dunnettreader + war_of_spanish_succession   30

Harold Samuel Stone - Vico's Cultural History: The Production and Transmission of Ideas in Naples ...(1997) - Google Books
Based on a U of Chicago thesis supervised by Stephen Toulmin.
A study of the cultural world of Giambattista Vico, one of the most creative social theorists of the eighteenth century. Based on extensive manuscript as well as printed materials, and relying on the methods of book and publishing history, this volume describes Vico's intellectual community. Special attention is paid to the interaction between scholars and Naples' vibrant operatic and artistic community. The first part of the book investigates a controversy concerning an inquisitorial investigation, Neapolitan travel literature, the papers of a scientific academy, and the patronage system for book publication. The second part describes the cultural context of Vico's writings and especially the three editions of "The New Science," This work explains the accomplishments that made Naples one of the great cultural centers of the early Enlightenment.
Habsburgs  Papacy  Cartesians  intellectual_history  18thC  cultural_history  War_of_Spanish_Succession  atomism  patronage  Bourbons  17thC  Italy  Enlightenment  Deism  Naples  books  Republic_of_Letters  Inquisition  history_of_book  Vico 
may 2016 by dunnettreader
Robert P. Irvine - Labor and Commerce in Locke and Early 18thC English Georgic (2009) | JSTOR - ELH
ELH, Vol. 76, No. 4 (Winter, 2009), pp. 963-988 -- importance of (agricultural) labor from Locke’s 2nd Treatise to "naturakize" money not just within the economy but within politics of the mercantilist imperial state - comparing Virgil use of georgics to encompass the Roman imperial state. Contrasts political agendas of Philips (Cyder 1707) and Pope (Windsor Forest 1713) in their use of georgics, both working within the Lockean framework of property. Extensive lit survey - lots of recent work on 18thC georgics to say nothing of cultural dimensions of political economy of expanding trade, commercialization and imperialism. -- downloaded pdf to Note
article  jstor  literary_history  English_lit  18thC  intellectual_history  political_philosophy  moral_philosophy  Locke-2_Treatises  property  mercantilism  imperialism  trade  commerce  commerce-doux  civility-political  politeness  civil_society  public_sphere  nature  parties  partisanship  Whigs  Whig_Junto  City  Tories  gentry  landed_interest  national_ID  national_interest  War_of_Spanish_Succession  Queen_Anne  Spectator  Addison  political_culture  economic_culture  British_politics  British_Empire  poetry  poetics  nature-poetry  nature-mastery  Virgil  Pope  1700s  1710s  peace  Peace_of_Utrecht  labor_theory_of_value  labor  agriculture  Davenant  political_economy  bibliography  downloaded 
november 2015 by dunnettreader
William A. Pettigrew - Freedom's Debt: The Royal African Company and the Politics of the Atlantic Slave Trade, 1672-1752 (2013) | UNC Press
Shortlisted for the 2013 Whitfield Prize, Royal Historical Society
In the years following the Glorious Revolution, independent slave traders challenged the charter of the Royal African Company by asserting their natural rights as Britons to trade freely in enslaved Africans. In this comprehensive history of the rise and fall of the RAC, William A. Pettigrew grounds the transatlantic slave trade in politics, not economic forces, analyzing the ideological arguments of the RAC and its opponents in Parliament and in public debate. Ultimately, Pettigrew powerfully reasons that freedom became the rallying cry for those who wished to participate in the slave trade and therefore bolstered the expansion of the largest intercontinental forced migration in history. Unlike previous histories of the RAC, Pettigrew's study pursues the Company's story beyond the trade’s complete deregulation in 1712 to its demise in 1752. Opening the trade led to its escalation, which provided a reliable supply of enslaved Africans to the mainland American colonies, thus playing a critical part in entrenching African slavery as the colonies' preferred solution to the American problem of labor supply. -- William A. Pettigrew is lecturer in history at the University of Kent.
books  British_history  US_history  British_politics  17thC  18thC  slavery-Africans  African_trade  slavery-law  commerce  trading_companies  Royal_African_Co  Whigs  Whig_Junto  freedom  free_trade  maritime_history  West_Indies  North_America  American_colonies  Atlantic  colonialism  British_foreign_policy  Parliament  Harley  Bolingbroke  Peace_of_Utrecht  1690s  1700s  1710s  capitalism  plantations  colonial_governance  Nine_Years_War  War_of_Spanish_Succession  War_of_Jenkins_Ear 
september 2015 by dunnettreader
Marion Brétéché - Les compagnons de Mercure: Journalisme et politique dans l'Europe de Louis XIV, 1680-1720 (2015) | Champ-Vallon
360 pages, - ISBN 979.10.267.0022.7, 27 euros -- Dans l’Europe intolérante du 18thC, la Hollande fait figure d’exception. C’est là, précisément, qu’est né, à la fin des 1680s, le journalisme politique d’analyse et d’opinion. Afin de rendre compte de l’« art de gouverner et de policer les États » (Furetière), afin de révéler au grand jour ce que les autorités politiques cachent ou taisent, comment des hommes sont-ils parvenus à faire de l’actualité leur profession ? M. Brétéché reconstitue toutes les dimensions de l’activité d’une douzaine de professionnels de l’information, pour la plupart des exilés huguenots, et explore les conditions d’apparition dans les Provinces-Unies de la première presse politique, libre et critique, en langue française. Devenus auteurs en Hollande, ils furent aussi des informateurs au service des puissants : ils nous permettent de saisir dans leur diversité l’inventivité des pratiques manuscrites et imprimées de publication des nouvelles au tournant du Grand Siècle et du Siècle des Lumières. (..) cet ouvrage retrace la rencontre entre un marché de l’information en plein essor, toujours plus avide de nouvelles fraîches, et les politiques de communication des gouvernements, partagés entre la publicité de leur action et les arcana imperii nécessaires à l’exercice du pouvoir. À la croisée de l’histoire sociale du journalisme et de l’histoire politique des médias, est retracé ici un épisode aussi essentiel que méconnu de l’histoire de l’information, qui manifeste déjà la tension entre contrainte et autonomie, entre censure et liberté d’expression. -- Marion Brétéché, agrégée et docteur en histoire, est chercheur associé au Centre Roland Mousnier (Paris Sorbonne – CNRS) et au GRIHL (Groupe de Recherche Interdisciplinaire sur l’Histoire du Littéraire – EHESS).
find  media  Nine_Years_War  books  arcana_imperii  17thC  newspapers  censorship  Revocation_of_Edict_of_Nantes  France  information-markets  information-intermediaries  -opinion  government-public_communication  spying  circulation-ideas  secrecy  newsletter  news  journalists  amazon.fr  patronage  propaganda  public_policy  Dutch  political_discourse  Huguenots  literary_history  political_press  cultural_history  circulation-news  social_history  War_of_Spanish_Succession  journalism  libraries 
june 2015 by dunnettreader
Dan Bogart - "There Can Be No Partnership with the King": Regulatory Commitment and the Tortured Rise of England's East Indian Merchant Empire | via Brad DeLong - Equitablog
Dan Bogart, Department of Economics, UC Irvine - : “There Can Be No Partnership with the King”: Regulatory Commitment and the Tortured Rise of England’s East Indian Merchant Empire: “The English East India Company helped build Britain’s colonial empire, but the Company was not a leader in East Asian trade for nearly a century after its founding in 1600. This paper argues that its early performance was hindered by a problem of regulatory commitment. It gives a brief history of the torturous renegotiations over its monopoly trading privileges and the fiscal demands by the monarchy. It also analyzes the effects of political instability, warfare, and fiscal capacity on the Company’s investment in shipping tonnage. Regressions show the growth of shipping tonnage declined significantly when there were changes in government ministers, when Britain was at war in Europe and North America, and when shipping capacity exceeded central government tax revenues. The findings point to the significance of regulatory institutions in Britain’s development and its links with politics and war. They also provide an important case where regulatory uncertainty lowers investment.” paper dated Jan 2015 -- downloaded pdf to Note
paper  downloaded  economic_history  British_history  British_Empire  fiscal-military_state  state-building  UK_government-colonies  East_India_Company  trade-policy  trading_companies  trading_privileges  monopolies  British_Navy  17thC  institutional_capacity  regulation  monarchy-proprietary  James_I  Charles_I  Charles_II  James_II  English_Civil_War  Interregnum  taxes  political_culture  shipping  merchants  interlopers  military_history  Anglo-Dutch_wars  Glorious_Revolution  Nine_Years_War  War_of_Spanish_Succession  investment  uncertainty-regulation  uncertainty-political  British_politics  Restoration  colonialism  parties  faction  EF-add 
february 2015 by dunnettreader
John Emerich Edward Dalberg, Lord Acton, Lectures on Modern History, ed. John Neville Figgis and Reginald Vere Laurence (London: Macmillan, 1906) - Online Library of Liberty
These are the lectures given by the great English classical liberal historian, Lord Acton, in the academic years 1899-1901 at Cambridge University. It is a survey of modern history from the rise of the modern nation state to the American Revolution. The book also contains his “Inaugural Lecture” of 1895. *---* INTRODUCTION LORD ACTON AS PROFESSOR *-* INAUGURAL LECTURE ON THE STUDY OF HISTORY *-* I: BEGINNING OF THE MODERN STATE. *-* II: THE NEW WORLD. *-* III: THE RENAISSANCE *-* IV: LUTHER. *-& V: THE COUNTER–REFORMATION. *-* VI: CALVIN AND HENRY VIII. *-* VII: PHILIP II., MARY STUART, AND ELIZABETH. *-* VIII: THE HUGUENOTS AND THE LEAGUE. *-* IX: HENRY THE FOURTH AND RICHELIEU. *-* X: THE THIRTY YEARS’ WAR. *-* XI: THE PURITAN REVOLUTION. *-* XII: THE RISE OF THE WHIGS. *-* XIII: THE ENGLISH REVOLUTION. *-* XIV: LEWIS THE FOURTEENTH. *-* XV: THE WAR OF THE SPANISH SUCCESSION. *-* XVI: THE HANOVERIAN SETTLEMENT. *-* XVII: PETER THE GREAT AND THE RISE OF PRUSSIA. *-* XVIII: FREDERIC THE GREAT. *-* XIX: THE AMERICAN REVOLUTION. *-* APPENDIX I. *-* APPENDIX II - NOTES TO THE INAUGURAL LECTURE ON THE STUDY OF HISTORY -- downloaded kindle version of html
books  etexts  Liberty_Fund  downloaded  intellectual_history  historiography-19thC  British_history  British_politics  Europe-Early_Modern  Renaissance  Reformation  Counter-Reformation  nation-state  France  Wars_of_Religion  Henri_IV  Richelieu  Louis_XIV  War_of_Spanish_Succession  Peter_the_Great  Frederick_the_Great  Hanoverian_Succession  James_II  Glorious_Revolution  Whigs  Tudor  Elizabeth  Mary_Queen_of_Scots  Thirty_Years_War  English_Civil_War  Puritans  Calvin  Henry_VIII  usable_past  EF-add 
september 2014 by dunnettreader
Samuel von Pufendorf, The Divine Feudal Law: Or, Covenants with Mankind, Represented, trans. Theophilus Dorrington (1703), ed. Simone Zurbruchen - Online Library of Liberty
Samuel von Pufendorf, The Divine Feudal Law: Or, Covenants with Mankind, Represented, trans. Theophilus Dorrington, ed. with an Introduction by Simone Zurbruchen (Indianapolis: Liberty Fund, 2002). 07/10/2014. <http://oll.libertyfund.org/titles/177> -- The Divine Feudal Law sets forth Pufendorf’s basis for the reunion of the Lutheran and Calvinist confessions. This attempt to seek a “conciliation” between the confessions complements the concept of toleration discussed in Of the Nature and Qualification of Religion in Reference to Civil Society. In both works Pufendorf examines the proper way to secure the peaceful coexistence of different confessions in a state. -- Published posthumously in 1695 - likely that timing of translation part of ecumenical impulse within Protestantism, reinforcing the goal of the War of the Spanish Succession as protection of the Protestant Interest opposed to Louis XIV, despite being allied not only with German (Lutheran) members of the Holy Roman Empire but with the Catholic Emperor himself -- downloaded pdf to Note
books  etexts  17thC  18thC  1690s  1700s  Pufendorf  Lutherans  Calvinist  ecumenical  Christendom  Protestants  Protestant_International  anti-Catholic  War_of_Spanish_Succession  Nine_Years_War  tolerance  theology  downloaded  EF-add 
july 2014 by dunnettreader
Baron John Emerich Edward Dalberg-Acton, Lord Acton - Lectures on Modern History (1921 reprint 1907) - Google Books
Editors - with Introduction, John Neville Figgis, Reginald Vere Laurence -- Contents -- Inaugural Lecture on the Study of History *--* LECTURES ON MODERN HISTORY *--* Beginning of the Modern State *--* The New World *--* The Renaissance *--* Luther *--* The CounterReformation *--* Calvin and Henry VIII *--* The Puritan Revolution *--* The Rise of the Whigs *--* The English Revolution *--* Lewis XIV *--* The War of the Spanish Succession *--* The Hanoverian Settlement *--* Peter the Great and the Rise of Prussia *--* Frederic the Great *--* Philip II Mary Stuart and Elizabeth *--* The Huguenots and the League *--* Henry the Fourth and Richelieu *--* The Thirty Years War *--* The American Revolution *--* Letter to Contributors to the Cambridge Modern History *--* Notes to Inaugural Lecture -- downloaded pdf to Note
books  etexts  Google_Books  historiography-19thC  historians-and-politics  historians-and-religion  religious_history  politics-and-religion  political_history  nation-state  modernity-emergence  Europe-Early_Modern  Reformation  Counter-Reformation  British_history  British_politics  English_Civil_War  Wars_of_Religion  Thirty_Years_War  War_of_Spanish_Succession  Hanoverian_Succession  colonialism  American_Revolution  Louis_XIV  Henry_VIII  Lutherans  Calvinist  Peter_the_Great  Frederick_the_Great  Elizabeth  Mary_Queen_of_Scots  Spanish_Empire  Huguenots  Renaissance  Puritans  Whigs  downloaded  EF-add 
july 2014 by dunnettreader
Andrew Lincoln - The Culture of War and Civil Society in the Reigns of William III and Anne | JSTOR: Eighteenth-Century Studies, Vol. 44, No. 4 (SUMMER 2011), pp. 455-474
The essay examines the representation of war in poems and church services during the reigns of William III and Queen Anne. It identifies relations between social discipline and the imaginative participation in violence, and considers how war—described by poets as a test of heroism, and represented by the church as the occasion for spiritual purgation—served the interests of those who wanted to regulate and refine the manners of civil society. It argues that the promotion of gentler manners did not undermine the commitment to military aggression, but worked in the service of it. -- huge bibliography of both primary and secondary literature -- paywall
article  jstor  paywall  17thC  18thC  British_history  British_politics  Nine_Years_War  War_of_Spanish_Succession  English_lit  poetry  sermons  politeness  reformation_of_manners  militarism  William_III  Marlborough  heroes  Providence  religious_culture  elite_culture  Elias_Norbert  Addison  publishing  public_sphere  civil_society  bibliography  EF-add 
january 2014 by dunnettreader
Review by: Nuala Zahedieh - War and Economy in the Age of William III and Marlborough by D. W. Jones | JSTOR: The Economic History Review, New Series, Vol. 43, No. 1 (Feb., 1990), pp. 141-142
She buys Jones argument that the wars following the Glorious Revolution were an immense economic burden -- Britain was borrowing and taxing for expenditures mostly abroad. Coin clipping was actually salvation in the 1690s -- without new sources of gold and silver and some other pieces of good fortune, Marlborough victories wouldn't have happened.
books  reviews  bookshelf  jstor  17thC  18thC  economic_history  British_history  sovereign_debt  Nine_Years_War  War_of_Spanish_Succession  currency  money_supply  fiscal-military_state  EF-add 
january 2014 by dunnettreader
NUALA ZAHEDIEH - Regulation, rent-seeking, and the Glorious Revolution in the English Atlantic economy | JSTOR: The Economic History Review, New Series, Vol. 63, No. 4 (NOVEMBER 2010), pp. 865-890
The rapid rise of England's colonial commerce in the late seventeenth century expanded the nation's resource base, stimulated efficiency improvements across the economy, and was important for long-term growth. However, close examination of the interests at play in England's Atlantic world does not support the Whiggish view that the Glorious Revolution played a benign role in this story. In the decades after the Restoration, the cases of the Royal African Company and the Spanish slave trade in Jamaica are used to show that the competition between Crown and Parliament for control of regulation constrained interest groups on either side in their efforts to capture the profits of empire. Stuart 'tyranny' was not able to damage growth and relatively competitive (and peaceful) conditions underpinned very rapid increases in colonial output and trade. The resolution of the rules of the Atlantic game in 1689 allowed a consolidated state better to manipulate and manage the imperial economy in its own interests. More secure rent-seeking enterprises and expensive wars damaged growth and European rivals began a process of catch-up. The Glorious Revolution was not sufficient to permanently halt economic development but it was sufficient to slow progress towards industrial revolution. -- very interesting attack on North-Weingast, Pincus et al -- paywall Wiley -- enormous bibliography on jstor information page
article  jstor  paywall  Wiley  economic_history  British_history  British_Empire  American_colonies  West_Indies  Atlantic  17thC  18thC  Glorious_Revolution  fiscal-military_state  North-Weingast  rent-seeking  UK_government-colonies  economic_growth  trade  trading_companies  British_politics  Parliament  Nine_Years_War  War_of_Spanish_Succession  colonialism  mercantilism  tariffs  Whig_Junto  bibliography 
january 2014 by dunnettreader
Jamel Ostwald - Operationalizing Military Operations - July 2013 | Society for Military History Blog
While working feverishly to complete an 8,000-word (ok, more like 8,600) chapter narrating the War of the Spanish Succession (1701-1714) – a part of West Point’s massive new e-textbook for their History of Warfare survey course – I got to talking with another author. The discussion quickly descended into that classic game of “I’ve got it worse than you.” My self-serving jeremiad was that I couldn’t pity some of the other authors who had the same amount of space to cover just a few years of a war, say 1805-1807 or a few years of WW2. Which got me thinking (famous last words) about how one could more objectively rate the amount of detail needed to adequately narrate and explain various wars. Given a set number of words to explain the conduct of two wars at the same level of detail (i.e. putting aside the editorial decision to, a priori, declare some wars worthy of more or deeper coverage than others), what makes the task more difficult for one war versus the other? This is what I’ve come up with thus far.
military_history  historiography  War_of_Spanish_Succession 
september 2013 by dunnettreader
Matias Vernengo: Crowding out and the Industrial Revolution July 2013 | NAKED KEYNESIANISM
Charts from Dickson re interest rates on UK bonds through 18thC and the interest rates spikes during War of Spanish Succession -- links to classic studies (JSTOR) estimating slower growth during 18thC and speculating on crowding out. Link to McColloch paper disputing that Bubble Act reduced industrial investment in 18thC. Vernengo doesn't mention either usury controls or, more important for his speculation that finance for investment grew only as demand grew, that Britain was most heavily taxed and relied increasingly on consumption taxes that would have an impact on growth of demand. Temin and Voth theory that focuses on banking, and less on capital markets (do they think Bubble Act was important? ), other than relations between banking system and sovereign debt market. Vernengo cites papers (including from 1950s) that see Bank of England providing liquidity to the whole system especially in 2nd half of 18thC through the expansion of the revenue collection and government spending process -- new country banks also collecting taxes and the government was spending large amounts on war. Vernengo mentions that in earlier post on same topic and McColloch paper. JSTOR papers are downloaded to Note
paper  article  jstor  links  political_economy  economic_history  18thC  Britain  public_finance  sovereign_debt  fiscal-military_state  fiscal_policy  taxes  interest_rates  Bubble_Act  Bank_of_England  economic_growth  investment  financial_regulation  banking  War_of_Spanish_Succession  Industrial_Revolution  crowding_out  financial_repression  EF-add 
september 2013 by dunnettreader
Bruce G. Carruthers: Homo Economicus and Homo Politicus: Non-Economic Rationality in the Early 18th Century London Stock Market (1994)
JSTOR: Acta Sociologica, Vol. 37, No. 2 (1994), pp. 165-194 -- downloaded pdf to Note -- big bibliography including political history on Whig and Tory fights, funding the War of Spanish Succession and so forth - amazing this paper isn't cited in all the institutional_economics stuff done on this period -- The case of the early 18th-century London stock market is used to evaluate economic and sociological theories of market trading. Data from 1712 on shares in two companies (the Bank of England and the East India Company), and on trading among three different groups (political parties, ethnic-religious groups, and guilds) are used to show how economic theories of rational trading do not account for market behavior, even though the 1712 London stock market was a highly centralized, organized and active capital market. Trading was embedded in domestic and international politics as party groups used the market to control joint-stock companies, and as ethnic-religious groups used the market to provide financial support for Britain's war with France. In addition to economic goals, political goals were pursued in the market.
article  jstor  18thC  1710s  British_politics  capital_markets  political_economy  Harley  Bolingbroke  Whig_Junto  Tories  War_of_Spanish_Succession  Peace_of_Utrecht  Bank_of_England  East_India_Company  public_finance  sovereign_debt  downloaded  EF-add 
september 2013 by dunnettreader
Bianca Chen: Digging for Antiquities with Diplomats: Gisbert Cuper (1644-1716) and his Social Capital | Republics of Letters: A Journal for the Study of Knowledge, Politics, and the Arts
Citation: Chen, Bianca. “Digging for Antiquities with Diplomats: Gisbert Cuper (1644-1716) and his Social Capital.” Republics of Letters: A Journal for the Study of Knowledge, Politics, and the Arts 1, no. 1 (May 1, 2009): http://rofl.stanford.edu/node/36. -- in "Rethinking the Republic of Letters" issue -- downloaded pdf to Note -- Gisbert Cuper’s career and his rise to fame allow us to examine the working practices of the Republic of Letters and reconsider how to judge a scholar’s merits in a historical context other than our own. First appointed professor of history and rhetoric at a provincial Athenaeum in Deventer (1668), Cuper subsequently became Rector of the institute (1672), burgomaster (mayor) of the city (1674), a delegate of the city to the meetings of the provincial States (the States of Overijssel), a delegate of the province to the States General of the Dutch Republic (1681-1694) and finally, for that highest governing body, a commissioner in the field during the War of the Spanish Succession (1706)...... This article will examine how the concurrence of politics and letters was important for the advancement of scholarship and how it led to the perception of Cuper as a particularly significant cultural intermediary in the Republic of Letters. I will refer to the concept of social capital to emphasize the importance of networks of patronage and the exchange of services within any community, including within the Republic of Letters. Explicitly stressing the value of correspondence to the Republic of Letters in general and to Cuper in particular, I will pay special attention to his large and diverse network of correspondents from different backgrounds. Ultimately this article seeks to demonstrate how successfully Cuper bridged the world of politics and letters by employing his social capital for the sake of learning and the subsequent benefits for his reputation in the Republic of Letters.
article  intellectual_history  political_history  cultural_history  political_culture  intelligentsia  Republic_of_Letters  Enlightenment  social_capital  networks  patronage  correspondence  diplomacy  diplomats  politicians  status  antiquaries  Dutch  War_of_Spanish_Succession  Peace_of_Utrecht  downloaded  EF-add 
september 2013 by dunnettreader
Robert V. McNamee: The marginalized Alexander Pope | Electronic Enlightenment Monthly Miscellany — Spring 2013
Nice homage to Pope and Windsor Forest. Includes info on advancements in medicine and Pope's disease. Link to Voltaire letter re Pope's Homer.
18thC  British_history  English_lit  Enlightenment  medicine  anti-Catholic  War_of_Spanish_Succession  Pope  Voltaire  digital_humanities  EF-add 
august 2013 by dunnettreader
Medieval France, Flanders, Burgundy - Crossbow competitions and civic communities | OUPblog August 2013
Great map of the counties and towns disputed between France and Burgundy - also the southern Netherlands, Picardy that became the cockpit in eg War of Spanish Succession
France  Netherlands  Medieval  14thC  15thC  map  War_of_Spanish_Succession 
august 2013 by dunnettreader
Kevin Sharpe: Rebranding Rule: 1660-1720 | Kindle Store
In the climactic part of his three-book series exploring the importance of public image in the Tudor and Stuart monarchies, Kevin Sharpe employs a remarkable interdisciplinary approach that draws on literary studies and art history as well as political, cultural, and social history to show how this preoccupation with public representation met the challenge of dealing with the aftermath of Cromwell's interregnum and Charles II's restoration, and how the irrevocably changed cultural landscape was navigated by the sometimes astute yet equally fallible Stuart monarchs and their successors.
books  British_history  British_politics  cultural_history  religious_history  monarchy  Charles_II  James_II  William_III  Queen_Anne  George_I  Restoration  Exclusion_Crisis  Glorious_Revolution  War_of_Spanish_Succession  Hanoverian_Succession  aristocracy  Parliament  political_economy  political_culture  art_history  English_lit  Whigs  Whig_Junto  Tories  colonialism  IR  EF-add  English_constitution 
july 2013 by dunnettreader
John C. Rule: Review Article: Gathering Intelligence in the Age of Louis XIV (1992) | Taylor & Francis Online
Review and essay re Lucien Bély. Espions et Ambassadeurs au Temps de Louis XIV. Paris: Fayard, 1990. Pp. 905.

Price $37

The International History Review
Volume 14, Issue 4, 1992
pages 732-752
DOI:10.1080/07075332.1992.9640632
article  paywall  find  books  reviews  bookshelf  18thC  France  British_history  Dutch  Holy_Roman_Empire  Spain  Germany  Austria  War_of_Spanish_Succession  Peace_of_Utrecht  espionage  diplomacy  IR  diplomatic_history  Louis_XIV  Bolingbroke 
july 2013 by dunnettreader

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