dunnettreader + walpole_horace   2

Jonathan G. W. Conlin - High Art and Low Politics: A New Perspective on John Wilkes | JSTOR: Huntington Library Quarterly, Vol. 64, No. 3/4 (2001), pp. 356-381
Fascinating for mid to late 18thC issues for both Continental Enlightenment and British thinkers and artists re scope of public sphere and state responsibility for promotion of the arts, its benefits for polite culture including middle classes with polite aspirations -- Wilkes connections with philosophes including Holbach and Diderot -- and how Wilkes wove his political reforms and promotion of arts and industry together. Useful discussion of range of historian takes on Wilkes, who he mobilized, relation with older republican opposition and later dissenters and radical opposition. Hume opposition to Wilkes' anti monarchy and anti aristocracy republicanism leads to different assessment of progress in civilizing arts and role of doux commerce. Each historian seems to put Wilkes in their own narrative resulting in dramatically different assessments of both Wilkes himself and his impact. -- useful references -- Downloaded pdf to Note
article  jstor  political_history  cultural_history  art_history  18thC  French_Enlightenment  British_history  British_politics  George_III  Wilkes  Hume  Diderot  d'Holbach  republics-Ancient_v_Modern  republicanism  opposition  public_sphere  public_opinion  governing_class  political_nation  political_culture  accountability  Parliament  franchise  Septennial_Act  nationalism  national_ID  xenophobia  anti-monarchy  anti-aristocracy  middle_class  merchants  state-roles  Grand_Tour  patriotism  Prussia  Frederick_the_Great  Catherine_the_Great  Walpole  Walpole_Horace  museums  academies  bibliography  enlightened_absolutism  downloaded  EF-add 
january 2014 by dunnettreader
Luisa Calè - Gray’s Ode and Walpole’s China Tub:The Order of the Book and The Paper Lives of an Object (2011) - Eighteenth-Century Studies
Project MUSE -- downloaded pdf to Note -- This essay tracks the inscriptions and disseminations of Thomas Gray’s “Ode on the Death of A Favourite Cat drowned in a Tub of Gold Fishes” and of Horace Walpole’s china tub. An incongruous element of chinoiserie in the Gothic fabric of Strawberry Hill, the tub marks the intersections between the orders of the collection, the house, and the book. Building on Michel Foucault’s analysis of the orders of things and the unities of discourse, this essay follows the paper-trail of the object and the poem through their inscription and extra-illustration in books that prove unstable repositories in a dynamic order of collecting. -- some interesting factoids re Sir Robert Walpole, his houses, his 1st wife
article  cultural_history  literary_history  18thC  Britain  Walpole_Horace  collections  interiors  design  poetry  sociability  Walpole 
september 2013 by dunnettreader

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