dunnettreader + us_government   97

Lords of Misrule | Matt Stoller - The Baffler - Sept 2017
In 1937, future Supreme Court Justice Robert Jackson gave a toast at the New York State Bar Association on the civic responsibilities of the legal profession.…
Evernote  legal_culture  corporate_law  legal_system  US_politics  US_legal_system  US_government  white-collar_crime  criminal_justice  DOJ  fraud  financial_crisis  financial_regulation  SEC  antitrust  Obama_administration  accountability  from instapaper
september 2017 by dunnettreader
Emmanuel Saez - Taxing the Rich More: Preliminary Evidence from the 2013 Tax Increase (Nov 2016) | NBER Working Papers
Taxing the Rich More: Preliminary Evidence from the 2013 Tax Increase
Emmanuel Saez
NBER Working Paper No. 22798 - Issued in November 2016
This paper provides preliminary evidence on behavioral responses to taxation around the 2013 tax increase that raised top marginal tax rates on capital income by about 9.5 points and on labor income by about 6.5 points. Using published tabulated tax statistics from the Statistics of Income division of the IRS, we find that reported top 1% incomes were significantly higher in 2012 than in 2013, implying a large short-run elasticity of reported income with respect to the net-of-tax rate in excess of one. This large short-run elasticity is due to income retiming for tax avoidance purposes and is particularly high for realized capital gains and dividends, and highest at the very top of the income distribution. However, comparing 2011 and 2015 top incomes uncovers only a small medium-term response to the tax increase as top income shares resumed their upward trend after 2013. Overall, we estimate that at most 20% of the projected tax revenue increase from the 2013 tax reform is lost through behavioral responses. This implies that the 2013 tax increase was an efficient way to raise revenue.
paywall  capital_gains  fiscal_policy  tax_collection  behavioral_economics  tax_increases  US_government  Obama_administration  1-percent  top-marginal_tax_rates  NBER  tax_policy  paper  tax_avoidance 
december 2016 by dunnettreader
NOAA's "Arctic Change" website - Permafrost "home" page
"Home" page for Permafrost-related materials - Permafrost is now included in the Arctic Report Card as an indicator that gets updated every 2-4 years.
website  US_government  science-government_research  NOAA  climate  carbon_budget  COP21  Arctic  links  report 
october 2016 by dunnettreader
Kurt Newman - Reflections on the Conference "Beyond the New Deal Order " Sept 2015 - S-USIH Blog
The impetus for the conference was the anniversary of a classic collection of essays edited by Steve Fraser and Gary Gerstle: The Rise and Fall of the New Deal Order, published by Princeton University Press in 1989. We learned that this volume came together in the mid-1980s as New Left veterans Fraser and Gerstle surveyed the rise of Reaganism and lamented the poverty of New Deal historiography: dominated as it then was by Whig great man hagiography and toothless stories of cycles of American liberalism and conservatism. We learned, too, that “order” was chosen carefully from a longer list of contenders (“regime,” “system,” etc), and that this choice of “order” was deeply connected to the volume’s stated goal of providing a ‘historical autopsy” for the period that ran from the election of FDR to the PATCO firings.
historiography  US_history  19thC  20thC  pre-WWI  entre_deux_guerres  post-WWII  US_politics  US_economy  political_economy  political_culture  New_Deal  US_politics-race  US_government  US_society  US_foreign_policy  US_military  state-roles  social_order  social_sciences-post-WWII  Keynesianism  Keynes  Reagan  labor_history  New_Left  historians-and-politics 
october 2016 by dunnettreader
Benjamin Witte - Trump as National Security Threat | Lawfare Blog
I don’t, as a rule, endorse political candidates. I don’t do work for campaigns. I have never given a dime to a candidate—for any office. I have never signed up…
Instapaper  national_security  US_foreign_policy  US_government  Trump  elections-2016  exec_branch  US_legal_system  US_military  IR-domestic_politics  from instapaper
july 2016 by dunnettreader
Eric Nelson - "Patriot Royalism: The Stuart Monarchy in American Political Thought, 1769-75" (2011) | William& Mary Quarterly
Nelson E. "Patriot Royalism: The Stuart Monarchy in American Political Thought, 1769-75". The William and Mary Quarterly [Internet]. 2011;3rd ser., 68 (4) :533-596. With responses by Gordon S. Wood, Pauline Maier, and Daniel Hulsebosch, as well a reply to critics ("Taking Them Seriously: Patriots, Prerogative, and the English Seventeenth Century"). -- preliminary to his "Royalist Revolution" -- downloaded pdf to Note
article  forum  downloaded  intellectual_history  political_philosophy  17thC  18thC  British_history  US_history  British_politics  British_Empire  British_Empire-constitutional_structure  Patriot_King  Patriots  American_colonies  American_Revolution  checks-and-balances  republics-Ancient_v_Modern  republicanism  Parliamentary_supremacy  Parliamentarians  Whigs  Whigs-oligarchy  Whigs-opposition  limited_monarchy  prerogative  liberalism-republicanism_debates  Whigs-Radicals  Commonwealthmen  Charles_I  George_III  Adams_John  US_constitution  Early_Republic  legislature  exec_branch  US_government  US_President  majoritarian  democracy  masses-fear_of  federalism  federal_preemption  national_interest  states_rights  government-forms  constitutions  constitutional_regime  Royalists 
may 2016 by dunnettreader
What It's Worth - Building a Strong Financial Future
Americans everywhere struggle to build strong financial futures for themselves and their families. The new book, What It's Worth, provides a roadmap for what families, communities and our nation can do to move forward on the path to financial well-being.
Collection of essays by people working on financial inclusion, asset-building etc. - downloaded via iPhone to DBOX
gig_economy  education-finance  philanthropy  credit  usury  financial_innovation  US_society  inequality-wealth  local_government  pensions  corporate_citizenship  mobility  banking  wages  health_care  access_to_finance  housing  financial_regulation  report  social_entrepreneurs  poverty  downloaded  welfare  US_economy  US_politics  families  mortgages  segregation  inequality  NBFI  unemployment  US_government 
april 2016 by dunnettreader
Larry Summers - No free lunches but plenty of cheap ones - Feb 2016
February 7, 2016 Trade-offs have long been at the center of economics. The aphorism “there is no such thing as a free lunch” captures a central economic idea:…
Instapaper  US_economy  US_government  Summers  stagnation  demand-side  economic_growth  Great_Recession  investment-government  government_finance  interest_rates  from instapaper
february 2016 by dunnettreader
Ben Leo and Todd Moss - Bringing US Development Finance into the 21st Century | Center For Global Development 7/20/15
Part of the White House and the World 2016 Briefing Book -- Well-established European development finance institutions (DFIs) are providing integrated services for businesses...-- debt and equity financing, risk mitigation, and technical assistance. .. emerging-market actors — including China, India, Brazil, and Malaysia — have dramatically increased financing activities in developing regions such as Latin America and Sub-Saharan Africa. As the needs of developing countries have changed, so has the political and economic environment in the US. First, traditional development dynamics are shifting rapidly from a donor-recipient aid relationship to win-win partnerships involving public and private actors. Second, most US aid agencies typically are not positioned to address many pressing development priorities, such as expanding economic opportunities in frontier markets. Third, the US development assistance budget has become increasingly constrained, with growing pressure to cut programs. Within this context, we assess the need for a modern, full-service US Development Finance Corporation and provide a series of options for how the next US president could structure such an institution consistent with bipartisan congressional support and budgetary realities. For such a USDFC, we propose below potential products, services, and tools; size, scale, and staffing requirements; governance structures and oversight functions; performance metrics; and capital structure models. We conclude with a notional implementation road map that includes the required US executive and legislative actions. -- downloaded pdf to Note
report  development  IFIs  aid  US_politics  public-private_partnerships  development-impact  development-finance  emerging_markets  FDI  technical_assistance  technology_transfer  US_government  US_politics-foreign_policy  fiscal_policy  cross-border  LDCs  World_Bank  IFC  downloaded 
october 2015 by dunnettreader
Two Philosophers’ Views on the Point of College | Daily Nous - September 2015
This week, two philosophers—Kwame Anthony Appiah (NYU) in the New York Times Magazine and Gary Gutting (Notre Dame) in The Chronicle of Higher Education—have discussed the point of a college education. - Both distinguish -long between the utilitarian (and subject mastery) function oriented toward what employers are likely to find useful and the intellectual or academic, oriented toward developing mental habits of learning with an open mind as a key part of whole-person development and life-long ability to be part of, at a minimum, middle brow culture. (The latter is more explicit in Gutting. The major difference is that Appiah takes a somewhat defensive faute de mieux approach, given the enormous economic pressures that are producing corporatized institutions that don't understand or appreciate the intellectual excellence tradition. Whereas Gutting (like Appiah) acknowledges the pressures for a "training " track that meets employer and employee expectations, he thinks the job should be shifted from what's effectively remedial classes in the first year or so of college with an effective J-12 education. Including shifting parties of college teachers )along with their budgets) to the K-12 system. He clearly thinks Appiah's defensive approach is going to fail. The demands if both students and employers are legitimate, and in the absence of another set of institutions to meet those legitimate expectations, the corporatism of universities will proceed at wn ever increasing pace.
education-finance  paywall  education-training  education-privatization  public_goods  intelligentsia  US_government  human_capital  university-contemporary  public_education  public_finance  Pocket  local_government  education-K-12  education-higher  US_politics  from pocket
september 2015 by dunnettreader
Richard Mayhew - The end of the private option | Balloon Juice - August 2015
next sixteen months, the states will have to start paying a little bit, and the expensive experiments to create Medicaid expansion without calling it Obamacare will start to bite. $10, $20, $30 million dollar state tabs for performance art will start getting expensive when a cheaper and just as effective option of traditional Medicaid expansion is available.
red_states  US_government  health_care  Obama_administration  government_agencies  Obamacare  GOP  US_politics 
august 2015 by dunnettreader
By nearly any measure, sunny South Florida is tops in fraud | CBS News July 2015
Yikes -- 46 times the national average for submitting fraudulent tax returns, plus Medicare scams, identity theft, and in and on
Pocket  US_society  crime  fraud  US_government  from pocket
august 2015 by dunnettreader
Philip Giraldi - Revenge of the Anti-Terror State | The American Conservative - July 2015
In Washington, a favored bit of legislation that doesn’t make it through the committee and onto the floor for a vote can always be tacked on to another bill. Or, if there is some awkwardness about it, it can always be repackaged and given another name. Both of those tactics are currently being employed to revive the Violent Radicalization Act as the The Countering Violent Extremism Act of 2015, which is now being rolled into the renewal of the Homeland Security Act as an amendment. It has also been bureaucratically jiggled, creating an Office for Countering Violent Extremism headed by an Assistant Secretary under the direction of the Department of Homeland Security (DHS) rather than a commission run by Congress.
Instapaper  military-industrial  bureaucracy  spying  marginalized_groups  Islamophobia  US_politics  US_foreign_policy  GWOT  DHS  civil_liberties  US_government  Congress  from instapaper
july 2015 by dunnettreader
Scott McConnell - Why Is Washington Addicted to War? | The American Conservative - July 2015
Most now assume that the defining foreign policy legacy of President Obama will be his Iran deal, which will seek to block Iran’s path to a nuclear weapon and… Points to the military-foreign_policy bureaucracy and domestic politics of Capitol Hill as automatically oriented to interventionism regardless of White House priorities and preferences -- gives example of pressure to help Ukraine against demonized Russia is producing alliances with the most unsavory types who are fundamentally hostile to the US. Was Huntington right that post Cold War we need enemies abroad to cover over the fissures at home?
Instapaper  US_foreign_policy  US_politics  US_government  militarism  interventionism  GOP  US_military  US_politics-foreign_policy  Russia-near_abroad  Ukraine  State_Dept  national_interest  post-Cold_War  from instapaper
july 2015 by dunnettreader
John Mikhail - The Constitution and the Philosophy of Language: Entailment, Implicature, and Implied Powers :: SSRN - Virginia Law Review, Vol. 101, No. 4, 2015 (rev'd June 11 2015)
Georgetown University Law Center -- The main purpose of this Article is to begin to recover and elucidate the core textual basis of a progressive approach to constitutional law, which appears to have been embraced in essential respects by many influential figures, including Wilson, Hamilton, Marshall, and the two Roosevelts, and which rests on an implied power to promote the general welfare. To pursue this objective, the Article relies on two strange bedfellows: the law of corporations and the philosopher Paul Grice. An ordinary language philosopher like Grice, (..) might seem like an unlikely ally to enlist in this endeavor. (..) underestimating the significance of Grice’s ideas for constitutional law would be a mistake. Plausibly interpreted, the Constitution vests an implied power in the Government of the United States to promote the general welfare, and Grice’s distinction between semantic and pragmatic implication is a helpful means of understanding why. After a general introduction, the Article first summarizes some key aspects of Grice’s philosophy of language and then briefly illustrates their relevance for constitutional law. The remainder of the Article is then devoted to explaining how, along with a relatively simple principle in the law of corporations, according to which a legal corporation is implicitly vested with the power to fulfill its purposes, Grice’s distinction between semantic and pragmatic implication helps to illuminate a thorny problem of enduring interest: What powers does the Constitution vest in the Government of the United States? -- Pages in PDF File: 41 -- Keywords: James Wilson, Charles Beard, James Madison, Gouverneur Morris, Paul Grice, constitution, implication, implicature, entailment, semantics, pragmatics, implied powers, enumerated powers, preamble, vesting clause, necessary and proper clause, sweeping clause, tenth amendment, originalism -- downloaded pdf to Note
article  SSRN  philosophy_of_law  philosophy_of_language  ordinary_language_philosophy  legal_reasoning  constitutional_law  US_constitution  US_history  federalism  US_government  US_legal_system  originalism  common_good  commonwealth  progressivism  Founders  Madison  Morris_Gouverneur  downloaded 
june 2015 by dunnettreader
Matt Taibbi - Forget What We Know Now: We Knew Then the Iraq War Was a Joke | Rolling Stone
So presidential hopeful Jeb Bush is taking a pounding for face-planting a question about his brother’s invasion of Iraq. Apparently, our national media priests…
US_politics  US_foreign_policy  US_government  Bush_administration  Iraq  bad_history  bad_journalism  public_opinion  intelligence_agencies  GWOT  Pentagon  Instapaper  from instapaper
may 2015 by dunnettreader
Elaine Karmack - Jonathan Rauch: Political realism - In praise of old fashioned politics | Brookings Institution - May 2015
Jonathan Rauch's paper “Political realism: How hacks, machines, big money and back-room deals can strengthen American democracy” marks the beginning of a serious effort on behalf of Brookings scholars to open up a conversation challenging the reform assumptions of the past few decades. In the coming months we will be convening social scientists and public intellectuals along with politicians and activists in order to explore a new way of looking at solutions to the polarization of contemporary American politics. Not everyone will agree—with Rauch—or with each other. But we feel the time has come to take on the conventional reform wisdom and begin an intellectual dialogue on why our democracy seems to be failing. Taking a page from international relations where realism assumes conflict among nations; political realism also assumes that conflict is a constant part of the system. According to Rauch realism, “…sees governing as difficult and political peace and stability as treasures never to be taken for granted.” He goes on to argue the virtues of transactional politics and to point out how, in the name of reform, weakening the bulwarks of transactional politics has weakened democracy as a whole. “Where the realist tends to believe that governing is inherently difficult, that politics is inherently transactional and that success is best judged in terms of reaching social accommodation rather than achieving some abstract purpose, the progressive tends to see government as perfectible and politics as a path toward a higher public good.” In practice this means that the political realist advocates things that have been anathema to reformers. -- downloaded pdf to Note
paper  democracy  US_politics  US_government  US_legal_system  good_government  sunshine_laws  transparency  realism-political  IR-realism  reform-political  parties  partisanship  faction  extremism  polarization  conflict  common_good  political_philosophy  political_culture  political_sociology  political_participation  political_science  politics-and-money  campaign_finance  elections  public_sphere  public_policy  downloaded 
may 2015 by dunnettreader
The Legacy of the U.S. Civil War: 150 Years Later - roundtable with historians | Cambridge University Press Blog - April 2015
Participants: Kathleen M. Hilliard  is the author of Masters, Slaves, and Exchange .  She is Assistant Professor in the Department of History at Iowa State… Quite interesting, both for their insights and for how the historiography of the US in the 19thC has changed -- not simply looking at social groups (both as actors and victims) who had been ignored, but that historiographical shifts in specialties (e.g. military history, or the connections between legal and political history) have changed or broadened the focus when it comes to the Civil War. Lots of links to CUP books as well as (unlinked) other books and papers. S
US_history  19thC  US_Civil_War  historiography-postWWII  historiography  military_history  social_history  cultural_history  digital_humanities  global_history  global_system  diplomatic_history  legal_history  constitutional_law  US_constitution  Congress  Lincoln  Confederacy  slavery  abolition  African-Americans  Native_Americans  Manifest_Destiny  frontier  industrialization  books  kindle-available  US_society  US_politics  US_government  US_legal_system  bibliography  Instapaper  from instapaper
may 2015 by dunnettreader
Caroline W. Lee - Do-It-Yourself Democracy: The Rise of the Public Engagement Industry (Jan 2015) - Oxford University Press
Citizen participation has undergone a radical shift since anxieties about "bowling alone" seized the nation in the 1990s. Many pundits and observers have cheered America's twenty-first century civic renaissance-an explosion of participatory innovations in public life. Invitations to "have your say!" and "join the discussion!" have proliferated. But has the widespread enthusiasm for maximizing citizen democracy led to real change? Sociologist Caroline W. Lee examines how participatory innovations have reshaped American civic life over the past two decades. Lee looks at the public engagement industry that emerged to serve government, corporate, and nonprofit clients seeking to gain a handle on the increasingly noisy demands of their constituents and stakeholders. The beneficiaries of new forms of democratic empowerment are not only humble citizens, but also the engagement experts who host the forums. Does it matter if the folks deepening democracy are making money at it? How do they make sense of the contradictions inherent in their roles? In investigating public engagement practitioners' everyday anxieties and larger worldviews, we see reflected the strange meaning of power in contemporary institutions. New technologies and deliberative practices have democratized the ways in which organizations operate, but Lee argues that they have also been marketed and sold as tools to facilitate cost-cutting, profitability, and other management goals - and that public deliberation has burdened everyday people with new responsibilities without delivering on its promises of empowerment.
books  kindle-available  US_society  US_politics  US_government  local_government  local_politics  democracy  democracy_deficit  political_participation  firms-organization  hierarchy  decision_theory  NGOs  deliberation-public  public_policy  public_goods  public-private_partnerships  political_culture 
april 2015 by dunnettreader
PRIME MINISTER CHURCHILL'S EULOGY IN COMMONS FOR THE LATE PRESIDENT ROOSEVELT April 17, 1945
Extraordinary piece of rhetoric, but typical Churchill -- knew how to give the intimate personalized touch -- so the audience somehow also "knows" FDR and can share the mourning -- and the grandeur and glory of the ages rolled into one. Interesting that much of his description of FDR's actions are within the frame he establishes of FDR's physical disabilities, and a favorite Churchillian theme, the extraordinary will power it took not just to rise to the presidency, but to conduct the extreme complexity of policy that required intense attention every single day, made further complicated by domestic and international politics, of which he was an intuitive master of the possible.
20thC  WWII  British_history  British_Empire  US_history  US_politics  US_foreign_policy  US_government  US_military  diplomatic_history  Churchill  FDR  rhetoric-political  rhetoric 
april 2015 by dunnettreader
Thomas Grillot & Pauline Peretz - Interview with William Novak and James Sparrow - The American State: Power Obscured | Nov 2011 - Books & ideas
Tags : welfare state | state | war | law | France | United States of America -- Finding the American state where historians never looked before: this could be the motto of the new history of the state, of which William Novak and James Sparrow are two of the strongest advocates. To capture the specificity of state formation in the U.S., they encourage historians to look at the mutual constitution of state and society, instead of taking their separation for granted. Their approach is key to understanding the current legitimation crisis undergone by the American state. -- downloaded pdf to Note
US_government  US_history  US_politics  state-building  state-roles  19thC  20thC  anti-statist  right-wing  rights-legal  rights-political  centralization  central_government  ideology  libertarianism  market_fundamentalism  historiography  political_science  political_culture  sociology-process  legitimacy  power  downloaded 
april 2015 by dunnettreader
Darrell M. West - How digital technology can reduce prison incarceration rates | Brookings Institution | March 31, 2015
It’s an acknowledged fact that the United States has the highest incarceration rate among developed nations. And just last week, there’s been a marked momentum for sentencing reform in Congress. On Thursday, March 26, former Republican House speaker Newt Gingrich and a top Koch Industries executive joined the left-leaning Center for American Progress and the ACLU at a bipartisan criminal justice summit in Washington to work towards avoiding incarceration for nonviolent offenders.
US_government  US_legal_system  crime  criminal_justice  prisons  US_politics  technology  privacy 
april 2015 by dunnettreader
Kelley Vlahos - A Blackwater World Order | The American Conservative - Feb 2015
...a recent examination by Sean McFate, a former Army paratrooper who later served in Africa working for Dyncorp International and is now an associate professor at the National Defense University, suggests that the Pentagon’s dependence on contractors to help wage its wars has unleashed a new era of warfare in which a multitude of freshly founded private military companies are meeting the demand of an exploding global market for conflict. “Now that the United States has opened the Pandora’s Box of mercenarianism,” McFate writes in The Modern Mercenary: Private Armies and What they Mean for World Order, “private warriors of all stripes are coming out of the shadows to engage in for-profit warfare.” It is a menacing thought. McFate said this coincides with what he and others have called a current shift from global dominance by nation-state power to a “polycentric” environment in which state authority competes with transnational corporations, global governing bodies, non-governmental organizations (NGO’s), regional and ethnic interests, and terror organizations in the chess game of international relations. New access to professional private arms, McFate further argues, has cut into the traditional states’ monopoly on force, and hastened the dawn of this new era. McFate calls it neomedievalism, the “non-state-centric and multipolar world order characterized by overlapping authorities and allegiances.” States will not disappear, “but they will matter less than they did a century ago.” - copied to Pocket
books  global_system  global_governance  IR  IR_theory  military_history  Europe-Early_Modern  nation-state  transnational_elites  privatization  MNCs  NGOs  civil_wars  international_system  international_law  mercenaries  US_government  US_foreign_policy  Pentagon  Afghanistan  warfare-irregular  national_ID  national_interest  national_security  Pocket 
february 2015 by dunnettreader
The Federal Advisory Committee Act (FACA) Brochure | GSA - US government
Advisory committees have played an important role in shaping programs and policies of the federal government from the earliest days of the Republic. Since President George Washington sought the advice of such a committee during the Whiskey Rebellion of 1794, the contributions made by these groups have been impressive and diverse. Today, an average of 1,000 advisory committees with more than 60,000 members advise the President and the Executive Branch on such issues as the disposal of high-level nuclear waste, the depletion of atmospheric ozone, the national fight against Acquired Immune Deficiency Syndrome (AIDS), efforts to rid the Nation of illegal drugs, to improve schools, highways, and housing, and on other major programs. Through enactment of the Federal Advisory Committee Act (FACA) of 1972 (Public Law 92-463), the U.S. Congress formally recognized the merits of seeking the advice and assistance of our nation's citizens. At the same time, the Congress also sought to assure that advisory committees: ** Provide advice that is relevant, objective, and open to the public; ** Act promptly to complete their work; and ** Comply with reasonable cost controls and record keeping requirements. -- With the expertise from advisory committee members, federal officials and the nation have access to information and advice on a broad range of issues affecting federal policies and programs. The public, in return, is afforded an opportunity to provide input into a process that may form the basis for government decisions.
US_government  administrative_agencies  open_government  public_policy  public_opinion  public-private_partnerships  governments-information_sharing  government_agencies  technocracy  governance  public_interest 
february 2015 by dunnettreader
FACA Database - US Government Federal Advisory Committee Act | Home
The Federal Advisory Committee Act (FACA) database is used by Federal agencies to continuously manage an average of 1,000 advisory committees government-wide This database is also used by the Congress to perform oversight of related Executive Branch programs and by the public, the media, and others, to stay abreast of important developments resulting from advisory committee activities. Although centrally supported by the General Services Administration's Committee Management Secretariat, the database represents a true "shared system" wherein each participating agency and individual committee manager has responsibility for providing accurate and timely information that may be used to assure that the system's wide array of users has access to data required by FACA.
US_government  open_access  open_government  governments-information_sharing  government_agencies  technocracy  governance  public_policy  public_goods  public-private_partnerships  website  databases 
february 2015 by dunnettreader
Shared Risks, Shared Solutions in an Interconnected World (Dec 2014 conference & white paper) | RANE & Knowledge@Wharton
conference at GW with their Department of Homeland Security program with focus on stuff like cybersecurity and terrorism -- downloaded pdf to Note
report  risk  cybersecurity  GWOT  public-private_partnerships  US_government  revolving_door  downloaded  London 
february 2015 by dunnettreader
John Irons and Isaac Shapiro - Report: Regulation, employment, and the economy: Fears of job loss are overblown | Economic Policy Institute - April 2011
After the first midterms debacle -- . In the first months since the new Congress convened, the House has held dozens of hearings designed to elicit criticisms of regulations, introduced legislation that would dramatically alter the regulatory process by requiring congressional approval of all major regulations, and passed a spending bill that would slash the funding levels of regulatory agencies and restrict their ability to enact rules covering areas such as greenhouse gas emissions. (..) opponents of regulation argue that agency rules are damaging to the economy in general and job generation in particular. Some say specific regulations will destroy millions of jobs and cite a study (critiqued later in this paper) purporting to show that regulations cost $1.75 trillion per year. Regulations are frequently discussed only in the context of their threat to job creation, while their role in protecting lives, public health, and the environment is ignored. This report reviews whether the evidence backs the perspective of regulatory opponents. The first section looks broadly at the effects of regulations, whether they play a useful role in the economy, and whether their overall benefits outweigh their overall costs. The second section assesses the theory and evidence for the assertion that regulations undermine jobs and the economy. The last section examines the kinds of studies that are discussed when regulations are being formulated; these studies, often cited in debates and therefore of great importance, tend to be prospective
estimates of the effects of proposed regulations. -- downloaded pdf to Note
US_economy  US_politics  Obama_administration  Congress  GOP  deregulation  cost-benefit  unemployment  business_influence  public_policy  public_goods  public_health  environment  climate  financial_regulation  US_government  regulation  regulation-environment  regulation-costs  common_good  commons  economic_sociology  economic_theory  economic_culture  statistics  downloaded  EF-add 
january 2015 by dunnettreader
Full transcript: President Obama, Dec 4 2013 - Inequality and rolling back Reagan Revolution | The Washington Post
But starting in the late ‘70s, this social compact began to unravel.Technology made it easier for companies to do more with less, eliminating certain job occupations. A more competitive world led companies ship jobs anyway. And as good manufacturing jobs automated or headed offshore, workers lost their leverage; jobs paid less and offered fewer benefits. As values of community broke down and competitive pressure increased, businesses lobbied Washington to weaken unions and the value of the minimum wage. As the trickle-down ideology became more prominent, taxes were slashes for the wealthiest while investments in things that make us all richer, like schools and infrastructure, were allowed to wither. And for a certain period of time we could ignore this weakening economic foundation, in part because more families were relying on two earners, as women entered the workforce. We took on more debt financed by juiced-up housing market. But when the music stopped and the crisis hit, millions of families were stripped of whatever cushion they had left. And the result is an economy that’s become profoundly unequal and families that are more insecure. (..) it is harder today for a child born here in America to improve her station in life than it is for children in most of our wealthy allies, countries like Canada or Germany or France. They have greater mobility than we do, not less.(..) The combined trends of increased inequality and decreasing mobility pose a fundamental threat to the American dream, our way of life and what we stand for around the globe. And it is not simply a moral claim that I’m making here. There are practical consequences to rising inequality and reduced mobility. -- downloaded as pdf to Note
speech  Obama  inequality  supply-side  labor_share  business-ethics  norms  norms-business  morality-conventional  morality-Christian  utilitarianism  globalization  technology  US_foreign_policy  US_economy  US_politics  US_society  US_government  US_history  common_good  civic_virtue  economic_growth  economic_culture  distribution-income  distribution-wealth  unemployment  health_care  public_goods  public_opinion  public_policy  downloaded  EF-add 
january 2015 by dunnettreader
Jacob Weisberg, review essay - Bridge Too Far - Rick Perlstein, The Invisible Bridge: The Fall of Nixon and the Rise of Reagan | Democracy Journal - Issue #34, Fall 2014
Rick Perlstein’s account of Ronald Reagan’s rise acknowledges his popularity, but doesn’t take the reasons behind it seriously enough. --
The Invisible Bridge: The Fall of Nixon and the Rise of Reagan By Rick Perlstein • Simon & Schuster • 2014 • 810 pages -- see Perlstein’s response -- both downloaded as pdf to Note
books  reviews  article  US_politics  US_history  US_society  US_government  US_foreign_policy  Cold_War  20thC  post-WWII  right-wing  Reagan  GOP  public_opinion  public_policy  elections  parties  partisanship  faction  historiography-20thC  downloaded  EF-add 
january 2015 by dunnettreader
Rick Perlstein - The Reason for Reagan, A response to Jacob Weisberg. | Democracy Journal: Issue #35, Winter 2015
In 1984, the year Reagan won 49 states and 59 percent of the popular vote, only 35 percent of Americans said they favored substantial cuts in social programs in order to reduce the deficit. Given these plain facts, historiography on the rise of conservatism and the triumph of Ronald Reagan must obviously go beyond the deadening cliché that since Ronald Reagan said government was the problem, and Americans elected Ronald Reagan twice, the electorate simply agreed with him that government was the problem. But in his recent review of my book The Invisible Bridge [“A Bridge Too Far,” Issue #34], Jacob Weisberg just repeats that cliché—and others. “Rick Perlstein’s account of Reagan’s rise acknowledges his popularity,” the article states, “but doesn’t take the reasons behind it seriously enough.” Weisberg is confident those reasons are obvious. Is he right? -- downloaded as pdf to Note
books  reviews  article  US_politics  US_history  US_society  US_government  US_foreign_policy  Cold_War  20thC  post-WWII  right-wing  Reagan  GOP  public_opinion  public_policy  elections  parties  partisanship  faction  historiography-20thC  downloaded  EF-add 
january 2015 by dunnettreader
Brad DeLong - My "Sisyphus as Social Democrat: A review of 'John Kenneth Galbraith: His Life, His Politics, His Economics', by Richard Parker," ( Grasping Reality...)
One of his series, "Hoisted from the Archives": J. Bradford DeLong (2005), "Sisyphus as Social Democrat: A review of John Kenneth Galbraith: His Life, His Politics, His Economics, by Richard Parker," Foreign Affairs May/June 2005. - diwnloaded pdf to iPhone
article  book  review  biography  intellectual_history  20thC  political_economy  economic_sociology  economic_theory  US_economy  US_politics  post-WWII  entre_deux_guerres  Great_Depression  WWII  US_government  US_foreign_policy  Keynesian  institutional_economics  liberalism  social_democracy  Galbraith_JK  downloaded  EF-add 
january 2015 by dunnettreader
Matthew Yglesias - Vox Jan 2015 - Fair Value Accounting: The obscure rule change that could make student loans more expensive
Proponents of Fair Value Accounting raise a lot of valid concerns about the way the United States Congress handles federal loan programs. To me, trying to resolve those problems with FVA is a cure worse than the disease. (...) But what is fundamentally called for here is political judgment not an accounting rule. It is also true that many — and perhaps most — federal credit programs are somewhat ill-conceived as policy and that it would be easier to get rid of them if we implemented FVA. But the federal government's ability to make affordable loans available in situations that would be too risky for a private bank is a real consequence of its nature as a sovereign state, not some kind of accounting error.
US_government  fiscal_policy  subsidies  Congress  US_politics  austerity  public_finance  sovereign_debt 
january 2015 by dunnettreader
Clement Fatovic - Reason and Experience in Alexander Hamilton’s Science of Politics | JSTOR: American Political Thought, Vol. 2, No. 1 (Spring 2013), pp. 1-30
Alexander Hamilton is often described as an enterprising modernist who promoted forward-looking reforms that broke with established institutions and ideas. However, the scale and apparent novelty of his reforms have tended to obscure the extent to which those innovations were rooted in a belief that knowledge and practice must be guided by “experience.” This article argues that even Hamilton’s most far-reaching reforms were grounded in a Humean understanding of the limits of rationality in explaining and controlling the world. Hamilton’s agreement with David Hume on the epistemic authority of experience helps explain his positions on constitutional design, executive power, democratic politics, public opinion, and other important political issues. Moreover, the epistemological underpinnings of Hamilton’s political thought are significant because they suggest that a “science of politics” grounded in experience can avoid some of the dangers associated with more rationalistic approaches yet still be quite open to significant innovation in politics. - as much or more Hume's various essays as Hamilton
article  jstor  intellectual_history  political_philosophy  moral_philosophy  18thC  British_history  British_politics  US_history  US_constitution  US_politics  US_economy  political_economy  political_culture  economic_culture  epistemology  epistemology-social  US_government  public_opinion  public_finance  democracy  republicanism  republics-Ancient_v_Modern  fiscal-military_state  sovereign_debt  Hume  Hume-politics  Hamilton  Founders  Early_Republic  bibliography  downloaded  EF-add 
january 2015 by dunnettreader
Lucian A. Bebchuk, Robert J. Jackson - Shining Light on Corporate Political Spending - Georgetown Law Journal, Vol. 101, April 2013, pp. 923-967 :: SSRN (last revised August 2014)
Lucian A. Bebchuk - Harvard Law School; National Bureau of Economic Research (NBER); Centre for Economic Policy Research (CEPR) and European Corporate Governance Institute (ECGI) -- Robert J. Jackson Jr. - Columbia Law School --- The SEC is currently considering a rulemaking petition requesting that the SEC develop rules requiring that public companies disclose their spending on politics. The petition, which was submitted by a committee of ten corporate law professors that we co-chaired, has received unprecedented support, including comment letters from nearly half a million individuals. (...)the petition has also attracted opponents, including prominent members of Congress and business organizations.This Article puts forward a comprehensive, empirically grounded case for the rulemaking advocated in the petition. We present (..) evidence indicating that a substantial amount of corporate spending on politics occurs under investors’ radar screens, and that shareholders have significant interest in receiving information about such spending. We argue that disclosure of corporate political spending is necessary to ensure that such spending is consistent with shareholder interests. We discuss the emergence of voluntary disclosure practices in this area and show why voluntary disclosure is not a substitute for SEC rules. We also provide a framework for the SEC’s design of these rules. Finally, we consider and respond to ten objections that have been raised to disclosure rules of this kind. We show that all of the considered objections, both individually and collectively, provide no basis for opposing rules that would require public companies to disclose their spending on politics. -- downloaded pdf to Note
article  SSRN  US_government  administrative_law  administrative_agencies  financial_system  SEC  disclosure  corporate_law  corporate_governance  corporate_finance  corporate_citizenship  campaign_finance  capital_markets  investors  political_participation  lobbying  downloaded  EF-add 
november 2014 by dunnettreader
Mike Konczal, review essay - Selling Fast: Public Goods, Profits, and State Legitimacy | Boston Review - November 10, 2014
Nicholas R. Parrillo, Against the Profit Motive: The Salary Revolution in American Government, 1780–1940, Yale University Press, $55 (paper) -- Dana Goldstein, The Teacher Wars: A History of America’s Most Embattled Profession, Doubleday, $26.95 (cloth) -- Radley Balko, Rise of the Warrior Cop: The Militarization of America’s Police Forces, PublicAffairs, $17.99 (paper) -- Adam Smith was not the first, but he was certainly one of the most eloquent defenders of justice delivered according to the profit motive (..)since courts could charge fees for conducting a trial, each court would endeavor, “by superior dispatch and impartiality, to draw to itself as many causes as it could.” Competition meant a judge would try “to give, in his own court, the speediest and most effectual remedy which the law would admit, for every sort of injustice.” Left unsaid is what this system does to those who can’t afford to pay up. Our government is being remade in this mold—the mold of a business. The past thirty years have seen massive, outright privatization of government services. Meanwhile the logic of business, competition, and the profit motive has been introduced into what remains. But for those with a long enough historical memory, this is nothing new. Through the first half of our country’s history, public officials were paid according to the profit motive, and it was only through the failures of that system that a fragile accountability was put into place during the Progressive Era. One of the key sources of this accountability was the establishment of salaries for public officials who previously had been paid on commission.
books  reviews  kindle-available  US_government  US_society  governance  legitimacy  accountability  inequality  justice  privatization  US_history  18thC  19thC  20thC  21stC  competition  profit  Gilded_Age  Progressive_Era  civil_society  civil_liberties  US_constitution  Evernote  EF-add 
november 2014 by dunnettreader
Ruben Andersson - TIME TO UNFENCE OUR VIEW OF MIGRATION | Pandaemonium
Ruben Andersson is an anthropologist at LSE’s Civil Society and Human Security Research Unit, and the author of Illegality, Inc: Clandestine migration and the business of bordering Europe. He recently published a post on the LSE politics blog which described how immigration border fences feed the very problem they supposedly address. I am delighted to be able to republish it on Pandaemonium.
Ruben Andersson -- Migration panic is upon Calais yet again. Amid desperate and determined attempts by refugees and migrants to clamber over fences or scramble to reach UK-bound ferries, the media have over the past month painted a picture of yet another impending invasion. Police have launched crackdowns; far-right extremists have massed on the city; and French politicians have lobbied hard for a stronger British involvement in controls. In response to the chaos, the UK first offered to send France the ‘ring of steel’ fences recently used at the NATO summit; now it has pledged £12m over three years, earmarked – among other things – for the building of robust security barriers around Calais port. Fencing, the UK immigration minister has made clear, is one key element in efforts to ‘send out a very clear message… [that] Britain is no soft touch when it comes to illegal immigration’. -- Ruben Andersson’s book Illegality, Inc will be launched at the LSE on 14 October with a public discussion, Secure the borders: The cost and consequences of Europe’s ‘fight against irregular migration’. He tweets at @Ruben_Andersson. -- lots of links including absurd US SBI
21stC  nation-state  geography  migration  Labor_markets  EU  EU_governance  right-wing  EU-foreign_policy  US_government  US_politics  links 
october 2014 by dunnettreader
Home - Path to Full Employment | Project of Center on Budget and Policy Priorities
For most of the last few decades, the U.S. labor market has operated with considerable slack. Periods of full employment have been the exception, not the rule. In response, Jared Bernstein, Senior Fellow at the Center on Budget and Policy Priorities and previously Vice President Biden’s chief economic adviser, and the Center have begun a multiyear project to focus greater attention on the goal of reaching full employment and develop policy ideas to achieve this critical goal. To learn more about the project, visit our events page to watch our April 2 kick-off event at the National Press Club. To read a set of papers on policy ideas to get back to full employment, go to our papers’ page (this event was made possible thanks to a grant from the Rockefeller Foundation). -- Launched with big event and clutch of papers in April 2014 -- downloaded to Note pdf of Jared Bernstein's project overview paper -- as of October 2014 no new activity
US_economy  US_government  US_society  US_politics  Congress  Great_Recession  inequality  unemployment  labor  labor_law  labor_share  wages  wages-minimum  labor_standards  fiscal_policy  state_government  infrastructure  investment  downloaded  EF-add 
october 2014 by dunnettreader
Ylan Q. Mui - How the Fed is trying to fill in the gaps of monetary policy - The Washington Post - Oct 2014
[T]he Fed in recent years has made a concerted effort to incorporate Main Street concerns into their considerations of macroeconomic policy. On Thursday, Yellen will meet with nonprofits and community developers in Chelsea that have received funding through an initiative at the Boston Fed to address some of the economy’s most intractable problems — from long-term unemployment to access to credit — on the ground level. “When you think about maximum employment, monetary policy can deal with the cyclical," Boston Fed President Eric S. Rosengren said in an interview Thursday. "If we were able to change the mindset in some of these cities, the employment picture in these cities would clearly be better.” In Chelsea, Yellen will tour a program called Connect, which focuses on financial security. ....The three-year-old program seems to be gaining traction where monetary policy cannot. Ann Houston, executive director of the Neighborhood Developers, one of the organizations involved in the project, said those in the program see a $400 median increase in monthly net income. The median increase in credit score is 35 points. “Increasingly, there’s this recognition that monetary policy is sort of a blunt instrument,” said David Erickson, director of the Center for Community Development at the San Francisco Fed, which has compiled extensive research on programs and places that have successfully reduced poverty. “In that case, you need a little bit more of a surgical tool, and that’s where community development comes in.”
US_economy  US_government  US_society  Fed  financial_access  inequality  unemployment  community_development  education-training  education-finance  monetary_policy  banking 
october 2014 by dunnettreader
Austin Frakt - Notes on Cutler’s *The Quality Cure* | The Incidental Economist - October 2014
Below are my notes from reading David Cutler’s The Quality Cure. Quote of Cutler’s summary: " ...easiest changes are in the site of care. This involves people who are being hospitalized in expensive institutions when they could be treated just as well in less expensive ones or even on an outpatient basis. [...] The groundwork to affect [this] could be laid within one to two years [by 2016]. [...] Somewhat more difficult are changes that need to occur within institutions, to streamline the pathway of care for patients with various conditions [...] rationalizing who receives stents and who does not, implementing care pathways for routine labor and delivery, [etc.]. [...] My guess is that three to five years of work are required before major savings from these pathways can be realized [by 2021 if these follow after site-of-care changes]. The third tier of savings comes form populationwide prevention and patient engagement. [...] Such experimentation will need at least five years to start bearing fruit and likely a decade before major savings can be realized [by 2031 if this follows prior changes]. [...] All told, therefore, improving health care quality is a fifteen- to twenty-year venture. If we are able to pull out 30 percent of costs in fifteen years, this implies a cost reduction [productivity increase] of 2 percent annually. If the transition takes 20 years, the implication is an average cost savings [productivity increase] of 1.5 percent annually." -- If this productivity growth were entirely achieved by (or translated to) reductions in spending at the same rate, this would probably bring overall health care spending in line with GDP growth. However, as Cutler points out, we see higher productivity associated with more overall spending in other industries.
books  reviews  health_care  US_society  US_government  public_policy  management  productivity  organizations  OECD_economies 
october 2014 by dunnettreader
Dan Ward -Outrageous Waste—America’s Secret Strategy for Military Deterrence — War Is Boring - April 2014 — Medium
If BLOAT isn't our strategy it *should* be -- What if we spend decades and billions on cancelled and troubled projects, creating the appearance of difficulty and incompetence, in order to deceive our enemies and dissuade them from building advanced jets, tanks and ships? Making the unaffordable status quo appear inevitable creates a strong disincentive to hostile actors, so there is a genuine national benefit to convincing the world advanced weapon systems cannot be built in less than 25 years, even if we could actually do it in 18 months. I like to think this brilliant strategy has a cool codename like Operation BLOAT, short for Budgets Limit Opponent’s Acquisition of Technology. If BLOAT is real—and I hope it is—it explains why Allied pilots never had to engage Taliban pilots in dogfights over Afghanistan and why Al Qaeda never built a fleet of stealth bombers and submarines. In fact, Operation BLOAT ensures the U.S. military will never again face a Soviet-size opponent equipped with a full set of tanks, jets and ships. Any large nation who tries to follow America’s example will have great trouble fielding new gear, particularly if they steal our designs and try to build knock-offs. Meanwhile, smaller nations and assorted terrorist groups won’t even try in the first place.
US_government  US_foreign_policy  military  military-industrial_complex  IR_theory  strategy 
october 2014 by dunnettreader
What Is ISDS? | AFL-CIO Issues
What’s the risk? -- The risk is that foreign property owners can use this system of "corporate courts" to challenge anything from plain packaging rules for cigarettes to denials of permits for toxic waste dumps to increases in the minimum wage. For any law, regulation or other government decision that the foreign investor does not like, all it has to do is think of an argument for why the decision somehow violated its right to “fair and equitable treatment” or why it might reduce its expected profits and it’s got a case. And, sometimes, just threatening the case is enough for the proposed law or regulation to be withdrawn. -- downloaded pdf to Note "End Corporate Courts Now"
US_economy  US_politics  Congress  Obama_administration  US_government  state_government  regulation  regulation-harmonization  trade-agreements  Transatlantic_Trade_and_InvestmentPartnership  unions  investor-State_disputes  investment-bilateral_treaties  corporate_citizenship  MNCs  dispute_resolution  downloaded  EF-add 
october 2014 by dunnettreader
Rhodium Group » Remaking American Power - Economic Impacts of EPA Guidelines proposal - Preliminary Findings - July 24, 2014
John Larsen, Shashank Mohan, Whitney Ketchum, and Trevor Houser -- On June 2, 2014, the EPA proposed guidelines for states to develop and implement carbon dioxide emissions standards for existing US power plants. These rules will likely bring about the most significant change in the US electricity sector in decades. But regulating GHG emissions from existing power plants will also have important supply-side implications, whether fuel switching from coal to natural gas or expanded production of renewable energy and energy efficiency equipment technology. CSIS and RHG have partnered to do an initial assessment of the economic impact of future emissions standards that accounts for these broader energy market dynamics and maps impacts by region of the country to help inform key regional and industry stakeholders. The study focuses on the changes to the electric power and energy production that are likely to under the EPA’s proposal, as well as price, demand expenditures and other impacts. The analysis provides a balanced and measured set of estimates of national and regional results to inform ongoing policy deliberations both in Washington and in the states. -- downloaded pdf to Note
US_economy  US_government  state_government  energy  energy-markets  public_policy  downloaded 
september 2014 by dunnettreader
Chart of the day | occasional links & commentary -September 2014
Standard & Poor’s [pdf] finds a strong correlation between growing income inequality and the fiscal crisis of the states. The argument is pretty straightforward: rising income inequality since the late 1970s has been accompanied by two trends in the tax revenues received by the various states: a slowing in the rate of growth of tax revenues (from 1980 to 2011, average annual state tax revenue growth fell to 5 percent from 10 percent) and by a growing volatility in state tax revenues (from a standard deviation of 3.55 during 1950-1979 and 1.04 during 1990-1999 to 5.78 from 2000 to 2009). And the explanation for this relationship? - " the higher savings rates of those with high incomes causes aggregate consumer spending to suffer. And since one person’s spending is another person’s income, the result is slower overall personal income growth despite continued strong income gains at the top." On top of that, "Those at the top obtain more of their income from capital gains, which on the whole, fluctuate much more than income from wages. Tax revenues reflect this — both as a consequence of higher top-end tax rates and because the top end is where the income growth has occurred –- and are, therefore, more volatile." Thus, we should understand the following: when Standard & Poor’s downgrades the credit rating of one or another state, it’s actually downgrading the rise of income inequality within and across the states.
US_economy  US_government  state_government  taxes  tax_collection  fiscal_policy  public_finance  rating_agencies  inequality  1-percent  capital_gains  economic_growth  wages  savings 
september 2014 by dunnettreader
Legislative Tracker | Georgetown Climate Center
The Georgetown Climate Center tracks federal legislation that affects adaptation, energy, greenhouse gas emissions, and transportation policies. The Center also analyzes key legislation and identifies how pending bills could impact existing state policies and programs.
website  US_government  Congress  legislation  climate  climate-adaptation  risk-mitigation  land_use_planning  infrastructure  local_government  ocean  coastal_development  regulation-environment 
september 2014 by dunnettreader
Preparing Our Communities for Climate Impacts: Recommendations for Federal Action | Georgetown Climate Center - September 2014
The Georgetown Climate Center released 100 recommendations today to improve federal programs that could be used to prepare for climate change. The new report will inform the White House State, Local and Tribal Leaders Task Force on Climate Preparedness and Resilience.The report draws from a series of workshops with leading federal, state and local officials and builds upon lessons learned post-disaster in New Orleans (following Hurricane Katrina), New York (Hurricane Sandy) and Vermont (Hurricane Irene). The report identifies more than 30 federal programs, initiatives and laws that can be used to prepare for extreme events such as storms, floods and heat waves as well as rising seas. Although state and local governments will be the primary actors when it comes to preparing for climate change impacts, the federal government can boost – or impede – preparedness. The federal government sends billions of dollars to states and communities every year, some of which could be used more effectively to adapt to climate change. Federal laws and regulations also can be important drivers of state and local action. But, in some cases, federal rules have hindered state and local innovation. The recommendations in the report explore how existing federal dollars, programs, regulations and policies can be retooled, repurposed and deployed to promote and remove barriers to adaptation. -- downloaded pdf to Note
US_government  local_government  state_government  disaster  climate  risk-mitigation  environment  administrative_agencies  ocean  coordination-governments  regulation  cross-border  federalism  public_finance  infrastructure  downloaded  EF-add 
september 2014 by dunnettreader
The People vs. Federal Bank Settlements and Liquidity Rules | Demos - September 2014
The Big Six settlements are negligible compared to the damage their practices (and the practices of the investment banks they bought at the onset of the crisis rendering them bigger) considering that since 2006, there have been foreclosure actions brought against nearly 15 million homes. With an average value of about $191,000 per home, the total value represented by those foreclosure actions is approximately $2.8 trillion - a far cry from $106 billion. Let this sink in. Our government and bankers settled on $32 billion in maybe-aid to borrowers relative to $2.8 trillion of foreclosed properties many of which are being scooped up by hedge and private equity funds financed by the same big banks. Not only that. These banks have been able to access money at close to 0 percent interest courtesy of the Federal Reserve for nearly six years. Yet, rather than reducing mortgage principals with that extra cheap money, they stockpiled a record volume of $2.5 trillion in excess reserves at the Federal Reserve for which they are reaping 0.25% interest – higher interest than they give their mere mortal customers. -- and the banks are throwing a tizzy fit over increasing liquidity from 1 to 2% of assets -- post also gives figures on obscene consolidation of US banking since the crisis in BofA, Wells Fargo and JPMorganChase
US_economy  US_government  Fed  financial_regulation  banking  Great_Recession  housing  regulation-enforcement  financialization  financial_crisis  inequality  antitrust  oligarchy  political_economy  EF-add 
september 2014 by dunnettreader
Special Series: Contract to Cheat - Misclassification of Labor in the Government Contracts Construction Industry | McClatchy September 2014
Across the country, roughly 10 million construction workers spend each day in a dangerous and fickle industry. They hang drywall, lay carpet, shingle roofs. Yet in the eyes of their bosses, they aren't employees due the benefits the government requires. Employers treat many of these laborers as independent contractors. It's a tactic that costs taxpayers billions of dollars each year. Yet when it comes to public projects, government regulators have done nearly nothing about it, even when the proof is easy to get. The workers don't have protections. The companies don't withhold taxes. The regulators don't seem to care. McClatchy reporters in eight newsrooms spanning seven states spent a year unraveling the scheme, using little-noticed payroll records that show how widespread the practice has become and what it costs us all.
US_economy  US_government  local_government  regulation  regulation-enforcement  labor_law  labor  wages  race-to-the-bottom  Obama_administration 
september 2014 by dunnettreader
Tracy Alloway - RBS slashes US mortgage business - FT.com - May 2014
RBS is shrinking in the US under regulatory pressure from the Fed, with the loss of hundreds of jobs, mainly in mortgage trading, executives told staff on Tuesday. The moves solidify a sharp reversal in strategy from RBS, which built one of the biggest trading floors in the world in Stamford, Connecticut outside New York, but has now dramatically scaled back its ambitions. [New Fed rules] impose tough stress tests on foreign broker-dealers with more than $50bn in assets. -- In spite of the entreaties from Barclays and some officials such as Michel Barnier, the European commissioner, the Fed pushed ahead in March with the rules, including a stricter “leverage ratio”. Barclays argued the application of such a blunt measure of capital was unfair. In one concession that cheered foreign banks, the Fed did grant more time to comply. Typically, banks have been able to measure their capital on a global basis, with equity in one country counting against assets in another. But the Fed is concerned that US subsidiaries of banks with a large trading operation – particularly Barclays and Deutsche – could come unstuck and might come looking for US government support.
international_finance  US_economy  US_government  Fed  financial_regulation  capital_flows  leverage  banking  EU  securitization 
september 2014 by dunnettreader
Reuters - Water's edge: the crisis of rising sea levels - September 2014
Reuters special investigation of totally haphazard, uncoordinated, impossibly expensive problems of dealing with rising oceans and subsiding ground levels (mostly from depleting aquifers) along US shores controlled by state and local governments, driven by a combination of denial and grubbing for federal dollars for piecemeal pet projects. The pace of shore loss (1 beach up to 22 ft a yr) and costs are documented to be accelerating rapidly.
US_government  US_society  climate  ocean  water  Congress  risk  local_government  local_politics  GOP 
september 2014 by dunnettreader
John Emerich Edward Dalberg, Lord Acton, The History of Freedom and Other Essays, ed. John Neville Figgis and Reginald Vere Laurence (London: Macmillan, 1907). - Online Library of Liberty
Acton never completed his projected History of Liberty. We do have however several collections of his writings such as this one which contains 2 chapters from this planned history – on liberty in antiquity and Christianity – and many book reviews where one can piece together Acton’s approach to the writing of such a history. This volume consists of articles reprinted from the following journals: The Quarterly Review, The English Historical Review, The Nineteenth Century, The Rambler, The Home and Foreign Review, The North British Review, The Bridgnorth Journal. *--* CHRONICLE. *-* INTRODUCTION. *-* I: THE HISTORY OF FREEDOM IN ANTIQUITY. *-* II: THE HISTORY OF FREEDOM IN CHRISTIANITY. *-* III: SIR ERSKINE MAY’S DEMOCRACY IN EUROPE. *-* IV: THE MASSACRE OF ST. BARTHOLOMEW. *-* V: THE PROTESTANT THEORY OF PERSECUTION *-* VI: POLITICAL THOUGHTS ON THE CHURCH. *-* VII: INTRODUCTION TO L. A. BURD’S EDITION OF IL PRINCIPE BY MACHIAVELLI. *-* VIII: MR. GOLDWIN SMITH’S IRISH HISTORY. *-* IX: NATIONALITY. *-* X: DÖLLINGER ON THE TEMPORAL POWER. *-* XI: DÖLLINGER’S HISTORICAL WORK. *-* XII: CARDINAL WISEMAN AND THE HOME AND FOREIGN REVIEW. *'* XIII: CONFLICTS WITH ROME. *-* XIV: THE VATICAN COUNCIL. *-* XV: A HISTORY OF THE INQUISITION OF THE MIDDLE AGES. By Henry Charles Lea. *-* XVI: THE AMERICAN COMMONWEALTH. By James Bryce. *-* XVII: HISTORICAL PHILOSOPHY IN FRANCE AND FRENCH BELGIUM AND SWITZERLAND. By Robert Flint. -- downloaded kindle version of html
books  etexts  Liberty_Fund  downloaded  intellectual_history  historiography  political_philosophy  political_history  political_culture  liberty  Christianity  Christendom  antiquity  ancient_Greece  ancient_Rome  ancient_history  democracy  Reformation  persecution  Counter-Reformation  Inquisition  Wars_of_Religion  Bartholomew_Day_massacre  Huguenots  Protestants  national_ID  nationalism  Machiavelli  historiography-19thC  US_constitution  US_government  US_politics 
september 2014 by dunnettreader
The Reshoring Initiative Blog: The Reshoring Initiative's Recommendations for the Federal Government
The economic bleeding due to increasing offshoring has stopped. The rate of new reshoring is now equal to the rate of new offshoring. The challenge is now to reshore the 3 to 4 million manufacturing jobs that are still offshored. Recent reshoring announcements and successes by Apple, Caterpillar and GE and analysis of the economics of reshoring suggest that we could raise the net reshoring rate from the current zero jobs/year to 50,000. For the U.S. to achieve its full reshoring potential requires a continuation of offshore cost trends, improvement in U.S. competitiveness and changes in companies’ sourcing decision metrics. The U.S. government can influence all of these factors with minimal expenditure -- most recommendations for Dept of Commerce, especially integrating their reshoring tools and materials in their programs - also some Dept of Education extending encouragement of community college training initiatives - extend use of tool for calculating full costs of off-shoring as e.g. condition of federal contracts -- big issue currency manipulation by e.g. China at end of list is different in kind from the sorts of reorientation or extension of government programs or public-private_partnerships
US_government  US_economy  manufacturing  Labor_markets  exports  off-shoring  business  SMEs  unemployment 
august 2014 by dunnettreader
About MEP
The National Institute of Standards and Technology’s Hollings Manufacturing Extension Partnership (MEP) works with small and medium-sized manufacturers to help them create and retain jobs, increase profits, and save time and money. The nationwide network provides a variety of services, from innovation strategies to process improvements to green manufacturing. MEP also works with partners at the state and federal levels on programs that put manufacturers in position to develop new customers, expand into new markets and create new products. As a program of the Dept of Commerce, MEP is a nationwide network of more than 1,200 technical experts, - located in every state - serving as trusted business advisors, focused on transforming U.S. manufacturers to compete globally, support supply chain integration, and provide access to technology for improved productivity. MEP is built around manufacturing extension centers locally positioned throughout 50 states and Puerto Rico. MEP Centers are a diverse network of state, university-based, and non-profit organizations, offering products and services that address the critical needs of their local manufacturers. Each center works directly with area manufacturers to provide expertise and services tailored to their most critical needs, ranging from process improvement and workforce development to business practices and technology transfer. Additionally centers connect manufacturers with government and trade associations, universities and research laboratories, and a host of other public and private resources to help them realize individual goals.
US_government  business  SMEs  Innovation  exports  technical_assistance  productivity  manufacturing  technology_transfer  public-private_partnerships  nonprofit  supply_chains  education-training 
august 2014 by dunnettreader
KATRINA FORRESTER -- CITIZENSHIP, WAR, AND THE ORIGINS OF INTERNATIONAL ETHICS IN AMERICAN POLITICAL PHILOSOPHY, 1960–1975 (2014). | The Historical Journal, 57, pp 773-801. - Cambridge Journals Online - Abstract
KATRINA FORRESTER - St John's College, Cambridge -- This article examines a series of debates about civil disobedience, conscription, and the justice of war that took place among American liberal philosophers, lawyers, and activists during the civil rights movement and the Vietnam War. It argues that these debates fundamentally reshaped American political philosophy, by shifting the focus from the welfare state to the realm of international politics. In order to chart this transition from the domestic to the international, this article focuses on the writings of two influential political theorists, John Rawls and Michael Walzer. The turn to international politics in American political philosophy has its origins, in part, in their arguments about domestic citizenship. In tracing these origins, this article situates academic philosophical arguments alongside debates among the American public at large. It offers a first account of the history of analytical political philosophy during the 1960s and 1970s, and argues that the role played by the Vietnam War in this history, though underappreciated, is significant. -* I would like to thank Duncan Bell, Kenzie Bok, Christopher Brooke, Adam Lebowitz, Peter Mandler, Jamie Martin, Samuel Moyn, Andrew Preston, David Runciman, Tim Shenk, Brandon Terry, Mira Siegelberg, Joshua Specht, and two anonymous reviewers for their comments
article  paywall  intellectual_history  political_philosophy  analytical_philosophy  20thC  US_politics  US_foreign_policy  post-WWII  Vietnam_War  citizenship  civil_liberties  IR-liberalism  IR-domestic_politics  IR_theory  liberalism  Rawls  Walzer  power  power-asymmetric  justice  welfare_state  just_war  moral_philosophy  US_government  EF-add 
august 2014 by dunnettreader
Equity, Excellence and Inclusiveness in Education: Policy Lessons from Around the World (July 2014) - OECD iLibrary
Excellence in education without equity risks leading to large economic and social disparities; equity in education at the expense of quality is a meaningless aspiration. The most advanced education systems now set ambitious goals for all students, focusing on both excellence and equity. They also equip their teachers with the pedagogic skills that have been proven effective and with enough autonomy so that teachers can use their own creativity in determining the content and instruction they provide to their individual students. The fourth International Summit on the Teaching Profession brought together education ministers, union leaders and other teacher leaders from high-performing and rapidly improving education systems, as measured by PISA (the OECD Programme for International Student Assessment ). Their aim was to discuss equity, excellence and inclusiveness in education by exploring three questions: • How are high-quality teachers developed, and how do schools with the greatest need attract and retain them? • How can equity be ensured in increasingly devolved education systems? and • What kinds of learning environments address the needs of all students? - To underpin the discussions, this publication identifies some of the steps policy makers can take to build school systems that are both equitable and excellent. The analysis is complemented with examples that illustrate proven or promising practices in specific countries. -- Online access but pdf download requires $
education  inequality  poverty  culture  unions  governmentality  central_government  local_government  OECD_economies  US_government  US_society  university-contemporary  public_policy  public_goods 
july 2014 by dunnettreader
Why it’s hard for the US to learn from other countries on education - Vox - July 2014
Summary of OECD report re US comparative position on different metrics and what lessons might be drawn from the report -- see other bookmark for OECD link (to read online - pdf requires $) -- New data on poverty, inequality and education are likely to reignite the conversation. But it's easier to point to what other countries are doing right than it is to figure out what lessons they can teach the US. That's evident in the latest education report from the OECD, a group of 34 mostly rich countries and economies. The OECD is a big player in the international-comparison game because it tests students around the world in math, reading and other subjects. Those tests are often used as benchmarks to show that the US is falling behind. The OECD, though, also reports on how different nations handle inequity in education. That data, like the test scores, shows the US has a long way to go.
education  inequality  poverty  culture  unions  governmentality  central_government  local_government  OECD_economies  US_government  US_society  university-contemporary  public_policy  public_goods 
july 2014 by dunnettreader
Big Data and Discrimination | Demos - May 2014
On May 1, the White House released a 90 day review studying the effects of big data and privacy, led by Obama's Counsel, John Podesta. Big data truly has enormous potential for social change and creative innovation. However, a key finding of the review is that big data analytics has the potential to lead to discriminatory outcomes and to evade and stymie hard-won civil rights protections in housing, employment, credit, and the consumer market. Fundamentally, big data creates a power imbalance between those who hold and apply the data and between those who knowingly or unknowingly supply it. The review finds that perfect personalization, which is the fusion of many different kinds of data, processed in real time, can lead to overt and covert forms of discrimination in pricing, services, and opportunities.
US_government  Internet  tech  civil_liberties  inequality  Innovation  consumers 
may 2014 by dunnettreader
Separation of Parties, Not Powers by Daryl J. Levinson, Richard H. Pildes :: SSRN (Harvard Law Review 2006)
Few aspects of the Founding generation's political theory are now more clearly anachronistic than their vision of legislative-executive separation of powers. Nevertheless, few of the Framers' ideas continue to be taken as literally or sanctified as deeply by courts and constitutional scholars as the passages about interbranch relations in Madison's Federalist 51. This Article reenvisions the law and theory of separation of powers by viewing it through the lens of party competition. In particular, it points out that during periods - like the present - of cohesive and polarized political parties, the degree and kind of competition between the legislative and executive branches will vary significantly, and may all but disappear, depending on whether party control of the House, Senate, and Presidency is divided or unified. The practical distinction between party-divided and party-unified government thus rivals, and often dominates, the constitutional distinction between the branches in predicting and explaining interbranch political dynamics. Recognizing that these dynamics will shift from competitive when government is divided to cooperative when it is unified calls into question basic assumptions of separation of powers law and theory. More constructively, re-focusing the separation of powers on parties casts numerous aspects of constitutional structure, doctrine, and institutional design in a new and more realistic light. Numbers of Pages in PDF File: 74 -- downloaded pdf to Note
article  SSRN  US_government  US_politics  parties  partisanship  separation-of-powers  US_constitution  Founders  Madison  Congress  executive  downloaded  EF-add 
march 2014 by dunnettreader
Beryl Lieff Benderly, book review - Academia's Crooked Money Trail | Science Careers Jan 2012
“Follow the money!” -- The strategy also serves Georgia State University economist Paula Stephan extremely well in her illuminating and accessible new book, How Economics Shapes Science. A leading expert on the scientific labor market, Stephan isn’t looking to sniff out high-level government corruption. Rather, using the “tool bag” economics provides for “analyzing the relationships between incentives and costs,” she penetrates the financial structure of university-based science, explaining the motivation and behavior of everyone from august university presidents and professors to powerless and impecunious graduate students and postdocs. Undergraduates also carry an increasing share of the load, she adds: Their tuition, often paid with student loans, rises as more funds go to research. Their teachers, meanwhile, increasingly are cut-rate adjuncts rather than the famous professors the recruiting brochures boast about.
books  reviews  US_society  US_government  scientific_culture  science-and-politics  education-higher  Innovation  Labor_markets  EF-add 
march 2014 by dunnettreader
The Political Economy of Dodd-Frank: Why Financial Reform Tends to be Frustrated and Systemic Risk Perpetuated by John C. Coffee :: SSRN
86 pages -- didn't download -- Several commentators have argued that financial “reform” legislation enacted after a market crash is invariably flawed, results in “quack corporate governance” and “bubble laws,” and should be discouraged. This criticism has been specifically directed at both the Sarbanes-Oxley Act and the Dodd-Frank Act. This article presents a rival perspective. Investors, it argues, are naturally dispersed and poorly organized and so constitute a classic “latent group” (in Mancur Olson’s terminology). Such latent groups tend to be dominated by smaller, but more cohesive and better funded special interest groups in the competition to shape legislation and influence regulatory policy. This domination is interrupted, however, by major crises, which encourage “political entrepreneurs” to bear the transaction costs of organizing latent interest groups to take effective action. But such republican triumphs prove temporary, because, after the crisis subsides, the hegemony of the better organized interest groups is restored.

As a result, a persistent cycle that this article calls the “Regulatory Sine Curve” can be observed: the legislative success of the latent investor group is followed by increasingly equivocal implementation of the new legislation, tepid enforcement, and eventual legislative erosion. This article traces that pattern with respect to both the Sarbanes-Oxley Act and the ongoing implementation of the Dodd-Frank Act.

This article does not deny that “reform” legislation often contains flaws (as does much deregulatory legislation). But these are usually quickly eliminated in the latter half of the cycle. The greater dilemma is instead whether the problem of systemic risk can be satisfactorily addressed in the presence of the Regulatory Sine Curve.
paper  SSRN  financial_regulation  capital_markets  interest_groups  public_choice  legislation  US_government  financial_crisis  banking  global_governance  international_political_economy  political_economy 
february 2014 by dunnettreader
Mike Lofgren - Anatomy of the Deep State | BillMoyers.com Feb 2014
Yes, there is another government concealed behind the one that is visible at either end of Pennsylvania Avenue, a hybrid entity of public and private institutions ruling the country according to consistent patterns in season and out, connected to, but only intermittently controlled by, the visible state whose leaders we choose. My analysis of this phenomenon is not an exposé of a secret, conspiratorial cabal; the state within a state is hiding mostly in plain sight, and its operators mainly act in the light of day. Nor can this other government be accurately termed an “establishment.” All complex societies have an establishment, a social network committed to its own enrichment and perpetuation. In terms of its scope, financial resources and sheer global reach, the American hybrid state, the Deep State, is in a class by itself. That said, it is neither omniscient nor invincible. The institution is not so much sinister (although it has highly sinister aspects) as it is relentlessly well entrenched. Far from being invincible, its failures, such as those in Iraq, Afghanistan and Libya, are routine enough that it is only the Deep State’s protectiveness towards its higher-ranking personnel that allows them to escape the consequences of their frequent ineptitude.
US_government  US_military  US_politics  US_economy  GWOT  US_foreign_policy  national_security 
february 2014 by dunnettreader
Joel Lieske - The Changing Regional Subcultures of the American States and the Utility of a New Cultural Measure | JSTOR: Political Research Quarterly, Vol. 63, No. 3 (SEPTEMBER 2010), pp. 538-552
This study analyzes changes in the regional subcultures of the United States using 2000 census and religious survey data. The results suggest a remarkable degree of continuity with those the authors identified in an earlier study. In addition, they demonstrate that a new multidimensional measure of state culture does a much better job in predicting social and political behavior than other frequently used indicators. Finally, they show how their new measure of state culture significantly reduces and often eliminates the problem of spatial autocorrelation in many state-level indicators that cannot be explained by differences in economic development and racial—ethnic diversity. -- Some useful discussion re that "political culture" is real, but how to measure it. Distinguishes ideology (the what of policies) from political culture (the how of government). Compares approach with work that stemmed from Fischer 4 British folkways traced through immigration and subsequent migration patterns. -- didn't download
article  jstor  political_science  political_culture  ideology  immigration  migration  US_politics  US_history  US_government  methodology-quantitative  EF-add 
february 2014 by dunnettreader
Jim Hanley - U.S. Presidency 1: The Presidential Debate of 1787 | Ordinary Times Jan 28 2014
Abstract -- The lack of a national executive power under the Articles of Confederation was a major factor in the weakness and fragmenting of the American union in the post-Revolutionary era, a point recognized by James Madison and corrected in the Constitution. Opponents of the Constitution, the Anti-Federalists, saw the presidency as an incipient source of tyranny. Rebutting them, Hamilton argued that energy in the executive was critical to competent governance, and that the presidency was sufficiently constrained so that while a president could act as necessary for the good of the union he could not become tyrannical. How do these arguments hold for the contemporary presidency?
US_history  18thC  Early_Republic  US_constitution  US_government  US_politics  Madison  Hamilton  Founders  Federalist  separation-of-powers  executive  prerogative  EF-add 
february 2014 by dunnettreader
Jim Hanley - Introduction: U.S. Presidency - syllabus | Ordinary Times Jan 27 2014
The two main books are:

Presidential Power: Unchecked and Unbalanced, by Matthew Crenson and Benjamin Ginsberg. (buy cheap)
The Presidency and the Political System, Michael Nelson, ed. (buy, but not exactly cheap)
US_history  US_politics  US_government  US_constitution  18thC  Early_Republic  Founders  Madison  Hamilton  bibliography  EF-add 
february 2014 by dunnettreader
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