dunnettreader + tech/culture   3

Gill A. Pratt - Is a Cambrian Explosion Coming for Robotics? (2015) | AEAweb: Journal of Economic Perspectives, 29(3): 51-60.
Affiliation DARPA - About half a billion years ago, life on earth experienced a short period of very rapid diversification called the "Cambrian Explosion." Many theories have been proposed for the cause of the Cambrian Explosion, one of the most provocative being the evolution of vision, allowing animals to dramatically increase their ability to hunt and find mates. Today, technological developments on several fronts are fomenting a similar explosion in the diversification and applicability of robotics. Many of the base hardware technologies on which robots depend—particularly computing, data storage, and communications—have been improving at exponential growth rates. Two newly blossoming technologies—"Cloud Robotics" and "Deep Learning"—could leverage these base technologies in a virtuous cycle of explosive growth. I examine some key technologies contributing to the present excitement in the robotics field. As with other technological developments, there has been a significant uptick in concerns about the societal implication of robotics and artificial intelligence. Thus, I offer some thoughts about how robotics may affect the economy and some ways to address potential difficulties. -- downloaded pdf to Note
article  technology  technology-adoption  tech-mobile_phones  Tech/Culture  robotics  Labor_markets  labor_standards  labor_law  wages  social_process  change-economic  change-social  government-roles  military-industrial_complex  DARPA  investment-government  AI  IT  cloud  telecommunications  downloaded 
september 2015 by dunnettreader
Tim O'Reilly - The WTF Economy
We need a focused, high-level conversation about the deep ways in which computers and their ilk are transforming how we do business, how we work, and how we live. Just about everyone’s asking WTF? (“What the F***?” but also, more charitably “What’s the future?”) That’s why I’m launching a new event called Next:Economy (What’s The Future of Work?), to be held at the Palace Hotel in San Francisco Nov 12 and 13, 2015. My goal is to shed light on the transformation in the nature of work now being driven by algorithms, big data, robotics, and the on-demand economy.
politics-and-technology  careers  Tech/Culture  labor  global_economy  gig_economy  state-and-technology  Labor_markets  globalization  education-continuing  conference  tech-mobile_phones  Pocket  labor_standards  education-training  from pocket
august 2015 by dunnettreader
Alan Jacobs - the three big stories of modernity | TextPatterns July 2015
So far there have been three widely influential stories about the rise of modernity: the Emancipatory, the Protestant, and the Neo-Thomist. (..) all these narrators of modernity see our own age as one in which the consequences of 500-year-old debates conducted by philosophers and theologians are still being played out. I think all of these narratives are wrong. They are wrong because they are the product of scholars in universities who overrate the historical importance and influence of other scholars in universities, and because they neglect ideas that connect more directly with the material world. All of these grands recits should be set aside, and they should not immediately be replaced with others, but with more particular, less sweeping, and more technologically-oriented stories. The technologies that Marshall McLuhan called "the extensions of Man" are infinitely more important for Man's story, for good and for ill, than the debates of the schoolmen and interpreters of the Bible. Instead of grand narratives of the emergence of The Modern we need something far more plural: technological histories of modernity.
Instapaper  cultural_history  cultural_capital  modernity  technology  Tech/Culture  social_theory  intellectual_history  intellectual_history-distorted  religious_history  Thomism-21stC  Reformation  Renaissance  Enlightenment  Enlightenment_Project  Enlightenment-ongoing  modernity-emergence  material_culture  economic_history  Great_Divergence  Industrial_Revolution  colonialism  Military_Revolution  Scientific_Revolution  consumer_revolution  technology-history  historiography  medicine  public_health  public_sphere  public_goods  media  print_culture  history_of_science  history_of_book  history-and-social_sciences  narrative  narrative-contested  from instapaper
july 2015 by dunnettreader

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