dunnettreader + wwii   24

Dario Battistella - Raymond Aron, réaliste néoclassique | Érudit | Études internationales v43 n3 2012, p. 371-388 |
Institut d’études politiques de Bordeaux -- Successivement apprécié, critiqué, et oublié, Raymond Aron a toujours été difficile à classer au sein de la discipline des Relations internationales. Parmi les recensions récentes dont son oeuvre a fait l’objet, celle de Michael Doyle fait une proposition intéressante, en y voyant un réaliste constitutionnaliste. Notre contribution se propose d’approfondir cette piste en montrant qu’Aron est en fait un réaliste néoclassique avant la lettre. Après avoir rappelé les points communs qu’Aron partage avec le réalisme classique de Morgenthau et le néoréalisme de Waltz, cet article démontre les affinités à la fois ontologiques et épistémologiques entre l’internationaliste français et les réalistes néoclassiques nord-américains qui ignorent qu’ils ignorent Aron. -- dowloaded via Air
article  downloaded  intellectual_history  20thC  entre_deux_guerres  WWII  post-WWII  Cold_War  Aron_Raymond  IR  IR_theory  IR-domestic_politics  French_intellectuals  French_politics  French_history  Vichy  4th_Republic  5th_Republic  political_press  political_discourse 
october 2016 by dunnettreader
Ur-Fascism by Umberto Eco | The New York Review of Books
In 1942, at the age of ten, I received the First Provincial Award of Ludi Juveniles (a voluntary, compulsory competition for young Italian Fascists—that is, for… -- reprinted on his death when the nature of fascism and the process of fascist politics seems to have become relevant again
Instapaper  entre_deux_guerres  fascism  Italy  nationalism  national_tale  political_culture  WWII  resistance  post-WWII  from instapaper
march 2016 by dunnettreader
« Lectures. », Mil neuf cent. Revue d'histoire intellectuelle 1/2013 (n° 31) , p. 159-184 - Cairn.info
Titres recensés -- Jacques Julliard, Les gauches françaises, 1762-2012. Histoire, politique et imaginaire, Paris, Flammarion, 2012, 942 p.
Nathalie Richard, Hippolyte Taine. Histoire, psychologie, littérature, Classiques Garnier, 2013, 316 p.
Jean Jaurès, Œuvres, XIII, L’armée nouvelle, Jean-Jacques Becker (ed.), Paris, Fayard, 2013, 574 p.
Olivier Cosson, Préparer la Grande Guerre. L’armée française et la guerre russo-japonaise (1899-1914), Paris, Éd. Les Indes savantes, 2013, 380 p.
Géraldi Leroy, Charles Péguy. L’inclassable, Paris, Armand Colin, 2014, 366 p.
Gabriel Tarde, Sur le sommeil. Ou plutôt sur les rêves, Jacqueline Carroy, Louise Salmon (eds.), Lausanne, Éd. BHMS, 2009, 223 p.
Émile Durkheim, Hobbes a? l’agre?gation. Un cours d’E?mile Durkheim suivi par Marcel Mauss, Paris, Éd. de l’EHESS, coll. « Audiographie », 2011, 64 p.
Michel Murat, Frédéric Worms (eds.), Alain, littérature et philosophie mêlées, Paris, Éd. Rue d’Ulm-Presses de l’École normale supérieure, 2012, 221 p.
Frédéric Audren, Christian Chêne, Nicolas Mathey, Arnaud Vergne (eds.), Raymond Saleilles et au-delà, Paris, Dalloz, coll. « Thèmes
human_rights  representative_institutions  ultramontane  WWII  politics-and-religion  politics-and-literature  WWI  entre_deux_guerres  elites  philosophy-French  radicals  laïcité  socialism  France  anarchism  class_conflict  pre-WWI  republicanism  education  reviews  post-WWII  anti-clericalism  French_Revolution-impact  political_history  political_culture  political_press  materialism  political_philosophy  liberalism  democracy  French_intellectuals  French_Revolution  French_lit  social_theory  books  intellectual_history  cultural_history  political_participation  historiography-19thC  historiography  social_history  education-higher  20thC  Fin-de-Siècle  downloaded  social_sciences  Catholics-France  Bonapartism  justice  rule_if_law  19thC 
february 2016 by dunnettreader
Farr, Hacker & Kazee - Harold Lasswell, The Policy Scientist of Democracy (2006) | The American Political Science Review
The Policy Scientist of Democracy: The Discipline of Harold D. Lasswell -- James Farr, Jacob S. Hacker and Nicole Kazee -- Vol. 100, No. 4, Thematic Issue on the Evolution of Political Science, in Recognition of the Centennial of the Review (Nov., 2006), pp. 579-587 -- The "policy scientist of democracy" was a model for engaged scholarship invented and embodied by Harold D. Lasswell. This disciplinary persona emerged in Lasswell's writings and wartime consultancies during the 1940s, well before he announced in his APSA presidential address, printed in the Review precisely 50 years ago, that political science was "the policy science par excellence." The policy scientist of democracy knew all about the process of elite decision making, and he put his knowledge into practice by advising those in power, sharing in important decisions, and furthering the cause of dignity. Although Lasswell formulated this ambitious vision near the zenith of his influence, the discipline accorded the ideal—and Lasswell—a mixed reception. Some heralded the policy scientist of democracy; others observed a contradictory figure, at once positivist and value-laden, elitist and democratic, heroic and implausible. The conflicted response exemplifies Lasswell's legacy. The policy scientist of democracy was—and is—too demanding and too contradictory a hero. But the vital questions Lasswell grappled with still must be asked a century into the discipline's development: what is the role of the political scientist in a democratic society? - downloaded via iPhone to DBOX
social_sciences-post-WWII  technocracy  entre_deux_guerres  social_psychology  article  public_intellectuals  jstor  WWII  behavioralism  public_policy  20thC  public_interest  downloaded  political_science  US_history  elites  intellectual_history  bibliography  democracy  civic_virtue 
january 2016 by dunnettreader
Martin E. Marty - The birth of a book « The Immanent Frame - March 2011
Excerpted from Dietrich Bonhoeffer’s Letters and Papers from Prison: A Biography, published by Princeton University Press © 2011. Posted by permission. Come to the launch of Princeton University Press’s “Lives of Great Religious Books” series on Thursday, March 24, in New York City, hosted by the Institute for Public Knowledge at NYU and the SSRC Program on Religion and the Public Sphere.—ed. -- downloaded pdf to Note in folder " Biographies of Religious Texts - PUP series "
books  kindle-available  intellectual_history  religious_history  20thC  21stC  religious_lit  readership  reader_response  Germany  German_theologians  spirituality  Nazis  WWII  religious_experience  religious_culture  contextualism  downloaded 
august 2015 by dunnettreader
Daniel McCarthy - Why Liberalism Means Empire | Lead essay / TAC Summer 2014
Outstanding case made for "consrrvative" realist IR position of off-shore balancing - not really "conservative" but he needs to give it that spin for his aufience buy-in -- takes on not just the militarists, neicons and librral intrrventionists but thr "non-liberal" sbtu-interventionists like Kennan and Buchanan - he leaves out the corrosive, anti-liberal democracy effects of globalized, financial capitalism that undermines the narrative of gradualist liberal democratization and achievements in OECD rconomies - as Zingales putscit "save capitalism from the capitalists" beeds to be included with the hegemon's responsibilities along with off-shore balancing - dimensions of power beyond military, which Dan does stress in his sketch of ehy Britain could meet the military challenges until WWI
Pocket  18thc  19thc  20thc  anti-imperialism  balance-of-power  british_empire  british_history  british_politics  civil_rights  cold_war  competition-interstate  cultural_transmission  democracy  empires  entre_deux_guerres  europe  foreign_policy  french_revolution  geopolitics  germany  global  governance  globalization  great_powers  hegemony  hong_kong  human_rights  ideology  imperialism  international_system  ir  ir-history  iraq  japan  liberalism  military-industrial  military_history  napoleon  napoleonic  wars  national_security  national_tale  nationslism  naval_history  neocons  neoliberalism  peace  pinboard  political_culture  politics-and-history  post-wwii  power  rule_of_law  social_science  trade  us  history  us_foreign_policy  us_military  us_politics  uses_of_history  warfare  world  wwi  wwii 
july 2015 by dunnettreader
Julián Casanova - The death throes of Franco: Spain's new reckoning with the dictatorship and Civil War | Eurozine - July 2011
Original in Spanish - Translation by Martin Douch ' First published in Eurozine -- Spain's Amnesty Act of 1977 ensured that, during the first two decades of democracy, the memory of the Civil War and the human rights violations of the Franco dictatorship remained taboo. Initiatives by the Zapatero government to redress historic injustices signal a new era, yet there is a way to go before Spanish society is unanimous about its past, writes historian Julián Casanova. -- downloaded pdf to Note
political_culture  political_history  religious_history  20thC  entre_deux_guerres  WWII  post-WWII  Spain  Spanish_Civil_War  civil_wars  religious_wars  religious_culture  anti-Communist  authoritarian  democracy  human_rights  civil_liberties  civil_society  civility-political  tolerance  collective_memory  memory-cultural  historiography  historiography-religious  historians-and-politics  historians-and-state  lieux_de_mémoires  downloaded 
july 2015 by dunnettreader
Forum - Samuel Moyn's "Christian human rights" - overview page | The Immanent Frame
In 2010, Samuel Moyn published The Last Utopia: Human Rights in History, which offered an alternative historical explanation for the origins of human rights. He rejected narratives that viewed human rights as a long-term historical product of the Judeo-Christian tradition, The French Revolution, or Enlightenment rationalism, arguing that human rights as it is now understood began to emerge only during the 1970s. Prior to this, according to Moyn, rights were connected to the nation-state and had nothing to do with an international standard of morality or justice. In addressing critiques of The Last Utopia, Moyn has given considerable attention to the relationship between human rights and religion, conceding that there is, undoubtedly, a relationship between Christianity—Catholicism in particular—and human rights, but arguing that the “death of Christian Europe” by the 1960s “forced a complete reinvention of the meaning of human rights embedded in European identity both formally and really since the war”. Contributors offer their thoughts on Moyn’s article “Personalism, Community, and the Origins of Human Rights,” which became a central focus (see excerpt) in his forthcoming book, Christian Human Rights (University of Pennsylvania Press, 2015). Contributors also respond to “Christian Human Rights,” the introductory essay written for this series. -- downloaded pdfs but their footnotes and links don't work, so collected them in Evernote them
books  intellectual_history  narrative-contested  bad_history  intellectual_history-distorted  religious_history  church_history  moral_philosophy  theology  human_rights  natural_rights  medieval_philosophy  Europe-Medieval  Enlightenment  Enlightenment_Project  Enlightenment-ongoing  French_Revolution  IR  Europe  20thC  WWI  WWII  entre_deux_guerres  post-Cold_War  post-colonial  nation-state  genocide  Holocaust  UN  international_law  natural_law  law_of_nations  law_of_the_sea  justice  jurisprudence  philosophy_of_law  political_philosophy  political_culture  democracy  equality  liberty  Christendom  Judeo-Christian  links  Evernote 
july 2015 by dunnettreader
PRIME MINISTER CHURCHILL'S EULOGY IN COMMONS FOR THE LATE PRESIDENT ROOSEVELT April 17, 1945
Extraordinary piece of rhetoric, but typical Churchill -- knew how to give the intimate personalized touch -- so the audience somehow also "knows" FDR and can share the mourning -- and the grandeur and glory of the ages rolled into one. Interesting that much of his description of FDR's actions are within the frame he establishes of FDR's physical disabilities, and a favorite Churchillian theme, the extraordinary will power it took not just to rise to the presidency, but to conduct the extreme complexity of policy that required intense attention every single day, made further complicated by domestic and international politics, of which he was an intuitive master of the possible.
20thC  WWII  British_history  British_Empire  US_history  US_politics  US_foreign_policy  US_government  US_military  diplomatic_history  Churchill  FDR  rhetoric-political  rhetoric 
april 2015 by dunnettreader
Richard Harding, review essay - History of the Royal Navy [1st 3 volumes in series] | Reviews in History - Jan 2015
(1) Duncan Redford, Philip D. Grove, The Royal Navy : A History since 1900 -- (2) Duncan Redford, A History of the Royal Navy : World War II -- (3) Martin Robson, A History of the Royal Navy : The Napoleonic War -- Reviewer:
Dr Richard Harding, University of Westminister -- ... the first titles in an ambitious new series from I.B.Tauris... in association with the National Museum of the Royal Navy (..) is to throw ‘new light on almost every aspect of Britain’s Royal Navy’ from 1660 to the present day. (1) A History since 1900 ... it is clear that the authors have got a job to do. They have to bring readers, who almost certainly have a firm idea of what they think is significant in the Royal Navy’s past, through more than 100 years of history, present those readers with relatively new research, ... and challenge some of their cherished assumptions. (..) The main point emphasised by the authors is that sea power is not generally understood by the public (and even by planners, for that matter). Its operations are usually out of the public gaze. (..) the authors’ set out to show how sea power worked across the century; how it has been a vital, flexible element in Britain’s defence as diplomatic and military challenges changed; and how it remains essential today. (3) Robson’s narrative is the story of how [British naval dominance which cost the French dearly] was achieved at a tactical and strategic level. The work is divided into two – before 1805 which is characterised as the struggle for sea control, and after the Trafalgar campaign, which Robson describes as the period of exploitation of sea domination. It is a distinction that works better than alternatives (Peace of Amiens in 1802 or the coronation of Napoleon in 1804). The emphasis is, unsurprisingly, on the first period, in which the battles and the expeditions are more dramatic and frequent. (..) [These volumes] are welcome as an important balance to military and diplomatic histories that have ignored the sea and naval power, or which have not kept up to date with the great flowering of naval history that has taken place in the last 40 years. (..) there remains the danger that unless this idea of sea power is embedded into the broader fabric of British social and diplomatic concerns, the message with the authors wish to convey (..) will be overshadowed by the Royal Navy as a tradition and an institution. -- downloaded as pdf to Note
books  reviews  military_history  maritime_history  diplomatic_history  18thC  19thC  20thC  British_history  British_Empire  British_foreign_policy  British_Navy  British_Empire-military  French_Revolutionary_Wars  Napoleonic_Wars  WWI  WWII  blue_water_strategy  downloaded 
january 2015 by dunnettreader
Brad DeLong - My "Sisyphus as Social Democrat: A review of 'John Kenneth Galbraith: His Life, His Politics, His Economics', by Richard Parker," ( Grasping Reality...)
One of his series, "Hoisted from the Archives": J. Bradford DeLong (2005), "Sisyphus as Social Democrat: A review of John Kenneth Galbraith: His Life, His Politics, His Economics, by Richard Parker," Foreign Affairs May/June 2005. - diwnloaded pdf to iPhone
article  book  review  biography  intellectual_history  20thC  political_economy  economic_sociology  economic_theory  US_economy  US_politics  post-WWII  entre_deux_guerres  Great_Depression  WWII  US_government  US_foreign_policy  Keynesian  institutional_economics  liberalism  social_democracy  Galbraith_JK  downloaded  EF-add 
january 2015 by dunnettreader
Oren Harman review - Sean B. Carroll, Brave Genius : A Scientist, a Philosopher, and Their Daring Adventures from the French Resistance to the Nobel Prize - "Chance and Necessity" Revisited | The Los Angeles Review of Books - July 2014
IN THE FALL of 1970, Éditions du Seuil published Le hasard et la nécessité, a monograph by the French molecular biologist Jacques Monod,. Chance and Necessity was a slim book laden with technical details of oligomeric proteins, teleonomic structures, and microscopic perturbations. Despite the technical jargon, the book sold over 200,000 copies in its first year and became a best seller in Germany and Japan. It was bested in France only by Erich Segal’s Love Story. What explains its popularity? Monod was an eminent scientist, to be sure: he’d received the 1965 Nobel Prize with André Lwoff and François Jacob for “discoveries concerning genetic control of enzyme and virus synthesis.” But the resonance of Chance and Necessity is best explained by two epigraphs that adorned its opening page, stoic reminders that this was an affair well beyond the confines of mere science. The first is a dramatic statement by the Greek philosopher Democritus: “Everything existing in the Universe is the fruit of chance and necessity.” The second epigram, more than anything, best explains the book’s salience: a lengthy quotation from Albert Camus’s essay The Myth of Sisyphus. “The struggle itself towards the heights is enough to fill a man’s heart”; it ends, “One must imagine Sisyphus happy.” Sean B. Carroll, the American developmental molecular geneticist, reveals the deep friendship between Camus and Monod in Brave Genius. Their relationship, Carroll finds, not only illuminates the work of both men, but also unlocks the political and philosophical contingencies of a key moment in 20th-century thought.
books  reviews  intellectual_history  political_history  history_of_science  existentialism  20thC  France  WWII  French_Resistance  biography  Camus  evolutionary_biology  genetics  biology  cosmology  nihilism  chance  determinism  necessity 
august 2014 by dunnettreader
The story of D-Day, in five maps - Vox
Including animations of advances and other fronts
military_history  WWII  maps 
june 2014 by dunnettreader
Clarles Andrews Professor Piketty Fights Orthodoxy and Attacks Inequality | Marxist-Leninist thought today - May 2014
First, the world wars were themselves not accidental. WWI was an inevitable outcome of early monopoly capitalism, and WWII was a continuation of the first as well as capital's attempt to obliterate the first socialist society. -- Second, Piketty's almost exclusive metrics are inequality of income and wealth. They are important, to be sure. Let us remember, though, that despite less inequality, most of the period 1913-1950 was hellish for the masses in the capitalist world. They died by millions in WWI, made little economic progress in the 1920s, suffered the hunger of the Great Depression in the 1930s, and died by millions more in WWII. On the other hand, while inequality was high in the late 19thC and up to 1913, the working class did make advances, by militant class struggle largely under the socialist banner, in obtaining fruits of industrial progress.And there is justified nostalgia today for the era after Piketty's exceptional period. In the 1950s and 1960s life got better for a majority of the working people in the US, Britain, and western Europe. The peak of working-class progress was 1973 – after Piketty's focus and years before neoliberalism, financialization, and globalization. Since 1973, real median earnings in the US have stagnated and fallen. That turning point is the fact that demands explanation and action. Piketty recalls the two world wars often. He buries the fact that WWI triggered the first successful socialist revolution in Russia, and WWII provided openings for anti-imperialist and sometimes socialist revolutions, ...
books  reviews  Piketty  political_economy  economic_history  19thC  20thC  21stC  capitalism  WWI  WWII  Great_Depression  labor  class_conflict  unions  revolutions  post-WWII  post-Cold_War  neoliberalism  inequality  wages  Marxist  social_order  EF-add 
june 2014 by dunnettreader
James Schmidt - Charles W. Morris on Empiricism and the Counter-Enlightenment (Fabricating the “Counter-Enlightenment” Part IV) | Persistent Enlightenment
there remains an ambiguity in the way in which the term is used: it can function either as a characterization of views that were held in an earlier period (e.g., during the “Romantic Age”) or as a way of describing a continuing opposition to the continuing project of the Enlightenment......This last point can be seen in the two English examples from 1942. In his discussion of opposition to Enlightenment idea in eighteenth-century Latin America, Lanning was engaged in the historian’s task of exploring the ways in which ideas were appropriated during another period. But the “counter-Enlightenment” that figures in Charles W. Morris’s contribution to the second meeting of the Conference on Science, Religion, and Philosophy is not something that resides in the past; it is a present threat..... The tension inherent in the attempt to respect the autonomy of disciplines while, at the same time, appealing to fundamental religious values was nowhere more apparent than in the caustic address delivered by Mortimer J. Adler (one of the Conference’s founding members) at the inaugural meeting. As he saw it, the greatest danger to “the democratic way of life” came not from foreign enemies but from forces closer to home..... Morris’ account of democracy conforms rather closely to what we have grown accustomed to describing as “political liberalism.” But, as we shall see in our next installment, by the end of the 1940s the question of just what “liberalism” meant had become quite contested. And one of the results of that contestation would be a discussion of the nature of something called “the Counter-Enlightenment.”
intellectual_history  20thC  WWII  Cold_War  social_sciences-post-WWII  US_politics  political_culture  science-and-religion  Logical_Positivism  empiricism  conservatism  liberalism  nihilism  Counter-Enlightenment  EF-add 
january 2014 by dunnettreader
James Livingston - Ironic Enlightenment? Voltaire, Fussell, and the Neverending End of the Age of Irony | Persistent Enlightenment
Responding to an item in never ending "End of Irony" series in middle and high brow American press -- " But the claim Wampole attributes to Harrison, which views irony as a rhetorical device destined to be burned away with the ascent of “the real” (or, as the Lacanians like to say, “the Real”), is worth questioning."
cultural_history  irony  English_lit  18thC  Enlightenment  Voltaire  20thC  WWI  WWII  poetry  lit_crit  intellectual_history  EF-add 
october 2013 by dunnettreader
Robert Farlety » Sunday Book Review: Beneficial Bombing » Lawyers, Guns & Money Sept 2013
Review essay - Mark Clodfelter’s Beneficial Bombing: The Progressive Foundations of American Air Power, 1917-1945

Obviously, I think that Clodfelter could have used some more James Scott. I think the phenomenon he describes is better understood as a facet of high modernism than as a peculiarly American phenomenon. I don’t think it’s difficult to read Progressive politics as the American manifestation of High modernism. Quick review of Scott’s essentials of high modernism:

A strong confidence in the potential for scientific and technological progress, including a reliance on the expertise of scientists, engineers, bureaucrats and other intellectuals.
Attempts to master nature to meet human needs.
An emphasis on rendering complex environments or concepts legible, most often through spatial ordering (for example, city planning on a grid).
Disregard for historical, geographical and social context in development.
Echoing Clodfelter, I argue in the book that theories of strategic bombing represent the essence of high modernist thinking. They posit an essentially intelligible target population or organization and propose a relatively programmatic series of steps for influencing and reorganizing that population.
books  reviews  military_history  intellectual_history  20thC  WWII  US_history  US_military  High_Modernism  governmentality 
september 2013 by dunnettreader
Michal Kalecki, "Political Aspects of Full Employment" (1943) | Monthly Review
Michal Kalecki (22 June 1899 - 18 April 1970) was a Polish Marxist economist.  This essay was first published in Political Quarterly in 1943; it is reproduced here for non-profit educational purposes.  A shorter version of this essay was published inThe Last Phase in the Transformation of Capitalism (Monthly Review Press, 1972). This article corresponds roughly to a lecture given to the Marshall Society in Cambridge in the spring of 1942.
economic_history  unemployment  sovereign_debt  fiscal_policy  fascism  WWII  political_economy  EF-add 
august 2013 by dunnettreader
James M. Boughton: Dirtying (Harry Dexter) White | The Nation
Review of The Battle of Bretton Woods: John Maynard Keynes, Harry Dexter White, and the Making of a New World Order.By Benn Steil. The right wing will never stop distorting the evidence to "prove" the New Dealers were all commies. Even when the Soviet archives provide counter evidence. Why has the Council on Foreign Relations become home for skeevy revisionists of the 1930s? James M. Boughton is a historian of the International Monetary Fund.
IMF  Keynes  Cold_War  historiography  20thC  WWII  US_politics  culture_wars  economic_history  books  reviews  bad_journalism  from instapaper
june 2013 by dunnettreader

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