dunnettreader + us_foreign_policy   104

Re-Branded and Expanded: Visual Politics and the Implications of Guantanamo’s Make-Over | Duck of Minerva
There is a certain theatre to the Global War on Terror (GWoT). From the opening sequence of 9/11 to the shock and awe campaign ’ s projection of American…
GWOT  Gitmo  US_foreign_policy  US_military  soft_power  Trump-foreign_policy  from instapaper
march 2018 by dunnettreader
Unipolar Strategy in a Multipolar World
by Paul R. Pillar Vladimir Putin’s video show about formidable new Russian strategic weapons, which took up half of the Russian president’s recent…
US_foreign_policy  Russia  Russia-foreign_policy  multipolar  global_system  IR  military  from instapaper
march 2018 by dunnettreader
Grownups Are Not Running America’s Foreign Policy
At least their ties almost match. Photo: Brendan Smialowski/AFP/Getty Images Americans have gotten at least a little bit used to the idea that the Trump White…
US_foreign_policy  Trump-foreign_policy  from instapaper
march 2018 by dunnettreader
WTF happened in Lebanon and ISIS update - Tommy Vietor's foreign affairs podcast - Crooked Media - Nov 17 2017
With Rob Malley - Crisis Group - was ISIS lead on Obama NSC - he arrived in Beirut, scheduled to meet Hariri, just as Hariri resigned on Saudi TV. The stunt has succeeded in producing the miracle of all parties in Lebanon agreeing on something - that it was effectively a hostage situation and they want their Prime Minister back. The discussion mostly deals with Saudi screwing stuff up and MBS consistently taking counterproductive steps that blow up in his face, the problems when Trump is seen by the region as giving MBS a blank check, and the clean up efforts required, which the Trump Admin isn't (yet?) organized to do consistently. The only winner is Iran, which just has to sit back quietly and get out the popcorn. Interesting discussion of how the Obama administration found it difficult to stay out of supporting Saudis re Yemen - timing with Iran nuclear talks was key consideration in limiting perceived options.
podcast  US_foreign_policy  Obama_administration  Trump_foreign_policy  MENA  Lebanon  Saudia_Arabia  Iran  Syria  ISIS  GWOT  diplomacy 
november 2017 by dunnettreader
Prompt Global Strike: American and Foreign Developments - Carnegie Endowment for International Peace
JAMES M. ACTON
Testimony - December 08, 2015
House Armed Services Subcommittee on Strategic Forces
Summary:  The difficulty of reaching a definitive conclusion about whether to acquire Conventional Prompt Global Strike (CPGS) weapons stems both from technological immaturity and from flaws in the Department of Defense’s approach to CPGS development.
Copied to Evernote
US_military  US_foreign_policy  Air_Force  global_strike  strategy  military-industrial_complex 
july 2017 by dunnettreader
Flores-Maciss
What determines when states adopt war taxes to finance the cost of conflict? We address this question with a study of war taxes in the United States between 1789 and 2010. Using logit estimation of the determinants of war taxes, an analysis of roll-call votes on war tax legislation, and a historical case study of the Civil War, we provide evidence that partisan fiscal differences account whether the United States finances its conflicts through war taxes or opts for alternatives such as borrowing or expanding the money supply. Because the fiscal policies implemented to raise the revenues for war have considerable and often enduring redistributive impacts, war finance—in particular, war taxation—becomes a high-stakes political opportunity to advance the fiscal interests of core constituencies. Insofar as the alternatives to taxation shroud the actual costs of war, the findings have important implications for democratic accountability and the conduct of conflict. - Downloaded via iphone
US_history  downloaded  politics-and-money  US_military  deficit_finance  sovereign_debt  business_cycles  international_finance  fiscal_policy  Congress  US_foreign_policy  capital_markets  fiscal-military_state  political_history  article  political_economy  monetary_policy  taxes  US_politics  accountability  financial_system  redistribution  business-and-politics 
july 2017 by dunnettreader
The US joins the Turkey-PKK fight in northern Syria - International Crisis Group - June 2017
Kurdish People’s Protection Units (YPG) members man a checkpoint near the Kurdish town of Efrin, in Syria, on 27 November 2014. REUTERS/Abdalrhman Ismail Report…
Trump_foreign_policy  US_foreign_policy  Syria  Iraq  Iran  ISIS  Russia  Turkey  US_military  Kurds  from instapaper
june 2017 by dunnettreader
Trump’s Self-Defeating Executive Order On Interrogation | Lawfare - Jan 2017
Author's Note: I wrote the following in the belief that the draft executive order published yesterday by the Washington Post and analyzed yesterday by the Times…
Instapaper  Trump  executive_orders  US_foreign_policy  US_legal_system  US_military  torture  Congress  from instapaper
january 2017 by dunnettreader
Kurt Newman - Reflections on the Conference "Beyond the New Deal Order " Sept 2015 - S-USIH Blog
The impetus for the conference was the anniversary of a classic collection of essays edited by Steve Fraser and Gary Gerstle: The Rise and Fall of the New Deal Order, published by Princeton University Press in 1989. We learned that this volume came together in the mid-1980s as New Left veterans Fraser and Gerstle surveyed the rise of Reaganism and lamented the poverty of New Deal historiography: dominated as it then was by Whig great man hagiography and toothless stories of cycles of American liberalism and conservatism. We learned, too, that “order” was chosen carefully from a longer list of contenders (“regime,” “system,” etc), and that this choice of “order” was deeply connected to the volume’s stated goal of providing a ‘historical autopsy” for the period that ran from the election of FDR to the PATCO firings.
historiography  US_history  19thC  20thC  pre-WWI  entre_deux_guerres  post-WWII  US_politics  US_economy  political_economy  political_culture  New_Deal  US_politics-race  US_government  US_society  US_foreign_policy  US_military  state-roles  social_order  social_sciences-post-WWII  Keynesianism  Keynes  Reagan  labor_history  New_Left  historians-and-politics 
october 2016 by dunnettreader
Div Levin - When Great Powers Get a Vote - International Studies Quarterly - 2016
What are the electoral consequences of attempts by great powers to intervene in a partisan manner in another country’s elections? Great powers frequently deploy partisan electoral interventions as a major foreign policy tool. For example, the U.S. and the USSR/Russia have intervened in one of every nine competitive national level executive elections between 1946 and 2000. However, scant scholarly research has been conducted about their effects on the election results in the target. I argue that such interventions usually significantly increase the electoral chances of the aided candidate and that overt interventions are more effective than covert interventions. I then test these hypotheses utilizing a new, original dataset of all U.S. and USSR/Russian partisan electoral interventions between 1946 and 2000. I find strong support for both arguments.
US_foreign_policy  downloaded  propaganda  soft_power  power  article  post-Cold_War  Cold_War  elections  influence-IR  Grear_Powers  intervention  IR-domestic_politics 
july 2016 by dunnettreader
Benjamin Witte - Trump as National Security Threat | Lawfare Blog
I don’t, as a rule, endorse political candidates. I don’t do work for campaigns. I have never given a dime to a candidate—for any office. I have never signed up…
Instapaper  national_security  US_foreign_policy  US_government  Trump  elections-2016  exec_branch  US_legal_system  US_military  IR-domestic_politics  from instapaper
july 2016 by dunnettreader
This reports sheds new light on Obama's most controversial piece of foreign policy - drones
The White House has released data on the number of civilians killed in drone attacks . The United States has inadvertently killed between 64…
US_foreign_policy  Obama_administration  drones  CIA  DOD  counter-terrorism  GWOT  from instapaper
july 2016 by dunnettreader
The Papers of John Jay | Columbia Digital Library Collections
The Papers of John Jay is an image database and indexing tool comprising some 13,000 documents (more than 30,000 page images) scanned chiefly from photocopies of original documents. Most of the source material was assembled by Columbia University's John Jay publication project staff during the 1960s and 1970s under the direction of the late Professor Richard B. Morris. These photocopies were originally intended to be used as source texts for documents to be included in a planned four-volume letterpress series entitled The Selected Unpublished Papers of John Jay, of which only two volumes were published.

In 2005, the new, seven-volume letterpress and online edition of The Selected Papers of John Jay was launched under the direction of Dr. Elizabeth M. Nuxoll and is being published by the University of Virginia Press as part of its Rotunda American Founding Era Collection. The new Selected Papers project not only uses the online Jay material available on this website as source texts, but also provides links from document transcriptions in the letterpress and digital editions to the scanned page images posted here.
website  US_history  American_colonies  American_Revolution  Early_Republic  US_constitution  US_foreign_policy  correspondence  Founders  Jay_John  manuscripts  papers-collected  libraries  digital_humanities 
october 2015 by dunnettreader
Robert Kuttner - America's Collapsing Trade Initiatives | HuffPost blog - Sept 2015
As Kuttner says, these deals are collapsing under their own (lack of) logic -- though the MNCs that would benefit will do their utmost to keep them alive. The ISDS problem is looking increasingly fatal in the EU - a proposal for a "better" dispute resolution forum is being rejected by both the Friends of the Earth and the US Chamber of Commerce. Kuttner also thinks Canada, regardless of who's the next PM, will struggle to swallow it. The most maddening claim is how the MNCs will accept the US "giving away the store" seen from an American angle of jobs and trade deficits, since their foreign manufacturing operations will benefit.
MNCs  Trans-Pacific-Partnership  investor-State_disputes  FX-rate_management  Labor_markets  wages  Pocket  EU_governance  trade  Transatlantic_Trade_and_InvestmentPartnership  US-China  capital_flows  Obama_administration  China-international_relations  trade-policy  trade-agreements  ISDS  unemployment  US_foreign_policy  FX-misalignment  from pocket
september 2015 by dunnettreader
Dave Roberts - Carly Fiorina did a 4-minute riff on climate change. Everything she said was wrong.| Vox - August 2015
Fiorina is test marketing the "moderate Republican" approach to do-nothing policies on climate change -- don't look like a crazy science denialist, but after "accepting the science" provide misinformation to justify do-nothing
Pocket  US_politics  GOP  climate-denialism  climate  climate-adaptation  diplomacy-environment  US_foreign_policy  renewables  oil  coal  fiscal_policy  EPA  from pocket
august 2015 by dunnettreader
Philip Giraldi - The Neoconservative "Cursus Honorum" | The American Conservative - March 2015
The warmongering right has carefully built a network of credentialing institutions that secure it outsized influence. -- Wingnut welfare involves crucial initial steps of using their institutions to produce fake validation of expert credentials and then maintain them in an alphabet soup of "think tanjs" for hacks, publishing outlets and cushy private sector positions when the revolving door isn't available.
Instapaper  US_politics-foreign_policy  US_foreign_policy  neocons  wingnut_welfare  Israel  Iraq  Iran  arms_control  interventionism  from instapaper
july 2015 by dunnettreader
Philip Giraldi - Revenge of the Anti-Terror State | The American Conservative - July 2015
In Washington, a favored bit of legislation that doesn’t make it through the committee and onto the floor for a vote can always be tacked on to another bill. Or, if there is some awkwardness about it, it can always be repackaged and given another name. Both of those tactics are currently being employed to revive the Violent Radicalization Act as the The Countering Violent Extremism Act of 2015, which is now being rolled into the renewal of the Homeland Security Act as an amendment. It has also been bureaucratically jiggled, creating an Office for Countering Violent Extremism headed by an Assistant Secretary under the direction of the Department of Homeland Security (DHS) rather than a commission run by Congress.
Instapaper  military-industrial  bureaucracy  spying  marginalized_groups  Islamophobia  US_politics  US_foreign_policy  GWOT  DHS  civil_liberties  US_government  Congress  from instapaper
july 2015 by dunnettreader
Scott McConnell - Why Is Washington Addicted to War? | The American Conservative - July 2015
Most now assume that the defining foreign policy legacy of President Obama will be his Iran deal, which will seek to block Iran’s path to a nuclear weapon and… Points to the military-foreign_policy bureaucracy and domestic politics of Capitol Hill as automatically oriented to interventionism regardless of White House priorities and preferences -- gives example of pressure to help Ukraine against demonized Russia is producing alliances with the most unsavory types who are fundamentally hostile to the US. Was Huntington right that post Cold War we need enemies abroad to cover over the fissures at home?
Instapaper  US_foreign_policy  US_politics  US_government  militarism  interventionism  GOP  US_military  US_politics-foreign_policy  Russia-near_abroad  Ukraine  State_Dept  national_interest  post-Cold_War  from instapaper
july 2015 by dunnettreader
Paul Pillar - The Heavy Historical Baggage of U.S. Policy Toward the Middle East | The National Interest Blog - July 2015
July 8, 2015 There is much to be said for what is commonly called a “zero-based review”—a fresh look at a problem or project unencumbered by existing… For all the insistence each Administration has to have its own strategic doctrine that breaks with predecessors, there's striking continuity in the Foreign policy Establishment attitudes toward MENA that comes from accumulated history of events or shifts in politics and economics in the region that produces a narrow range of what's seen as possible policy. Some of it's just facts that have produced structures that aren't going anywhere anytime soon. But that shouldn't impose strait-jackets on auto-responses.
Instapaper  US_politics  US_foreign_policy  MENA  Iran  Iraq  oil  Saudia_Arabia  Israel  Syria  GWOT  from instapaper
july 2015 by dunnettreader
Daniel McCarthy - Why Liberalism Means Empire | Lead essay / TAC Summer 2014
Outstanding case made for "consrrvative" realist IR position of off-shore balancing - not really "conservative" but he needs to give it that spin for his aufience buy-in -- takes on not just the militarists, neicons and librral intrrventionists but thr "non-liberal" sbtu-interventionists like Kennan and Buchanan - he leaves out the corrosive, anti-liberal democracy effects of globalized, financial capitalism that undermines the narrative of gradualist liberal democratization and achievements in OECD rconomies - as Zingales putscit "save capitalism from the capitalists" beeds to be included with the hegemon's responsibilities along with off-shore balancing - dimensions of power beyond military, which Dan does stress in his sketch of ehy Britain could meet the military challenges until WWI
Pocket  18thc  19thc  20thc  anti-imperialism  balance-of-power  british_empire  british_history  british_politics  civil_rights  cold_war  competition-interstate  cultural_transmission  democracy  empires  entre_deux_guerres  europe  foreign_policy  french_revolution  geopolitics  germany  global  governance  globalization  great_powers  hegemony  hong_kong  human_rights  ideology  imperialism  international_system  ir  ir-history  iraq  japan  liberalism  military-industrial  military_history  napoleon  napoleonic  wars  national_security  national_tale  nationslism  naval_history  neocons  neoliberalism  peace  pinboard  political_culture  politics-and-history  post-wwii  power  rule_of_law  social_science  trade  us  history  us_foreign_policy  us_military  us_politics  uses_of_history  warfare  world  wwi  wwii 
july 2015 by dunnettreader
Jeffrey A. Bader - Changing China policy: Are we in search of enemies? | Brookings Institution
East Asia has avoided major military conflicts since the 1970s. After the United States fought three wars in the preceding four decades originating in East Asia, with a quarter of a million lost American lives, this is no small achievement. It is owing to the maturity and good sense of most of the states of the region, their emphasis on economic growth over settling scores, and the American alliances and security presence that have deterred military action and provided comfort to most peoples and states. But above all else, it is due to the reconciliation of the Asia-Pacific’s major powers, the United States, and China, initiated by Richard Nixon and Henry Kissinger and nurtured by every American administration and Chinese leadership since. In the inaugural Brookings China Strategy Paper, Jeff Bader evaluates the recent rhetoric towards China, and argues that the United States and China should work out their differences in a way that promotes continued economic dynamism and lowers tensions in the region. Jeffrey Bader is the John C. Whitehead Senior Fellow in International Diplomacy at the Brookings Institution in Washington, D.C. From 2009 until 2011, Bader was special assistant to the president of the United States for national security affairs at the National Security Council. In that capacity, he was the principal advisor to President Obama on Asia. Bader served from 2005 to 2009 as the director of the China Initiative and subsequently as the first director of the John L. Thornton China Center at the Brookings Institution. His latest book, "Obama and China’s Rise: An Insider’s Account of America’s Asia Strategy," was published by Brookings Institution Press in March 2012. -- downloaded pdf to Note
paper  US_foreign_policy  China-international_relations  maritime_issues  East_Asia  US-China  diplomacy  US_military  US_politics  international_political_economy  global_economy  global_system  global_governance  NPT  IR  multilateralism  hegemony  downloaded 
july 2015 by dunnettreader
Matt Taibbi - Forget What We Know Now: We Knew Then the Iraq War Was a Joke | Rolling Stone
So presidential hopeful Jeb Bush is taking a pounding for face-planting a question about his brother’s invasion of Iraq. Apparently, our national media priests…
US_politics  US_foreign_policy  US_government  Bush_administration  Iraq  bad_history  bad_journalism  public_opinion  intelligence_agencies  GWOT  Pentagon  Instapaper  from instapaper
may 2015 by dunnettreader
PRIME MINISTER CHURCHILL'S EULOGY IN COMMONS FOR THE LATE PRESIDENT ROOSEVELT April 17, 1945
Extraordinary piece of rhetoric, but typical Churchill -- knew how to give the intimate personalized touch -- so the audience somehow also "knows" FDR and can share the mourning -- and the grandeur and glory of the ages rolled into one. Interesting that much of his description of FDR's actions are within the frame he establishes of FDR's physical disabilities, and a favorite Churchillian theme, the extraordinary will power it took not just to rise to the presidency, but to conduct the extreme complexity of policy that required intense attention every single day, made further complicated by domestic and international politics, of which he was an intuitive master of the possible.
20thC  WWII  British_history  British_Empire  US_history  US_politics  US_foreign_policy  US_government  US_military  diplomatic_history  Churchill  FDR  rhetoric-political  rhetoric 
april 2015 by dunnettreader
Martin Albrow, review essay - Who Rules the Global Rule Makers? - Books & ideas - 3 November 2011
Reviewed: Tim Bütheand Walter Mattli, The New Global Rulers: The Privatization of Regulation in the World Economy, Princeton University Press, Princeton, New Jersey, 2011; and Vibert, Frank, Democracy and Dissent: The Challenge of International Rule Making, Edward Elgar, Cheltenham, UK, 2011. -- Tags : democracy | globalisation | European Union | governance | United States of America -- Thirty years of misguided deregulation have brought us the 2008 collapse. Two books look at how we should create new rules democratically. While adopting widely different perspectives, both beg the same question: can rulemaking alone ensure the wellbeing of people in a global society? -- saved to Instapaper
books  reviews  21stC  globalization  global_governance  privatization  MNCs  IFIs  regulation  regulation-harmonization  regulation-enforcement  deregulation  capitalism-systemic_crisis  capital_flows  capital_markets  sovereignty  capitalism  democracy  democracy_deficit  political_participation  US_foreign_policy  US_economy  US_politics  market_fundamentalism  markets_in_everything  markets-failure  plutocracy  Instapaper 
april 2015 by dunnettreader
Scott McConnell - How the GOP Became the Israel Party | The American Conservative - April 2015
He sees it as a long march of the neocons through the GOP-oriented institutions, with The Weekly Standard playing a key role as ideological enforcer from the 1990s (post GHW Bush administration). He recounts how National Review and figures like Buchanan and Novak had an audience for nationalist-based scepticism of lockstep support for Israeli policies, and that Murdoch and the Kristol folks succeeded in making those positions unspeakable within Beltway-accepted polite discourse on the right -- clearly one reason why he helped found AmCon, since NR caved to the neocons and became ideological enforcers themselves. He doesn't see the Christian Zionist support as suddenly becoming more vocal, rabid or effective at enforcing single-issue discipline -- if anything, the Evangelicals are seeing fissures as the Israeli bombing campaigns, settler intransigence, and the reality of occupation has become visible to more Americans. The SCOTUS-authorized tsunami of money into US politics from ultra Likudnik billionaires is a factor, but its effect has been more the final cementing of uniform ultra-rightwing Israeli support from all corners of the GOP -- no one who wants to run for office on the national level as a Republican can even contemplate the least bit of daylight from the Israeli far right. And there aren't any important policy players on the right who have staked out "moderate" pro Israel positions who could create credible space for a GOP politician to take a position to the left of Bibi. The decades of investment in think tanks and Middle East policy shops promoted by the neocons and their affiliated deep-pocket funders made the career opportunities for GOP-leaning foreign policy types nearly exclusively on the far right, and 9/11 and the Iraq war created an enormous further expansion of energy, ideological discipline and funding. Leaving few alternatives for up and coming careerists and politicians.
US_politics  US_foreign_policy  GOP  neoconservatism  political_press  propaganda  politics-and-money  Israel  right-wing  Evangelical  Zionist  millennarian  Islamophobia  Likud  Iran  diplomacy  arms_control 
april 2015 by dunnettreader
Elaine Housby - Book Review: American Apocalypse: A History of Modern Evangelicalism by Matthew Avery Sutton | LSE Review of Books
American Apocalypse: A History of Modern Evangelicalism. Matthew Avery Sutton. Harvard University Press. Harvard University Press. 2014. -- With American Apocalypse, Matthew Avery Sutton aims to draw on extensive archival research to document the ways an initially obscure network of charismatic preachers and their followers reshaped American religion, at home and abroad, for over a century. Elaine Housby is impressed with this readable contribution.
books  reviews  kindle-available  religious_culture  religious_belief  US_politics  evangelical  apocalyptic  right-wing  New_Deal  social_gospel  nativism  GOP  eschatology  millennarian  Israel  US_foreign_policy  segregation  Black_churches  Bible-as-history  Biblical_exegesis  revelation  prophets 
march 2015 by dunnettreader
Kelley Vlahos - A Blackwater World Order | The American Conservative - Feb 2015
...a recent examination by Sean McFate, a former Army paratrooper who later served in Africa working for Dyncorp International and is now an associate professor at the National Defense University, suggests that the Pentagon’s dependence on contractors to help wage its wars has unleashed a new era of warfare in which a multitude of freshly founded private military companies are meeting the demand of an exploding global market for conflict. “Now that the United States has opened the Pandora’s Box of mercenarianism,” McFate writes in The Modern Mercenary: Private Armies and What they Mean for World Order, “private warriors of all stripes are coming out of the shadows to engage in for-profit warfare.” It is a menacing thought. McFate said this coincides with what he and others have called a current shift from global dominance by nation-state power to a “polycentric” environment in which state authority competes with transnational corporations, global governing bodies, non-governmental organizations (NGO’s), regional and ethnic interests, and terror organizations in the chess game of international relations. New access to professional private arms, McFate further argues, has cut into the traditional states’ monopoly on force, and hastened the dawn of this new era. McFate calls it neomedievalism, the “non-state-centric and multipolar world order characterized by overlapping authorities and allegiances.” States will not disappear, “but they will matter less than they did a century ago.” - copied to Pocket
books  global_system  global_governance  IR  IR_theory  military_history  Europe-Early_Modern  nation-state  transnational_elites  privatization  MNCs  NGOs  civil_wars  international_system  international_law  mercenaries  US_government  US_foreign_policy  Pentagon  Afghanistan  warfare-irregular  national_ID  national_interest  national_security  Pocket 
february 2015 by dunnettreader
NICOLAS GUILHOT - THE FIRST MODERN REALIST: FELIX GILBERT'S MACHIAVELLI AND THE REALIST TRADITION IN INTERNATIONAL THOUGHT | Modern Intellectual History (Feb 2015) - Cambridge Journals Online
Centre national de la recherche scientifique, New York University E-mail: nicolas.guilhot@nyu.edu -- In the disciplines of political science and international relations, Machiavelli is unanimously considered to be “the first modern realist.” This essay argues that the idea of a realist tradition going from the Renaissance to postwar realism founders when one considers the disrepute of Machiavelli among early international relations theorists. It suggests that the transformation of Machiavelli into a realist thinker took place subsequently, when new historical scholarship, informed by strategic and political considerations related to the transformation of the US into a global power, generated a new picture of the Renaissance. Focusing on the work of Felix Gilbert, and in particular his Machiavelli and Guicciardini, the essay shows how this new interpretation of Machiavelli was shaped by the crisis of the 1930s, the emergence of security studies, and the philanthropic sponsorship of international relations theory. -- * I would like to thank Samuel Moyn and three anonymous reviewers for their comments on a prior version of this paper. I greatly benefited from discussions with Volker Berghahn, Anthony Molho, and Jacques Revel. -- paywall
article  paywall  find  libraries  IR_theory  intellectual_history  IR-realism  20thC  entre_deux_guerres  post-WWII  strategic_studies  Renaissance  15thC  16thC  Machiavelli  Guicciardini  historiography-postWWII  US_foreign_policy  hegemony  EF-add 
february 2015 by dunnettreader
Full transcript: President Obama, Dec 4 2013 - Inequality and rolling back Reagan Revolution | The Washington Post
But starting in the late ‘70s, this social compact began to unravel.Technology made it easier for companies to do more with less, eliminating certain job occupations. A more competitive world led companies ship jobs anyway. And as good manufacturing jobs automated or headed offshore, workers lost their leverage; jobs paid less and offered fewer benefits. As values of community broke down and competitive pressure increased, businesses lobbied Washington to weaken unions and the value of the minimum wage. As the trickle-down ideology became more prominent, taxes were slashes for the wealthiest while investments in things that make us all richer, like schools and infrastructure, were allowed to wither. And for a certain period of time we could ignore this weakening economic foundation, in part because more families were relying on two earners, as women entered the workforce. We took on more debt financed by juiced-up housing market. But when the music stopped and the crisis hit, millions of families were stripped of whatever cushion they had left. And the result is an economy that’s become profoundly unequal and families that are more insecure. (..) it is harder today for a child born here in America to improve her station in life than it is for children in most of our wealthy allies, countries like Canada or Germany or France. They have greater mobility than we do, not less.(..) The combined trends of increased inequality and decreasing mobility pose a fundamental threat to the American dream, our way of life and what we stand for around the globe. And it is not simply a moral claim that I’m making here. There are practical consequences to rising inequality and reduced mobility. -- downloaded as pdf to Note
speech  Obama  inequality  supply-side  labor_share  business-ethics  norms  norms-business  morality-conventional  morality-Christian  utilitarianism  globalization  technology  US_foreign_policy  US_economy  US_politics  US_society  US_government  US_history  common_good  civic_virtue  economic_growth  economic_culture  distribution-income  distribution-wealth  unemployment  health_care  public_goods  public_opinion  public_policy  downloaded  EF-add 
january 2015 by dunnettreader
Jacob Weisberg, review essay - Bridge Too Far - Rick Perlstein, The Invisible Bridge: The Fall of Nixon and the Rise of Reagan | Democracy Journal - Issue #34, Fall 2014
Rick Perlstein’s account of Ronald Reagan’s rise acknowledges his popularity, but doesn’t take the reasons behind it seriously enough. --
The Invisible Bridge: The Fall of Nixon and the Rise of Reagan By Rick Perlstein • Simon & Schuster • 2014 • 810 pages -- see Perlstein’s response -- both downloaded as pdf to Note
books  reviews  article  US_politics  US_history  US_society  US_government  US_foreign_policy  Cold_War  20thC  post-WWII  right-wing  Reagan  GOP  public_opinion  public_policy  elections  parties  partisanship  faction  historiography-20thC  downloaded  EF-add 
january 2015 by dunnettreader
Rick Perlstein - The Reason for Reagan, A response to Jacob Weisberg. | Democracy Journal: Issue #35, Winter 2015
In 1984, the year Reagan won 49 states and 59 percent of the popular vote, only 35 percent of Americans said they favored substantial cuts in social programs in order to reduce the deficit. Given these plain facts, historiography on the rise of conservatism and the triumph of Ronald Reagan must obviously go beyond the deadening cliché that since Ronald Reagan said government was the problem, and Americans elected Ronald Reagan twice, the electorate simply agreed with him that government was the problem. But in his recent review of my book The Invisible Bridge [“A Bridge Too Far,” Issue #34], Jacob Weisberg just repeats that cliché—and others. “Rick Perlstein’s account of Reagan’s rise acknowledges his popularity,” the article states, “but doesn’t take the reasons behind it seriously enough.” Weisberg is confident those reasons are obvious. Is he right? -- downloaded as pdf to Note
books  reviews  article  US_politics  US_history  US_society  US_government  US_foreign_policy  Cold_War  20thC  post-WWII  right-wing  Reagan  GOP  public_opinion  public_policy  elections  parties  partisanship  faction  historiography-20thC  downloaded  EF-add 
january 2015 by dunnettreader
T. G. Otte, review - Martin Horn, Britain, France, and the Financing of the First World War | JSTOR - The Economic History Review Vol. 56, No. 3 (Aug., 2003), pp. 578-579
Gives very high marks to both archival research and analysis - shows governance mechanisms and both cooperation and conflict, which varied over time from early (expectation of a short war) to the latter years when France was done for without external finance. Notes that Horn demolishes one of Niall Ferguson claims - so academic specialists were on to his questionable historiography on the economic policies of British Empire long before he became a joke on macroeconomics. Derives some of the conflict from the very different national objectives for "finance capital" for their respective nations and empires. Doesn't seem to get into the reparations problem. It appears the later part deals some with US loans, but transatlantic isn't a big focus. Also deals with some conflicts over support to specific allies e.g. Russia. Didn't download
books  reviews  jstor  economic_history  20thC  WWI  Britain  British_Empire  British_foreign_policy  France  French_Empire  financial_economics  international_finance  money_market  sovereign_debt  Russian_revolution  US_foreign_policy  financial_centers  financial_centers-London  WWI-finance 
january 2015 by dunnettreader
Brad DeLong - My "Sisyphus as Social Democrat: A review of 'John Kenneth Galbraith: His Life, His Politics, His Economics', by Richard Parker," ( Grasping Reality...)
One of his series, "Hoisted from the Archives": J. Bradford DeLong (2005), "Sisyphus as Social Democrat: A review of John Kenneth Galbraith: His Life, His Politics, His Economics, by Richard Parker," Foreign Affairs May/June 2005. - diwnloaded pdf to iPhone
article  book  review  biography  intellectual_history  20thC  political_economy  economic_sociology  economic_theory  US_economy  US_politics  post-WWII  entre_deux_guerres  Great_Depression  WWII  US_government  US_foreign_policy  Keynesian  institutional_economics  liberalism  social_democracy  Galbraith_JK  downloaded  EF-add 
january 2015 by dunnettreader
Hilde Eliassen Restad - Old Paradigms in History Die Hard in Political Science: US Foreign Policy and American Exceptionalism | JSTOR: American Political Thought, Vol. 1, No. 1 (Spring 2012), pp. 53-76
Most writers agree that domestic ideas about what kind of country the United States is affect its foreign policy. In the United States, this predominant idea is American exceptionalism, which in turn is used to explain US foreign policy traditions over time. This article argues that the predominant definition of American exceptionalism, and the way it is used to explain US foreign policy in political science, relies on outdated scholarship within history. It betrays a largely superficial understanding of American exceptionalism as an American identity. This article aims to clarify the definition of American exceptionalism, arguing that it should be retained as a definition of American identity. Furthermore, it couples American exceptionalism and US foreign policy differently than what is found in most political science literature. It concludes that American exceptionalism is a useful tool in understanding US foreign policy, if properly defined. -- extensive bibliography of both historians and IR theorists -- downloaded pdf to Note
article  jstor  17thC  18thC  19thC  20thC  21stC  political_culture  US_history  American_Revolution  American_colonies  Puritans  American_exceptionalism  national_ID  nation-state  US_foreign_policy  IR_theory  IR-domestic_politics  IR  Founders  Manifest_Destiny  multilateralism  international_law  Jefferson  imperialism  republicanism  bibliography  downloaded  EF-add 
january 2015 by dunnettreader
Joshua Landis - Syria Year-End Predictions and Analysis – (28 December 2014)
Syria will become increasingly fragmented in 2015. The Somalia-ization of the country is inevitable so long as the international community degrades all centers of power in Syria and the opposition fails to unite.
islamist  diplomacy  syria  turkey  us_military  russia  us_foreign_policy  iran  military  global  governance  iraq  un  oil  price  obama  admin  failed  states  mena  civil  wars  congress  Pocket 
january 2015 by dunnettreader
James Fallows - The Tragedy of the American Military | The Atlantic Dec 2014
how we've become a chickenhawk nation, with a titally unaccountable military and an out-if-contril military-industrial complex that isn't just wasteful but actively counterproductive re both military war-fighting capabilities and US strategic positioning in glibalized, multi-polar and real-time connected world - Fallows also reflects concerns re manageralist mindset that can neither deal with shifting big picture (othet than more, faster, etc is automatically better) nor allow innovative problem solving at tactical level - bureaucratic fiefdoms that don't combine coherently, in evidence by 1990s as Versailles in the Potimac, has only gotten worse, with the press corps more enablers than watchdogs - and the stuff that does get media attention is pennyante, easy to hype gaffes not the goring of any important interest's ox. The F-35 vs A10 debacle is the perfect illustration, in a breathtaking scale, of everything wrong re both DOD and the military services, and it's basically a non-issue for both the press and politicians of all persuasions.
technology  ir  us  government  cultural_history  inequality  21stc  hegemony  us_politics  us_foreign_policy  20thc  military  history  iraq  gwot  miitary-industrial  comple  fiscal  policy  accountability  congress  Pocket  from instapaper
january 2015 by dunnettreader
Lori Wallach & Ben Beachy - Eyes on Trade: Defending Foreign Corporations' Privileges Is Hard, Especially When Looking At The Facts - Nov 11 2014
Forbes just published this response from Lori Wallach and Ben Beachy (GTW director and research director) to a counterfactual Forbes opinion piece by John Brinkley in support of investor-state dispute settlement. Even those who support the controversial idea of a parallel legal system for foreign corporations, known as investor-state dispute settlement or ISDS, likely cringed at John Brinkley’s recent attempt to defend that system. (“Trade Dispute Settlement: Much Ado About Nothing,” October 16.) In trying to justify trade agreement provisions that provide special rights and privileges to foreign firms to the disadvantage of their domestic competitors, Brinkley wrote 24 sentences with factual assertions. Seventeen of them were factually wrong.
US_foreign_policy  US_legal_system  corporate_law  corporate_citizenship  cross-border  treaties  ISDS  free_trade  trade-policy  Transatlantic_Trade_and_InvestmentPartnership  Trans-Pacific-Partnership  fast_track  US_trade_agreements  international_law  property_rights  property-confiscations  competition  Congress  consumer_protection  environment  FDI  investor-State_disputes  investment-bilateral_treaties  EF-add 
november 2014 by dunnettreader
Garry Wills’s "James Madison" - American Presidency series | Notes from my library - June 2014
The most notable event in Madison’s presidency, of course, was the War of 1812, of which as Wills says, “After all, he deliberately went to war with incompetent war secretaries and generals, with inadequate economic and military resources, with reliance on an unfit militia. He accomplished not a single one of the five goals he set for the war to achieve.” (..) Wills highlights the contradictions in Madison’s thinking over his career, from being the “Father of the American Constitution” and the principal author with Hamilton of The Federalist Papers to the dogged adversary of Hamilton and the “Imperial Presidency.” He went from being the principal adviser to Washington on the details of his precedent-setting term in office to being totally scorned by the ”Father of his Country” over the Jay Treaty. In this conflict with Washington, and as was typical of many of the problems with which he wrestled during his presidency, Madison did a total about-face on some of his most forcefully argued constitutional positions. In the end, Washington “(..) had concluded, after a long sad experience, that Madison was duplicitous and dishonorable.” Wills relies often on Henry Adams’s brilliant 19thC "History of the United States during the Administrations of James Madison", on Madison’s complete writings, and on several more recent biographical studies. For those who aren’t satisfied with Wills’s short volume and want more of the details of Madison’s presidency, I would highly recommend Adams’s nearly 1,500 page study in the beautiful Library of America series.
books  reviews  US_history  18thC  19thC  Madison  Washington_George  US_constitution  US_foreign_policy  historiography-19thC  Adams_Henry  treaties 
november 2014 by dunnettreader
Dan Ward -Outrageous Waste—America’s Secret Strategy for Military Deterrence — War Is Boring - April 2014 — Medium
If BLOAT isn't our strategy it *should* be -- What if we spend decades and billions on cancelled and troubled projects, creating the appearance of difficulty and incompetence, in order to deceive our enemies and dissuade them from building advanced jets, tanks and ships? Making the unaffordable status quo appear inevitable creates a strong disincentive to hostile actors, so there is a genuine national benefit to convincing the world advanced weapon systems cannot be built in less than 25 years, even if we could actually do it in 18 months. I like to think this brilliant strategy has a cool codename like Operation BLOAT, short for Budgets Limit Opponent’s Acquisition of Technology. If BLOAT is real—and I hope it is—it explains why Allied pilots never had to engage Taliban pilots in dogfights over Afghanistan and why Al Qaeda never built a fleet of stealth bombers and submarines. In fact, Operation BLOAT ensures the U.S. military will never again face a Soviet-size opponent equipped with a full set of tanks, jets and ships. Any large nation who tries to follow America’s example will have great trouble fielding new gear, particularly if they steal our designs and try to build knock-offs. Meanwhile, smaller nations and assorted terrorist groups won’t even try in the first place.
US_government  US_foreign_policy  military  military-industrial_complex  IR_theory  strategy 
october 2014 by dunnettreader
Stephen Griffin - Balkinization: War Powers "As If" - September 2014
...too much commentary has focused on treating Obama's use of war powers "as if" it was occurring in a judicial forum, rather than politically as a matter of interbranch deliberation. Doing the latter inevitably means taking into consideration that we are right before the congressional elections. Deliberating before an election is rarely a good idea -- that's how we got the 2002 Iraq war resolution! Yet the NYT scores the Congress for failing in its constitutional responsibilities, "shamelessly ducking a vote." Yes, they should duck it. They haven't got the time to do a proper review before the election, particularly if what we should be interested in is a new AUMF. -- As far as the legal commentary, too many legal scholars are too worried about what Obama is claiming re the previous AUMFs. They seem to think that these claims might come back to haunt us as "precedents." But we are not in a judicial forum (nor are we ever likely to be) when it comes to the use of military force. -- We surely need to think as constitutionalists, but mindful of the constitutional order that applies to foreign affairs and in light of the fact that we are, after all, dealing with the "political" branches. So talk of bad precedents and Congress acting irresponsibly is not helpful. It won't help the country get anywhere it wants to go. I do agree with much current commentary that we badly need a legal review of Obama's war authority with a view to drafting a new AUMF. That would be all to the good. So far I see no sign that Congress is truly interested in drafting one. But as I say in my Tulane talk, there is no doubt that Obama could render a service to his country in his final two years in office by putting an AUMF on the national agenda when the new Congress is seated in 2015.
US_politics  US_constitution  US_foreign_policy  separation-of-powers  Obama_administration  Congress  Iraq  Syria  US_military  EF-add 
september 2014 by dunnettreader
Jack Goldstone - What is ISIS? | NewPopulationBomb - August 13, 2014
The Islamic State in Iraq and Syria (ISIS) has emerged as the most terrifying and brutal of extreme jihadist groups (and that is against tough competition, such as Boko Haram in Nigeria and Al-Shabaab in Somalia). Why have such extreme Islamist groups emerged in so many places in recent years? Odd as this may sound, it is not because of the appeal of extreme Islam itself. A study of fighters in Syria by Mironova, Mrie, and Whitt found that most fighters join ISIS and similar groups because (1) they want vengeance against the Assad regime and (2) they found from experience that the Islamist groups take the best care of their fighters — caring for the wounded, supporting them in battle. In situations of social breakdown — which are generally NOT caused by the Islamist groups themselves, but by problems of finances, elite divisions, and popular unrest due to oppressive or arbitrary actions by the state – extremists tend to have major advantages. This has always been the case throughout the history of revolutions: moderates are usually outflanked and outmaneuvered and out-recruited by radicals; so much so that the triumph of radicals over moderates is a staple of academic work on the trajectory of revolutions, from Crane Brinton to my own.
historical_sociology  revolutions  radicals  Iraq  Syria  MENA  Islamist_fundamentalists  US_foreign_policy  global_governance  NATO  military  military_history  alliances  Thirty_Years_War  terrorism  GWOT 
september 2014 by dunnettreader
Eyes on Trade: A Deal Only Wall Street Could Love | Public Citizen - December 2013
Last week, US financial regulators took a step toward reining in some of the Wall Street risk-taking that led to the financial crisis by finalizing the Volcker Rule, designed to stop banks from engaging in risky, hedge-fund-like bets for their own profit. But this week, EU and US trade negotiators could move in the opposite direction, pursuing an agenda that could thwart such efforts to re-regulate Wall Street. Negotiators from both sides of the Atlantic are converging in Washington, D.C. this week for a third round of talks on the Trans-Atlantic Free Trade Agreement (TAFTA). What is TAFTA? A “trade” deal only in name, TAFTA would require the United States and EU to conform domestic financial laws and regulations, climate policies, food and product safety standards, data privacy protections and other non-trade policies to TAFTA rules. We profiled recently the top ten threats this deal poses to U.S. consumers. One area of particular concern is how TAFTA's expansive agenda implicates regulations to promote financial stability. Here's a synopsis. -- professionally done eviseration with lots of links
US_politics  US_economy  US_foreign_policy  Obama_administration  Congress  trade-policy  trade-agreements  EU  EU-foreign_policy  international_political_economy  global_governance  international_finance  financial_regulation  Transatlantic_Trade_and_InvestmentPartnership  FDI  banking  capital_markets  NBFI  shadow_banking  asset_management  derivatives  leverage  risk-systemic  financial_crisis  central_banks  macroprudential_regulation  too-big-to-fail  regulation-harmonization  cross-border  MNCs  tax_havens  investor-State_disputes  law-and-finance  administrative_law  race-to-the-bottom  lobbying  big_business  EF-add 
september 2014 by dunnettreader
Leaked document shows EU is going for a trade deal that will weaken financial regulation | Corporate Europe Observatory
According to a leaked document, the EU is bent on using the TTIP negotiations with the US to get an agreement on financial regulation that, according to this analysis by Kenneth Haar of Corporate Europe Observatory (CEO) and Myriam Vander Stichele of The Centre for Research on Multinational Corporations (SOMO) will weaken reform and control of the financial sector. If the EU has its way, a final agreement between the EU and the US to establish a free trade and investment agreement the Transatlantic Trade and Investment Partnership (TTIP) will weaken regulation and raise obstacles to much needed reform of the financial sector. That is the conclusion after the leak of an EU proposal for so-called “regulatory cooperation” on financial regulation.1 tabled by the EU in March 2014. Regulatory cooperation is a continuous process of ironing out disagreements and differences between the two Parties to ensure agreement on what constitutes legitimate regulation – which in this case, would serve the interests of the financial industry. In the document, the EU suggests a number of mechanisms that will both scale back existing regulation, and prevent future regulation that might contradict the interests of financial corporations from both sides of the Atlantic. The leak follows news that EU negotiators have increased political pressure on the US to accept negotiations on “financial regulatory cooperation", which the US negotiators have so far refused. -- lengthy analysis with tons of links to coverage of the issues in financial press -- downloaded pdf to Note
US_politics  US_economy  US_foreign_policy  Obama_administration  EU  EU_governance  Transatlantic_Trade_and_InvestmentPartnership  financial_system  financial_regulation  international_finance  banking  capital_markets  NBFI  leverage  too-big-to-fail  bailouts  derivatives  lobbying  regulation-harmonization  cross-border  trade-agreements  trade-policy  MNCs  transparency  accountability  civil_society  central_banks  downloaded  EF-add 
september 2014 by dunnettreader
Smart Track Can't Be Fast Track in Disguise - Citizens Trade Campaign
FastTrackinDisguiseNearly 600 organizations, together representing millions of Americans, have sent a joint letter to Senate Finance Chair Ron Wyden (D-OR) expressing their steadfast opposition to Fast Track and outlining the minimum requirements for a new, democratic and accountable trade policy-making process. Earlier this year, Senator Wyden announced he is working on new “Smart Track” legislation to replace the expired Fast Track process that allows harmful trade agreements like the Trans-Pacific Partnership (TPP) to be rushed through Congress circumventing ordinary review, amendment and debate procedures. The sign-on letter promoted by CTC members such as the Sierra Club, Communications Workers of America, the Teamsters and Public Citizen, among others both inside and outside CTC, urges that Fast Track be eliminated and replaced with a new model of trade authority that includes transparency in trade negotiations, a Congressional role in selecting trade partners, a clear set of negotiating mandates and Congressional certification that mandates have been met before negotiations can conclude. -- downloaded pdf to Note
US_politics  US_economy  US_foreign_policy  Obama_administration  Congress  trade-policy  trade-agreements  unions  climate  environment  transparency  civil_society  grassroots  MNCs  globalization  global_economy  global_governance  international_political_economy  downloaded  EF-add 
september 2014 by dunnettreader
Getting Action Strategy Check: Confronting ‘corporate super-rights’ in the TTIP | The Democracy Center - April 2014
The European Commission’s public consultation on the inclusion of the investor-state dispute settlement (ISDS) mechanism in the investment chapter of the Trans-Atlantic Trade and Investment Partnership (TTIP) is clearly a result of growing citizen concern and civil society pressure. Even though the scope of the Commission’s consultation has come in for severe criticism from civil society groups, the high profile that this issue has garnered in Europe in recent months represents a unique opportunity for campaigners. In order to facilitate a strategy conversation among activists and civil society groups on ISDS in the TTIP campaign, the Network for Justice in Global Investment – a core Democracy Center project – recently interviewed two people at the center of campaigns on both sides of the Atlantic: Pia Eberhardt from the Corporate Europe Observatory and Arthur Stamoulis from the Citizen’s Trade Campaign in the United States. (The complete interview transcripts can be found here and here.) We began by asking them what strategic opportunities and challenges they see for campaigners given the current high profile of investment rules and ISDS in Europe.
investment-bilateral_treaties  investor-State_disputes  power-asymmetric  democracy  FDI  MNCs  international_political_economy  global_governance  trade-agreements  trade-policy  US_economy  US_foreign_policy  EU  EU_governance  Transatlantic_Trade_and_InvestmentPartnership  grassroots  unions  civil_society 
september 2014 by dunnettreader
Michael Sallah, Robert O’Harrow Jr., Steven Rich - 3-part WaPo Investigation: "Stop and Seize on America's highways" | The Washington Post September 2014
Part 1: In recent years, thousands of people have had cash confiscated by police without being charged with crimes. -- Part 2: One training firm started a private intelligence-sharing network and helped shape law enforcement nationwide. -- Part 3: Motorists caught up in the seizures talk about the experience and the legal battles that sometimes took more than a year. **--** After the terror attacks on 9/11, the government called on police to become the eyes and ears of homeland security on America’s highways. Local officers, county deputies and state troopers were encouraged to act more aggressively in searching for suspicious people, drugs and other contraband. Dept Homeland Security and DOJ spent millions on police training. The effort succeeded, but it had an impact that has been largely hidden from public view: the spread of an aggressive brand of policing that has spurred the seizure of $100s millions in cash from motorists and others not charged with crimes. Thousands of people have been forced to fight legal battles to get their money back. Behind the rise in seizures is a cottage industry of private police-training firms that teach the techniques of “highway interdiction” to departments across the country. One firm created a private intelligence network that enabled police nationwide to share detailed reports about motorists — criminals and the innocent alike — including their Social Security numbers, addresses and identifying tattoos, as well as hunches about which drivers to stop. Many of the reports have been funneled to federal agencies and fusion centers as part of the government’s burgeoning law enforcement intelligence systems — despite warnings from state and federal authorities that the information could violate privacy and constitutional protections. A thriving subculture of road officers on the network now competes to see who can seize the most cash and contraband, describing their exploits in the network’s chat rooms and sharing “trophy shots” of money and drugs. Some police advocate highway interdiction as a way of raising revenue for cash-strapped municipalities.
US_society  US_constitution  US_foreign_policy  US_legal_system  US_politics-race  national_security  judiciary  local_government  state_government  government_finance  police  privacy  networks-information  power-asymmetric  abuse_of_power  public-private_partnerships  crime  criminal_justice  civil_liberties  terrorism  due_process  property-confiscations  intelligence_agencies  militarization-society  incentives  civil_society  governmentality  government_officials  authoritarian  EF-add 
september 2014 by dunnettreader
Junianto James Losari, Michael Ewing-Chow - A Clash of Treaties: The Legality of Countermeasures in International Trade Law and International Investment Law :: SSRN June 20, 2014
Junianto James Losari - National University of Singapore (NUS) - Centre for International Law -- Michael Ewing-Chow - National University of Singapore (NUS) - Faculty of Law -- Fourth Biennial Global Conference of the Society of International Economic Law (SIEL) Working Paper No. 2014/18. *--* Countermeasures are well recognized under Customary International Law and have been incorporated into the WTO Dispute Settlement Understanding as a mechanism to facilitate compliance, subject to an authorization by the WTO Dispute Settlement Body. However, such a countermeasure — increased tariffs, quantitative restrictions and permission to breach intellectual property rights — may also affect private investors. When there is an investment treaty between two WTO Members and one of the Members is subject to WTO countermeasures by the other Member, a clash of treaties may arise. This happened in the Sugar Dispute between Mexico and the United States. Mexico claimed that their measures on High Fructose Corn Syrup were trade countermeasures under the North America Free Trade Agreement (NAFTA) in retaliation for a US breach of NAFTA. US investors affected by these measures brought claims against Mexico for breach of NAFTA Chapter 11 — the Investment Chapter. All three International Centre for the Settlement of Investment Disputes tribunals held for different reasons, that a countermeasure that affects the rights of investors would not be valid. In contrary, this paper argues that a legitimate trade countermeasure should also be legitimate in the investment regime. A failure to consider the need for such coherence between the regimes could lead to a clash between the regimes and limit states’ ability to enforce its legitimate trade interests. - Number of Pages: 37 -- didn't download
paper  SSRN  international_law  international_economics  law-and-economics  international_political_economy  free_trade  trade-agreements  FDI  investment-bilateral_treaties  arbitration  WTO  global_governance  conflict_of_laws  IP  property_rights  dispute_resolution  US_foreign_policy  Mexico  nation-state  national_interest  EF-add 
september 2014 by dunnettreader
Thorstensen, Fernandes Marçal, Ferraz - WTO x PTAs -- Where to Negotiate Trade and Currency :: SSRN June 16, 2014
Vera Thorstensen - São Paulo School of Economics (EESP) at Fundação Getulio Vargas (FGV) -- Emerson Fernandes Marçal - Sao Paulo School of Economics - FGV; Mackenzie Presbyterian University -- Lucas Ferraz - Sao Paulo School of Economics-FGV. -- Fourth Biennial Global Conference of the Society of International Economic Law (SIEL) Working Paper No. 2014/09. *--* The negotiations of mega agreements between the US and the Pacific countries (TPP) and between the US and the EU (TTIP) are raising the attention of experts on international trade law and economics. TPP and TTIP are proclaimed to be the designers of the rules for the XXI Century. Old trade instruments such as tariffs are said to be no more important for TTIP because tariffs are negligible among those partners but significant to for TPP. Another relevant agreement in negotiation is between the EU and Mercosul, where tariffs are the most important issue in discussion. The main purpose of this paper is to shows that tariff are important for all these agreements, not because of its nominal value, but because the impacts of exchange rate misalignments on tariffs are so significant that all concessions can be distorted by overvalued and by devaluated currencies. The article is divided into six sections: the first gives an introduction to the issue; the second explains the methodologies used to determine exchange rate misalignments and also presents some results for Brazil, US and China; the third summarizes the methodology applied to calculate the impacts of exchange rate misalignments on the level of tariff protection through an exercise of “misalignment tariffication” and examines the effects of exchange rate variations on tariffs and their consequences for the multilateral trading system; the fourth creates a methodology to estimate exchange rates against a basket of currencies (a virtual currency of the World) and a proposal to deal with persistent and significant misalignments related to trade rules. The fifth presents some estimates for the main PTAs. The conclusions are present in the last section. -- downloaded pdf to Note
paper  SSRN  international_law  international_economics  law-and-economics  trade-agreements  tariffs  FX  global_imbalance  US_foreign_policy  China  Brazil  EU  Latin_America  South-South_economics  emerging_markets  capital_flows  international_monetary_system  FX-misalignment  prices  costs  downloaded  EF-add 
september 2014 by dunnettreader
Locknie Hsu - Convergence, Divergence, and Regulatory Tension - An Asian Perspective :: SSRN September 5, 2014
Singapore Management University - School of Law -- Singapore Management University School of Law Research Paper No. 30/201 -- Fourth Biennial Global Conference of the Society of International Economic Law (SIEL), pp 2-14, June 2014, Working Paper No. 2014/13. *--* Regulatory issues relating to public health, including regulation of access to medicines and tobacco control have increasingly been the source of tension in recent trade and investment negotiations, treaties and disputes. The ongoing Trans-Pacific Partnership negotiations, which include a number of developing Asian states, are an example that brings some of these issues to the fore and show a divergence of negotiating views. The intersection between public health regulation and trade and investment treaties has given some Asian states significant pause for thought; -- This intersection and resulting tension have led the WTO, WHO and WIPO to work together in an unprecedented manner to address some of the issues at the global level. The law evolving around these issues is demonstrating a deep divergence, in the manner that related disputes are being handled, and in terms of regulatory as well as negotiating stances. As an example, the debate on access to medicines demonstrates a divergence of approaches and proposed global solutions, as numerous proposals for reform of the existing construct (comprising patents and their “progeny” in the form of related commercial rights) are canvassed. Meanwhile, some countries such as India have begun to move ahead to embrace solutions such as compulsory licensing. -- It is suggested that a convergence of purpose(s) is needed, for a convergence of solutions to be found. Until then, the current divergences will continue to feed regulatory tension. -- Keywords: Convergence, divergence, trade, investment, public health, tobacco, pharmceuticals, FTAs, Asia, ASEAN -- downloaded pdf to Note
paper  SSRN  international_law  international_economics  law-and-economics  international_political_economy  global_governance  Trans-Pacific-Partnership  Asia_Pacific  Asia  India  IP  convergence-business  technology  technology_transfer  Innovation  health_care  commercial_law  neoliberalism  FDI  trade-agreements  property_rights  public_health  public_goods  US_foreign_policy  US_legal_system  business-and-politics  investment  WTO  international_organizations  downloaded  EF-add 
september 2014 by dunnettreader
Rodrigo Polanco - The Chilean Experience in South-South Trade and Investment Agreements :: SSRN July 29, 2014
University of Chile - Faculty of Law; World Trade Institute - University of Bern -- Fourth Biennial Global Conference of the Society of International Economic Law (SIEL) Working Paper No. 2014-26. *--* This paper analyzes the main features of Chilean trade and investment treaties, examining if there is a Chilean pattern in the regulation of trade and investment flows or if it is influenced by agreements signed by Chile with developed countries. The article also examines if there are differences between the treaties signed by Chile and other “Southern” developing countries and those negotiated with “Northern” developed economies, and if sustainable development concerns are part of the negotiations of trade and investment agreements by Chile. -- Number of Pages in PDF File: 29 -- Keywords: investment treaties, preferential trade agreements, investor-state arbitration, North-South agreements, South-South agreements, law and development, sustainable development, Chile. - downloaded pdf to Note
paper  SSRN  international_law  international_economics  Latin_America  Chile  trade-policy  trade-agreements  FDI  investment-bilateral_treaties  investor-State_disputes  capital_flows  South-South_economics  US_trade_agreements  US_foreign_policy  US_legal_system  law-and-economics  emerging_markets  sustainability  downloaded  EF-add 
september 2014 by dunnettreader
Gareth Evans explores the potential risks stemming from Japan's international muscle-flexing. - Project Syndicate - July 2014
Highlights love-in between Abe and Abbott and new "special relation" -- looks more dangerous re exacerbating young Chinese nationalists than the modest constitutional changes being proposed. Good links
East_Asia  Asia  Asia_Pacific  Japan  Australia  China  international_system  alliances  US_foreign_policy 
august 2014 by dunnettreader
KATRINA FORRESTER -- CITIZENSHIP, WAR, AND THE ORIGINS OF INTERNATIONAL ETHICS IN AMERICAN POLITICAL PHILOSOPHY, 1960–1975 (2014). | The Historical Journal, 57, pp 773-801. - Cambridge Journals Online - Abstract
KATRINA FORRESTER - St John's College, Cambridge -- This article examines a series of debates about civil disobedience, conscription, and the justice of war that took place among American liberal philosophers, lawyers, and activists during the civil rights movement and the Vietnam War. It argues that these debates fundamentally reshaped American political philosophy, by shifting the focus from the welfare state to the realm of international politics. In order to chart this transition from the domestic to the international, this article focuses on the writings of two influential political theorists, John Rawls and Michael Walzer. The turn to international politics in American political philosophy has its origins, in part, in their arguments about domestic citizenship. In tracing these origins, this article situates academic philosophical arguments alongside debates among the American public at large. It offers a first account of the history of analytical political philosophy during the 1960s and 1970s, and argues that the role played by the Vietnam War in this history, though underappreciated, is significant. -* I would like to thank Duncan Bell, Kenzie Bok, Christopher Brooke, Adam Lebowitz, Peter Mandler, Jamie Martin, Samuel Moyn, Andrew Preston, David Runciman, Tim Shenk, Brandon Terry, Mira Siegelberg, Joshua Specht, and two anonymous reviewers for their comments
article  paywall  intellectual_history  political_philosophy  analytical_philosophy  20thC  US_politics  US_foreign_policy  post-WWII  Vietnam_War  citizenship  civil_liberties  IR-liberalism  IR-domestic_politics  IR_theory  liberalism  Rawls  Walzer  power  power-asymmetric  justice  welfare_state  just_war  moral_philosophy  US_government  EF-add 
august 2014 by dunnettreader
Ricardo Hausmann - Why technological diffusion does not occur according to economic theory. - Project Syndicate - May 2014
That is why cities, regions, and countries can absorb technology only gradually, generating growth through some recombination of the knowhow that is already in place, maybe with the addition of some component – a bassist to complete a string quartet. But they cannot move from a quartet to a philharmonic orchestra in one fell swoop, because it would require too many missing instruments – and, more important, too many musicians who know how to play them. Progress happens by moving into what the theoretical biologist Stuart Kauffman calls the “adjacent possible,” which implies that the best way to find out what is likely to be feasible in a country is to consider what is already there. Politics may indeed impede technological diffusion; but, to a large extent, technology does not diffuse because of the nature of technology itself.
economic_theory  economic_growth  economic_history  institutional_economics  institutional_change  institution-building  development  US_foreign_policy  rent-seeking  elites  oligarchy  technology  capital  labor  knowhow 
may 2014 by dunnettreader
Pauk Pillar - Putin's Instructive Speech | The National Interest Blog March 2014
On annexation of Crimea, Putin explains the counterproductive effects of "American exceptionalism" especially the Bush II version of ignoring international rules and organizations via "you're with us or against us", coalitions of the "willing" and preventive war doctrines.
US_foreign_policy  Bush_administration  UN  NATO  Russia  post-Cold_War  Eastern_Europe 
march 2014 by dunnettreader
Nikolas Gdosev - Commentary: Ukraine and the Failure of Strategic Ambiguity | The National Interest
Strategic ambiguity was designed to square three very different circles. The first was how to reassure countries newly freed from the Soviet yoke that, as Russian power resurged, they would not find themselves under threat from Moscow. The unhappy experience of the three Baltic States--which enjoyed twenty years of independence between the two World Wars only to be incorporated into the Soviet Union--drove efforts to seek binding security guarantees from the Western powers. The second was how to avoid complicating U.S. (and European) relations with a Russia that might, under the right circumstances, become a true partner to and even member of the Euro-Atlantic world. The final and perhaps most decisive consideration was to avoid taking on burdensome new obligations or political costs.
US_foreign_policy  Europe  EU  Russia  NATO  geopolitics 
march 2014 by dunnettreader
Mike Lofgren - Anatomy of the Deep State | BillMoyers.com Feb 2014
Yes, there is another government concealed behind the one that is visible at either end of Pennsylvania Avenue, a hybrid entity of public and private institutions ruling the country according to consistent patterns in season and out, connected to, but only intermittently controlled by, the visible state whose leaders we choose. My analysis of this phenomenon is not an exposé of a secret, conspiratorial cabal; the state within a state is hiding mostly in plain sight, and its operators mainly act in the light of day. Nor can this other government be accurately termed an “establishment.” All complex societies have an establishment, a social network committed to its own enrichment and perpetuation. In terms of its scope, financial resources and sheer global reach, the American hybrid state, the Deep State, is in a class by itself. That said, it is neither omniscient nor invincible. The institution is not so much sinister (although it has highly sinister aspects) as it is relentlessly well entrenched. Far from being invincible, its failures, such as those in Iraq, Afghanistan and Libya, are routine enough that it is only the Deep State’s protectiveness towards its higher-ranking personnel that allows them to escape the consequences of their frequent ineptitude.
US_government  US_military  US_politics  US_economy  GWOT  US_foreign_policy  national_security 
february 2014 by dunnettreader
R. Adcock and M. Bevir - Political Science since World War Two: Americanization and Its Limits [eScholarship] (2010)
R. Adcock and M. Bevir, “Political Science since World War Two: Americanization and its Limits”, in R. Backhouse and P. Fontaine, eds.,The History of Postwar Social Science (Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 2010), pp. 71-101.
article  eScholarship  intellectual_history  sociology_of_knowledge  social_sciences-post-WWII  Cold_War  US_foreign_policy  university-contemporary  disciplines  behavioralism  covering_laws  positivism  empiricism  downloaded  EF-add 
february 2014 by dunnettreader
Stanley Aronowitz - The End of Political Economy | JSTOR: Social Text, No. 2 (Summer, 1979), pp. 3-52
Written at end of 1970s seeing a "crisis of capitalism" that abandonment of political economy left social scientists, historians etc bereft of a way to think about current state of affairs including US foreign policy, neo-colonialism and so forth. Interesting for how political economy was lost than for leftist Cold War views. -downloaded pdf to Note
article  jstor  social_theory  intellectual_history  political_economy  social_sciences-post-WWII  Cold_War  economic_theory  Keynesianism  conservatism  post-colonial  Marxism  US_foreign_policy  capitalism  downloaded  EF-add 
january 2014 by dunnettreader
Hilde Eliassen Restad - Old Paradigms in History Die Hard in Political Science: US Foreign Policy and American Exceptionalism | JSTOR: American Political Thought, Vol. 1, No. 1 (Spring 2012), pp. 53-76
Most writers agree that domestic ideas about what kind of country the United States is affect its foreign policy. In the United States, this predominant idea is American exceptionalism, which in turn is used to explain US foreign policy traditions over time. This article argues that the predominant definition of American exceptionalism, and the way it is used to explain US foreign policy in political science, relies on outdated scholarship within history. It betrays a largely superficial understanding of American exceptionalism as an American identity. This article aims to clarify the definition of American exceptionalism, arguing that it should be retained as a definition of American identity. Furthermore, it couples American exceptionalism and US foreign policy differently than what is found in most political science literature. It concludes that American exceptionalism is a useful tool in understanding US foreign policy, if properly defined.
article  jstor  US_history  intellectual_history  US_foreign_policy  US_politics  American_colonies  American_Revolution  US_constitution  IR_theory  bibliography  EF-add 
january 2014 by dunnettreader
Charlie Stross - Spy Kids | Foreign Policy August 2013
We human beings are primates. We have a deeply ingrained set of cultural and interpersonal behavioral rules that we violate only at social cost. One of these rules, essential for a tribal organism, is bilaterality: Loyalty is a two-way street. (Another is hierarchy: Yield to the boss.) Such rules are not iron-bound or immutable -- we're not robots -- but our new hive superorganism employers don't obey them instinctively, and apes and monkeys and hominids tend to revert to tit-for-tat strategies readily when they're unsure of their relative status. Perceived slights result in retaliation, and blundering, human-blind organizations can bruise an employee's ego without even noticing. And slighted or bruised employees who lack instinctive loyalty, because the culture they come from has spent generations systematically destroying social hierarchies and undermining their sense of belonging, are much more likely to start thinking the unthinkable.
US_foreign_policy  US_government  US_military  US_society  NSA  civil_liberties  neoliberalism  nationalism  Internet 
december 2013 by dunnettreader
« earlier      
per page:    204080120160

related tags

15thC  16thC  17thC  18thc  19thc  20thc  21stc  abuse_of_power  accountability  Adams_Henry  Adams_JQ  admin  administrative_law  Afghanistan  Africa  AIPAC  Air_Force  air_power  alliances  American_colonies  American_exceptionalism  American_Revolution  analytical_philosophy  anti-Communist  anti-imperialism  apocalyptic  Arab_Spring  arbitration  arms_control  article  Asia  Asia-Pacific  Asia_Pacific  asset_management  Australia  authoritarian  bad_history  bad_journalism  bailouts  balance-of-power  balance_of_power  banking  behavioralism  Bible-as-history  Biblical_exegesis  bibliography  big_business  bilateral_agreements  biography  Black_churches  Blair  book  books  Brazil  Britain  british_empire  British_foreign_policy  british_history  british_politics  bureaucracy  Bush  Bush_administration  business-and-politics  business-ethics  business_cycles  capital  capitalism  capitalism-systemic_crisis  capital_flows  capital_markets  central_banks  Chile  China  China-governance  China-international_relations  Chinese_politics  Churchill  CIA  citizenship  civic_virtue  civil  civil_liberties  civil_rights  civil_society  civil_wars  climate  climate-adaptation  climate-denialism  climate-policy  coal  cold_war  commercial_law  common_good  competition  competition-interstate  comple  conflict_of_laws  congress  conservatism  consumer_protection  containment  convergence-business  corporate_citizenship  corporate_law  correspondence  corruption  cost-benefit  costs  counter-terrorism  covering_laws  crime  criminal_justice  cross-border  cultural_history  cultural_transmission  deficit_finance  democracy  democracy_deficit  Democrats  deregulation  derivatives  development  DHS  digital_humanities  dignity  diplomacy  diplomacy-environment  diplomatic_history  disciplines  dispute_resolution  distribution-income  distribution-wealth  DOD  downloaded  drones  due_process  Early_Republic  Eastern_Europe  East_Asia  economic_culture  economic_growth  economic_history  economic_sociology  economic_theory  education-women  EF-add  elections  elections-2016  elites  emerging_markets  empires  empiricism  energy  energy-markets  entrepreneurs  entre_deux_guerres  environment  EPA  epidemics  eschatology  eScholarship  EU  EU-foreign_policy  europe  Europe-Early_Modern  Eurozone  EU_governance  evangelical  Evernote  executive_orders  exec_branch  faction  failed  fast_track  FDI  FDR  federalism  financial_centers  financial_centers-London  financial_crisis  financial_economics  financial_regulation  financial_system  find  fiscal  fiscal-military_state  fiscal_policy  foreign_policy  Founders  France  free_trade  French_Empire  french_revolution  FX  FX-misalignment  FX-rate_management  Galbraith_JK  game_theory  geopolitics  germany  Gitmo  global  globalization  global_economy  global_governance  global_imbalance  global_strike  global_system  GOP  governance  government  governmentality  government_finance  government_officials  Grand_Strategy  grassroots  Grear_Powers  Great_Depression  great_powers  Great_Recession  Greece  green_economy  green_finance  Guicciardini  Gulf_Stares  gwot  health_care  hegemony  historians-and-politics  historical_sociology  historiography  historiography-19thC  historiography-20thC  historiography-postWWII  history  hong_kong  human_capital  human_rights  ideology  IFIs  imperialism  incentives  India  indigenous_peoples  inequality  influence-IR  infrastructure  Innovation  Instapaper  institution-building  institutional_change  institutional_economics  intellectual_history  intelligence_agencies  international_economics  international_finance  international_law  international_monetary_system  international_organizations  international_political_economy  international_system  Internet  intervention  interventionism  investment  investment-bilateral_treaties  investor-State_disputes  IP  ir  IR-domestic_politics  ir-history  IR-liberalism  IR-realism  iran  iraq  Iraq_war  IR_theory  ISDS  ISIS  Islamic_civilization  islamist  Islamist_fundamentalists  Islamophobia  Israel  japan  Jay_John  Jefferson  journal  jstor  judiciary  justice  just_war  Keynes  Keynesian  Keynesianism  kindle-available  knowhow  Kurds  labor  labor_history  Labor_markets  labor_share  Latin_America  law-and-economics  law-and-finance  Lebanon  legitimacy  leverage  liberalism  libraries  Libya  Likud  links  lobbying  local_government  Machiavelli  macroprudential_regulation  Madison  Manifest_Destiny  manuscripts  marginalized_groups  maritime_issues  markets-failure  markets_in_everything  market_fundamentalism  Marxism  mena  mercenaries  Mexico  miitary-industrial  militarism  militarization-society  military  military-industrial  military-industrial_complex  military_history  millennarian  MNCs  monetary_policy  money_market  morality-Christian  morality-conventional  moral_philosophy  multilateralism  multipolar  napoleon  napoleonic  nation-state  nationalism  national_ID  national_interest  national_security  national_tale  nationslism  Native_Americans  nativism  NATO  naval_history  NBFI  neocons  neoconservatism  neoliberalism  networks-information  New_Deal  New_Left  NGOs  norms  norms-business  North_Korea  NPT  NSA  nuclear_deterrence  nuclear_weapons  obama  Obama_administration  oil  oligarchy  Ottomans  paper  papers-collected  parties  partisanship  paywall  peace  Pentagon  pinboard  plutocracy  Pocket  podcast  police  policy  political_culture  political_economy  political_history  political_participation  political_philosophy  political_press  politics-and-history  politics-and-money  positivism  post-Cold_War  post-colonial  post-wwii  poverty  power  power-asymmetric  pre-WWI  price  prices  privacy  privatization  progress  propaganda  property-confiscations  property_rights  prophets  public-private_partnerships  public_goods  public_health  public_opinion  public_policy  Puritans  race-to-the-bottom  radicals  Rawls  Reagan  realism  redistribution  regional_blocs  regulation  regulation-enforcement  regulation-harmonization  religion  religious_belief  religious_culture  Renaissance  renewables  rent-seeking  republicanism  revelation  review  reviews  revolutions  rhetoric  rhetoric-political  right-wing  risk-systemic  rule_of_law  russia  Russia-foreign_policy  Russia-near_abroad  Russian_revolution  Saudia_Arabia  SCOTUS  segregation  separation-of-powers  shadow_banking  SMEs  social_democracy  social_gospel  social_order  social_science  social_sciences-post-WWII  social_theory  sociology_of_knowledge  soft_power  South-South_economics  sovereignty  sovereign_debt  speech  spying  SSRN  standards-sustainability  state-roles  states  State_Dept  state_government  strategic_studies  strategy  Sub-Saharan_Africa  supply-side  supply_chains  sustainability  syria  tariffs  taxes  tax_havens  technical_assistance  technology  technology_transfer  terrorism  Thirty_Years_War  tolerance  too-big-to-fail  torture  trade  trade-agreements  trade-policy  Trans-Pacific-Partnership  Transatlantic_Trade_and_InvestmentPartnership  transnational_elites  transparency  treaties  Trump  Trump-foreign_policy  Trump_foreign_policy  turkey  Ukraine  UK_Government  UK_politics  un  unemployment  unions  university-contemporary  us  US-China  uses_of_history  US_constitution  US_economy  us_foreign_policy  US_government  US_history  US_legal_system  us_military  us_politics  US_politics-foreign_policy  US_politics-race  US_society  US_trade_agreements  utilitarianism  Vietnam_War  wages  Walzer  warfare  warfare-irregular  wars  Washington_George  water  website  welfare_state  wingnut_welfare  world  WTO  wwi  WWI-finance  wwii  Zionist 

Copy this bookmark:



description:


tags: