dunnettreader + william_iii   36

Melinda S. Zook - Turncoats and Double Agents in Restoration and Revolutionary England: The Case of Robert Ferguson, the Plotter (2009) | JSTOR - Eighteenth-Century Studies
Eighteenth-Century Studies, Vol. 42, No. 3 (Spring, 2009), pp. 363-378 -- The propagandist and conspirator, Robert Ferguson, so-called, The Plotter, has always been something of a puzzle to historians; his conversion from Whig to Jacobite following the Glorious Revolution has always been particularly troubling. This essay argues that Ferguson's winding career was far from unusual in the late Stuart era. Many politicians, prelates, playwrights and publicists altered their principles or even their religion within the fast changing political environment of Restoration and Revolution England. Secondly, this essay takes Ferguson seriously as a sophisticated political theorist, arguing that his political principles, from Whig to Jacobite, remained fairly consistent and revolve around his understanding of England's ancient constitution. His political life took many twists and turns, but his basic ideology remained the same. -- article published after her Radical Whigs and conspiracies book -- downloaded pdf to Note
article  jstor  political_history  British_history  British_politics  17thC  18thC  Restoration  Popish_Plot  Exclusion_Crisis  Glorious_Revolution  Jacobites  Whigs  Whigs-Radicals  Whig_Junto  conspiracy  James_II  James_III  William_III  Queen_Anne  1715_uprising  ancient_constitution  ideology  political_philosophy  political_culture  bibliography  downloaded 
november 2015 by dunnettreader
Michael Schaich, ed. - Monarchy and Religion: The Transformation of Royal Culture in 18thC Europe (2007) - Oxford University Press
OUP/German Historical Institute London Studies of the German Historical Institute London -- 509 pages | 978-0-19-921472-3 | Hardback | This collection of essays is a pioneering survey of the spiritual dimensions of kingship in 18thC Europe. It investigates the role of clergymen in the mechanics of the court, the religious observances of monarchs and their entourages, and the importance of religious images and ceremonial in underpinning royal power. The volume compares the British, French, Russian, and some of the German monarchies in order to allow comparisons to be drawn between different national and especially confessional settings. Based on original research and new source material, the 15 essays by established scholars chart mostly unknown territory. Previous research on the subject has focused on the 16thC and 17thC at the expense of the age of Enlightenment which has widely been regarded as a period of desacralization of monarchy. The essays open up new perspectives on the function of court clerics, conspicuous and internalized forms of aulic devotion, the gendered framing of religion, the purpose of court ritual, and the divide between the public and private spheres of monarchy. Overall the essays maintain that despite the gradual decline of monarchy by divine right, religion still permeated almost all aspects of court life and monarchical representation. The volume thus challenges received wisdom about the disenchantment of kingship and the rise of more rationalized forms of absolutist government during the period between c.1688 and 1789. -- surprise, surprise, leads off with an "ancien régime" essay by JCD Clark
books  cultural_history  religious_history  political_history  political_culture  politics-and-religion  17thC  18thC  Enlightenment  Ancien_régime  secularization  monarchy  monarchy-proprietary  Absolutism  divine_right  court_culture  authority  cultural_authority  cultural_change  gender  religion-established  gender-and-religion  British_history  Glorious_Revolution  Jacobites  courtiers  Jacobite_court  propaganda  art_history  patronage-artistic  William_III  Queen_Anne  Hanoverian_Succession  George_I  George_II  George_III  royal_families  société_des_princes  kingship  Louis_XIV  Louis_XV  Louis_XVI  France  Russia  Holy_Roman_Empire  Catherine_the_Great  Prussia  Frederick_the_Great  Germany  Austria  Spain  ritual 
april 2015 by dunnettreader
- DAVID LEWIS JONES - British Parliaments and Assemblies: A Bibliography of Printed Materials (2009) Parliamentary History - Wiley Online Library
Each section a pdf downloaded to Note - combined, c 25,000 entries *--* Section 1: Preface, Introduction, The Westminster Parliament 1-4005. **--** Section 2: The Medieval Parliament 4006-4728 **--** Section 3: Tudor Parliaments 4729-5064 **--* Section 4: Stuart Parliaments 5063-6805 **--** Section 5: The Unreformed Parliament 1714-1832 6806-9589. **--** Section 6: The Reformed Parliament 1832-1918 9590-15067 **--** Section 7: Parliament 1918-2009 15068-21582. **--** Section 8: The Judicial House of Lords 21583-21835. -- The Palace of Westminster 21836-22457. -- The Irish Parliament 22458-23264 -- The Scottish Parliament (to 1707) 23265-23482 -- The New Devolved Assemblies 23483-23686 -- The Scottish Parliament (1999-) 23687-24251 -- Northern Ireland 24252-24563 -- The National Assembly for Wales 24537-24963 -- Minor Assemblies
bibliography  historiography  Medieval  medieval_history  15thC  16thC  17thC  18thC  19thC  20thC  21stC  political_culture  political_philosophy  political_economy  political_history  politics-and-religion  political_participation  political_press  legal_history  legal_system  legal_theory  British_history  British_politics  Britain  British_Empire  British_foreign_policy  English_constitution  British_Empire-constitutional_structure  monarchy  monarchy-proprietary  monarchical_republic  limited_monarchy  Parliament  Parliamentary_supremacy  House_of_Commons  House_of_Lords  sovereignty  government-forms  governing_class  government_finance  government_officials  Scotland  Ireland  Ireland-English_exploitation  elites  elite_culture  common_law  rule_of_law  1690s  1700s  1707_Union  1680s  Glorious_Revolution  Glorious_Revolution-Scotland  English_Civil_War  Three_Kingdoms  composite_monarchies  Absolutism  ancient_constitution  religion-established  Church_of_England  Reformation  reform-legal  reform-political  elections  franchise  state-building  opposition  parties  pa 
december 2014 by dunnettreader
The Works of John Locke, vol. 4 (Essays on money and Two Treatises of Government) [1824 edition] - Online Library of Liberty
Essays on money -- SOME CONSIDERATIONS OF THE CONSEQUENCES OF THE LOWERING OF INTEREST, AND RAISING THE VALUE OF MONEY. IN A LETTER SENT TO A MEMBER OF PARLIAMENT, 1691. Having lately met with a little tract, entitled, “A Letter to a friend concerning usury,” printed this present year, 1660; which gives, in short, the arguments of some treatises, printed many years since, for the lowering of interest; it may not be amiss briefly to consider them. -- Of raising our Coin. *--* SHORT OBSERVATIONS ON A PRINTED PAPER, ENTITLED, For encouraging the coining silver money in England, and after for keeping it here. *--* FURTHER CONSIDERATIONS CONCERNING RAISING THE VALUE OF MONEY. [Dedicated to Lord Somers] -- converted to html -- didn't download
books  etexts  Liberty_Fund  intellectual_history  political_philosophy  economic_history  political_economy  17thC  Glorious_Revolution  1690s  Locke  Locke-2_Treatises  monetary_policy  interest_rates  commerce  currency  bimetalism  FX  prices  usury  Parliament  House_of_Commons  William_III  Whig_Junto 
august 2014 by dunnettreader
PHILIP LOFT -- POLITICAL ARITHMETIC AND THE ENGLISH LAND TAX IN THE REIGN OF WILLIAM III. (2013). | The Historical Journal, 56, pp 321-343. - Cambridge Journals Online - Abstract
PHILIP LOFT - University College London -- This article explores the role of the method of political arithmetic and political arithmeticians in the changing methods of raising finance during the Nine Years War. It discusses the actions of parliament-men in committees and their interaction with reports containing data, and the influence of projectors on the decision to introduce, and later abandon, the pound rate. Throughout this period, political arithmeticians were active participants, providing data, advice, and schemes to the treasury and parliament, and when they were not, ‘country’ MPs, in particular, were active in calling for data and leading its cross-examination. This article suggests that debates on public finance did not occur along party lines, with ‘county communities’ given fresh presence by the quantification of the inequality of the land tax burden. Political arithmetic is shown to have played an important role in the processes and negotiations that occurred over the setting of taxation policy in the ‘long eighteenth century’. -* I thank Julian Hoppit for his generous encouragement and comments on this article. Thanks also to Clare Jackson, Andrew Preston and the anonymous reviewers. - available for download - to Note
article  17thC  18thC  British_history  British_politics  economic_history  political_economy  Glorious_Revolution  William_III  Nine_Years_War  taxes  landed_interest  land_tax  fiscal_policy  fiscal-military_state  political_arithmetick  Parliament  House_of_Commons  Parliamentary_supremacy  Country_Party  oversight-legislature  public_finance  public_policy  partisanship  Whig_Junto  Tories  Whigs-opposition  sovereign_debt  downloaded  EF-add 
august 2014 by dunnettreader
WILLIAM A. PETTIGREW and GEORGE W. VAN CLEVE -- PARTING COMPANIES: THE GLORIOUS REVOLUTION, COMPANY POWER, AND IMPERIAL MERCANTILISM. (2014). | The Historical Journal, 57, pp 617-638. Cambridge Journals Online - Abstract
WILLIAM A. PETTIGREW - University of Kent and GEORGE W. VAN CLEVE - Seattle University School of Law --This article revisits the late seventeenth-century histories of two of England's most successful overseas trading monopolies, the East India and Royal African Companies. It offers the first full account of the various enforcement powers and strategies that both companies developed and stresses their unity of purpose in the seventeenth century. It assesses the complex effects that the ‘Glorious Revolution’ had on these powers and strategies, unearthing much new material about the case law for monopoly enforcement in this critical period and revising existing accounts that continue to assert the Revolution's exclusively deregulating effects and that miss crucial subtleties in the case law and related alterations in company behaviour. It asks why the two companies parted company as legal and political entities and offers an explanation that connects the fortunes of both monopoly companies to their public profile and differing constituencies in the English empire and the varying non-European political contexts in which they operated. -- * We warmly thank Michael R. T. Macnair for his indispensable advice and assistance regarding matters of seventeenth-century English law and are grateful to Clive Holmes for encouraging us to look into these issues and to Simon Douglas and Jeffrey Hackney for initial help in doing so. Paul Halliday, Daniel Hulsebosch, and Philip J. Stern provided helpful responses to specific research queries.
article  paywall  find  17thC  British_history  British_politics  economic_history  Glorious_Revolution  mercantilism  monopolies  trading_companies  East_India_Company  Royal_African_Co  colonialism  slavery  piracy  competition  parties  London  legal_history  judiciary  commercial_law  interest_groups  Whig_Junto  Tories  James_II  William_III  Parliament  institutional_economics  North-Weingast  regulation  West_Indies  ports  shipping  trade-policy  entrepôts  exports  imports  luxury_goods  consumers  EF-add 
august 2014 by dunnettreader
The Roots of Liberty: Magna Carta, Ancient Constitution, and the Anglo-American Tradition of Rule of Law, ed. Ellis Sandoz, - Online Library of Liberty
Ellis Sandoz, The Roots of Liberty: Magna Carta, Ancient Constitution, and the Anglo-American Tradition of Rule of Law, edited and with an Introduction by Ellis Sandoz (Indianapolis: Liberty Fund, 2008). 07/12/2014. <http://oll.libertyfund.org/titles/2180> -- This is a critical collection of essays on the origin and nature of the idea of liberty. The authors explore the development of English ideas of liberty and the relationship those ideas hold to modern conceptions of rule of law. The essays address early medieval developments, encompassing such seminal issues as the common-law mind of the sixteenth century under the Tudor monarchs, the struggle for power and authority between the Stuart kings and Parliament in the seventeenth century, and the role of the ancient constitution in the momentous legal and constitutional debate that occurred between the Glorious Revolution and the American Declaration of Independence. Authors -- Corinne Comstock Weston - John Phillip Reid - Paul Christianson - Christopher W. Brooks - James Clarke Holt - Editor: Ellis Sandoz -- a lot of historiography discussion of legal history, politics and political philosophy - interesting to see their take on Pocock - original publication date 1993, so bibliography will be a bit dated and the articles won't reflect all the waves of revisionism but important place to start -- downloaded pdf to Note
books  etexts  legal_history  legal_theory  political_philosophy  Anglo-American  16thC  17thC  18thC  English_constitution  ancient_constitution  Anglo-Saxons  Norman_Conquest  Magna_Carta  Tudor  Elizabeth  James_I  Charles_I  Charles_II  James_II  William_III  Hanoverian_Succession  common_law  lawyers  judiciary  rule_of_law  British_history  British_politics  Atlantic  American_colonies  government-forms  mixed_government  Absolutism  republicanism  limited_monarchy  Parliament  Parliamentary_supremacy  citizens  legitimacy  authority  resistance_theory  Patriot_King  civil_liberties  civic_humanism  liberty  taxes  property  petitions  Petition_of_Right  House_of_Commons  House_of_Lords  checks-and-balances  separation-of-powers  franchise  bibliography  downloaded  EF-add 
july 2014 by dunnettreader
Joyce Lee Malcom, The Struggle for Sovereignty: 17thC English Political Tracts, vol. 2 of 2 - Online Library of Liberty
Joyce Lee Malcom, The Struggle for Sovereignty: Seventeenth-Century English Political Tracts, 2 vols, ed. Joyce Lee Malcolm (Indianapolis: Liberty Fund, 1999). Vol. 2. 07/12/2014. <http://oll.libertyfund.org/titles/1824> -- Vol 1 covers 1603 to 1660, Vol 2 from the Restoration (starting with Vane's defense) through the flurry after the Glorious_Revolution, including Sherlock on the rule of William and Mary now settled, debates over loyalty oath and bill of rights. -- An entire literature of political discourse resulted from this extraordinary outpouring – and vigorous exchange – of views. The results are of a more than merely antiquarian interest. The political tracts of the English peoples in the 17thC established enduring principles of governance and of liberty that benefited not only themselves but the founders of the American republic. These writings, by the renowned (Coke, Sidney, Shaftesbury) and the unremembered (“Anonymous”) therefore constitute an enduring contribution to the historical record of the rise of ordered liberty. Each volume includes an introduction and chronology. -- downloaded pdf to Note
books  etexts  17thC  British_history  British_politics  English_Civil_War  Interregnum  Protectorate  Restoration  Exclusion_Crisis  Popish_Plot  Rye_House_Plot  tolerance  prerogative  Glorious_Revolution  Charles_II  James_II  William_III  Queen_Mary  Shaftesbury_1st_Earl  Sidney  intellectual_history  political_philosophy  history_of_England  politics-and-religion  political_participation  sovereignty  Parliament  ancient_constitution  government-forms  Absolutism  divine_right  Magna_Carta  politics-and-literature  political-theology  commonwealth  civic_humanism  republicanism  republics-Ancient_v_Modern  loyalty_oaths  Royalists  dissenters  parties  faction  Church_of_England  resistance_theory  religion-established  ecclesiology  nonjurors  defacto_rule  Norman_Conquest  bibliography  primary_sources  downloaded  EF-add 
july 2014 by dunnettreader
John Millar, An Historical View of the English Government [1803], eds. Mark Salber Philips and Dale R. Smith - Online Library of Liberty
John Millar, An Historical View of the English Government, From the Settlement of the Saxons in Britain to the Revolution in 1688, in four volumes, edited by Mark Salber Philips and Dale R. Smith, introduction by Mark Salber Philips (Indianapolis: Liberty Fund, 2006). 07/11/2014. <http://oll.libertyfund.org/titles/1886> -- An Historical View of the English Government consists of three parts, concerned with the most substantive revolutions in English government and manners: from the Saxon settlement to the Norman Conquest, from the Norman Conquest to the accession of James I, and from James I to the Glorious Revolution. Through these three phases Millar traces the development of the “great outlines of the English constitution”—the history of institutions of English liberty from Saxon antiquity to the revolution settlement of 1689. Millar demonstrates serious concern for the maintenance of liberties achieved through revolution and maintains that the manners of a commercial nation, while particularly suited to personal and political liberty, are not such as to secure liberty forever.
books  etexts  18thC  intellectual_history  Scottish_Enlightenment  British_history  British_politics  historiography-Whig  historiography-18thC  historians-and-politics  ancient_constitution  English_constitution  Anglo-Saxons  Norman_Conquest  Magna_Carta  Tudor  Elizabeth  James_I  Charles_I  Charles_II  James_II  William_III  English_Civil_War  Restoration  Glorious_Revolution  Revolution_Principles  commerce  liberty  Parliament  Parliamentary_supremacy  monarchy  civil_liberties  civilizing_process  downloaded  EF-add 
july 2014 by dunnettreader
John Paget - The new "Examen": or, An inquiry into... Lord Macaulay's History ... (1861) - Google Books
John Paget -- The new "Examen": or, An inquiry into the evidence relating to certain passages in Lord Macaulay's History concerning I. The Duke of Marlborough; II. The massacre of Glencoe; III. The Highlands of Scotland; IV. Viscount Dundee; V. William Penn -- W. Blackwood and sons, 1861 -- essays 1st published in Blackwood's Magazine -- downloaded pdf to Note
books  etexts  Google_Books  17thC  18thC  British_history  British_politics  historiography-19thC  historiography-Whig  Macaulay  Marlborough  Marlborough_Duchess  William_III  Highlands-Scotland  James_II  Penn_William  Shrewsbury  Godolphin  tolerance  religion-established  Church_of_England  Glorious_Revolution  Glorious_Revolution-Scotland  Nine_Years_War  British_Army  British_Navy  Jacobites  downloaded  EF-add 
july 2014 by dunnettreader
Kevin Sharpe, review essay - Print, Polemics, and Politics in 17thC England | JSTOR: Journal of British Studies, Vol. 41, No. 2 (Apr., 2002), pp. 244-254
Writing and Society: Literacy, Print and Politics in Britain, 1590-1660 by Nigel Wheale; Whores of Babylon: Catholicism, Gender and Seventeenth-Century Print Culture by Frances E. Dolan; Political Passions: Gender, The Family and Political Argument in England, 1680-1714 by Rachel Weil; The Age of Faction: Court Politics, 1660-1702 by Alan Marshall -- downloaded pdf to Note
books  bookshelf  reviews  jstor  17thC  18thC  British_history  British_politics  cultural_history  publishing  print_culture  public_sphere  political_press  anti-Catholic  gender_history  family  patriarchy  Restoration  Elizabeth  James_I  Charles_I  Charles_II  James_II  William_III  Queen_Anne  partisanship  faction  parties  court_culture  courtiers  Whigs  Whig_Junto  Tories  Glorious_Revolution  English_Civil_War  literacy  downloaded  EF-add 
may 2014 by dunnettreader
Hugh Dunthorne - Britain and the Dutch Revolt 1560-1700 (2013) :: Cambridge University Press
Hardback and ebook - not yet pbk -- England's response to the Revolt of the Netherlands (1568–1648) has been studied hitherto mainly in terms of government policy, yet the Dutch struggle with Habsburg Spain affected a much wider community than just the English political elite. It attracted attention across Britain and drew not just statesmen and diplomats but also soldiers, merchants, religious refugees, journalists, travellers and students into the conflict. Hugh Dunthorne draws on pamphlet literature to reveal how British contemporaries viewed the progress of their near neighbours' rebellion, and assesses the lasting impact which the Revolt and the rise of the Dutch Republic had on Britain's domestic history. The book explores affinities between the Dutch Revolt and the British civil wars of the seventeenth century - the first major challenges to royal authority in modern times - showing how much Britain's changing commercial, religious and political culture owed to the country's involvement with events across the North Sea. --

** Reveals the wide-ranging impact of the Dutch Revolt on Britain's political, religious and commercial culture
** Connects the Dutch Revolt and Britain's seventeenth-century civil wars
** Places early modern Dutch and British history in international context
books  find  kindle-available  16thC  17thC  British_history  British_politics  British_Navy  Dutch  Spain  Dutch_Revolt  Thirty_Years_War  Protestant_International  English_Civil_War  diplomatic_history  military_history  Elizabeth  James_I  Charles_I  Restoration  economic_culture  political_culture  religious_culture  Calvinist  Absolutism  public_opinion  political_participation  political_press  politics-and-religion  William_III  Glorious_Revolution  Whigs  Whigs-Radicals  exiles  pamphlets  travel  Europe-Early_Modern  EF-add 
february 2014 by dunnettreader
Andrew Lincoln - The Culture of War and Civil Society in the Reigns of William III and Anne | JSTOR: Eighteenth-Century Studies, Vol. 44, No. 4 (SUMMER 2011), pp. 455-474
The essay examines the representation of war in poems and church services during the reigns of William III and Queen Anne. It identifies relations between social discipline and the imaginative participation in violence, and considers how war—described by poets as a test of heroism, and represented by the church as the occasion for spiritual purgation—served the interests of those who wanted to regulate and refine the manners of civil society. It argues that the promotion of gentler manners did not undermine the commitment to military aggression, but worked in the service of it. -- huge bibliography of both primary and secondary literature -- paywall
article  jstor  paywall  17thC  18thC  British_history  British_politics  Nine_Years_War  War_of_Spanish_Succession  English_lit  poetry  sermons  politeness  reformation_of_manners  militarism  William_III  Marlborough  heroes  Providence  religious_culture  elite_culture  Elias_Norbert  Addison  publishing  public_sphere  civil_society  bibliography  EF-add 
january 2014 by dunnettreader
Issue TOC - Science and Civilization under William and Mary | JSTOR: Notes and Records of the Royal Society of London, Vol. 43, No. 2, Jul., 1989
TOC -- (1) The Crown, the Public and the New Science, 1689-1702 (pp. 99-116) M. C. W. Hunter. (2) William III and His Two Navies (pp. 117-132) J. R. Bruijn. (3) 'Bright Enough for All Our Purposes': John Locke's Conception of a Civilized Society (pp. 133-153) J. M. Dunn. (4) Clockmaking in Britain and the Netherlands (pp. 155-165)
J. H. Leopold. (5) The Glorious Revolution and Medicine in Britain and the Netherlands (pp. 167-190) Simon Schaffer. (6) Leeuwenhoek and Other Dutch Correspondents of the Royal Society (pp. 191-207) L. C. Palm. (7) Christiaan Huygens and Newton's Theory of Gravitation (pp. 209-222) H. A. M. Snelders. (8) Huygens' 'Traité de la Lumière' and Newton's 'Opticks': Pursuing and Eschewing Hypotheses (pp. 223-247) A. E. Shapiro. (9) The Leeuwenhoek Lecture, 1988. Antoni van Leeuwenhoek 1632-1723 (pp. 249-273) A. R. Hall
article  jstor  intellectual_history  sociology_of_knowledge  history_of_science  science-and-politics  17thC  18thC  British_history  Dutch  Glorious_Revolution  Republic_of_Letters  Royal_Society  community-virtual  Locke  British_Navy  William_III  Nine_Years_War  technology  instruments  Huygens  Newton  medicine  university  optics  EF-add 
january 2014 by dunnettreader
Richard R. Johnson: Politics Redefined: An Assessment of Recent Writings on the Late Stuart Period of English History, 1660 to 1714 (1978)
JSTOR: The William and Mary Quarterly, Third Series, Vol. 35, No. 4 (Oct., 1978), pp. 691-732 -- downloaded pdf to Note -- doesn't look fabulous analytically, but fabulous collection of works after c 1960 including links to lots of studies of economic data -- although his critique of Plumb waiting for the appearance "of that portly deus ex machina" is delicious
article  jstor  historiography  bibliography  17thC  18thC  Restoration  Exclusion_Crisis  Glorious_Revolution  William_III  Queen_Anne  1680s  1690s  1700s  1710s  Hanoverian_Succession  political_history  economic_history  social_history  religious_history  downloaded  EF-add 
september 2013 by dunnettreader
Raymond Gillespie: The Irish Protestants and James II, 1688-90 (1992)
JSTOR: Irish Historical Studies, Vol. 28, No. 110 (Nov., 1992), pp. 124-133 -- downloaded pdf to Note
article  jstor  17thC  1680s  Glorious_Revolution  Ireland  Protestants-Ireland  James_II  William_III  Jacobites  downloaded  EF-add 
september 2013 by dunnettreader
Review by: J. G. A. Pocock: Revolution Principles: The Politics of Party, 1689-1720 by J. P. Kenyon (1978)
JSTOR: The Journal of Modern History, Vol. 50, No. 3 (Sep., 1978), pp. 509-513 -- downloaded pdf to Note -- after agreeing that most of the turmoil was about vulnerability and power grabs or fears of the other side which produced an authoritarian oligarchy that proscribed its enemies he is still looking for neo-Harringtonians -- but now Defoe
books  bookshelf  reviews  Pocock  intellectual_history  political_philosophy  17thC  18thC  British_politics  parties  Glorious_Revolution  Tories  Whigs  Whig_Junto  William_III  Queen_Anne  Whigs-oligarchy  Whigs-Radicals  Hanoverian_Succession  Bolingbroke  Walpole  Whigs-opposition  Country_Party  downloaded  EF-add 
september 2013 by dunnettreader
Review essay: Linda Colley and Mark Goldie - The Principles and Practice of Eighteenth-Century Party (1979)
JSTOR: The Historical Journal, Vol. 22, No. 1 (Mar., 1979), pp. 239-246 -- downloaded pdf to Note --Works reviewed: --**-- Parliament, Policy and Politics in the Reign of William III by Henry Horwitz;  --**-- The Growth of Parliamentary Parties 1689-1742 by B. W. Hill; Stability and Strife 1714-1760 by W. A. Speck;  --**-- Revolution Principles: The Politics of Party 1689-1720 by J. P. Kenyon; --**--  Liberty and Property: Political Ideology in Eighteenth Century Britain by H. T. Dickinson
books  bookshelf  reviews  jstor  17thC  18thC  political_history  Britain  British_history  British_politics  parties  Whigs  Whig_Junto  Tories  William_III  Queen_Anne  George_I  George_II  Walpole  Bolingbroke  provinces  local_government  elections  Country_Party  Whigs-opposition  ideology  elites  public_opinion  political_press  political_culture  downloaded  EF-add 
september 2013 by dunnettreader
J. G. A. Pocock: The Atlantic Republican Tradition: The Republic of the Seven Provinces | Republics of Letters: A Journal for the Study of Knowledge, Politics, and the Arts
Citation: Pocock, J. G. A.. “The Atlantic Republican Tradition: The Republic of the Seven Provinces.” Republics of Letters: A Journal for the Study of Knowledge, Politics, and the Arts2, no. 1 (December 15, 2010): http://rofl.stanford.edu/node/72. In "Limits of the Atlantic Republican Tradition" issue -- downloaded pdf to Note-- Hence the debate between ancient and modern liberty, to be found in Britain a century before it was taken up by Benjamin Constant. It was a debate by no means uniquely British, but in the form it took in Britain a class of free landholders, whose history could be traced back through Gothic to classic and Greco-Roman times, played a crucial role. The image of the republic, it needs repeating, was not presented as a norm to be imitated; it was a bench­mark for the interpretation of history, for measuring the gains and losses of movement away from it. This narrative, shaped by a succession of historians from Bruni to Robertson, developed concurrently with a “philosophic” history of human (but European) society, based on the stadial sequence from hunter-gatherers to merchants and capitalists and culminating in the political economy of Adam Smith. In this complex historiography, the role of medieval leagues of merchant republics, Lombard, Hanseatic, and Dutch, was important but problematic; and it is here that the anglophone and Atlantic reader, rightly or wrongly, finds the key to the problem of Dutch republican thought.
article  16thC  17thC  18thC  intellectual_history  political_history  political_culture  historiography  lessons-of-history  republicanism  Machiavelli  Britain  British_politics  American_colonies  American_Revolution  Dutch  city_states  Holy_Roman_Empire  commerce  trade  landed_interest  burghers  oligarchy  corruption  civic_virtue  William_III  Queen_Anne  George_III  tyranny  Stadholder  republics-Ancient_v_Modern  downloaded  EF-add 
september 2013 by dunnettreader
Catherine Tinsley Tuell: "By His Majestie's Special Command": William III and Uncommon Prayer - thesis 2011 - Udini
William III ascended to the throne of England in 1689 following his military intervention in support of the erstwhile claim to the throne by his wife (Mary II) as a replacement for the sitting Roman Catholic king, who was also her father James II. During the ideological and theological conflict that followed William's invited invasion, public worship and public prayer in the Church of England was used by Williamite propagandists to promote and legitimize a monarchy that re-fashioned the concept of a sovereign who ruled by divine right in spite of Parliament into one where the sovereign's divine right was determined by Parliament. Using what I term "uncommon prayer" as supplements to the liturgy of the 1662 Book of Common Prayer , church divines promoted the political agenda and ideology of the Williamite regime. Most often crafted for use on royally designated days of national fasting or thanksgiving, these occasional Forms of Prayer required the active participation of all of their Majesties' subjects during public worship. Satirical balladry during the Irish conflict with James II lampooning the royal proclamation for public fasting and uncommon prayer confirms their Majesties' adversaries recognized the effectiveness of the royal polemical campaign conducted by and through the church. The examination of uncommon prayers reveals that the revolutionary government used language familiar to the people in radically new ways to justify the invasion by a foreign prince, the forced "abdication" of a sitting monarch, and a re-shaping of not only the monarchy, but the Church of England and Parliament. It defined the role of William as the instrument of God's divine providence and emphasized the responsibility of the people for the nation's misfortunes because of their individual and collective sin. The sustained use of uncommon or occasional prayer throughout the years of the Williamite monarchy (1689-1702) to bring before the people the royal agenda attests to the vitality of public worship, the perceived efficacy of public prayer, and the importance of the Church of England on the social and political landscape of late-seventeenth century England.
thesis  17thC  British_history  British_politics  Ireland  Glorious_Revolution  propaganda  William_III  Providence  Church_of_England  religious_history  religious_culture  political_culture  Jacobites  paywall  EF-add 
august 2013 by dunnettreader
Kevin Sharpe: Rebranding Rule: 1660-1720 | Kindle Store
In the climactic part of his three-book series exploring the importance of public image in the Tudor and Stuart monarchies, Kevin Sharpe employs a remarkable interdisciplinary approach that draws on literary studies and art history as well as political, cultural, and social history to show how this preoccupation with public representation met the challenge of dealing with the aftermath of Cromwell's interregnum and Charles II's restoration, and how the irrevocably changed cultural landscape was navigated by the sometimes astute yet equally fallible Stuart monarchs and their successors.
books  British_history  British_politics  cultural_history  religious_history  monarchy  Charles_II  James_II  William_III  Queen_Anne  George_I  Restoration  Exclusion_Crisis  Glorious_Revolution  War_of_Spanish_Succession  Hanoverian_Succession  aristocracy  Parliament  political_economy  political_culture  art_history  English_lit  Whigs  Whig_Junto  Tories  colonialism  IR  EF-add  English_constitution 
july 2013 by dunnettreader
A Plague of Informers by Rachel Weil - Yale University Press - pub date Jan 2014
Stories of plots, sham plots, and the citizen-informers who discovered them are at the centre of Rachel Weil's compelling study of the turbulent decade following the Revolution of 1688. Most studies of the Glorious Revolution focus on its causes or long-term effects, but Weil instead zeroes in on the early years when the survival of the new regime was in doubt. By encouraging informers, imposing loyalty oaths, suspending habeas corpus, and delaying the long-promised reform of treason trial procedure, the Williamite regime protected itself from enemies and cemented its bonds with supporters, but also put its own credibility at risk.
books  17thC  British_history  British_politics  Glorious_Revolution  Jacobites  Whig_Junto  William_III  EF-add 
july 2013 by dunnettreader
A Plague of Informers by Rachel Weil - Yale University Press (pub date Feb 2014)
A Plague of Informers: Conspiracy and Political Trust in William III's England 

ISBN:9780300171044
Dimensions:320 pages:
Stories of plots, sham plots, and the citizen-informers who discovered them are at the centre of Rachel Weil's compelling study of the turbulent decade following the Revolution of 1688. Most studies of the Glorious Revolution focus on its causes or long-term effects, but Weil instead zeroes in on the early years when the survival of the new regime was in doubt. By encouraging informers, imposing loyalty oaths, suspending habeas corpus, and delaying the long-promised reform of treason trial procedure, the Williamite regime protected itself from enemies and cemented its bonds with supporters, but also put its own credibility at risk.
books  British_history  political_history  17thC  William_III  Whig_Junto  Jacobites 
june 2013 by dunnettreader

related tags

9_years_war  15thC  16thC  17thC  18thC  19thC  20thC  21stC  1680s  1690s  1700s  1707_Union  1710s  1715_uprising  Absolutism  Addison  agriculture  allegiance  alliances  American_colonies  American_Revolution  ancient_constitution  Ancien_régime  Anglo-American  Anglo-Dutch  Anglo-Dutch_wars  Anglo-French  Anglo-Saxons  Anglo-Scot  anti-Catholic  aristocracy  article  art_history  Atlantic  Austria  authority  balance_of_power  bibliography  bimetalism  Bolingbroke  books  bookshelf  Britain  British_Army  British_Empire  British_Empire-constitutional_structure  British_foreign_policy  British_history  British_Navy  British_politics  burghers  buy  Calvinist  Catherine_the_Great  Catholics-England  Catholics-Ireland  Catholic_emancipation  Charles_I  Charles_I-personal_rule  Charles_II  checks-and-balances  Christology  church_history  Church_of_England  citizens  city_states  civic_humanism  civic_virtue  civilizing_process  civil_liberties  civil_society  coffeehouses  colonialism  comedy  commerce  commercial_law  commonwealth  Commonwealthmen  common_law  community-virtual  competition  composers  composite_monarchies  conspiracy  consumers  corruption  Counter-Reformation  Country_Party  courses  courtiers  court_culture  critics  Cromwell  cultural_authority  cultural_change  cultural_history  currency  defacto_rule  diplomatic_history  dissenters  divine_right  downloaded  Dryden  Dutch  Dutch_Revolt  East_India_Company  ecclesiology  economic_culture  economic_history  EF-add  elections  Elias_Norbert  elites  elite_culture  Elizabeth  English_Civil_War  English_constitution  English_lit  Enlightenment  entrepôts  Erastianism  etexts  Europe-Early_Modern  Exclusion_Crisis  exiles  experimental_philosophy  exports  faction  family  find  fiscal-military_state  fiscal_policy  France  franchise  Frederick_the_Great  FX  gender  gender-and-religion  gender_history  George_I  George_II  George_III  Germany  Glorious_Revolution  Glorious_Revolution-Scotland  Godolphin  Google_Books  governing_class  government-forms  government_finance  government_officials  Hanoverian_Succession  heroes  Highlands-Scotland  High_Church  historians-and-politics  historiography  historiography-17thC  historiography-18thC  historiography-19thC  historiography-Whig  history_of_England  history_of_science  Holy_Roman_Empire  House_of_Commons  House_of_Lords  Huygens  ideology  impeachment  imports  improvement  industry  institutional_economics  instruments  intellectual_history  interest_groups  interest_rates  Interregnum  IR  Ireland  Ireland-English_exploitation  Irish_Parliament  Jacobite-Ireland  Jacobites  Jacobite_court  James_I  James_II  James_III  Jesuits  jstor  judiciary  kindle-available  kingship  Kirk  landed_interest  landowners-Ireland-Anglo_elite  land_tax  language-history  language-national  language-politics  Laudian  lawyers  legal_history  legal_system  legal_theory  legislation  legislature  legislature-committees  legislature-process  legitimacy  lessons-of-history  liberty  Liberty_Fund  limited_monarchy  literacy  literary_history  local_government  Locke  Locke-2_Treatises  London  Louis_XIV  Louis_XV  Louis_XVI  loyalty_oaths  luxury_goods  Macaulay  Machiavelli  Magna_Carta  manuscripts  Marlborough  Marlborough_Duchess  masques  medicine  Medieval  medieval_history  mercantilism  militarism  military_history  mixed_government  Molyneux  monarchical_republic  monarchy  monarchy-proprietary  monetary_policy  monopolies  music_history  national_ID  natural_law  natural_philosophy  naval_history  Navigation_Acts  Newton  Nine_Years_War  nonjurors  Norman_Conquest  North-Weingast  occasional_conformity  oligarchy  opera  opposition  optics  oversight-legislature  pamphlets  Parliament  Parliamentary_supremacy  parties  partisanship  patriarchy  patriotism  Patriot_King  patronage  patronage-artistic  paywall  Peace_of_Utrecht  Penn_William  petitions  Petition_of_Right  piracy  playwrights  Pocock  poetry  politeness  political-theology  political_arithmetick  political_culture  political_economy  political_history  political_participation  political_philosophy  political_press  politics-and-literature  politics-and-religion  Popish_Plot  popular_culture  popular_politics  ports  prerogative  prices  primary_sources  prime_ministers  print_culture  propaganda  property  property_rights  protectionism  Protectorate  Protestants-Ireland  Protestant_International  Providence  provinces  Prussia  public_finance  public_opinion  public_policy  public_sphere  publishing  Purcell  Puritans  Queen_Anne  Queen_Mary  reform-legal  reform-political  Reformation  reformation_of_manners  Regency-France  regulation  religion-established  religious_culture  religious_history  religious_lit  religious_wars  republicanism  republics-Ancient_v_Modern  Republic_of_Letters  resistance_theory  Restoration  reviews  Revolution_Principles  ritual  Royalists  Royal_African_Co  royal_families  Royal_Society  rule_of_law  Russia  Rye_House_Plot  science-and-politics  Scotland  Scottish_Enlightenment  Scottish_Parliament  secularization  separation-of-powers  sermons  Shaftesbury  Shaftesbury_1st_Earl  shipping  Shrewsbury  Sidney  slavery  sociability  social_history  sociology_of_knowledge  société_des_princes  soteriology  sovereignty  sovereign_debt  Spain  Stadholder  standing_army_debate  state-building  succession  taxes  technology  theater  theatre-politics  theatre-production  theatre-Restoration  theology  thesis  Thirty_Years_War  Three_Kingdoms  tolerance  Tories  Town  trade  trade-policy  trading_companies  travel  Tudor  tyranny  university  urban_elites  urban_politics  usury  via_media  video  Wales  Walpole  War_of_Spanish_Succession  West_Indies  Whigs  Whigs-oligarchy  Whigs-opposition  Whigs-Radicals  Whig_Junto  Whig_schism  William_III 

Copy this bookmark:



description:


tags: