of what became of this program during the late Renaissance, when two developments took place simultaneously: on the one hand, the utopia of the prisca sapientia set about to conquer the field formerly reserved to the Aristotelians, namely, natural philosophy; on the other hand, the first doubts arose about the overall validity of the historical-philological foundation of the program, especially the dating of the works of Hermes Trismegistus. -- downloaded pdf to Note
article  jstor  intellectual_history  15thC  16thC  17thC  natural_philosophy  Neoplatonism  Aristotelian  Kabbalah  alchemy  prisca_sapientia  Hermes_Trismegistus  Bible-as-history  chronology  ancient_philosophy  ancient_religions  Moses  ancient_Egypt  Renaissance  philology  downloaded 
may 2016 by dunnettreader
Lauren Kassell - "All Was This Land Full Fill'd of Faerie," or Magic and the past in Early Modern England (2006) | JSTOR - Journal of the History of Ideas
Journal of the History of Ideas, Vol. 67, No. 1 (Jan., 2006), pp. 107-122 - in issue devoted to histories of science -- looking at how histories of magic were framed with respect to work in mathematics, medicine and natural philosophy, especially to carve out legitimate intellectual inquiry from derogatory attacks linked to supposed magic -- tracks especially from mid 17thC how the discourses that involved magic were shifting -- probably puts Keith Thomas in more recent historiography on "religion and the decline of magic" -- downloaded pdf to Note
article  jstor  intellectual_history  16thC  17thC  religious_history  history_of_science  historiography  magic  medicine  natural_philosophy  alchemy  religious_culture  religious_belief  historiography-17thC  evidence  experimental_philosophy  publishing  downloaded 
october 2015 by dunnettreader
Kocku von Stuckrad, "The Scientification of Religion: An Historical Study of Discursive Change, 1800-2000" (De Gruyter, 2014)
Kocku von Stuckrad, Professor of Religious Studies at the University of Groningen, demonstrates how the construction of what constitutes 'religion' and 'science' was a relational process that emerged with the competition between various systems of knowledge. He traces the transformation and perpetuation of religious discourses as a result of their entanglement with secular academic discourses. In the first half of the book, he presents the discursive constructions of 'religion' and 'science' through the disciplines of astrology, astronomy, psychology, alchemy, chemistry, and scientific experimentation more generally. The second half of the book explores the power of academic legitimization of knowledge in emerging European modernities. Here, the discursive entanglements of professional and participant explanations of modern practices shaped and solidified those realities. Key figures in the history of the field of Religious Studies, such as Martin Buber, Gershom Scholem, Rudolf Otto, and Mircea Eliade, played instrumental roles in legitimizing the authority of mysticism, goddess worship, and shamanism. Ultimately, what we discover is that 'religion' and 'science' are not so much distinctive spheres but elastic systems that arise within the particular circumstances of secular modernity. In our conversation we discussed discursive approaches to the study of religion, the Theosophical Society, marginalized forms of knowledge, the occult sciences, Jewish mysticism, secularization, nature-focused spiritualities, experiential knowledge, pagan religious practices, and 'modern' science
books  interview  audio  intellectual_history  religious_history  sociology_of_religion  sociology_of_knowledge  science-and-religion  19thC  20thC  mysticism  secularization  ritual  pagans  hermeticism  Kabbalah  alchemy  astrology  astronomy  experimental_philosophy  scientific_method 
august 2015 by dunnettreader
Paul Newall interview of Stephen D. Snobelen: Newton Reconsidered - Theology and Alchemy | The Galilean Library
Stephen David Snobelen is Assistant Professor in the History of Science and Technology at University of King's College, Halifax, Nova Scotia. He is a founder member of the Newton project and author of many fascinating papers on Newton's alchemy and religious thinking. I was privileged to be able to ask him some questions about his work on Newton. -- helpful re the process by which Newton's papers were hidden, then sold at auction in 1936 and beginning in 1991 being made available for researchers as the dispersed manuscripts have been re-collected - who is working on what issues, as of 2005 -- Snobelen got his degrees in History of Philosophy of Science at Cambridge with Schaffer -- converted page and downloaded pdf to Note
interview  history_of_science  philosophy_of_science  religious_history  religious_belief  17thC  18thC  Newton  Socinians  Arian  anti-Trinitarian  Biblical_exegesis  Biblical_authority  Bible-as-history  Neoplatonism  immortality  soul  metaphysics  essence  substance  theology  Early_Christian  alchemy  downloaded 
july 2015 by dunnettreader
Peter Elmer, review - Paul Kleber Monod, Solomon's Secret Arts: the Occult in the Age of Enlightenment (Yale University Press 2013) | Reviews in History
Peter Elmer, University of Exeter -- This important work provides the first informed, well-researched and highly nuanced account of the fortunes of ‘occult’ thought and practice in England from the mid17thC to its demise at the end of the 18thC. Building on the work of a wide range of scholars from various disciplines, (..) the fortunes of the occult are argued to have peaked in the second half of the 17thC, dipped in the period from the Glorious Revolution to 1760, and then re-emerged in the last 4 decades of the 18thC in somewhat different but revitalized form. As Monod shows (..) the occult (defined broadly as alchemy, astrology and natural magic) was rarely perceived as a uniform movement of ideas, its adherents frequently picking and choosing those elements of the ‘occult’ which most appealed to them. It was thus a protean body of ideas, susceptible to frequent re-interpretation according to the personal preoccupations of the initiated. At the same time, while some of its adherents may have (in the earlier period especially) seen it as a body of ideas capable of replacing older systems of science and philosophy, it more often than not was studied and developed alongside other, competing systems of thought. (..) What is invigoratingly original here is Monod’s application of the same accommodating features of occult thinking with regard to Newtonianism and the Enlightenment in the later period. (..) it is hard to disagree with his conclusion that ‘the assumption of many historians, that occult thinking was debunked by experimental science … is essentially wrong’.(..) all the arguments against astrology, alchemy and natural magic had been fully developed long before 1650. This is equally true of witchcraft, (..) The occult was not simply argued out of existence. Only wider factors can help to explain this process. (..) in order to understand this process, we need to pay more heed to the wider social, religious and political context in which these ideas were promoted and debated. -- downloaded as pdf to Note
books  reviews  kindle-available  17thC  18thC  British_history  cultural_history  religious_history  religious_culture  religious_belief  intellectual_history  Scientific_Revolution  scientific_culture  Enlightenment  natural_philosophy  occult  chemistry  alchemy  medicine  Newtonian  astronomy  astrology  magic  hermeticism  esotericism  publishing  Charles_II  court_culture  Church_of_England  witchcraft  political_culture  Tories  dissenters  Evangelical  Whigs  Defoe  Thompson_EP  rationality  reason  social_history  experimental_philosophy  downloaded  EF-add 
january 2015 by dunnettreader
David Gentilcore, Review Article: Health in Europe 1500-1800 [ Peter Elmer, ed. of Open University essay collection and companion source book] | Reviews in History - Nov 2004
Dr David Gentilcore, University of Leicester -- (..) a chapter in the first volume on, say, the care and cure of mental illness provides us with a general introduction to and historical survey of the theme, as well as several case studies. (..) The documents alone are worth the price of the 2 books. Not only do they represent the first such collection of sources on early modern medicine, but their coverage is very broad indeed: from early-15thC Italian letters of medical advice to 18thC Parisian surgical instruction; from the published writings of a French midwife to the rules of an English voluntary hospital; from a treatise on the duties of the Christian physician during time of plague to a newspaper account of smallpox inoculation. Hitherto sources of this type have been available in a very few journals, (..) It is the first volume(..) which merits our attention, marking as it does the coming of age of the social and cultural history of medicine. It is the culmination of some 30 years of research that has transformed writing and teaching in the history of medicine. This has meant a shift away from the ‘great men’ focus towards attention to marginalised or neglected groups in society; away from an exclusive interest in medical practitioners towards the experiences of sufferers and patients; away from the allure of retro-diagnosis (that is, applying modern biomedical knowledge to the illnesses of the ‘rich and famous’ of the past) and towards how contemporaries understood disease in their own time; and away from a university- and hospital-centred account of medical knowledge and practice towards one influenced by notions of medical pluralism (the co-existence of alternative or complementary therapies and systems of belief). The essays in this book succeed in providing a cross-section of this research, addressing recent issues and debates in a thematic way. (..) without jettisoning the achievements of previous generations of scholarship. Thus the ‘ideas’ focus of the great men tradition, all too often seen as a worthy end in itself, is not abandoned here (as if the ideas themselves no longer mattered to our understanding of the past), but is re-configured as an exploration of how these ideas were transmitted and put into practice at different levels of society. -- downloaded as pdf to Note
books  reviews  16thC  17thC  18thC  Europe-Early_Modern  medicine  cultural_history  social_history  intellectual_history  sources  disease  mental_health  professions  history_of_science  historiography  Innovation  religious_culture  science-and-religion  alchemy  anatomy  natural_history  biology  hospitals  public_health  downloaded  EF-add 
january 2015 by dunnettreader
JMK-67-PP-60: Correspondence, notes and marked up catalogues and articles concerning Newton's life and writings
This is a page from typed draft of an essay in Newton, reflecting what Keynes discovered in the box of manuscripts - here Keynes terms Newton the last Magi rather than the 1st of Age of Reason
Newton  Keynes  occult  esoteric  alchemy  heterodoxy  history_of_science  17thC  20thC  intellectual  history  website  digital_humanities 
january 2015 by dunnettreader
Colin Dickey, review - One Book Opens Another: On Lawrence Principe, “The Secrets of Alchemy” | The Los Angeles Review of Books - Nov 2012
Great review! -- more central: any study of alchemy reveals the stubborn fact that early modern thought was far more universalizing in its scope than our own age’s tendency to compartmentalize fields of knowledge, and approaching alchemy on its own terms means rethinking our own relationship to the intellectual past. Whereas we regard art, chemistry, religion, and philosophy as separate, discrete areas of study, the early moderns didn’t think like this. Alchemy blends together a variety of disciplines, methods, and philosophies, and any attempt to isolate its chemistry or its symbolism out from the rest is a willful misreading. As Principe stresses repeatedly, “premoderns tended to conceive of and visualize the world in multivalent terms, where each individual thing was connected to many others by webs of analogy and metaphor. This view stands in contrast to the modern tendency to compartmentalize and isolate things and ideas into separate disciplines.” The lasting value of a book like this one is its reminder that we misunderstand the past because we constantly look for ourselves in it.
books  reviews  kindle-available  intellectual_history  historiography  history_of_science  sociology_of_knowledge  religious_history  natural_philosophy  alchemy  ancient_history  medieval_history  Islamic_civilization  Europe-Early_Modern  16thC  17thC  19thC  20thC  EF-add 
august 2014 by dunnettreader
The Authority of Obscurity: Fludd, Hamann, Heidegger, Kripke - Waggish 2012
Re Kripke's revival of obscurantist essentialist metaphysics based on "intuitions" -- The shorter version of this, again, is: saying makes it so. The way in which we use language somehow makes it possible to generate claims about metaphysical necessity. Can we rigidly refer to Nixon? That seems to be the shaky ground on which cart and horse must ride.

For someone like myself who thinks that simply naming something isn’t even sufficient to be certain it exists, Kripke is far off the mark, but again, that is beside the point here. My consideration here is with the rhetorical tactics involved and how they echo past thinkers who presume a familiarity with the inner nature of reality and use a certain sort of authoritative language to proclaim it.
intellectual_history  metaphysics  theology  language  philosophy_of_language  esotericism  alchemy  macro-microcosm  symbol  analogy  16thC  18thC  20thC  Counter-Enlightenment  Germany  Heidegger  analytical_philosophy  Quine  essence  essentialism  EF-add 
april 2014 by dunnettreader
Cécile Alduy, Roland Greene - Forum Introduction - Between Experience and Experiment: Five Articles at an Early Modern Crossroads | Republics of Letters - Volume 1, Issue 2 ( February 2010)
Nice overview of the entangling and untangling of our notions of experience and experiment from Petrarch to Montaigne -- downloaded pdf to Note -- TOC of Forum -- Between Experience and Experiment: Five Articles at an Early Modern Crossroads by Cécile Alduy, by Roland Greene. (1) Artificial Men: Alchemy, Transubstantiation, and the Homunculus by Mary Baine Campbell. (2) Machines in the Garden by Jessica Riskin. (3) Atheism as a Devotional Category by George Hoffmann. (4) Montaigne: The Eclectic Pragmatist by Anthony Long. (5) Putting Experience First by Timothy Hampton
article  Renaissance  14thC  15thC  16thC  epistemology  empiricism  self  metaphor  cultural_history  literary_history  Seneca  Montaigne  scepticism  atheism_panic  pragmatism  alchemy  experimental_philosophy  downloaded  EF-add 
january 2014 by dunnettreader
J. V. Golinski - A Noble Spectacle: Phosphorus and the Public Cultures of Science in the Early Royal Society | JSTOR: Isis, Vol. 80, No. 1 (Mar., 1989), pp. 11-39
Huge bibliography of both primary and secondary literature -- chemistry and link to medicine were important for experimental_philosophy, but the flashiness of experiments for the public could both attract public interest and provide ammunition for enemies -- downloaded pdf to Note
article  jstor  intellectual_history  history_of_science  17thC  British_history  Royal_Society  sociology_of_knowledge  experimental_philosophy  natural_philosophy  medicine  chemistry  magic  alchemy  Boyle  Hooke  Harvey  science-public  scientific_culture  Scientific_Revolution  bibliography  downloaded  EF-add 
january 2014 by dunnettreader
Review by: Alessadro Arcangeli - Music, Science and Natural Magic in 17thC England by Penelope Gouk |JSTOR: History and Philosophy of the Life Sciences, Vol. 25, No. 4 (2003), pp. 535-537
Cultural practice of both music and experimental philosophy - private groups supported by patronage or coterie affiliation (court such as masque, aristocracy and universities) - training in both from early education - magus personalities include Hooke, Newton as well as the personalities we find so hard to relate to like Kitchener, who make sense in that environment. Lots of iconography and manuscripts as to be expected from a Warburg priduction. Dedicated to DP Walker.
books  reviews  find  17thC  British_history  cultural_history  history_of_science  music_history  patronage  court_culture  experimental_philosophy  coterie  Newton  Hooke  magic  alchemy  EF-add 
january 2014 by dunnettreader
In the Middle: Do Stones Have Souls? -Jeffrey Cohen - Nov 2013
Additional material from the final chapter of a book to be published Spring 2015. -- impact of Aristotle and anima on 13thC notions of souls (tripartite for human - vegetative, sensible, rational), classification of material world, and Albertus Magnus opus on minerals, insisting they had no souls yet assigning agency to features of particular minerals especially as linked with biology, human usage. -- notes of references and reader comments of interest
13thC  medieval_history  Medieval  Aristotle  soul  theology  history_of_science  intellectual_history  alchemy  microcosm  bibliography  EF-add 
december 2013 by dunnettreader

related tags

13thC  14thC  15thC  16thC  17thC  18thC  19thC  20thC  alchemy  analogy  analytical_philosophy  anatomy  ancient_Egypt  ancient_history  ancient_philosophy  ancient_religions  anti-Trinitarian  Arian  Aristotelian  Aristotle  article  astrology  astronomy  atheism_panic  audio  Bible-as-history  Biblical_authority  Biblical_criticism  Biblical_exegesis  bibliography  biology  books  Boyle  British_history  Charles_II  chemistry  Christianity  chronology  Church_of_England  coterie  Counter-Enlightenment  court_culture  cultural_history  Defoe  Deism  digital_humanities  disease  dissenters  downloaded  Early_Christian  EF-add  empiricism  Enlightenment  epistemology  esoteric  esotericism  essence  essentialism  Europe-Early_Modern  Evangelical  evidence  experimental_philosophy  find  Germany  Harvey  Heidegger  Hermes_Trismegistus  hermeticism  heterodoxy  historiography  historiography-17thC  history  history_of_science  Hooke  hospitals  immortality  Innovation  intellectual  intellectual_history  interview  Islamic_civilization  jstor  Kabbalah  Keynes  kindle-available  language  libraries  literary_history  macro-microcosm  magic  medicine  Medieval  medieval_history  mental_health  metaphor  metaphysics  microcosm  Montaigne  Moses  music_history  mysticism  natural_history  natural_philosophy  natural_religion  Neoplatonism  Newton  Newtonian  occult  pagans  patronage  philology  philosophy_of_language  philosophy_of_science  political_culture  pragmatism  prisca_sapientia  professions  public_health  publishing  Quine  rationality  rational_religion  reason  religious_belief  religious_culture  religious_history  Renaissance  research  reviews  ritual  Royal_Society  scepticism  science-and-religion  science-public  scientific_culture  scientific_method  Scientific_Revolution  secularization  self  Seneca  social_history  Socinians  sociology_of_knowledge  sociology_of_religion  soul  sources  substance  symbol  theology  Thompson_EP  Tories  website  Whigs  witchcraft 

Copy this bookmark:



description:


tags: