dunnettreader + taylor_charles   20

Akeel Bilgrami, ed. - Beyond the Secular West (2016) | Columbia University Press
What is the character of secularism in countries that were not pervaded by Christianity, such as China, India, and the nations of the Middle East? To what extent is the secular an imposition of colonial rule? How does secularism comport with local religious cultures in Africa, and how does it work with local forms of power and governance in Latin America? Has modern secularism evolved organically, or is it even necessary, and has it always meant progress? A vital extension of Charles Taylor's A Secular Age, in which he exhaustively chronicled the emergence of secularism in Latin Christendom, this anthology applies Taylor's findings to secularism's global migration. (...) What began as a modern reaction to—as well as a stubborn extension of—Latin Christendom has become a complex export shaped by the world's religious and political systems. Brilliantly alternating between intellectual and methodological approaches, this volume fosters a greater engagement with the phenomenon across disciplines.
Preface, by Akeel Bilgrami
1. Can Secularism Travel?, by Charles Taylor
2. The Sufi and the State, by Souleymane Bachir Diagne
3. The Individual and Collective Self-Liberation Model of Ustadh Mahmoud Mohamed Taha, by Abdullahi Ahmed An-Na'im
4. Creating Democratically Friendly Twin Tolerations Outside of Latin Christendom: Tunisia, by Alfred Stepan
5. Secularism and the Mexican Revolution, by Claudio Lomnitz
6. Is Confucianism Secular?, by Peter van der Veer
7. Disenchantment Deferred, by Sudipta Kaviraj
8. An Ancient Indian Secular Age?, by Rajeev Bhargava
9. Gandhi's Radicalism: An Interpretation, by Akeel Bilgrami
10. A Secular Age Outside Latin Christendom: Charles Taylor Responds
books  kindle-available  secularization  modernity  modernization  Islam  tolerance  liberalism  decolonization  secularism  universalism  MENA  Tunisia  Mexico  India  ancient_India  Gandhi  Sufis  Confucianism  connected_history  Taylor_Charles  Christianity  Christendom 
july 2016 by dunnettreader
Davide Panagia - A Theory of Aspects: Media Participation in Political Theory | Academia.edu
New Literary History (2014) - My aim in this essay is to elaborate a mode of political theorizing that is not beholden to the “how do you know?” question. Rather than focusing on epistemic arguments, I propose that people interested in studying political theory address the partiality of aspects that emerge when engaging works, and the participation of media in the creation of political concepts. Central to my elaborations is the aesthetic notion that there is no overarching rule that will determine how objects, peoples, and events relate to one another and stand out as relevant to political theory, and that there are no necessary qualifications for participation in political theorizing. The essay is comprised of three sections. The first engages three thinkers of the interpretive turn in political theory: Charles Taylor, Quentin Skinner, and James Tully. The second section assembles three images of thought drawn from three different expressions of three diverse thinkers: Roland Barthes, Stanley Cavell, and Jacques Derrida. In the third section I depart from the theoretical experimentation and interpretive work of the previous sections and redirect attention to the participation of media in political theorizing. I conclude the essay by suggesting that political theory is process of mediation between and amongst a diversity of elements that have no common measure. - Downloaded via MacMini - EF Mobile to File
political_philosophy  aspect_theory  political_culture  cultural_studies  'media  political_press  political_participation  mass_culture  cultural_critique  Cambridge_School  Taylor_Charles  Skinner  Cavell  Barthes  Derrida  downloaded 
march 2016 by dunnettreader
Céline Spector - Charles Taylor, philosophe de la culture (career review) - La Vie des idées - 8 avril 2014
Charles Taylor n’a cessé de critiquer l’individualisme des sociétés modernes. La politique de la reconnaissance qu’il prône entend respecter la singularité de chacun et son inscription dans une communauté morale ou politique – quitte à accorder une importance excessive aux convictions religieuses. -- downloaded pdf to Note
article  intellectual_history  20thC  21stC  Taylor_Charles  individualism  modernity  secularism  religious_belief  religious_culture  downloaded 
december 2015 by dunnettreader
Alan Jacobs - Fantasy and the Buffered Self - The New Atlantis - Winter 2014
If fantasy rose to centrality as a form of nostalgia for a day when the porous self was at least surrounded by other sentient beings rather than a dark and silent cosmos, it may now have become something else altogether, a kind of ultimate disenchantment where even our own selves are vacated in favor of a world prefabricated for us by others. This raises again that key question from American Gods: Is resistance futile? Is it simply the case that “all we’re facing here is a f — ing paradigm shift”? Or might there be forces of resistance capable of waging a “mighty battle” on behalf of human freedom?(..) we might take comfort from what seems to me the authentic core of the fantastic as a genre, as we see it from the standpoint of late modernity: fantasy may best be taken as an acknowledgment that the great problem of the pagan world — how to navigate as safely as possible through an ever-shifting landscape of independent and unpredictable powers who are indifferent to human needs — is our problem once more. (..) American Gods is an especially important text for this moment, because it rightly identifies technologies as gods and simultaneously sides with the older gods as being intrinsically closer to the proper human lifeworld. Imaginatively, if not in substantive belief, we are pagans once more. (..) We may choose to believe that we can buffer ourselves, protect ourselves against unknown powers. But that’s a kind of wager: if the powers are real, our disbelief won’t deter them. And it may be that certain powers profit from being disregarded or treated as mere fancies. -- downloaded as pdf to Note
article  SFF  religious_belief  religious_culture  gods-antiquity  technology  self  teleology  cosmology  modernity  disenchantment  sublime  humanism  Taylor_Charles  philosophical_anthropology  cultural_change  downloaded 
july 2015 by dunnettreader
Paul Silas Peterson - Thomas Pfau and the emergence of the modern individual « The Immanent Frame - Oct 2014
Thomas Pfau’s presentation of modernity in Minding the Modern fails to incorporate both the sociopolitical dimensions of modernity’s emergence and its positive aspects. He sees modernity as the home of the “modern subject” of the Western world, or the “quintessentially modern, solitary individual” in his “palpable melancholy,” both “altogether adrift” and without “interpersonal relations.” (..) a challenge to those whom he sometimes calls the “modern apologists of secular, liberal, Enlightenment society.” -- Pfau draws upon a narrative which might be called the “middle age voluntarism to modern alienation theory.” This has many predecessors in the second half of the 20thC (..). The geopolitical situation in the 1980s and 1990s is one of the important features of the historical context of many of these narratives (..) a variety of intellectual assaults were waged in the Western world against what had become the dominant intellectual paradigm in the West. (..) Over the last 30 years (..) this critical diagnosis of modernity has become more precise; there has been a consolidation of the sources and arguments -- Alasdair MacIntyre, Michael J. Buckley, Charles Taylor, Colin E. Gunton, Stanley Hauerwas, John Milbank, Michael Allen Gillespie, and more recently David B. Hart, Adrian Pabst and Brad S. Gregory. Pfau’s Minding the Modern is a new contribution to this anti-modern diagnosis of contemporary Western culture and the modern individual. (..)some of the arguments can be found in the French Catholic reform theologians of the early 20thC. There were also many German-speaking intellectuals in the 1920s and 1930s who were developing sweeping narratives that cast a dark light on modernity and thus, both implicitly and explicitly, called into question the rationale and legitimacy of the liberal political order. Pfau claims that his book does not provide one of these narratives (..). It does seem to be similar, however, to the classic decline-and-fall narratives. Even the essays at the end of the book about “retrieving the human” are analogous. -- downloaded post as pdf to Note
books  kindle-available  reviews  modernity  modernity-emergence  reform-legal  intellectual_history  medieval_philosophy  theology  Renaissance  humanism  Erasmus  Thomism  Thomism-21stC  voluntarism  Ockham  Luther  liberalism  self  alienation  18thC  Enlightenment  Enlightenment_Project  Counter-Enlightenment  Counter-Reformation  19thC  Coleridge  transcendence  ontology  individualism  17thC  English_Civil_War  religious_wars  religious_culture  Hobbes  20thC  21stC  declinism  MacIntyre  Taylor_Charles  downloaded  EF-add 
november 2014 by dunnettreader
The Power of Religion in the Public Sphere, eds. Eduardo Mendieta and Jonathan VanAntwerpen (2011) — Social Science Research Council - Publications
The Power of Religion in the Public Sphere (Columbia University Press, 2011) represents a rare opportunity to experience a diverse group of preeminent philosophers confronting one pervasive contemporary concern: what role does—or should—religion play in our public lives? Reflecting on her recent work concerning state violence in Israel-Palestine, Judith Butler explores the potential of religious perspectives for renewing cultural and political criticism, while Jürgen Habermas, best known for his seminal conception of the public sphere, thinks through the ambiguous legacy of the concept of “the political” in contemporary theory. Charles Taylor argues for a radical redefinition of secularism, and Cornel West defends civil disobedience and emancipatory theology. Eduardo Mendieta and Jonathan VanAntwerpen detail the immense contribution of these philosophers to contemporary social and political theory, and an afterword by Craig Calhoun places these attempts to reconceive the significance of both religion and the secular in the context of contemporary national and international politics. The essays comprising this volume include Habermas’s “The Political: The Rational Meaning of a Questionable Inheritance of Political Theology,” Taylor’s “Why We Need a Radical Redefinition of Secularism,” Butler’s “Is Judaism Zionism?” and West’s “Prophetic Religion and the Future of Capitalist Civilization.” Each chapter was originally presented as a talk at a recent symposium co-hosted by the SSRC, the Institute for Public Knowledge at New York University, and the Humanities Institute at SUNY Stony Brook. -- Excerpt from the afterword by Craig Calhoun downloaded pdf to Note -- the Taylor essay responded to at The Immanent Frame starting with Bigrami's paper
books  sociology_of_religion  political_philosophy  moral_philosophy  theology  social_theory  politics-and-religion  political_participation  secularism  public_sphere  IR  IR-domestic_po  litics  Judaism  diasporas  exiles  Habermas  Taylor_Charles  Butler_Judith  downloaded  EF-add 
november 2014 by dunnettreader
Regina Schwartz - Secularism, belief, and truth « The Immanent Frame - Oct 2011
Triggered by Bilgrami’s paper and Taylor's thoughts on respect of multicultural communities, becomes a meditation on the virtues of open, vigorous debate in endless truth-seeking stimulated by Milton. -- It is because that Truth of how best to live together is a mystery, not fully graspable, knowable, manipulable, after all, that we need to approach the dialogue with the other with full respect—to listen, learn, and evaluate. So I guess mystery turns out not to be so woosie for politics, after all. Another way to say this is that I agree with Taylor’s assessment that we are in an era of reflexivity regarding religion in which belief is always questionable and there are many different positions, that this is a good, the outcome of the Enlightenment and the romantic Counter-Enlightenment, and surely, we need that same reflexivity in our secular beliefs. -- downloaded page as pdf to Note
epistemology-social  religious_belief  multiculturalism  Taylor_Charles  secularism  free_speech  freedom_of_conscience  reflexivity  liberalism  Milton  downloaded  EF-add 
november 2014 by dunnettreader
Andrew Koppelman - Naked Strong Evaluation - Dissent, p. 105, Winter 2009 :: SSRN
Andrew Koppelman -Northwestern University School of Law -- Northwestern Public Law Research Paper No. 14-49 -- A review, for Dissent magazine, of Charles Taylor’s book, A Secular Age. - Number of Pages in PDF File: 6 - Keywords: Charles Taylor, Religion, Secularism -- downloaded pdf to Note
books  reviews  Taylor_Charles  historical_sociology  sociology_of_religion  cultural_history  intellectual_history  secularism  secularization  Reformation  Counter-Reformation  Protestants  Enlightenment  Enlightenment_Project  downloaded  EF-add 
september 2014 by dunnettreader
Ian Ward, review - Charles Taylor, A Secular Age | JSTOR: The Journal of Religion, Vol. 88, No. 3 (July 2008), pp. 420-422
Certain aspects of A Secular Age are bound to generate controversy, particularly among scholars trained in the study of religion. Those suspicious of the category of religious “experience,” given the ahistorical and covertly apologetic uses to which it has been put in the past, will be wary of Taylor’s idea of a “sense of fullness,” which draws upon the earlier work of Mircea Eliade, Rudolf Otto, and William James. --Most importantly, there is also the issue of where to place A Secular Age—who is Taylor arguing against and engaging in dialogue with? What are the relevant competitor views upon which we should bring it to bear? Given its size and complexity, one of the most obvious competitor accounts of secularity and modernity would be Hans Blumenberg’s The Legitimacy of the Modern Age, but Taylor’s explicit references to Blumenberg, while suggestive, are infrequent and parenthetical. Taylor does, more explicitly, situate his account against what he calls “subtraction” theories of secularity, which posit a “uniform and unilinear effect of modernity on religious belief and practice” (461). However, given that prominent scholars of secularization (such as Peter Berger and Jürgen Habermas) do not defend such a position, we might ask whether Taylor’s scholarly target remains a live one. -- didn't download
books  reviews  kindle-available  jstor  religious_history  cultural_history  secularization  secularism  religious_belief  religious_culture  religious_experience  sociology_of_religion  modernity  Blumenberg  Enlightenment  progress  Providence  Taylor_Charles 
august 2014 by dunnettreader
Kenan Malik - Review of "Inventing the Individual" by Larry Siedentop - CHRISTIANITY AND LIBERALISM | Pandaemonium Jan 2014
Review of "Inventing the Individual" by Larry Siedentop -- ‘The characteristic of historical writing in recent centuries’, Siedentop observes, ‘is an inclination to minimize the moral and intellectual distance between the modern and the ancient world, while at the same time maximizing the moral and intellectual distance between modern Europe and the middle ages.’ I am not sure that it makes much sense to talk about a ‘characteristic of historical writing’ that stretches over ‘centuries’. This is particularly so given that one the characteristics of recent historiography has been the opposite: the tendency to blur the distinction between the Middle Ages and modernity. Inventing the Individual is very much part of this revisionist trend. The trouble is, in revising the previous approach Siedentop now makes the ancient world too alien and modernity not distinctive enough. -- at least it's a counter to the mournful Thomist condemnation of liberal individualism by MacIntyre, Taylor et al.
books  reviews  intellectual_history  religious_history  religious_culture  political_culture  political_philosophy  Christianity  liberalism  equality  free_will  original_sin  hierarchy  authority  individualism  MacIntyre  Taylor_Charles 
may 2014 by dunnettreader
Claudia Blöser, Aron Schöpf and Marcus Willaschek - Autonomy, Experience, and Reflection. On a Neglected Aspect of Personal Autonomy | JSTOR: Ethical Theory and Moral Practice, Vol. 13, No. 3 (June 2010), pp. 239-253
The aim of this paper is to suggest that a necessary condition of autonomy has not been sufficiently recognized in the literature: the capacity to critically reflect on one's practical attitudes (desires, preferences, values, etc.) in the light of new experiences. It will be argued that most prominent accounts of autonomy—ahistorical as well as historysensitive—have either altogether failed to recognize this condition or at least failed to give an explicit account of it. -- discusses internalist (Frankfurt's "free_will" 1st and 2nd order desires that involves critical reflection; ahistorical, Taylor's "punctuated"?) and externalist (adds conditions of information not just psychology in determining values) - this paper adds ability to reflect on values and experience going forward when new experience doesn't fit with expectations from existing values --focus is on practical judgment without extending into a particular view of moral philosophy etc though points out where theorists in other areas have used a narrower notion of autonomy --bibliography may be useful eg Rawls -- didn't download
article  jstor  human_nature  free_will  moral_philosophy  political_philosophy  autonomy  practical_reason  values  development-personal  bibliography  Taylor_Charles  EF-add 
february 2014 by dunnettreader
Steven Johnston - This Patriotism Which Is Not One | JSTOR: Polity, Vol. 34, No. 3 (Spring, 2002), pp. 285-312
The essay explores the resurgence of patriotic thought, focusing on the recent work of Richard Rorty and a classic essay by John Schaar. Patriotism, it is argued, names a permanent possibility lodged in the human predicament. It routinely seeks transcendent assistance to support its political operations. This move, in turn, may help account for patriotism's narcissistic, self-destructive character and the danger it ultimately poses to democracy. For both Rorty and Schaar, curiously, the Vietnam War looms large in their narratives. By engaging them on the question of Vietnam, the dangers and cruelties endemic to patriotism emerge full-blown. Subsequently, any patriotism worthy of the name, it is suggested, would have to end by suspending itself. -- useful bibliography of communitarian inflected theorists pre 9/11 -- from the quotes, looks like the "self hating liberals" phenomenon leaves them exposed to precisely the sort of weaknesses they proposed to shore up with patriotic gestures -- may be helpful when need to look at recent patriotism discussions, though the focus on one essay by Schaar probably too limiting -- didn't download
article  jstor  liberalism  communitarian  national_ID  patriotism  Rorty  Taylor_Charles  EF-add 
february 2014 by dunnettreader
Olakunle George - Modernity and the Promise of Reading | JSTOR: Diacritics, Vol. 25, No. 4 (Winter, 1995), pp. 71-88
Didn't download -- interesting on Adorno re the essay as critique -- purpose to put Adorno and Taylor in dialogue with an African poet. Looking at postcolonial as needing more than an affirmative to counter the negative images from colonialism. Eurocentrism isn't an ethnic superiority complex but the conditions of global capital social relations.
article  jstor  social_theory  lit_crit  modernity  Eurocentrism  post-colonial  Adorno  Taylor_Charles  Africa  multiculturalism  EF-add 
february 2014 by dunnettreader
Charles Taylor - Foucault on Freedom and Truth | JSTOR: Political Theory, Vol. 12, No. 2 (May, 1984), pp. 152-183
Downloaded pdf to Note -- 1st in what became a back and forth with Connolly -- maybe I'll figure out Taylor and Connolly if not Foucault. No bibliography on jstor information page but lengthy article.
article  jstor  political_philosophy  social_theory  moral_philosophy  epistemology  philosophy_of_social_science  freedom  autonomy  Taylor_Charles  Foucault  downloaded  EF-add 
february 2014 by dunnettreader

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