dunnettreader + uk_government   33

There are liars and then there’s Boris Johnson and Michael Gove | Nick Cohen
‘Prospered by treating public life as a game’: Boris Johnson leaves his home in Oxfordshire on Saturday.Photograph: Peter Nicholls/Reuters W here was the…
Instapaper  UK_politics  Brexit  Tories  EU  EU_governance  UK_Government  UK_economy  political_press  from instapaper
june 2016 by dunnettreader
A disrupters view on UK payday — The Paydaynomist - Medium Jan 2016
A disrupters view on UK paydayWe’d love to do it and you know you’ve always had it comingThis is our maiden post. It’s our birth story explaining why we, as two…
Instapaper  access_to_finance  UK_economy  UK_Government  financial_regulation  banking  credit  microfinance  OECD_economies  emerging_markets  from instapaper
january 2016 by dunnettreader
Cameron’s letter: European views on the UK’s renegotiation | LSE Blog - Nov 2015
On 10 November, David Cameron formally sent a letter to the President of the European Council, Donald Tusk, outlining his aims for the planned renegotiation of…
21stC  2010s  EU  EU_governance  Brexit  British_foreign_policy  UK_Government  UK_politics  from instapaper
november 2015 by dunnettreader
Bourke, R.: Empire and Revolution: The Political Life of Edmund Burke. (eBook and Hardcover)
Drawing on the complete range of printed and manuscript sources, Empire and Revolution offers a vivid reconstruction of the major concerns of this outstanding statesman, orator, and philosopher.In restoring Burke to his original political and intellectual context, this book strips away the accumulated distortions that have marked the reception of his ideas. In the process, it overturns the conventional picture of a partisan of tradition against progress. In place of the image of a backward-looking opponent of popular rights, it presents a multifaceted portrait of one of the most captivating figures in eighteenth-century life and thought. While Burke was a passionately energetic statesman, he was also a deeply original thinker. Empire and Revolution depicts him as a philosopher-in-action who evaluated the political realities of the day through the lens of Enlightenment thought, variously drawing on the ideas of such figures as Montesquieu, Rousseau, and Hume. A boldly ambitious work of scholarship, this book challenges us to rethink the legacy of Burke and the turbulent era in which he played so pivotal a role. -- Richard Bourke is professor in the history of political thought and codirector of the Centre for the Study of the History of Political Thought at Queen Mary University of London. He is the author of Peace in Ireland: The War of Ideas and the coeditor of Political Judgement. -- Big early chunk on Vindication of Natural Society -- TOC and Intro (24 pgs) downloaded to Note
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september 2015 by dunnettreader
Josh Chafetz - Democracy’s Privileged Few: Legislative Privilege and Democratic Norms in the British and American Constitutions | Yale University Press - 2011
This book is the first to compare the freedoms and protections of members of the United States Congress with those of Britain’s Parliament. Placing legislative privilege in historical context, Josh Chafetz explores how and why legislators in Britain and America have been granted special privileges in five areas: jurisdictional conflicts between the courts and the legislative houses, freedom of speech, freedom from civil arrest, contested elections, and the disciplinary powers of the houses. Legislative privilege is a crucial component of the relationship between a representative body and the other participants in government, including the people. In recounting and analyzing the remarkable story of how parliamentary government emerged and evolved in Britain and how it crossed the Atlantic, Chafetz illuminates a variety of important constitutional issues, including the separation of powers, the nature of representation, and the difference between written and unwritten constitutionalism. This book will inspire in readers a much greater appreciation for the rise and triumph of democracy. -- see kindle sample
books  kindle-available  political_history  17thC  18thC  19thC  20thC  21stC  constitutions  constitutional_law  constitutional_regime  democracy  checks-and-balances  separation-of-powers  representative_institutions  political_participation  UK_Government  British_history  British_politics  British_Empire-constitutional_structure  American_colonies  US_constitution  Congress  Parliament  Parliamentary_supremacy  House_of_Commons  House_of_Lords  House_of_Representatives  constituencies  judiciary  judicial_review  exec_branch  monarchy  monarchical_republic  MPs  legal_history  legal_theory  legal_culture  legitimacy  Founders  Madison  Blackstone  Mill  prerogative  bill_of_rights  bills_of_attainder  elections-disputed  Bolingbroke 
august 2015 by dunnettreader
Alex Massie - What do they know of Britain who only England (or Scotland) know?
A long, long time ago, in the fading years of the last century, I was one half of a debating team that, representing Trinity College Dublin’s Philosophical…
Instapaper  UK_politics  UK_Government  English_constitution  Scotland  Scottish_politics  British_history  British_politics  political_culture  1707_Union  Tories  Labour  SNP  local_politics  Ireland  from instapaper
june 2015 by dunnettreader
George Selgin - Steam, Hot Air, and Small Change: Matthew Boulton and the Reform of Britain's Coinage | JSTOR - The Economic History Review Vol. 56, No. 3 (Aug., 2003), pp. 478-509
This article challenges the claim that Great Britain solved its 'big problem of small change' (the problem of keeping decent low-denomination coins in circulation) by embracing Matthew Boulton's steam-based coining technology. Evidence from Great Britain's commercial token episode (1787-97) shows that a successful small change system depended, not on the motive power employed in coining, but on the quality and consistency of coin engravings and on having means for systematically withdrawing worn coins. The Tower Mint failed to solve Great Britain's small change problem, not because its equipment was old-fashioned, but because its policies and constitution were flawed. -- excellent bibliography -- challenges story in Sargeant and Velde "Big Problem of Small Change" - bookshelf -- downloaded pdf to Note
article  jstor  economic_history  Europe-Early_Modern  18thC  19thC  British_history  currency  commerce  Innovation  UK_Government  monetary_policy  gold_standard  Napoleonic_Wars  bookshelf  bibliography  downloaded  EF-add 
january 2015 by dunnettreader
Douglas M. Peers, review - H. V. Bowen, The Business of Empire: The East India Company and Imperial Britain, 1756-1833 (2006) JSTOR: The International History Review, Vol. 29, No. 3 (Sep., 2007), pp. 605-606
Cambridge University Press -- very enthusiastic review especially re the data Bowen uses, and purportedly will make available - data shows greater economic impact of trading with the East -- Bowen ends with qualified acceptance of "gentlemanly capitalism" thesis
books  reviews  jstor  find  amazon.com  18thC  19thC  British_history  British_politics  British_Empire  East_India_Company  India  imperialism  economic_history  political_economy  financial_system  City  Parliament  interest_groups  UK_Government  UK_government-colonies  UK_economy 
october 2014 by dunnettreader
PATRICK A. WALSH -- THE FISCAL STATE IN IRELAND, 1691–1769 (2013).| The Historical Journal, 56, pp 629-656 Cambridge Journals Online - Abstract
PATRICK A. WALSH - University College, Dublin (& UCL post doc fellowship) -- This article examines the Irish fiscal-military state in the eighteenth century. It locates the Irish state within a broader imperial context showing how Ireland contributed to the wider British imperial project. In particular, this article looks at the development of an efficient tax-gathering apparatus, showing how the revenue board, the most pervasive agency of the eighteenth-century Irish state, extracted increasing levels of taxation from a sometimes hostile population. Drawing extensively on the records of the Irish revenue commissioners, a very rich if under utilized source, it demonstrates for the first time the levels of taxation raised in Ireland, while also exploring how these taxes were collected. It concludes that this period saw the expansion of an increasingly professional bureaucracy, challenging existing interpretations that have focused predominantly on politicization. The final section looks at issues of evasion and compliance, showing the difficulties faced by the Irish state in this period, as it expanded deeper into Irish society. -* I would like to thank Stephen Conway, Niamh Cullen, Julian Hoppit, Eoin Magennis, and Ivar McGrath, as well as the two anonymous readers, for their comments on earlier drafts.
article  paywall  find  17thC  18thC  British_history  Ireland  Ireland-English_exploitation  taxes  fiscal-military_state  tax_collection  bureaucracy  state-building  British_Empire  British_Empire-constitutional_structure  UK_Government  UK_government-colonies  primary_sources  EF-add 
august 2014 by dunnettreader
The Works and Life of Walter Bagehot, vol. 5 (Historical & Financial Essays; The English Constitution) - Online Library of Liberty
A UNIVERSAL MONEY. (1869.) Deals with international exchange, seignorage etc-- *-- HENRY CRABB ROBINSON.1 (1869.) *--* BAD LAWYERS OR GOOD? (1870.) *--* THE EARL OF CLARENDON. (1870.) *--* MR. GROTE. (1870?) *--* ON THE EMOTION OF CONVICTION. (1871.) *--* MR. LOWE AS CHANCELLOR OF THE EXCHEQUER. (1871.) **--**--**--**-- THE ENGLISH CONSTITUTION. (2nd edition)
books  etexts  17thC  18thC  19thC  British_history  British_politics  historiography-17thC  historiography-19thC  historicism  English_Civil_War  English_constitution  political_philosophy  constitutionalism  ancient_history  ancient_Greece  public_finance  sovereign_debt  Clarendon_1st_Earl  historians-and-politics  historiography-Whig  UK_Government  Bagehot  EF-add 
july 2014 by dunnettreader
The Works and Life of Walter Bagehot, vol. 4 (Political & Literary Essays) - Online Library of Liberty
WILLIAM PITT. (1861.) *--* THE PRINCE CONSORT. (1861.) *--* COUNT YOUR ENEMIES AND ECONOMISE YOUR EXPENDITURE. (1862.) -- POSTSCRIPT. *--* LADY MARY WORTLEY MONTAGU.1 (1862.) -- “To Mr. Wortley Montagu. -- “TOWN ECLOGUES. *--* THE IGNORANCE OF MAN. (1862.) *--* MR. CLOUGH’S POEMS. (1862.) *--* BOLINGBROKE AS A STATESMAN. (1863.) *--* WHAT LORD LYNDHURST REALLY WAS. (1863.) *--* SIR GEORGE CORNEWALL LEWIS.1 (1863.) -- Right Hon. Sir George C. Lewis to Earl Stanhope. -- The same to the same. *--* THE TRIBUTE AT HEREFORD TO SIR G. C. LEWIS. (1864.) *--* STERNE AND THACKERAY.1 (1864.) *--* SACRED TO THE MEMORY OF MRS. ELIZABETH DRAPER, IN WHOM GENIUS AND BENEVOLENCE WERE UNITED. SHE DIED AUGUST 3, 1778, AGED 35. *--* WORDSWORTH, TENNYSON, AND BROWNING OR PURE, ORNATE, AND GROTESQUE ART IN ENGLISH POETRY.1 (1864.) *--* CÆSARISM AS IT EXISTED IN 1865. *--* MR. COBDEN. (1865.) *--* LORD PALMERSTON. (1865.) *--* BOSCASTLE.1 (1866.) -- downloaded pdf to Note
books  etexts  Bagehot  18thC  19thC  British_history  British_politics  English_lit  poetry  novels  Bolingbroke  Montagu_Lady_Mary  Sterne  Thackeray  Wordsworth  Tennyson  Victorian  Romanticism  parties  partisanship  Tories  British_Empire  British_foreign_policy  political_economy  laisser-faire  free_trade  Parliament  UK_Government  Pitt_the_Younger  Palmerston  downloaded  EF-add 
july 2014 by dunnettreader
Edmund Burke: A Historical Study (1867) - John Morley - Google Books
Explicitly not a biography - a mix of life political history and political culture of last half of 18thC -- added to Google_Books library - lots of full view copies on Google_Books - this from Czech Library looks in good shape
books  etexts  Google_Books  Morley  18thC  19thC  British_history  British_politics  intellectual_history  political_philosophy  political_history  parties  Whigs-oligarchy  Burke  George_III  Ireland  American_Revolution  French_Revolution  East_India_Company  British_foreign_policy  British_Empire-constitutional_structure  British_Empire  conservatism  Pitt_the_Younger  UK_Government  UK_government-colonies  EF-add 
may 2014 by dunnettreader
Martin Wolf - AstraZeneca is more than investors’ call - FT.com - May 8 2014
The questions any normal person would ask are three. Would a takeover increase competition? Would it increase investment in life-transforming research? Would assurances given by the bidder about future production and research be credible? The answer to all is “no”. Yet the merger is likely to go ahead, because the only people whose interests count are shareholders, whether they have owned their shares for 10 years or 10 seconds. AstraZeneca can be sold and bought like a sack of potatoes. Does this make sense? Until recently I believed it to be the least bad arrangement. Now I am not so sure, as I shall argue in a conference on Inclusive Capitalism in London later this month. We need to rethink ownership and control of limited liability companies
UK_Government  corporate_governance  corporate_finance  corporate_citizenship  shareholders  investors  Innovation  M&A  pharma  R&D 
may 2014 by dunnettreader
Guy Chet - The Ocean Is a Wilderness: Atlantic Piracy and the Limits of State Authority, 1688-1856 | University of Massachusetts Press
Historians have long maintained that the rise of the British empire brought an end to the great age of piracy, turning the once violent Atlantic frontier into a locus of orderly commerce by 1730. Guy Chet documents the persistence of piracy, smuggling, and other forms of illegal trade throughout the 18thC despite ongoing governmental campaigns to stamp it out. The failure of the Royal Navy to police oceanic trade reflected the state’s limited authority and legitimacy at port, in the courts, and in the hearts and minds of Anglo-American constituents. Chet shows how the traditional focus on the growth of the modern state overlooks the extent to which old attitudes and cultural practices continued to hold sway. Even as the British government extended its naval, legal, and bureaucratic reach, in many parts of the Atlantic world illegal trade was not only tolerated but encouraged. In part this was because Britain’s constabulary command of the region remained more tenuous than some have suggested, and in part because maritime insurance and wartime tax policies ensured that piracy and smuggling remained profitable. When Atlantic piracy eventually waned in the early 19thC, it had more to do with a reduction in its profitability at port than with forceful confrontation at sea. -- Jack Greene gives it high marks
books  17thC  18thC  19thC  British_history  British_Empire  British_Navy  UK_Government  UK_government-colonies  Atlantic  piracy  risk  taxes  insurance  financial_system  smuggling  profit  ports  judiciary  American_colonies  West_Indies 
may 2014 by dunnettreader
Carol E. Heim and Philip Mirowski - Interest Rates and Crowding-Out During Britain's Industrial Revolution | JSTOR: The Journal of Economic History, Vol. 47, No. 1 (Mar., 1987), pp. 117-139
Available evidence on interest rates and government borrowing during Britain's industrial revolution, while limited, does not support the idea that war spending crowded out private investment. This article demonstrates the importance of using data on net receipts from borrowing, rather than changes in government debt. Weaknesses of the crowding-out model concerning capital markets and investment, openness of the economy, and full employment are identified for the historical case. The case raises broader issues of whether conceptions of saving and investment based in neoclassical supply-constrained models are as appropriate as theories of capital accumulation. -- 1st in series of back and forth articles -- didn't download
article  jstor  economic_history  finance_capital  sovereign_debt  crowding_out  capital_markets  fiscal-military_state  Industrial_Revolution  18thC  19thC  British_history  UK_Government  interest_rates  international_finance  capital_flows  savings  investment  EF-add 
february 2014 by dunnettreader
Marilyn Silverman and P. H. Gulliver - 'Common Sense' and 'Governmentality': Local Government in Southeastern Ireland, 1850-1922 | JSTOR: The Journal of the Royal Anthropological Institute, Vol. 12, No. 1 (Mar., 2006), pp. 109-127
Early paradigms in political anthropology identified formal government councils as a subject for cross-cultural comparison (structural functionalism) or as a political resource for goal-orientated actors (transactionalism). Recent concerns with power and regulation can also profit from a focus on local-level government councils by using them to explore the conceptual and empirical linkages between 'common sense' and 'governmentality'. In this article, as a point of entry, we highlight a key moment in the history of Britain's colonial and hegemonic project in Ireland, namely the orderly administrative transition from colony to state which occurred in Ireland after 1919. By constructing a historical narrative of a local government council in the southeast after 1850, and of its material and discursive bases, we show how the actions and ideologies of elite farmers were implicated in this orderly administrative transition and, therefore, how the concepts of governmentality, hegemony, and common sense might be linked. -- interesting discussion of 2nd half of 20thC shift from stucturalist-functionalist to transactionalism to seeing power everywhere but with different focus (Gramsci materialist and production of internally contradictory common sense) and Foucault (more discourse and self formation) with different views of verticality of power. With everything becoming political economic, loss of interest in governmental units that had been central to comparative stucturalist-functionalist system analysis.
article  jstor  social_theory  methodology  lit_survey  structuralist  poststructuralist  historical_change  agency  anthropology  philosophy_of_social_science  levels_of_analyis  Gramsci  Foucault  governmentality  local_government  government_officials  governing_class  political_culture  political_economy  hegemony  Ireland  19thC  20thC  UK_Government  UK_government-colonies  local_politics  bibliography  EF-add 
february 2014 by dunnettreader
Lucy S. Sutherland and J. Binney - Henry Fox as Paymaster General of the Forces | JSTOR: The English Historical Review, Vol. 70, No. 275 (Apr., 1955), pp. 229-257
Describes the complex system, much imposed by Parliamentary appropriations requirements - the potential fortune to be made in the position, but the huge personal liability it also entailed until a satisfactory audit was finished, the audit being no simple matter. May be useful for Bolingbroke's situation as Secretary for War and relation to the other parts of the Army bureaucracy, with the huge sums sloshing around. -- didn't download
article  jstor  17thC  18thC  British_history  British_Army  UK_Government  government_officials  Bolingbroke  Brydges  places-income  government_finance  capital_markets  money_market  sovereign_debt  Fox_Henry  1760s  EF-add 
january 2014 by dunnettreader
Julian Hoppit - Political Arithmetic in Eighteenth-Century England | JSTOR: The Economic History Review, New Series, Vol. 49, No. 3 (Aug., 1996), pp. 516-540
With regard to public policy, in late seventeenth-century Britain there was a remarkable development of social statistics, what Petty called 'political arithmetic'. The general view, however, is that this new approach ended early in the eighteenth century only to be rediscovered by the early Victorian statistical movement. In fact, through the eighteenth century public policy continued to be considered partly in quantitative terms. This article explores some of the dimensions and peculiarities of this varied and extensive political arithmetic. -- downloaded pdf to Note
article  jstor  economic_history  political_history  18thC  British_politics  political_arithmetick  UK_economy  UK_Government  Parliament  public_policy  public_opinion  political_press  economic_growth  wages  prices  trade  fiscal_policy  sovereign_debt  fiscal-military_state  taxes  Excise_Crisis  luxury  UK_government-colonies  downloaded  EF-add 
january 2014 by dunnettreader
Tom Arkell - Illuminations and Distortions: Gregory King's Scheme Calculated for the Year 1688 and the Social Structure of Later Stuart England | JSTOR: The Economic History Review, New Series, Vol. 59, No. 1 (Feb., 2006), pp. 32-69
Compare with Geoffrey Holmes critique of King's estimates in 1970s -- This critique of King's well-known Scheme of the social order in 1688 examines his purposes, the Scheme's evolutionary process, and the taxation data (hearth, poll, window, and marriage duty) that King used to construct it, before contrasting his conclusions with recent research. His social hierarchy emerges as a rather crude and backward-looking stereotype based on too many intelligent guesses, with his treatment of the poorer families being least satisfactory. Overall, King's population totals appear sound, his national income estimate low, and various mean household sizes and family and children's totals unreliable. -- didn't download
article  jstor  economic_history  social_history  demography  population  classes  lower_orders  British_history  political_arithmetick  UK_Government  17thC  18thC  EF-add 
january 2014 by dunnettreader
Frank O'Gorman, review essay - Approaches to Hanoverian Society JSTOR: The Historical Journal, Vol. 39, No. 2 (Jun., 1996), pp. 521-534
(1) Philanthropy and Police: London Charity in the Eighteenth Century by Donna T. Andrew; *--* (2) The Language of Liberty: Political Discourse and Social Dynamics in the Anglo-American World by J. C. D. Clark; *--* (3) Stilling the Grumbling Hive. The Response to Social and Economic Problems in England, 1689-1750 by L. Davison; *--* (4) Riot, Risings and Revolution. Governance and Violence in Eighteenth- Century England by Ian Gilmour; *--* (5) A Patriot Press. National Politics and the London Press in the 1740s by Robert Harris; *--* (6) Judging New Wealth. Popular Publishing and Responses to Commerce in England, 1750-1850 by James Raven; *--* (7)The Local Origins of Modern Society. Gloucestershire 1500-1800 by David Rollison; *--* (8) An Imperial State at War: Britain from 1689 to 1815 by Lawrence Stone; *--* (9) Protest and Survival: The Historical Experience. Essays for E. P. Thompson by John Rule; Robert Malcolmson -- downloaded pdf to Note
books  reviews  bookshelf  article  jstor  political_history  cultural_history  political_culture  social_history  political_economy  17thC18thC  19thC  British_politics  British_Empire  UK_economy  UK_Government  UK_government-colonies  British_foreign_policy  military_history  political_press  class_conflict  local_government  political_philosophy  charity  crime  violence  riots  lower_orders  mercantilism  luxury  status  nouveaux_riches  governing_class  governmentality  fiscal-military_state  popular_culture  popular_politics  populism  downloaded  EF-add 
january 2014 by dunnettreader
Michael Braddick: State Formation and Social Change in Early Modern England: A Problem Stated and Approaches Suggested (1991)
JSTOR: Social History, Vol. 16, No. 1 (Jan., 1991), pp. 1-17 -- downloaded pdf to Note -- the theoretical background to Braddick work on local government, taxation, authority and challenges in Three Kingdoms etc -- focus on state building process not on state as entity
article  jstor  historiography  historical_sociology  17thC  British_history  UK_Government  British_politics  social_history  local_government  taxes  fiscal-military_state  state-building  nation-state  English_Civil_War  political_culture  Ireland  Scotland 
september 2013 by dunnettreader
Derek Hirst: The Place of Principle [in Early Stuart conflict] (1981) | P&P
JSTOR: Past & Present, No. 92 (Aug., 1981), pp. 79-99 -- with T Rabb on role of Commons responding to Early Stuart revisionists (eg Sharpe, Russell)-- downloaded pdf to Note
article  jstor  historiography  revisionism  17thC  Britain  British_history  British_politics  James_I  Charles_I  English_Civil_War  UK_Government  local_government  aristocracy  political_culture  religious_culture  Puritans  Church_of_England  downloaded  EF-add 
august 2013 by dunnettreader
Rebekah Higgitt: Did the Longitude Act speed up the solution to the longitude problem? | Bd of Longitude Project Blog May 2013
While the Longitude Act held out the possibility of a very large reward, it was certainly not the only or – for most people – the most likely way to make new ideas around longitude pay.The question of “speed” is an interesting one. It is impossible to predict how long new ideas should take to develop, but when we consider that it is two decades before the Commissioners of Longitude met as a group, and another three before serious money was dispensed, it doesn’t sound particularly speedy. The 1714 Act had looked for a “practicable and useful” solution for the public, but there wasn’t anything widely available until a century later.
British_history  Scientific_Revolution  Industrial_Revolution  UK_Government  technology  Innovation  18thC  EF-add 
july 2013 by dunnettreader

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