dunnettreader + wto   15

Peter Draper, Andreas Freytag, and Sarah Al Doyaili - Why Should Sub-Saharan Africa Care about the Doha Development Round? — Economics E-Journal - May 08, 2013
(Published in Special Issue Multilateral Trade Liberalization and Regional Integration under Stress – Workshop in Honor of Prof. Dr. Rolf J. Langhammer) -- In recent years sub-Saharan Africa, notwithstanding the global financial crisis, has increased its share in global trade and investment flows. This has led to an appreciable improvement in development levels, albeit off a small base. However, these patterns are still dominated by commodity flows and investment, and remain marginal on the global stage. Increased trade and investment flows, particularly related to network services, would be of great benefit to the sub-continent. Yet many domestic regulatory constraints remain. Furthermore, substantial international market distortions, particularly in agricultural trade, inhibit economic diversification into more value-adding activities. The Doha development round could, if concluded, go a long way towards addressing these barriers. Ultimately it could prove more consequential to the sub-continent’s development trajectory than regional economic integration. The latter, whilst important, is shallow and too reliant on institution-intensive forms mimicking the European Union. Overall therefore this paper motivates for an African trade agenda focused on concluding the Doha round.-- didn't download
paper  e-journal  economic_growth  regional_blocs  Sub-Saharan_Africa  trade-policy  trade-agreements  WTO  FDI  agriculture  development  economic_policy 
july 2015 by dunnettreader
Martens, Rusconi and Leuze, eds. - New Arenas of Education Governance: The Impact of International Organizations and Markets on Educational Policy Making | Palgrave Macmillan - November 2007
Edited by Kerstin Martens, Alessandra Rusconi, Kathrin Leuze -- How and to what extent is education becoming a field of international and market governance? Traditionally, education policy making has been viewed as the responsibility of the nation state, falling within the realm of domestic politics. But recent years have witnessed the transformation of the state. Globalization has introduced new actors and led to the internationalization and marketization of education. This volume provides the most comprehensive and up-to-date account of these new arenas of education governance, examining the impact of international organizations and the role of the market in policymaking. It demonstrates how education policy is formulated at international levels and what the consequences for national policy making will be. -- excerpt = TOC, Introduction and index -- downloaded pdf to Note
books  public_policy  education  education-higher  education-training  education-privatization  education-finance  international_organizations  globalization  markets_in_everything  market_fundamentalism  privatization  public_goods  governance  global_governance  business-and-politics  business_influence  education-civic  values  accountability  Labor_markets  human_capital  competition  competition-interstate  development  distance_learning  IT  communication  nation-state  national_ID  knowledge_economy  OECD  World_Bank  WTO  trade-policy  trade-agreements  student_debt  democracy_deficit  political_participation  EU  EU_governance  standards-setting  testing  downloaded 
may 2015 by dunnettreader
Zhijie Chen, Jing Zhuo - The Trade and Culture Debate in the Context of Creative Economy: An Adaptive Regulatory Approach from Fragmentation to Coherence :: SSRN June 16, 2014
Zhijie Chen - The University of Hong Kong (PhD Student) -- Jing Zhuo - University of Macau. -- Fourth Biennial Global Conference of the Society of International Economic Law (SIEL) Working Paper No 2014/07. **--** The trade and culture debate has been a long tension without a definite result. It has been widely argued that neither the existing WTO regulatory framework nor the UNESCO Convention on the Protection and Promotion of the Diversity of Cultural Expression can address the debate. More recently, some emerging domains in the digital age, including digital technology and intellectual property rights, have posed crucial challenges These trends invite the careful reconsideration of the role of law, the dominant legal responses and regulatory approaches; however they have not been paid due attention. This paper investigates a possibly more adaptive regulatory approach for the trade and culture debate under the changed regulatory environment. Compared with cultural industries, it appears that creative industries tend to more properly reflect the status quo of the current economy, and the concept of creative economy could be employed as the concept to design a new regulatory approach for the debate in the digital age. For the WTO regulatory framework, a two-steps approach could be considered. The first step is to formulae the ‘creative economy’ as a legal concept, followed by the second step of introducing the concept into the WTO regulatory framework. It is suggested that such approach could be a more adaptive and coherent regulatory approach for the trade and culture debate in the digital age. -- Number of Pages: 41 - downloaded pdf to Note
paper  SSRN  international_law  international_economics  law-and-economics  international_political_economy  global_governance  UN  UNESCO  culture  diversity  trade-policy  WTO  creative_economy  regulation  regulation-harmonization  digital_humanities  technology  Innovation  convergence-business  globalization  national_interest  public_goods  free_trade  protectionism  IP  property_rights  downloaded  EF-add  change-social 
september 2014 by dunnettreader
Lilian Richieri Hanania - The UNESCO Convention on the Diversity of Cultural Expressions as a Coordination Framework to Promote Regulatory Coherence in the Creative Economy :: SSRN June 7, 2014
"The UNESCO Convention on the Diversity of Cultural Expressions as a Coordination Framework to Promote Regulatory Coherence in the Creative Economy" -- Université Paris I Panthéon-Sorbonne -- Fourth Biennial Global Conference of the Society of International Economic Law (SIEL) Working Paper No. 2014/03. **--** [The paper looks at] business convergence in creative industries from the perspective of cultural diversity. It is based on the premise that the recognition of the creative and innovative component of the so-called “creative industries” or the “creative economy” confirms the need for non-economic factors and particularly cultural concerns to be taken into account in regulatory efforts addressing those industries. It examines the way new technologies and business convergence may affect the “trade and culture debate” vis-à-vis the WTO, and how the UNESCO Convention on the Protection and Promotion of the Diversity of Cultural Expressions (CDCE) may respond in a relevant manner to those challenges. Despite its weakly binding language, the CDCE contains principles, objectives and rules that set a comprehensive framework for policy “related to the protection and promotion of the diversity of cultural expressions” at the national, regional and international levels. -- By prioritizing policy and regulatory coordination, ... the main elements enshrined in the CDCE should be employed to contribute to greater coherence ...vis-à-vis the WTO and other IOs. - Number of Pages: 23 - downloaded pdf to Note
paper  SSRN  international_law  international_economics  law-and-economics  international_political_economy  global_governance  UN  UNESCO  diversity  culture  cultural_change  culture_industries  creative_economy  trade-policy  trade-agreements  international_organizations  WTO  development  sustainability  regulation-harmonization  administrative_agencies  administrative_law  convergence-business  globalization  downloaded  EF-add 
september 2014 by dunnettreader
Rostam J. Neuwirth - The Creative Industries as a New Paradigm for Business and Law: Of 'Smart Phones' and 'Smarter Regulation' :: SSRN June 13, 2014
University of Macau - Faculty of Law, E32 -- Fourth Biennial Global conference of the Society of International Economic Law (SIEL) Working Paper No. 2014/05. **--** From a macroeconomic perspective, the historical evolution of trade and commerce has been closely entangled in a two-way or paradoxical relationship with the evolution of laws, where one is inextricably linked to the other and both mutually influence each other. At the microeconomic level, the same can be said about the relationship between businesses or industries and their underlying technologies. Recent changes, and notably the accelerated pace by which we recognize change, has led to a widespread trend of “convergence”. Convergence has been recognised in different contexts, namely in languages, technologies, and industries as well as regulatory matters. The objective of this article is thus to first trace and describe convergence from a linguistic, technological and industrial perspective. Subsequently, in order to ponder the future regulatory challenges in the regulation of global trade under the aegis of the World Trade Organization (WTO), it will focus on the question of whether technological and industrial convergence should be met by a similar trend towards regulatory convergence through regulatory harmonisation. Put differently, it will critically evaluate the present situation of regulatory divergence in the form of regulatory diversity and regulatory competition with a view of contributing to the debate of improving global trade regulation in the 21st century. - Number of Pages: 21 -- didn't download
paper  SSRN  international_law  international_economics  law-and-economics  international_political_economy  global_governance  WTO  regulation  administrative_agencies  administrative_law  technocracy  accountability  public_policy  legal_culture  regulation-harmonization  technology  technology_transfer  economic_culture  creative_economy  political_participation  globalization  global_system  manufacturing  production  change-social  EF-add 
september 2014 by dunnettreader
R. Michael Gadbaw - Existential Risks to the Global Trading System and the Problem of Currency Intervention as a Case Study :: SSRN June 16, 2014
Institute of International Economic Law, Georgetown University Law Center -- Fourth Biennial Global Conference of the Society of International Economic Law (SIEL) - Society of International Economic Law (SIEL) Working Paper No. 2014/10. *&--** As countries seek to promote growth in the aftermath of the financial crisis, currency intervention has become more prevalent and distortions in exchange rates with their resulting imbalances in trade flows have prompted call for new initiatives to address them, including in the negotiations of the Trans-Pacific Partnership (TPP) and of the Transatlantic Trade and Investment Partnership (TTIP). Both economic and legal experts have brought new insight into the impact of currency intervention on trade and a fresh legal perspective on the application of the rules in the WTO against measures that frustrate the intent of the GATT/WTO agreements. This paper reviews the underlying legal and policy issues and provides possible language for inclusion in the TPP or TTIP, and eventually in the WTO, that would build on the existing disciplines in the WTO and IMF agreements by authorizing remedial action in the form of safeguard and countervailing duties in response to a finding of actionable currency intervention. -- Number of Pages: 10 -- downloaded pdf to Note
paper  SSRN  international_law  international_economics  law-and-economics  international_political_economy  global_governance  international_monetary_system  international_organizations  IMF  FX  FX-misalignment  WTO  trade-agreements  global_imbalance  trade-policy  Trans-Pacific-Partnership  Transatlantic_Trade_and_InvestmentPartnership  competition  capital_flows  investment-bilateral_treaties  central_banks  downloaded  EF-add 
september 2014 by dunnettreader
Henning Grosse Ruse-Khan - Litigating Intellectual Property Rights in Investor-State Arbitration: From Plain Packaging to Patent Revocation :: SSRN August 14, 2014
University of Cambridge - Faculty of Law; Max Planck Institute for Innovation and Competition -- Fourth Biennial Global Conference of the Society of International Economic Law (SIEL) Working Paper No. 2014-21 - Max Planck Institute for Innovation & Competition Research Paper No. 14-13. **--** Enforcing intellectual property rights abroad is difficult. International treaties have generally not created directly enforceable IP rights. Usually, the protection they confer cannot be directly invoked in national courts. Because of the territorial nature of IP protection, right holders must proceed in local courts based on local laws. Litigating IP rights abroad hence faces several hurdles. International investment law offers some options to overcome these hurdles: -- This article focusses on the investment interface aspect of IP: Compared to domestic proceedings (where international standards usually cannot be invoked), WTO dispute settlement (where right holders have no legal standing), and the protection of property under human rights instruments (where protection is limited to specific human rights standards), investor-state arbitration may be the only forum where right holders can litigate international IP norms such as the TRIPS Agreement. This may have significant effects on the autonomy of host states in responding to public interest concerns (such as access to medicines or reducing smoking) once measures affect IP rights of foreign investors. Reviewing the options for litigating international IP norms in investment disputes, I conclude that most routes pursued by right holders are unlikely to be successful. Ironically, it is only clauses in investment treaties which aim to safeguard flexibilities in the international IP system that are likely to open a door for challenging compliance with international IP obligations in investor-state arbitration. - Number of Pages: 44 - downloaded pdf to Note
paper  SSRN  international_law  international_economics  law-and-economics  international_political_economy  global_governance  IP  patents  litigation  property_rights  property-confiscations  investors  FDI  dispute_resolution  arbitration  investor-State_disputes  trade-agreements  investment-bilateral_treaties  public_health  public_goods  nation-state  national_interest  sovereignty  WTO  downloaded  EF-add 
september 2014 by dunnettreader
Junianto James Losari, Michael Ewing-Chow - A Clash of Treaties: The Legality of Countermeasures in International Trade Law and International Investment Law :: SSRN June 20, 2014
Junianto James Losari - National University of Singapore (NUS) - Centre for International Law -- Michael Ewing-Chow - National University of Singapore (NUS) - Faculty of Law -- Fourth Biennial Global Conference of the Society of International Economic Law (SIEL) Working Paper No. 2014/18. *--* Countermeasures are well recognized under Customary International Law and have been incorporated into the WTO Dispute Settlement Understanding as a mechanism to facilitate compliance, subject to an authorization by the WTO Dispute Settlement Body. However, such a countermeasure — increased tariffs, quantitative restrictions and permission to breach intellectual property rights — may also affect private investors. When there is an investment treaty between two WTO Members and one of the Members is subject to WTO countermeasures by the other Member, a clash of treaties may arise. This happened in the Sugar Dispute between Mexico and the United States. Mexico claimed that their measures on High Fructose Corn Syrup were trade countermeasures under the North America Free Trade Agreement (NAFTA) in retaliation for a US breach of NAFTA. US investors affected by these measures brought claims against Mexico for breach of NAFTA Chapter 11 — the Investment Chapter. All three International Centre for the Settlement of Investment Disputes tribunals held for different reasons, that a countermeasure that affects the rights of investors would not be valid. In contrary, this paper argues that a legitimate trade countermeasure should also be legitimate in the investment regime. A failure to consider the need for such coherence between the regimes could lead to a clash between the regimes and limit states’ ability to enforce its legitimate trade interests. - Number of Pages: 37 -- didn't download
paper  SSRN  international_law  international_economics  law-and-economics  international_political_economy  free_trade  trade-agreements  FDI  investment-bilateral_treaties  arbitration  WTO  global_governance  conflict_of_laws  IP  property_rights  dispute_resolution  US_foreign_policy  Mexico  nation-state  national_interest  EF-add 
september 2014 by dunnettreader
Gregory Shaffer - How the WTO Shapes the Regulatory State :: SSRN August 14, 2014
University of California, Irvine - School of Law -- Fourth Biennial Global Conference of the Society of International Economic Law (SIEL) Working Paper No. 2014/29. *--* The World Trade Organization (WTO) arguably shapes regulatory governance in more countries to a greater extent than any other international organization. This chapter provides a new framework for assessing the broader regulatory implications of the WTO within nation states, as opposed to viewing the WTO as a form of global governance above the nation state. It first examines seven types of changes required for national law and legal practice, which affect how the state raises revenue, how the state spends it, and the principles the state applies to regulation. The chapter then assesses four broader dimensions of regulatory change catalyzed by WTO rules: (i) changes in the boundary between the market and the state (involving concomitantly market liberalization and growth of the administrative state); (ii) changes in the relative authority of institutions within the state (promoting bureaucratized and judicialized governance); (iii) changes in professional expertise engaging with state regulation (such as the role of lawyers); and (iv) changes in normative frames and accountability mechanisms for national regulation (which are trade liberal and transnational in scope). In practice, these four dimensions of change interact and build on each other. The chapter presents what we know to date and a framework for conducting further empirical study. - Number of Pages: 43 -- Keywords: WTO, World Trade Organization, Regulation, Regulatory governance, Market liberalization - downloaded pdf to Note
paper  SSRN  international_law  international_economics  law-and-economics  international_political_economy  global_governance  WTO  regulation  administrative_agencies  administrative_law  technocracy  accountability  public_policy  legal_culture  legal_theory  lawyers  political_participation  business-and-politics  norms-business  markets_in_everything  markets  neoliberalism  free_trade  democracy  downloaded  EF-add 
september 2014 by dunnettreader
Locknie Hsu - Convergence, Divergence, and Regulatory Tension - An Asian Perspective :: SSRN September 5, 2014
Singapore Management University - School of Law -- Singapore Management University School of Law Research Paper No. 30/201 -- Fourth Biennial Global Conference of the Society of International Economic Law (SIEL), pp 2-14, June 2014, Working Paper No. 2014/13. *--* Regulatory issues relating to public health, including regulation of access to medicines and tobacco control have increasingly been the source of tension in recent trade and investment negotiations, treaties and disputes. The ongoing Trans-Pacific Partnership negotiations, which include a number of developing Asian states, are an example that brings some of these issues to the fore and show a divergence of negotiating views. The intersection between public health regulation and trade and investment treaties has given some Asian states significant pause for thought; -- This intersection and resulting tension have led the WTO, WHO and WIPO to work together in an unprecedented manner to address some of the issues at the global level. The law evolving around these issues is demonstrating a deep divergence, in the manner that related disputes are being handled, and in terms of regulatory as well as negotiating stances. As an example, the debate on access to medicines demonstrates a divergence of approaches and proposed global solutions, as numerous proposals for reform of the existing construct (comprising patents and their “progeny” in the form of related commercial rights) are canvassed. Meanwhile, some countries such as India have begun to move ahead to embrace solutions such as compulsory licensing. -- It is suggested that a convergence of purpose(s) is needed, for a convergence of solutions to be found. Until then, the current divergences will continue to feed regulatory tension. -- Keywords: Convergence, divergence, trade, investment, public health, tobacco, pharmceuticals, FTAs, Asia, ASEAN -- downloaded pdf to Note
paper  SSRN  international_law  international_economics  law-and-economics  international_political_economy  global_governance  Trans-Pacific-Partnership  Asia_Pacific  Asia  India  IP  convergence-business  technology  technology_transfer  Innovation  health_care  commercial_law  neoliberalism  FDI  trade-agreements  property_rights  public_health  public_goods  US_foreign_policy  US_legal_system  business-and-politics  investment  WTO  international_organizations  downloaded  EF-add 
september 2014 by dunnettreader
SSRN Society of International Economic Law (SIEL), Fourth Biennial Global Conference
The Fourth Biennial Global Conference of the Society of International Economic Law (SIEL) was held in Bern and hosted by the World Trade Institute (WTI) of the University of Bern, from 10-12 July 2014. You can browse all SIEL Fourth Biennial Global Conference abstracts in the SSRN eLibrary. The Society of International Economic Law (SIEL) is a new organization aimed at academics and academically-minded practitioners and officials in the field of IEL, in all parts of the world. The broad goals and objectives of the organization include: building links and networks between and among IEL academics and academically-minded practitioners and officials; fostering the development of local IEL expertise and IEL organizations where needed; representing the discipline of international economic law as appropriate in global, regional and national fora; and encouraging research, practice, service and teaching in the field of IEL.
paper  SSRN  international_law  international_economics  law-and-economics  international_organizations  development  trade-policy  trade-agreements  WTO  global_governance  international_political_economy  reform-legal  institutional_economics  international_finance  capital_markets  capital_flows  climate  energy  ocean  treaties 
september 2014 by dunnettreader
John Williamson, Olivier Jeanne, Arvind Subramanian: International rules for capital controls | vox June 2012
Do we need international rules for capital controls? This column looks at the different regimes in countries such as Brazil and China and argues that we do. -- economists now understand better the theoretical case for such policies with a new literature on the welfare economics of prudential capital controls ...which transposes to international capital flows the closed-economy analysis of the macroprudential policies that aim to curb the boom-bust cycle in credit and asset prices. It finds that it is optimal to impose a countercyclical Pigouvian tax on debt inflows in a boom to reduce the risk and severity of a bust. Interestingly, the optimal tax would fall primarily on the flows (short-term or foreign currency debt) that are the least likely to be conducive to economic growth. -- We see compelling reasons to establish an international regime for capital flows. First, the lack of commonly agreed rules implies that capital controls are still marked by a certain stigma ... but an international regime for capital flows should go further, and take appropriate account of spill-over effects. This is particularly the case of policies that repress domestic demand and, through a combination of reserve accumulation and restrictions on inflows, maintain a current account surplus. Those policies have the same economic effects as trade protectionism and undermine the global public good of free trade. But the point may apply also to prudential capital controls. As recently shown by Forbes et al (2012) in the case of Brazil, capital account restrictions are liable to divert capital flows from one recipient to another, and thereby give third countries a strong interest in the controls imposed by others. The implications of this argument have not yet been absorbed by the profession, but it seems possible that they will turn out to be significant for the optimal international design of capital account policies.
international_political_economy  FX  capital_flows  capital_markets  international_finance  financial_crisis  financial_regulation  emerging_markets  contagion  trade-theory  global_economy  global_governance  global_imbalance  macroprudential_policies  monetary_policy  IMF  WTO  EF-add 
september 2013 by dunnettreader

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