dunnettreader + whigs-radicals   15

Eric Nelson - "Patriot Royalism: The Stuart Monarchy in American Political Thought, 1769-75" (2011) | William& Mary Quarterly
Nelson E. "Patriot Royalism: The Stuart Monarchy in American Political Thought, 1769-75". The William and Mary Quarterly [Internet]. 2011;3rd ser., 68 (4) :533-596. With responses by Gordon S. Wood, Pauline Maier, and Daniel Hulsebosch, as well a reply to critics ("Taking Them Seriously: Patriots, Prerogative, and the English Seventeenth Century"). -- preliminary to his "Royalist Revolution" -- downloaded pdf to Note
article  forum  downloaded  intellectual_history  political_philosophy  17thC  18thC  British_history  US_history  British_politics  British_Empire  British_Empire-constitutional_structure  Patriot_King  Patriots  American_colonies  American_Revolution  checks-and-balances  republics-Ancient_v_Modern  republicanism  Parliamentary_supremacy  Parliamentarians  Whigs  Whigs-oligarchy  Whigs-opposition  limited_monarchy  prerogative  liberalism-republicanism_debates  Whigs-Radicals  Commonwealthmen  Charles_I  George_III  Adams_John  US_constitution  Early_Republic  legislature  exec_branch  US_government  US_President  majoritarian  democracy  masses-fear_of  federalism  federal_preemption  national_interest  states_rights  government-forms  constitutions  constitutional_regime  Royalists 
may 2016 by dunnettreader
Melinda S. Zook - Turncoats and Double Agents in Restoration and Revolutionary England: The Case of Robert Ferguson, the Plotter (2009) | JSTOR - Eighteenth-Century Studies
Eighteenth-Century Studies, Vol. 42, No. 3 (Spring, 2009), pp. 363-378 -- The propagandist and conspirator, Robert Ferguson, so-called, The Plotter, has always been something of a puzzle to historians; his conversion from Whig to Jacobite following the Glorious Revolution has always been particularly troubling. This essay argues that Ferguson's winding career was far from unusual in the late Stuart era. Many politicians, prelates, playwrights and publicists altered their principles or even their religion within the fast changing political environment of Restoration and Revolution England. Secondly, this essay takes Ferguson seriously as a sophisticated political theorist, arguing that his political principles, from Whig to Jacobite, remained fairly consistent and revolve around his understanding of England's ancient constitution. His political life took many twists and turns, but his basic ideology remained the same. -- article published after her Radical Whigs and conspiracies book -- downloaded pdf to Note
article  jstor  political_history  British_history  British_politics  17thC  18thC  Restoration  Popish_Plot  Exclusion_Crisis  Glorious_Revolution  Jacobites  Whigs  Whigs-Radicals  Whig_Junto  conspiracy  James_II  James_III  William_III  Queen_Anne  1715_uprising  ancient_constitution  ideology  political_philosophy  political_culture  bibliography  downloaded 
november 2015 by dunnettreader
Biancamaria Fontana - Rethinking the Politics of Commercial Society The Edinburgh Review 1802–1832 (hdbk 1985, pbk & ebook 2008) | Political philosophy | Cambridge University Press
This book explores the sources of modern British liberalism through a study of the Edinburgh Review, the most influential and controversial early nineteenth-century British periodical. Founded by a group of young Scottish intellectuals in 1802, the Review served as a principal channel through which the ideas of the Scottish Enlightenment gained wider currency, and did much to popularize the doctrines of economic and political reform. As Dr Fontana shows in this lucid and keen analysis, the first thirty years in the life of the Review clearly display the new social and economic problems confronting European society in the aftermath of the French Revolution. **--** Introduction *--* 1. Scottish theories of commercial society and the French Revolution *-* 2. Adam Smith's heritage: the Edinburgh reviewers and the Wealth of Nations *-* 3. The definition of political economy: political economy as a social science *-* 4. The Edinburgh reviewers and the Whig party *-* 5. Commercial society and its enemies: the debate on the First Reform Bill *-* Conclusion -- downloaded pdfs of front matter and excerpt to Note
books  kindle-available  intellectual_history  political_philosophy  political_economy  18thC  19thC  British_history  Scottish_Enlightenment  French_Revolution-impact  civil_society  commerce  commerce-doux  science_of_man  social_sciences  democracy  mass_culture  political_participation  British_politics  Edinburgh_Review  Whigs  Whigs-Radicals  Whigs-grandees  liberalism  Industrial_Revolution  industrialization  international_political_economy  British_Empire  British_foreign_policy  Napoleonic_Wars  Napoleonic_Wars-impact  social_order  reform-political  reform-social  reform-finance  reform-economic  Reform_Act_1832  Parliament  parties  trade-policy  trade-theory  trade-cultural_transmission  downloaded  EF-add 
february 2015 by dunnettreader
- DAVID LEWIS JONES - British Parliaments and Assemblies: A Bibliography of Printed Materials (2009) Parliamentary History - Wiley Online Library
Each section a pdf downloaded to Note - combined, c 25,000 entries *--* Section 1: Preface, Introduction, The Westminster Parliament 1-4005. **--** Section 2: The Medieval Parliament 4006-4728 **--** Section 3: Tudor Parliaments 4729-5064 **--* Section 4: Stuart Parliaments 5063-6805 **--** Section 5: The Unreformed Parliament 1714-1832 6806-9589. **--** Section 6: The Reformed Parliament 1832-1918 9590-15067 **--** Section 7: Parliament 1918-2009 15068-21582. **--** Section 8: The Judicial House of Lords 21583-21835. -- The Palace of Westminster 21836-22457. -- The Irish Parliament 22458-23264 -- The Scottish Parliament (to 1707) 23265-23482 -- The New Devolved Assemblies 23483-23686 -- The Scottish Parliament (1999-) 23687-24251 -- Northern Ireland 24252-24563 -- The National Assembly for Wales 24537-24963 -- Minor Assemblies
bibliography  historiography  Medieval  medieval_history  15thC  16thC  17thC  18thC  19thC  20thC  21stC  political_culture  political_philosophy  political_economy  political_history  politics-and-religion  political_participation  political_press  legal_history  legal_system  legal_theory  British_history  British_politics  Britain  British_Empire  British_foreign_policy  English_constitution  British_Empire-constitutional_structure  monarchy  monarchy-proprietary  monarchical_republic  limited_monarchy  Parliament  Parliamentary_supremacy  House_of_Commons  House_of_Lords  sovereignty  government-forms  governing_class  government_finance  government_officials  Scotland  Ireland  Ireland-English_exploitation  elites  elite_culture  common_law  rule_of_law  1690s  1700s  1707_Union  1680s  Glorious_Revolution  Glorious_Revolution-Scotland  English_Civil_War  Three_Kingdoms  composite_monarchies  Absolutism  ancient_constitution  religion-established  Church_of_England  Reformation  reform-legal  reform-political  elections  franchise  state-building  opposition  parties  pa 
december 2014 by dunnettreader
Laurence L. Bongie, David Hume: Prophet of the Counter-revolution (2nd ed., 2000), Foreword by Donald W. Livingston - Online Library of Liberty
Laurence L. Bongie, David Hume: Prophet of the Counter-revolution (2nd ed.), Foreword by Donald W. Livingston (Indianapolis: Liberty Fund, 2000). 07/13/2014. <http://oll.libertyfund.org/titles/673> -- Though usually Edmund Burke is identified as the first to articulate the principles of a modern conservative political tradition, arguably he was preceded by a Scotsman who is better known for espousing a brilliant concept of skepticism. As Laurence Bongie notes, “David Hume was undoubtedly the eighteenth-century British writer whose works were most widely known and acclaimed on the Continent during the later Enlightenment period. Hume’s impact [in France] was of undeniable importance, greater even for a time than the related influence of Burke, although it represents a contribution to French counter-revolutionary thought which, unlike that of Burke, has been almost totally ignored by historians to this day.” The bulk of Bongie’s work consists of the writings of French readers of Hume who were confronted, first, by the ideology of human perfection and, finally, by the actual terrors of the French Revolution. Offered in French in the original edition of David Hume published by Oxford University Press in 1965, these vitally important writings have been translated by the author into English for the Liberty Fund second edition. In his foreword, Donald Livingston observes that “If conservatism is taken to be an intellectual critique of the first attempt at modern total revolution, then the first such event was not the French but the Puritan revolution, and the first systematic critique of this sort of act was given by Hume.” -- original on bookshelf - downloaded for Livingston foreword and translations
books  bookshelf  etexts  17thC  18thC  19thC  Hume-historian  Hume-politics  Hume-ethics  history_of_England  intellectual_history  political_history  political_philosophy  moral_philosophy  moral_psychology  moral_sentiments  progress  perfectibility  human_nature  historians-and-politics  historiography-18thC  Enlightenment  Scottish_Enlightenment  French_Enlightenment  English_Civil_War  Puritans  Levellers  Interregnum  Protectorate  Charles_I  Cromwell  Parliament  Parliamentarians  Ancien_régime  French_Revolution  Terror  counter-revolution  Counter-Enlightenment  conservatism  Whigs-Radicals  Radical_Enlightenment  downloaded  EF-add 
july 2014 by dunnettreader
Nicholas Hudson - "Britons Never Will be Slaves": National Myth, Conservatism, and the Beginnings of British Antislavery | Eighteenth-Century Studies 34.4 (2001) 559-576 - Project MUSE
According to a virtual consensus in modern scholarship on the abolition of slavery, this event marked a historic victory for nonconformist, radical, or otherwise antiestablishment elements in British culture. A recent historian has connected the rise of antislavery with "Wilkite" tendencies in the British middle class, and others have located abolitionism in a "reform complex" devoted to the radical overhaul of the British political system. It has been widely assumed that British slavery was generally excused by the established Anglican church and that the abolitionist movement was dominated by "Quakers, evangelicals and Rational Dissenters." -- This scholarship exemplifies a "Whig" historiography that routinely looks for the sources of social change in the attack of peripheral or nontraditional groups on the center. -- the most resonant voices against slavery during the 18thC belonged to men and women with strong backgrounds in the Anglican Church and conservative views on social and political issues in Britain. These include Samuel Johnson, William Warburton, Edmund Burke, ... -- we find that these humanitarian objections emerged from within the groups and ideologies that conceived of Britain as fundamentally Anglican, royal, and hierarchical. -- it is, in fact, inaccurate to identify mainstream British values with the merchants and colonists who controlled the slave-trade. As I will contend, antislavery took shape amidst an essentially ideological conflict about the very nature of "Britain" between proponents of unbridled free-market capitalism and the essentially conservative and traditionalist outlook of those who wished to contain capitalism within the constraints of morality, religion, and their patriotic image of Britons as a freedom-loving people. -- copy 1st 2 pages in Simple Note
article  Project_MUSE  paywall  find  18thC  British_history  British_politics  Atlantic  West_Indies  American_colonies  slavery  dissenters  Radical_Enlightenment  Whigs-oligarchy  Whigs-Radicals  Whigs-opposition  Tories  national_ID  British_Empire  abolition  plantations  planters  Anglican  Royalists  Wilkes  Johnson  Warburton  Burke  conservatism  historiography-Whig  nationalism  merchants  finance_capital  moral_economy  political_economy  capitalism  patriotism  Patriots  Patriot_King  Bolingbroke  EF-add 
may 2014 by dunnettreader
John Seed - The Spectre of Puritanism: Forgetting the 17thC in Hume's "History of England" | JSTOR: Social History, Vol. 30, No. 4 (Nov., 2005), pp. 444-462
The seventeenth century was not finished in eighteenth-century England. The ghosts of the 'Great Rebellion' continued to haunt Hanoverian England as political groupings struggled for some kind of control of representations of the past. One of the explicit purposes of Hume's "History of England" (1752-64) was to exorcize these ghosts of the past and to delegitimize the political memories of Whigs, Tories and Jacobites, churchmen and dissenters. This article focuses on the account of the puritans in the "History of England." In significant ways this contravenes Hume's own agenda. Out of his anti-puritan history there emerges the negative figure of the radical political intellectual which was subsequently appropriated by Burke and by wider forces of political reaction in England in the 1790s. Far from escaping the obsolete antagonisms of the past which continued to shape Hanoverian political hostilities, Hume in his "History of England" contributed to their reproduction and even intensification from the 1770s. -- begins by contrasting Bolingbroke's upfront treatment of the power of collective memory to enflame party conflict with Hume's attempt to reframe the memories themselves -- downloaded pdf to Note
article  jstor  17thC  18thC  1770s  1790s  British_history  British_politics  historiography-18thC  Hume-historian  Hume-politics  Bolingbroke  Dissertation_on_Parties  Remarks_on_History_of_England  history_of_England  historians-and-politics  historiography-Whig  counter-revolution  Counter-Enlightenment  dissenters  Whigs-Radicals  Burke  French_Revolution  downloaded  EF-add 
may 2014 by dunnettreader
Hugh Dunthorne - Britain and the Dutch Revolt 1560-1700 (2013) :: Cambridge University Press
Hardback and ebook - not yet pbk -- England's response to the Revolt of the Netherlands (1568–1648) has been studied hitherto mainly in terms of government policy, yet the Dutch struggle with Habsburg Spain affected a much wider community than just the English political elite. It attracted attention across Britain and drew not just statesmen and diplomats but also soldiers, merchants, religious refugees, journalists, travellers and students into the conflict. Hugh Dunthorne draws on pamphlet literature to reveal how British contemporaries viewed the progress of their near neighbours' rebellion, and assesses the lasting impact which the Revolt and the rise of the Dutch Republic had on Britain's domestic history. The book explores affinities between the Dutch Revolt and the British civil wars of the seventeenth century - the first major challenges to royal authority in modern times - showing how much Britain's changing commercial, religious and political culture owed to the country's involvement with events across the North Sea. --

** Reveals the wide-ranging impact of the Dutch Revolt on Britain's political, religious and commercial culture
** Connects the Dutch Revolt and Britain's seventeenth-century civil wars
** Places early modern Dutch and British history in international context
books  find  kindle-available  16thC  17thC  British_history  British_politics  British_Navy  Dutch  Spain  Dutch_Revolt  Thirty_Years_War  Protestant_International  English_Civil_War  diplomatic_history  military_history  Elizabeth  James_I  Charles_I  Restoration  economic_culture  political_culture  religious_culture  Calvinist  Absolutism  public_opinion  political_participation  political_press  politics-and-religion  William_III  Glorious_Revolution  Whigs  Whigs-Radicals  exiles  pamphlets  travel  Europe-Early_Modern  EF-add 
february 2014 by dunnettreader
EARLY MODERN RESEARCH GROUP - COMMONWEALTH: THE SOCIAL, CULTURAL, AND CONCEPTUAL CONTEXTS OF AN EARLY MODERN KEYWORD | JSTOR: The Historical Journal, Vol. 54, No. 3 (SEPTEMBER 2011), pp. 659-687
Group includes Mark Knights? -- The article explores 'commonwealth' both as a term and a conceptual field across the early modern period, with a particular focus on the Anglophone world. The shifts of usage of 'commonwealth' are explored, from a term used to describe the polity, to one used to describe a particular, republican form of polity, through to its eclipse in the eighteenth century by other terms such as 'nation' and 'state'. But the article also investigates the variety of usages during any one time, especially at moments of crisis, and the network of related terms that constituted 'commonwealth'. That investigation requires, it is argued, not just a textual approach but one that embraces social custom and practice, as well as the study of literary and visual forms through which the keyword 'commonwealth' was constructed. The article emphasizes the importance of social context to language; the forms, metaphors and images used to describe and depict the polity; and to show how linguistic change could occur through the transmutation of elements of the conceptual field that endowed the keyword with its meaning. -- lots of references -- looks immensely useful, of course cites original version of Skinner on Bolingbroke -- paywall Cambridge journals
article  jstor  paywall  find  libraries  intellectual_history  political_philosophy  political_culture  Europe-Early_Modern  16thC  17thC  18thC  British_politics  commonwealth  body_politic  common_good  republicanism  Whigs-Radicals  macro-microcosm  keywords  political_press  images-political  English_lit  metaphor  concepts  metaphor-political  political-theology  Bolingbroke  bibliography  EF-add 
january 2014 by dunnettreader
DMITRI LEVITIN -- MATTHEW TINDAL'S "RIGHTS OF THE CHRISTIAN CHURCH" (1706) AND THE CHURCH—STATE RELATIONSHIP | JSTOR: The Historical Journal, Vol. 54, No. 3 (SEPTEMBER 2011), pp. 717-740
Matthew Tindal's Rights of the Christian church (1706), which elicited more than thirty contemporary replies, was a major interjection in the ongoing debates about the relationship between church and state in late seventeenth- and early eighteenth-century England. Historians have usually seen Tindal's work as an exemplar of the 'republican civil religion' that had its roots in Hobbes and Harrington, and putatively formed the essence of radical whig thought in the wake of the Glorious Revolution. But this is to misunderstand the Rights. To comprehend what Tindal perceived himself as doing we need to move away from the history of putatively 'political' issues to the histories of ecclesiastical jurisprudence, patristic scholarship, and biblical exegesis. The contemporary significance of Tindal's work was twofold: methodologically, it challenged Anglican patristic scholarship as a means of reaching consensus on modern ecclesiological issues; positively, it offered a powerful argument for ecclesiastical supremacy lying in crown-in-parliament, drawing on a legal tradition stretching back to Christopher St Germain (1460—1540) and on Tindal's own legal background. Tindal's text provides a case study for the tentative proposition that 'republicanism', whether as a programme or a 'language', had far less impact on English anticlericalism and contemporary debates over the church—state relationship than the current historiography suggests. -- extensive references of Cambridge_School articles, refers to Goldie a great deal, whether for support of particular episodes or to attack is unclear -- the quarrel over patristic claims of the Church_of_England important for Bolingbroke's argument re Tillotson etc -- paywall
article  jstor  paywall  find  libraries  historiography  intellectual_history  political_philosophy  religious_history  politics-and-religion  political-theology  ecclesiology  17thC  18thC  British_history  British_politics  church_history  Church_of_England  religion-established  patristic_scholarship  Biblical_exegesis  Erastianism  crown-in-parliament  Whigs-Radicals  anticlerical  republicanism  Harrington  Hobbes  civil_religion  High_Church  Convocation  Tindal_Matthew  free-thinkers  religious_lit  political_press  pamphlets  bibliography  EF-add 
january 2014 by dunnettreader
Mark Goldie: John Locke's Circle and James II (1992)
JSTOR: The Historical Journal, Vol. 35, No. 3 (Sep., 1992), pp. 557-586 -- downloaded pdf to Note -- James II's grant of religious toleration and his invitation to the whigs to return to office dramatically changed the English political scene and created profound dilemmas for the crown's former enemies. Although there is ambiguity in their responses, and although Locke himself remained an immovable exile, his circle of friends took advantage of these changes. This included nomination to James's proposed tolerationist parliament, an accommodation which damaged them in the actual elections to the Convention of 1689. Some took office, and in at least two cases Locke's associates published pamphlets in support of the king. By exploring the politics of the Lockean whigs a contradiction in earlier views is resolved. For whilst Richard Ashcraft has argued that Locke's circle remained unremittingly hostile to James and engaged in clandestine plotting, other sources identify the same people as among the king's `whig collaborators'. The chief actors in Locke's circle are Edward Clarke, Sir Walter Yonge, Richard Duke and Richard Burthogge.
article  jstor  political_history  Britain  British_politics  tolerance  Whigs-Radicals  Locke  James_II  downloaded  EF-add 
september 2013 by dunnettreader
Judith Richards, Lotte Mulligan and John K. Graham: "Property" and "People": Political Usages of Locke and Some Contemporaries (1981)
JSTOR: Journal of the History of Ideas, Vol. 42, No. 1 (Jan. - Mar., 1981), pp. 29-51-- downloaded pdf to Note -- comparison especially with Exclusion Crisis authors eg Sidney, Tyrrel, Henry Neville who were more prominent and used by Whigs in decades after Glorious Revolution. The potential radicalism of each depends on how they used same terms differently
article  jstor  intellectual_history  political_philosophy  language-politics  property  populism  people_the  17thC  Exclusion_Crisis  Glorious_Revolution  Revolution_Principles  British_politics  1680s  1690s  Locke  Sidney  Whigs-Radicals  downloaded  EF-add 
september 2013 by dunnettreader
Review by: J. G. A. Pocock: Revolution Principles: The Politics of Party, 1689-1720 by J. P. Kenyon (1978)
JSTOR: The Journal of Modern History, Vol. 50, No. 3 (Sep., 1978), pp. 509-513 -- downloaded pdf to Note -- after agreeing that most of the turmoil was about vulnerability and power grabs or fears of the other side which produced an authoritarian oligarchy that proscribed its enemies he is still looking for neo-Harringtonians -- but now Defoe
books  bookshelf  reviews  Pocock  intellectual_history  political_philosophy  17thC  18thC  British_politics  parties  Glorious_Revolution  Tories  Whigs  Whig_Junto  William_III  Queen_Anne  Whigs-oligarchy  Whigs-Radicals  Hanoverian_Succession  Bolingbroke  Walpole  Whigs-opposition  Country_Party  downloaded  EF-add 
september 2013 by dunnettreader
Review by: Geraint Parry - John Locke and the Theory of Sovereignty: Mixed Monarchy and the Right of Resistance in the Political Thought of the English Revolution by Julian H. Franklin (1982)
JSTOR: Ethics, Vol. 92, No. 2 (Jan., 1982), pp. 358-361 -- focus is on Locke's use of Lawson -- see later section re distinction between Hobbes version of sovereignty and what Locke takes the sovereignty issue to be
reviews  books  intellectual_history  political_philosophy  political_history  Britain  17thC  sovereignty  Locke  Hobbes  Exclusion_Crisis  Whigs-Radicals  EF-add 
september 2013 by dunnettreader

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