dunnettreader + whig_junto   36

Scott Sowerby, review - Brian Cowan, The State Trial of Doctor Henry Sacheverell | H-Albion, H-Net Reviews. August, 2014.
Cowan’s erudite edition of primary sources charts contemporary reactions to the Sacheverell trial. Cowan sees the trial as an instance of the personalization of political ideas, as long-standing debates about church and state became “focused on one figure—Sacheverell, who could now be cast as either a hero or a scoundrel, depending upon one’s politics” (p. 15, emphasis in original). Unlike so many studies of print culture that focus on production, this volume is attuned to reception, with reproductions of commonplace books and marginalia that alternately endorsed and disputed the standard printed accounts of the trial. Cowan’s edition assembles sources from eleven libraries on two continents. Most of his selections are from unpublished manuscripts; five are from publications so rare that they are found in only one repository. The footnotes alone are worth the price of admission, providing a blow-by-blow account of the trial for the uninitiated. The volume is splendidly illustrated, with photographs of manuscripts, satirical prints, engravings of Sacheverell’s portrait, and depictions of the courtroom. The extended introduction surveys the history of printed transcripts of the trial, from Jacob Tonson’s official record to competing accounts by Tory and Whig authors. A helpful timeline and a comprehensive biographical guide round out the edition.
books  reviews  find  18thC  British_history  British_politics  Sacheverell  1710s  1720s  parties  Tories  Whig_Junto  Whigs  Church_of_England  tolerance  comprehension-church  Protestant_International  church-in-danger  Queen_Anne  impeachment  Parliament  House_of_Commons  House_of_Lords  political_press  public_sphere  public_opinion  Revolution_Principles  Walpole  print_culture  reception  Tonson  rhetoric-political  politics-and-religion  religion-established  Church-and-State  manuscripts  primary_sources 
january 2016 by dunnettreader
Melinda S. Zook - Turncoats and Double Agents in Restoration and Revolutionary England: The Case of Robert Ferguson, the Plotter (2009) | JSTOR - Eighteenth-Century Studies
Eighteenth-Century Studies, Vol. 42, No. 3 (Spring, 2009), pp. 363-378 -- The propagandist and conspirator, Robert Ferguson, so-called, The Plotter, has always been something of a puzzle to historians; his conversion from Whig to Jacobite following the Glorious Revolution has always been particularly troubling. This essay argues that Ferguson's winding career was far from unusual in the late Stuart era. Many politicians, prelates, playwrights and publicists altered their principles or even their religion within the fast changing political environment of Restoration and Revolution England. Secondly, this essay takes Ferguson seriously as a sophisticated political theorist, arguing that his political principles, from Whig to Jacobite, remained fairly consistent and revolve around his understanding of England's ancient constitution. His political life took many twists and turns, but his basic ideology remained the same. -- article published after her Radical Whigs and conspiracies book -- downloaded pdf to Note
article  jstor  political_history  British_history  British_politics  17thC  18thC  Restoration  Popish_Plot  Exclusion_Crisis  Glorious_Revolution  Jacobites  Whigs  Whigs-Radicals  Whig_Junto  conspiracy  James_II  James_III  William_III  Queen_Anne  1715_uprising  ancient_constitution  ideology  political_philosophy  political_culture  bibliography  downloaded 
november 2015 by dunnettreader
Robert P. Irvine - Labor and Commerce in Locke and Early 18thC English Georgic (2009) | JSTOR - ELH
ELH, Vol. 76, No. 4 (Winter, 2009), pp. 963-988 -- importance of (agricultural) labor from Locke’s 2nd Treatise to "naturakize" money not just within the economy but within politics of the mercantilist imperial state - comparing Virgil use of georgics to encompass the Roman imperial state. Contrasts political agendas of Philips (Cyder 1707) and Pope (Windsor Forest 1713) in their use of georgics, both working within the Lockean framework of property. Extensive lit survey - lots of recent work on 18thC georgics to say nothing of cultural dimensions of political economy of expanding trade, commercialization and imperialism. -- downloaded pdf to Note
article  jstor  literary_history  English_lit  18thC  intellectual_history  political_philosophy  moral_philosophy  Locke-2_Treatises  property  mercantilism  imperialism  trade  commerce  commerce-doux  civility-political  politeness  civil_society  public_sphere  nature  parties  partisanship  Whigs  Whig_Junto  City  Tories  gentry  landed_interest  national_ID  national_interest  War_of_Spanish_Succession  Queen_Anne  Spectator  Addison  political_culture  economic_culture  British_politics  British_Empire  poetry  poetics  nature-poetry  nature-mastery  Virgil  Pope  1700s  1710s  peace  Peace_of_Utrecht  labor_theory_of_value  labor  agriculture  Davenant  political_economy  bibliography  downloaded 
november 2015 by dunnettreader
William A. Pettigrew - Freedom's Debt: The Royal African Company and the Politics of the Atlantic Slave Trade, 1672-1752 (2013) | UNC Press
Shortlisted for the 2013 Whitfield Prize, Royal Historical Society
In the years following the Glorious Revolution, independent slave traders challenged the charter of the Royal African Company by asserting their natural rights as Britons to trade freely in enslaved Africans. In this comprehensive history of the rise and fall of the RAC, William A. Pettigrew grounds the transatlantic slave trade in politics, not economic forces, analyzing the ideological arguments of the RAC and its opponents in Parliament and in public debate. Ultimately, Pettigrew powerfully reasons that freedom became the rallying cry for those who wished to participate in the slave trade and therefore bolstered the expansion of the largest intercontinental forced migration in history. Unlike previous histories of the RAC, Pettigrew's study pursues the Company's story beyond the trade’s complete deregulation in 1712 to its demise in 1752. Opening the trade led to its escalation, which provided a reliable supply of enslaved Africans to the mainland American colonies, thus playing a critical part in entrenching African slavery as the colonies' preferred solution to the American problem of labor supply. -- William A. Pettigrew is lecturer in history at the University of Kent.
books  British_history  US_history  British_politics  17thC  18thC  slavery-Africans  African_trade  slavery-law  commerce  trading_companies  Royal_African_Co  Whigs  Whig_Junto  freedom  free_trade  maritime_history  West_Indies  North_America  American_colonies  Atlantic  colonialism  British_foreign_policy  Parliament  Harley  Bolingbroke  Peace_of_Utrecht  1690s  1700s  1710s  capitalism  plantations  colonial_governance  Nine_Years_War  War_of_Spanish_Succession  War_of_Jenkins_Ear 
september 2015 by dunnettreader
Stephen Bernard, ed. - The Literary Correspondences of the Tonsons - Oxford University Press
The Tonsons were the pre-eminent literary publishers of the late seventeenth and early eighteenth centuries. It is difficult to estimate their contribution to the formation of English literature accurately. Nevertheless, it is clear that they carried Shakespeare into the eighteenth century and started the practice of modern editing of him. Without Rowe's life and without the Pope-Theobald controversy, the history of Shakespeare studies would have been different, perhaps much less illustrious. The same is true of Milton, a figure who through his political sympathies was in disrepute, but on whom Jacob Tonson the elder (and his nephew after him) decided to lavish the care, eventually including illustration and annotation, usually reserved for the classics. Later they issued an edition of Spenser by John Hughes, thus creating the triumvirate who for many years were to dominate the study of English renaissance literature. It is not unreasonable to claim that the house of Tonson invented English literature as matter for repeated reading and study. In addition, of course, the Tonsons were Dryden's main publisher, the first to publish Pope, and the consistent supporters of Addison and Steele and their early periodicals, while Jacob Tonson the elder had earlier shaped the miscellany, the translation of classical poetry into English, the pocket Elzevier series, and the luxury edition - practices carried on by the Tonson firm throughout the eighteenth century. They were at the forefront of the creation of a Whig literary culture and Jacob Tonson the elder was the founder of the famous Whig Kit-Cat Club which, it has been said, saved the nation. This edition brings together the correspondences of the Tonsons for the first time and represents a major intervention in the field of the history of the book and literary production. It includes 158 letters, with translations where necessary, from major authors, politicians, and men and women of letters of the period, discussing their work and the role that the Tonsons played in getting literature to the press and the reading nation. The letters are accompanied by generous and insightful annotation, as well as brief biographies of each of the Tonsons, and special sections on publishing, patronage, and retirement.
books  find  17thC  18thC  British_history  cultural_history  elite_culture  British_politics  Whigs  Whig_Junto  Whigs-grandees  Whigs-oligarchy  cultural_capital  cultural_authority  publishing  print_culture  printing  Dryden  Pope_Alexander  Addison  Steele  English_lit  poetry  theater  theatre-Restoration  theatre-politics  correspondence  EF-add 
april 2015 by dunnettreader
Lorena S. Walsh, review - Nuala Zahedieh, The Capital and the Colonies: London and the Atlantic Economy, 1660-1700 (2010) | EH.net Review - Feb 2011
Zahedieh finds increasing concentration of plantation commerce among large merchants specializing in particular commodities and regions in the 1680s, when falling commodity prices and increased taxes eroded profit margins and drove out small traders. Colonial merchants seldom invested in overseas property, but made a massive contribution to expansion of empire in the form of short-term credit extended to settlers. The larger operators accumulated enough capital to diversify investment into shipbuilding, slave-trading, joint-stocks, insurance, wharves, industry, landed property, loans, and public credit. This decade was a turning point, as merchant concentration and specialization led to improved productivity, economies of scale, and reduced costs. (..) attempts of the later Stuarts to corner the profits of empire by restricting free trade among Englishmen as having limited success. (..) she sees the effect of the Glorious Revolution, not as leading to an economically optimal political arrangement, but as consolidating the capacity of the transatlantic trading elite to enforce regulation in its own interests and enhance the value and scale of rent-seeking enterprises at the expense of competition and efficiency, leading to a period of slower growth in colonial trade and shipping at the end of the century. Unlike trade with Europe, colonial commerce required an unusually large fixed capital investment in the greater tonnage needed to transport large volumes of bulky goods over long distances. (..) English- and plantation-built ships were better suited to most colonial commerce than were Dutch (..) it was long-distance commerce, rather than the protection of the Navigation Acts, that revived the English shipbuilding industry. By 1700 plantation shipping accounted for 40% of London's overseas trading capacity. (..) increased education among mariners (..) managerial skills, (..) navigational instruments. (..) London's prosperity by stimulating the construction of wharfs and warehouses, (.) naval refitting, repair, and provisioning trades. Although technology and unit input costs were fairly stable across the period, increased volumes and growing experience with colonial conditions led to organizational improvements which made more efficient use of inputs. - page encoding a mess on Note - try to save page or copy to EF in Air
books  bookshelf  reviews  17thC  economic_history  British_history  British_Empire  London  colonialism  North-Weingast  American_colonies  West_Indies  trade  trade-policy  shipping  Navigation_Acts  1680s  1690s  entrepôts  economic_growth  economic_culture  Charles_II  James_II  Atlantic  capital  investment  trade_finance  Dutch  education-training  Glorious_Revolution  Whigs  Whig_Junto  City_politics  infrastructure  ports  technology  navigation  interlopers  regulatory_capture  commodities  EF-add 
january 2015 by dunnettreader
- DAVID LEWIS JONES - British Parliaments and Assemblies: A Bibliography of Printed Materials (2009) Parliamentary History - Wiley Online Library
Each section a pdf downloaded to Note - combined, c 25,000 entries *--* Section 1: Preface, Introduction, The Westminster Parliament 1-4005. **--** Section 2: The Medieval Parliament 4006-4728 **--** Section 3: Tudor Parliaments 4729-5064 **--* Section 4: Stuart Parliaments 5063-6805 **--** Section 5: The Unreformed Parliament 1714-1832 6806-9589. **--** Section 6: The Reformed Parliament 1832-1918 9590-15067 **--** Section 7: Parliament 1918-2009 15068-21582. **--** Section 8: The Judicial House of Lords 21583-21835. -- The Palace of Westminster 21836-22457. -- The Irish Parliament 22458-23264 -- The Scottish Parliament (to 1707) 23265-23482 -- The New Devolved Assemblies 23483-23686 -- The Scottish Parliament (1999-) 23687-24251 -- Northern Ireland 24252-24563 -- The National Assembly for Wales 24537-24963 -- Minor Assemblies
bibliography  historiography  Medieval  medieval_history  15thC  16thC  17thC  18thC  19thC  20thC  21stC  political_culture  political_philosophy  political_economy  political_history  politics-and-religion  political_participation  political_press  legal_history  legal_system  legal_theory  British_history  British_politics  Britain  British_Empire  British_foreign_policy  English_constitution  British_Empire-constitutional_structure  monarchy  monarchy-proprietary  monarchical_republic  limited_monarchy  Parliament  Parliamentary_supremacy  House_of_Commons  House_of_Lords  sovereignty  government-forms  governing_class  government_finance  government_officials  Scotland  Ireland  Ireland-English_exploitation  elites  elite_culture  common_law  rule_of_law  1690s  1700s  1707_Union  1680s  Glorious_Revolution  Glorious_Revolution-Scotland  English_Civil_War  Three_Kingdoms  composite_monarchies  Absolutism  ancient_constitution  religion-established  Church_of_England  Reformation  reform-legal  reform-political  elections  franchise  state-building  opposition  parties  pa 
december 2014 by dunnettreader
The Works of John Locke, vol. 4 (Essays on money and Two Treatises of Government) [1824 edition] - Online Library of Liberty
Essays on money -- SOME CONSIDERATIONS OF THE CONSEQUENCES OF THE LOWERING OF INTEREST, AND RAISING THE VALUE OF MONEY. IN A LETTER SENT TO A MEMBER OF PARLIAMENT, 1691. Having lately met with a little tract, entitled, “A Letter to a friend concerning usury,” printed this present year, 1660; which gives, in short, the arguments of some treatises, printed many years since, for the lowering of interest; it may not be amiss briefly to consider them. -- Of raising our Coin. *--* SHORT OBSERVATIONS ON A PRINTED PAPER, ENTITLED, For encouraging the coining silver money in England, and after for keeping it here. *--* FURTHER CONSIDERATIONS CONCERNING RAISING THE VALUE OF MONEY. [Dedicated to Lord Somers] -- converted to html -- didn't download
books  etexts  Liberty_Fund  intellectual_history  political_philosophy  economic_history  political_economy  17thC  Glorious_Revolution  1690s  Locke  Locke-2_Treatises  monetary_policy  interest_rates  commerce  currency  bimetalism  FX  prices  usury  Parliament  House_of_Commons  William_III  Whig_Junto 
august 2014 by dunnettreader
PHILIP LOFT -- POLITICAL ARITHMETIC AND THE ENGLISH LAND TAX IN THE REIGN OF WILLIAM III. (2013). | The Historical Journal, 56, pp 321-343. - Cambridge Journals Online - Abstract
PHILIP LOFT - University College London -- This article explores the role of the method of political arithmetic and political arithmeticians in the changing methods of raising finance during the Nine Years War. It discusses the actions of parliament-men in committees and their interaction with reports containing data, and the influence of projectors on the decision to introduce, and later abandon, the pound rate. Throughout this period, political arithmeticians were active participants, providing data, advice, and schemes to the treasury and parliament, and when they were not, ‘country’ MPs, in particular, were active in calling for data and leading its cross-examination. This article suggests that debates on public finance did not occur along party lines, with ‘county communities’ given fresh presence by the quantification of the inequality of the land tax burden. Political arithmetic is shown to have played an important role in the processes and negotiations that occurred over the setting of taxation policy in the ‘long eighteenth century’. -* I thank Julian Hoppit for his generous encouragement and comments on this article. Thanks also to Clare Jackson, Andrew Preston and the anonymous reviewers. - available for download - to Note
article  17thC  18thC  British_history  British_politics  economic_history  political_economy  Glorious_Revolution  William_III  Nine_Years_War  taxes  landed_interest  land_tax  fiscal_policy  fiscal-military_state  political_arithmetick  Parliament  House_of_Commons  Parliamentary_supremacy  Country_Party  oversight-legislature  public_finance  public_policy  partisanship  Whig_Junto  Tories  Whigs-opposition  sovereign_debt  downloaded  EF-add 
august 2014 by dunnettreader
BRENT S. SIROTA -- THE OCCASIONAL CONFORMITY CONTROVERSY, MODERATION, AND THE ANGLICAN CRITIQUE OF MODERNITY, 1700–1714 (2014) | The Historical Journal, 57, pp 81-105 - Cambridge Journals Online - Abstract
BRENT S. SIROTA - North Carolina State University -- The occasional conformity controversy during the reign of Queen Anne has traditionally been understood as a straightforward symptom of the early eighteenth-century ‘rage of party’. For all the pious rhetoric concerning toleration and the church in danger, the controversy is considered a partisan squabble for short-term political gain. This traditional interpretation has, however, never been able to account for two features of the controversy: first, the focus on ‘moderation’ as a unique characteristic of post-Revolutionary English society; and second, the prominence of the Anglican nonjurors in the debate. This article revisits the occasional conformity controversy with an eye toward explaining these two related features. In doing so, it will argue that the occasional conformity controversy comprised a referendum on the Revolution settlement in church and state. Nonjurors lit upon the practice of occasional conformity as emblematic of the broader malady of moderation afflicting post-Revolutionary England. From their opposition to occasional conformity, the nonjurors, and soon the broader Anglican high-church movement, developed a comprehensive critique of religious modernity that would inform the entire framework of debate in the early English Enlightenment. -* I thank James Vaughn, Steve Pincus, Bill Bulman, Robert Ingram, and the participants in the ‘God and the Enlightenment’ conference at Ohio University in October 2012 for their generous engagement with earlier drafts of this article. Thanks also to Phil Withington and the anonymous reviewers for their assistance in shaping this article into its final form.
article  paywall  find  18thC  British_history  British_politics  1700s  1710s  occasional_conformity  nonjurors  High_Church  Church_of_England  religious_history  church_history  religious_culture  religion-established  politics-and-religion  political_press  pamphlets  political_participation  tolerance  latitudinarian  secularization  atheism_panic  partisanship  Tories  Whigs  dissenters  Whig_Junto  moderation  modernity  Enlightenment  Queen_Anne  Harley  Bolingbroke  comprehension-church  Convocation  church-in-danger  sermons  religious_lit  cultural_critique  Atterbury  popular_politics  popular_culture  Revolution_Principles  Glorious_Revolution  EF-add 
august 2014 by dunnettreader
WILLIAM A. PETTIGREW and GEORGE W. VAN CLEVE -- PARTING COMPANIES: THE GLORIOUS REVOLUTION, COMPANY POWER, AND IMPERIAL MERCANTILISM. (2014). | The Historical Journal, 57, pp 617-638. Cambridge Journals Online - Abstract
WILLIAM A. PETTIGREW - University of Kent and GEORGE W. VAN CLEVE - Seattle University School of Law --This article revisits the late seventeenth-century histories of two of England's most successful overseas trading monopolies, the East India and Royal African Companies. It offers the first full account of the various enforcement powers and strategies that both companies developed and stresses their unity of purpose in the seventeenth century. It assesses the complex effects that the ‘Glorious Revolution’ had on these powers and strategies, unearthing much new material about the case law for monopoly enforcement in this critical period and revising existing accounts that continue to assert the Revolution's exclusively deregulating effects and that miss crucial subtleties in the case law and related alterations in company behaviour. It asks why the two companies parted company as legal and political entities and offers an explanation that connects the fortunes of both monopoly companies to their public profile and differing constituencies in the English empire and the varying non-European political contexts in which they operated. -- * We warmly thank Michael R. T. Macnair for his indispensable advice and assistance regarding matters of seventeenth-century English law and are grateful to Clive Holmes for encouraging us to look into these issues and to Simon Douglas and Jeffrey Hackney for initial help in doing so. Paul Halliday, Daniel Hulsebosch, and Philip J. Stern provided helpful responses to specific research queries.
article  paywall  find  17thC  British_history  British_politics  economic_history  Glorious_Revolution  mercantilism  monopolies  trading_companies  East_India_Company  Royal_African_Co  colonialism  slavery  piracy  competition  parties  London  legal_history  judiciary  commercial_law  interest_groups  Whig_Junto  Tories  James_II  William_III  Parliament  institutional_economics  North-Weingast  regulation  West_Indies  ports  shipping  trade-policy  entrepôts  exports  imports  luxury_goods  consumers  EF-add 
august 2014 by dunnettreader
John Locke, Encouragement of Irish Linen Manufacture (August 1697) - Online Library of Liberty
John Locke, H.B. Fox Bourne, The Life of John Locke. In Two Volumes (London: Henry S. King, 1876). Vol. 2 pp. 363-372. 07/16/2014. <http://oll.libertyfund.org/titles/2332> -- Available as Facsimile PDF 352 KB This is a facsimile or image-based PDF made from scans of the original book -- Locke’s detailed proposals to encourage the Irish linen industry which was quoted in full in Fox Bourne’s The Life of John Locke (1876), vol. 2, pp. 363-372.
etexts  17thC  intellectual_history  British_history  British_politics  political_economy  Locke  biography  Ireland  Ireland-English_exploitation  industry  agriculture  protectionism  development  interest_groups  Parliament  Parliamentary_supremacy  Irish_Parliament  1690s  Whig_Junto  Board_of_Trade  UK_government-colonies  EF-add 
july 2014 by dunnettreader
John Locke, Proposed Poor Law Reform (October 1697) - Online Library of Liberty
John Locke, H.B. Fox Bourne, The Life of John Locke. In Two Volumes (London: Henry S. King, 1876). Vol. 2 pp. 377-391. 07/16/2014. <http://oll.libertyfund.org/titles/2331> -- Available as Facsimile PDF 638 KB This is a facsimile or image-based PDF made from scans of the original book. -- Locke’s detailed proposals for the reform of the Poor Laws which was quoted in full in Fox Bourne’s The Life of John Locke (1876), vol. 2, pp. 377-391.
etexts  Liberty_Fund  17thC  British_history  British_politics  governmentality  reformation_of_manners  poverty  charity  Poor_Laws  reform-social  Locke  biography  1690s  Whig_Junto  EF-add 
july 2014 by dunnettreader
Isabel Karremann and Anja Müller, eds. - Mediating Identities in Eighteenth-Century England (2011) | Ashgate
This volume engages in a critical discussion of the connection between historically specific categories of identity determined by class, gender, nationality, religion, political factions and age, and the media available at the time, including novels, newspapers, trial reports, images and the theatre. Recognizing the proliferation of identities in the epoch, these essays explore the ways in which different media determined constructions of identity and were in turn shaped by them. *--* Introduction: mediating identities in 18th-century England, Isabel Karremann; *--* Identifying an age-specific English literature for children, Anja Müller; *--* Found and lost in mediation: manly identity in Defoe's A Journal of the Plague Year, Isabel Karremann; *--* Gender identity in sentimental and pornographic fiction: Pamela and Fanny Hill, Franz Meier; *--* Paratexts and the construction of author identities: the preface as threshold and thresholds in the preface, Katharina Rennhak; *--* Owning identity: the 18th-century actress and theatrical property, Felicity Nussbaum; *--* Constructing identity in 18th-century comedy: schools of scandal, observation and performance, Anette Pankratz; *--* Material sites of discourse and the discursive hybridity of identities, Uwe Böker; *--* Constructions of political identity: the example of impeachments, Anna-Christina Giovanopoulos; *--* The public sphere, mass media, fashion and the identity of the individual, Christian Huck; *--* Topography and aesthetics: mapping the British identity in painting, Isabelle Baudino; *--* The panoramic gaze: the control of illusion and the illusion of control, Michael Meyer; *--* Peripatetics of citizenship in the 1790s, Christoph Houswitschka; *--* Critical responses, Rainer Emig, Hans-Peter Wagner and Christoph Heyl - downloaded introduction to Note
books  find  17thC  18thC  British_history  British_politics  cultural_history  politics-and-literature  English_lit  literary_history  novels  theater  theatre-Restoration  gender  masculinity  partisanship  Whig_Junto  Tories  impeachment  Somers  Harley  public_sphere  Habermas  aesthetics  consumers  children  family  citizenship  national_ID  identity  identity_politics  Defoe  comedy  downloaded  EF-add 
june 2014 by dunnettreader
Michael Albertus and Victor Menaldo - Gaming Democracy: Elite Dominance during Transition and the Prospects for Redistribution | British Journal of Political Science - Cambridge Journals Online
Inequality and democracy are far more compatible empirically than social conflict theory predicts. This article speaks to this puzzle, identifying the scope conditions under which democratization induces greater redistribution. Because autocrats sometimes have incentives to expropriate economic elites, who lack reliable institutions to protect their rights, elites may prefer democracy to autocratic rule if they can impose roadblocks to redistribution under democracy ex ante. Using global panel data (1972–2008), this study finds that there is a relationship between democracy and redistribution only if elites are politically weak during a transition; for example, when there is revolutionary pressure. Redistribution is also greater if a democratic regime can avoid adopting and operating under a constitution written by outgoing elites and instead create a new constitution that redefines the political game. This finding holds across three different measures of redistribution and instrumental variables estimation. This article also documents the ways in which elites ‘bias’ democratic institutions.
article  paywall  political_science  political_economy  democracy  inequality  elites  redistribution  revolutions  transition_economies  property_rights  economic_culture  economic_reform  political_culture  institutional_change  North-Weingast  Glorious_Revolution  Whig_Junto  Whigs-oligarchy  EF-add 
june 2014 by dunnettreader
Kevin Sharpe, review essay - Print, Polemics, and Politics in 17thC England | JSTOR: Journal of British Studies, Vol. 41, No. 2 (Apr., 2002), pp. 244-254
Writing and Society: Literacy, Print and Politics in Britain, 1590-1660 by Nigel Wheale; Whores of Babylon: Catholicism, Gender and Seventeenth-Century Print Culture by Frances E. Dolan; Political Passions: Gender, The Family and Political Argument in England, 1680-1714 by Rachel Weil; The Age of Faction: Court Politics, 1660-1702 by Alan Marshall -- downloaded pdf to Note
books  bookshelf  reviews  jstor  17thC  18thC  British_history  British_politics  cultural_history  publishing  print_culture  public_sphere  political_press  anti-Catholic  gender_history  family  patriarchy  Restoration  Elizabeth  James_I  Charles_I  Charles_II  James_II  William_III  Queen_Anne  partisanship  faction  parties  court_culture  courtiers  Whigs  Whig_Junto  Tories  Glorious_Revolution  English_Civil_War  literacy  downloaded  EF-add 
may 2014 by dunnettreader
NUALA ZAHEDIEH - Regulation, rent-seeking, and the Glorious Revolution in the English Atlantic economy | JSTOR: The Economic History Review, New Series, Vol. 63, No. 4 (NOVEMBER 2010), pp. 865-890
The rapid rise of England's colonial commerce in the late seventeenth century expanded the nation's resource base, stimulated efficiency improvements across the economy, and was important for long-term growth. However, close examination of the interests at play in England's Atlantic world does not support the Whiggish view that the Glorious Revolution played a benign role in this story. In the decades after the Restoration, the cases of the Royal African Company and the Spanish slave trade in Jamaica are used to show that the competition between Crown and Parliament for control of regulation constrained interest groups on either side in their efforts to capture the profits of empire. Stuart 'tyranny' was not able to damage growth and relatively competitive (and peaceful) conditions underpinned very rapid increases in colonial output and trade. The resolution of the rules of the Atlantic game in 1689 allowed a consolidated state better to manipulate and manage the imperial economy in its own interests. More secure rent-seeking enterprises and expensive wars damaged growth and European rivals began a process of catch-up. The Glorious Revolution was not sufficient to permanently halt economic development but it was sufficient to slow progress towards industrial revolution. -- very interesting attack on North-Weingast, Pincus et al -- paywall Wiley -- enormous bibliography on jstor information page
article  jstor  paywall  Wiley  economic_history  British_history  British_Empire  American_colonies  West_Indies  Atlantic  17thC  18thC  Glorious_Revolution  fiscal-military_state  North-Weingast  rent-seeking  UK_government-colonies  economic_growth  trade  trading_companies  British_politics  Parliament  Nine_Years_War  War_of_Spanish_Succession  colonialism  mercantilism  tariffs  Whig_Junto  bibliography 
january 2014 by dunnettreader
D'Maris Coffman: Bringing History to Economics | The Institute for New Economic Thinking
This episode features grantee D’Maris Coffman of the Centre for Financial History talking about her organization’s commitment to a New Financial History and what the fruits of their approach can tell us about modern debt crises and sustainable debt levels. She also discusses her research, funded by the Institute for New Economic Thinking, which explores fundamental questions about how Britain averted a Malthusian trap in the early nineteenth century and why the answers matter for global food security today.

our research into the “Credible Commitment” thesis has yielded three key findings. One that political risk is the most important single determinate of sovereign risk. Two, that the willingness of one party to honor the other party’s commitments is essential, and thus 1710 (when the Tories honored Whig commitments) was more of a turning-point than 1688-89. And three, that rather than crowding out the private sector, public sector spending and a coercive and authoritarian fiscal system paid for public borrowing during the Napoleonic wars.

These findings show that that gridlock in Washington is the “worst sort of politics possible.” Indeed, it is my firmly held belief that our research will overturn the relatively glib heuristics proposed by Carmen Reinert and Kenneth Rogoff.
video  books  kindle-available  economic_history  institutional_economics  North-Weingast  sovereign_debt  economic_growth  development  Tories  Whigs  Whig_Junto  Bank_of_England  1710s  Harley  Bolingbroke  EF-add 
october 2013 by dunnettreader
David Stasavage: Credible Commitment in Early Modern Europe: North and Weingast Revisited (2002)
JSTOR: Journal of Law, Economics, & Organization, Vol. 18, No. 1 (Apr., 2002), pp. 155-186 -- to check - already in EF? -- This article proposes a revision to existing arguments that institutions of limited government (characterized by multiple veto points) improve the ability of governments to credibly commit. Focusing on the issue of sovereign indebtedness, I present a simple framework for analyzing credibility problems in an economy divided between owners of land and owners of capital. I then argue that establishing multiple veto points can improve credibility, but whether this takes place depends upon the structure of partisan interests in a society, on the existence of cross-issue coalitions, and on the extent to which management of government debt is delegated. I develop several propositions to take account of these factors and evaluate them with historical evidence from eighteenth century England and France. The results show that incorporating these additional factors can help to explain a broader range of phenomena than is accounted for in existing studies.
article  jstor  economic_history  financial_system  institutional_economics  North-Weingast  17thC  18thC  Britain  France  British_politics  Whig_Junto  public_finance  sovereign_debt  bibliography  EF-add 
september 2013 by dunnettreader
Bruce G. Carruthers: Homo Economicus and Homo Politicus: Non-Economic Rationality in the Early 18th Century London Stock Market (1994)
JSTOR: Acta Sociologica, Vol. 37, No. 2 (1994), pp. 165-194 -- downloaded pdf to Note -- big bibliography including political history on Whig and Tory fights, funding the War of Spanish Succession and so forth - amazing this paper isn't cited in all the institutional_economics stuff done on this period -- The case of the early 18th-century London stock market is used to evaluate economic and sociological theories of market trading. Data from 1712 on shares in two companies (the Bank of England and the East India Company), and on trading among three different groups (political parties, ethnic-religious groups, and guilds) are used to show how economic theories of rational trading do not account for market behavior, even though the 1712 London stock market was a highly centralized, organized and active capital market. Trading was embedded in domestic and international politics as party groups used the market to control joint-stock companies, and as ethnic-religious groups used the market to provide financial support for Britain's war with France. In addition to economic goals, political goals were pursued in the market.
article  jstor  18thC  1710s  British_politics  capital_markets  political_economy  Harley  Bolingbroke  Whig_Junto  Tories  War_of_Spanish_Succession  Peace_of_Utrecht  Bank_of_England  East_India_Company  public_finance  sovereign_debt  downloaded  EF-add 
september 2013 by dunnettreader
Review by: J. G. A. Pocock: Revolution Principles: The Politics of Party, 1689-1720 by J. P. Kenyon (1978)
JSTOR: The Journal of Modern History, Vol. 50, No. 3 (Sep., 1978), pp. 509-513 -- downloaded pdf to Note -- after agreeing that most of the turmoil was about vulnerability and power grabs or fears of the other side which produced an authoritarian oligarchy that proscribed its enemies he is still looking for neo-Harringtonians -- but now Defoe
books  bookshelf  reviews  Pocock  intellectual_history  political_philosophy  17thC  18thC  British_politics  parties  Glorious_Revolution  Tories  Whigs  Whig_Junto  William_III  Queen_Anne  Whigs-oligarchy  Whigs-Radicals  Hanoverian_Succession  Bolingbroke  Walpole  Whigs-opposition  Country_Party  downloaded  EF-add 
september 2013 by dunnettreader
Review essay: Linda Colley and Mark Goldie - The Principles and Practice of Eighteenth-Century Party (1979)
JSTOR: The Historical Journal, Vol. 22, No. 1 (Mar., 1979), pp. 239-246 -- downloaded pdf to Note --Works reviewed: --**-- Parliament, Policy and Politics in the Reign of William III by Henry Horwitz;  --**-- The Growth of Parliamentary Parties 1689-1742 by B. W. Hill; Stability and Strife 1714-1760 by W. A. Speck;  --**-- Revolution Principles: The Politics of Party 1689-1720 by J. P. Kenyon; --**--  Liberty and Property: Political Ideology in Eighteenth Century Britain by H. T. Dickinson
books  bookshelf  reviews  jstor  17thC  18thC  political_history  Britain  British_history  British_politics  parties  Whigs  Whig_Junto  Tories  William_III  Queen_Anne  George_I  George_II  Walpole  Bolingbroke  provinces  local_government  elections  Country_Party  Whigs-opposition  ideology  elites  public_opinion  political_press  political_culture  downloaded  EF-add 
september 2013 by dunnettreader
Review of Nicola Parsons, Reading Gossip in Early Eighteenth-Century England | Digital Defoe
Parsons follows in the hallowed footsteps of Jürgen Habermas’s The Structural Transformation of the Public Sphere (German 1962; English 1989) and its most eminent recent endorsement, Michael McKeon’s The Secret History of Domesticity (2005). In Reading Gossip in Early Eighteenth-Century England, Nicola Parsons identifies Queen Anne’s reign (1702–14) as a pivotal moment of political reorganization wherein a residual absolutist ideology predicated on state secrets (arcana imperii) completed its transition to a new order in which there was a demand that political processes be subjected to public scrutiny. Parsons argues that in works by Delarivier Manley, Sir Richard Steele, Daniel Defoe, and Jane Barker gossip functioned to negotiate the as-yet-tenuous split between public and private. The crux of Reading Gossip is, in many respects, the development discussed in Parsons’s chapter on the fall-out of the Sacheverell riots in 1710 and Defoe’s modification of the secret history genre in response to the backlash against his patron, Robert Harley, following Anne’s death. In line with Rebecca Bullard’s recent Politics of Disclosure (2009), Parsons resists analyses of the secret history that produce a neat account of the rise of liberalism, instead proposing that the Sacheverell riots posed a dilemma for the Whig party, which needed to adopt Tory anti-mob rhetoric to maintain civic order, while maintaining its traditional stance that vox populi dictated polity. The Tories and Whigs therefore unwittingly “collaborated in the rhetorical construction of a more or less unified ‘public’” (78) and consolidated a political class with its own interests over against the public at large. The test case is Defoe’s sequence of three pamphlets entitled The Secret History of the White-Staff (1714–1715),
books  kindle-available  reviews  18thC  1700s  1710s  British_history  British_politics  Queen_Anne  Harley  Defoe  political_culture  political_history  political_press  parties  Whig_Junto  Tories  Manley  Marlborough  Marlborough_Duchess  Steele  public_sphere  public_opinion  Bolingbroke  downloaded  EF-add 
august 2013 by dunnettreader
Kevin Sharpe: Rebranding Rule: 1660-1720 | Kindle Store
In the climactic part of his three-book series exploring the importance of public image in the Tudor and Stuart monarchies, Kevin Sharpe employs a remarkable interdisciplinary approach that draws on literary studies and art history as well as political, cultural, and social history to show how this preoccupation with public representation met the challenge of dealing with the aftermath of Cromwell's interregnum and Charles II's restoration, and how the irrevocably changed cultural landscape was navigated by the sometimes astute yet equally fallible Stuart monarchs and their successors.
books  British_history  British_politics  cultural_history  religious_history  monarchy  Charles_II  James_II  William_III  Queen_Anne  George_I  Restoration  Exclusion_Crisis  Glorious_Revolution  War_of_Spanish_Succession  Hanoverian_Succession  aristocracy  Parliament  political_economy  political_culture  art_history  English_lit  Whigs  Whig_Junto  Tories  colonialism  IR  EF-add  English_constitution 
july 2013 by dunnettreader
A Plague of Informers by Rachel Weil - Yale University Press - pub date Jan 2014
Stories of plots, sham plots, and the citizen-informers who discovered them are at the centre of Rachel Weil's compelling study of the turbulent decade following the Revolution of 1688. Most studies of the Glorious Revolution focus on its causes or long-term effects, but Weil instead zeroes in on the early years when the survival of the new regime was in doubt. By encouraging informers, imposing loyalty oaths, suspending habeas corpus, and delaying the long-promised reform of treason trial procedure, the Williamite regime protected itself from enemies and cemented its bonds with supporters, but also put its own credibility at risk.
books  17thC  British_history  British_politics  Glorious_Revolution  Jacobites  Whig_Junto  William_III  EF-add 
july 2013 by dunnettreader
A Plague of Informers by Rachel Weil - Yale University Press (pub date Feb 2014)
A Plague of Informers: Conspiracy and Political Trust in William III's England 

ISBN:9780300171044
Dimensions:320 pages:
Stories of plots, sham plots, and the citizen-informers who discovered them are at the centre of Rachel Weil's compelling study of the turbulent decade following the Revolution of 1688. Most studies of the Glorious Revolution focus on its causes or long-term effects, but Weil instead zeroes in on the early years when the survival of the new regime was in doubt. By encouraging informers, imposing loyalty oaths, suspending habeas corpus, and delaying the long-promised reform of treason trial procedure, the Williamite regime protected itself from enemies and cemented its bonds with supporters, but also put its own credibility at risk.
books  British_history  political_history  17thC  William_III  Whig_Junto  Jacobites 
june 2013 by dunnettreader

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