dunnettreader + virgil   12

VIRGILE – Géorgiques (Œuvre intégrale) | Litterature audio.com
Traduction versifiée (1770) : Jacques Delille (1738-1813)
Reader - Alain Degandt
audio-books  poetry  Latin_lit  Virgil  French_lit  18thC 
june 2017 by dunnettreader
Anna Foy - Grainger and the ‘Sordid Master’: Plantocratic Alliance in The Sugar-Cane and Its Manuscript (2017) | The Review of English Studies | Oxford Academic
Scholarship on James Grainger’s perceived alliance with the West Indian plantocracy in The Sugar-Cane has so far not assimilated relevant information from the poem’s extant manuscript. In an unpublished comment on Adam Smith’s Theory of Moral Sentiments, Grainger rejects Smith’s characterization of planters as ‘sordid masters’ and plans his ‘vindication’ of planters accordingly. The published poem largely fulfils this plan: it argues that planters are not heritably incapable of moral sentiment, even as it accepts the Enlightenment’s institutional critique of slavery as a political system that cultivates bad moral habits in slave masters. Grainger relies on conjectural-historical reasoning then typical of Enlightenment moral philosophy, and he posits ‘probity’ as a bulwark against Creole degeneration. Manuscript evidence suggests further that Grainger sought probity in his own philosophical outlook. Although modern scholars have sometimes seen the poem as an attempt to win plantocratic favour, political references confirm that he took a position in the Canada-Guadeloupe controversy opposed to that of the powerful West India Interest. Moreover, during the course of composition, Grainger altered his portraits of planters to make them less flattering and more satirical—an editing process consistent with his apparent desire for philosophical impartiality. -- Downloaded via iPhone to Dbox
Enlightenment  English_lit  Virgil  Scottish_Enlightenment  Kames  poetry  moral_philosophy  article  downloaded  West_Indies  imitation  British_Empire  slavery  18thC  civic_virtue  Smith 
april 2017 by dunnettreader
Robert P. Irvine - Labor and Commerce in Locke and Early 18thC English Georgic (2009) | JSTOR - ELH
ELH, Vol. 76, No. 4 (Winter, 2009), pp. 963-988 -- importance of (agricultural) labor from Locke’s 2nd Treatise to "naturakize" money not just within the economy but within politics of the mercantilist imperial state - comparing Virgil use of georgics to encompass the Roman imperial state. Contrasts political agendas of Philips (Cyder 1707) and Pope (Windsor Forest 1713) in their use of georgics, both working within the Lockean framework of property. Extensive lit survey - lots of recent work on 18thC georgics to say nothing of cultural dimensions of political economy of expanding trade, commercialization and imperialism. -- downloaded pdf to Note
article  jstor  literary_history  English_lit  18thC  intellectual_history  political_philosophy  moral_philosophy  Locke-2_Treatises  property  mercantilism  imperialism  trade  commerce  commerce-doux  civility-political  politeness  civil_society  public_sphere  nature  parties  partisanship  Whigs  Whig_Junto  City  Tories  gentry  landed_interest  national_ID  national_interest  War_of_Spanish_Succession  Queen_Anne  Spectator  Addison  political_culture  economic_culture  British_politics  British_Empire  poetry  poetics  nature-poetry  nature-mastery  Virgil  Pope  1700s  1710s  peace  Peace_of_Utrecht  labor_theory_of_value  labor  agriculture  Davenant  political_economy  bibliography  downloaded 
november 2015 by dunnettreader
Maggie Kilgour - Milton and the Metamorphosis of Ovid (2012) | Oxford University Press
Milton and the Metamorphosis of Ovid contributes to our understanding of the Roman poet Ovid, the Renaissance writer Milton, and more broadly the transmission and transformation of classical traditions through history. It examines the ways in which Milton drew on Ovid's oeuvre, as well as the long tradition of reception that had begun with Ovid himself, and argues that Ovid's revision of the past, and especially his relation to Virgil, gave Renaissance writers a model for their own transformation of classical works. Throughout his career Milton thinks through and with Ovid, whose stories and figures inform his exploration of the limits and possibilities of creativity, change, and freedom. Examining this specific relation between two very individual and different authors, Kilgour also explores the forms and meaning of creative imitation. Intertexuality was not only central to the two writers' poetic practices but helped shape their visions of the world. While many critics seek to establish how Milton read Ovid, Kilgour debates the broader question of why does considering how Milton read Ovid matter? How do our readings of this relation change our understanding of both Milton and Ovid; and does it tell us about how traditions are changed and remade through time?
books  kindle-available  Latin_lit  literary_history  Ovid  ancient_Rome  epic  poetry  Renaissance  English_lit  influence-literary  imitation  Virgil 
june 2015 by dunnettreader
Craig Kallendorf - The Other Virgil: 'Pessimistic' Readings of the Aeneid in Early Modern Culture | Oxford University Press
"The Other Virgil" tells the story of how a classic like the Aeneid can say different things to different people. As a school text it was generally taught to support the values and ideals of a succession of postclassical societies, but between 1500 and 1800 a number of unusually sensitive readers responded to cues in the text that call into question what the poem appears to be supporting. This book focuses on the literary works written by these readers, to show how they used the Aeneid as a model for poems that probed and challenged the dominant values of their society, just as Virgil had done centuries before. Some of these poems are not as well known today as they should be, but others, like Milton's Paradise Lost and Shakespeare's The Tempest, are; in the latter case, the poems can be understood in new ways once their relationship to the 'other Virgil' is made clear. -- no pbk, but shows ebook available
books  kindle-available  Latin_lit  literary_history  Virgil  epic  politics-and-literature  16thC  17thC  18thC  English_lit  Shakespeare  Milton  influence-literary  imitation  poetry 
june 2015 by dunnettreader
Matthew Bowser - The Golden Age of Rome: Augustus’ program to better the Roman Empire (2013 undergrad thesis) | History of the Ancient World - October 2014
Undergraduate Thesis, University of Pittsburgh, 2013 -- posted to History of the Ancient World website - Argument continues among historians to this day whether Augustus should be considered the benefactor that Vergil portrays, who restored virtue and order, or as the tyrant Tacitus describes. Using evidence from a variety of contemporary sources, I intend to show that Augustus did in fact work to bring about the Age of Gold that Vergil promises. Whether through warfare, legislation, political maneuvering, or propaganda, I believe that his actions from the start reflect a clear program to make the Roman Empire the most powerful and most secure state that it could be, and that he was not just working for personal ambition. I have narrowed down the concept of the Golden Age, as portrayed by the poets, to three primary qualities: peace and security, the flourishing of the old Republican virtues, and prosperity under a glorious, divine leader. I will address each of these aspects in turn, consulting evidence from the period to show how Augustus’ regime worked to satisfy them. This evidence will include contemporary literature, historical facts and records, art, architecture, religion, and symbolism. I will also address the major criticisms of each facet by eyewitnesses such as Ovid and Propertius, by Roman historians such as Tacitus and Suetonius, and by various modern scholars of Roman history. Studying the success of Augustus’ methods can reap numerous benefits, including a deeper understanding of later dictators and their programs. -- downloaded pdf to Note
thesis  ancient_history  empires  Roman_Republic  Roman_Empire  Augustan_Rome  political_history  political_culture  civic_virtue  civil_religion  literary_history  Latin_lit  Virgil  Tacitus  historians-and-politics  state-building  Ovid  Suetonius  historiography  historiography-antiquity  downloaded  EF-add 
october 2014 by dunnettreader
Jean Balsamo - « Qual l’alto Ægeo... » : Montaigne et l’essai des poètes italiens | Italique, XI, 2008, p.109-129.
Italique [En ligne], XI | 2008, mis en ligne le 01 février 2012, DOI : 10.4000/italique.213. **--** La poésie est l’expression privilégiée de l’émotion pour Montaigne.1Il cite tout au long des Essais d’innombrables vers, par lesquels il exprime tout ce que sa prose ne peut dire. Ces citations contribuent à un effet d’hétérogénéité stylistique et linguistique, qui définit l’originalité même du livre, dans le cadre d’une « rhétorique des citations » et d’une esthétique de la surprise et de la varietas. Ces vers sont en latin pour la plupart d’entre eux, constituant une véritable anthologie, d’Ovide et de Virgile, cités dès le chapitre 2 du premier livre, à Horace, qui conclut le dernier chapitre du livre III. Montaigne cite également 70 vers de poètes italiens. Ces fragments en langue italienne sont plus importants que les vers français, si l’on excepte, dans les trois premières éditions, le recueil des 29 sonnets d’Etienne de La Boétie, qui constitue à lui seul la matière d’un chapitre dédié à la comtesse de Guiche. La langue italienne, sous le règne de Henri III, était un signe de distinction. De tels vers étaient l’expression ostentatoire d’une culture mondaine, que le livre partageait avec ses lecteurs, dames et gentilshommes dont Montaigne voulait être le pédagogue sans pédantisme. -- downloaded pdf to Note
article  revues.org  French_lit  Italian_lit  Latin_lit  literary_history  intellectual_history  cultural_history  Renaissance  poetry  poetics  vernacular  epic  epigrammes  prose  style-philosophy  Montaigne  intertextual  influence-literary  elite_culture  Petrarch  Ariosto  Dante  Virgil  Tasso  Lucretius  Seneca  Pléiade  downloaded  EF-add 
september 2014 by dunnettreader
Betty Rose Nagle, review - William Fitzgerald, How to Read a Latin Poem: If You Can’t Read Latin Yet (2013) | Bryn Mawr Classical Review 2014.01.07
This engagingly written and cleverly organized book contains sophisticated discussions of a wide range of poets, periods, and genres, primarily in the form of close readings of the Latin originals. By what means, and how successfully, does its author accommodate that hypothetical Latinless reader? He does not do this by dumbing anything down; these are readings from which the proficient can profit, too. The poets and works included come mostly from the “greatest hits” list, but there are some unorthodox choices as well, such as Sulpicia in the chapter on love poetry, several Priapea included with Catullus and Martial in a chapter on invective, and Persius as the featured satirist. The first two chapters treat antithetical topics (love, hate); the middle two treat respectively a collection (Horace’s Odes) and a corpus (Virgil’s works) written during the same period; the fifth treats another pair of contemporaries, the Neronians Petronius [actually Lucan?] and Seneca; and the sixth, thematic again, pairs Lucretius and Ovid as philosophical and narrative “science fiction.” There is also an introduction for his readers, cleverly followed by a “Prelude” discussing two poems addressed to their readers, and a brief “Epilogue,” using Hadrian’s animula as a bridge to a few comments about the very different poetry of Christian hymns. Ancillaries include a pronunciation guide, suggestions for further reading, a glossary of terms, an index of names and topics, and another of poems. -- Oxford University Press - only hdbk on amazon.com - ebook available on Google_Books for c $20 - is OUP having a kindle fight? From Google preview, looks fabulous
books  reviews  buy  Google_Books  Latin_lit  Horace  Virgil  Ovid  Seneca  Lucretius  satire  Augustan_Rome  politics-and-literature  ancient_Rome  Roman_Empire  poetry  EF-add 
july 2014 by dunnettreader
Bryn Mawr Classical Review (BMCR) - Home
Bryn Mawr Classical Review (BMCR) (ISSN 1055-7660) publishes timely open-access, peer-reviewed reviews of current scholarly work in the field of classical studies (including archaeology). This site is the authoritative archive of BMCR's publication, from 1990 to the present. Reviews from August 2008 on are also posted on our blog.
website  books  reviews  intellectual_history  literary_history  ancient_history  ancient_philosophy  social_history  cultural_history  economic_history  archaeology  art_history  religious_history  religious_culture  historiography  ancient_Greece  ancient_Rome  Greek_lit  Latin_lit  poetry  theater  Augustan_Rome  pre-Socratics  Plato  Socrates  Aristotle  Hellenism  Cicero  Stoicism  Epicurean  Virgil  Horace  Ovid  Roman_Empire  Roman_Republic  Roman_law 
may 2014 by dunnettreader
Oxford drama fit for a queen: William Gager’s “Dido” four centuries later | Hortulus Oct 2013
Note the tradition linking Queen Elizabeth to Christ Church - her portrait still over head tabke. An element in Queen Anne visit to Oxford in 1702?

The production of William Gager’s Dido in the Great Hall of Christ Church, Oxford, on 21st September 2013 was by any measure a special occasion. The Early Drama at Oxford (EDOX) research project aims to bring to light medieval and early modern plays staged within the University. One of the guiding lights of the project is Elisabeth Dutton, who directed Gager’s play as part of their ‘Performing Dido’ event, with the work performed alongside Edward’s Boys production of Christopher Marlowe’s more famous dramatization of the tale from Virgil. Gager’s Latin drama had been originally acted in June 1583 as part of the Christ Church celebrations in honour of visiting Polish prince, Albrecht Łaski. 430 years after this first performance, Gager’s Latin, smoothly translated into English by graduate student Elizabeth Sandis, was again staged before an influential Polish visitor – this time Minister Counsellor Mr Dariusz Łaska. As on the original occasion, parts were played by male university students (here with a couple of slightly older exceptions) before an audience partaking of a College banquet. It was impossible not to find thrilling an event so similar in many ways to that experienced by sixteenth century Oxonians – even down to a reconstructed period menu.
16thC  English_lit  theater  university  Oxford  Elizabeth  Virgil  actors  Bolingbroke  EF-add 
december 2013 by dunnettreader

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