dunnettreader + strauss   25

Léo Strauss - Les trois vagues de la modernité (trans M Nafi) - 2005 Modernité issue of Philosophire - Cairn.info
Written by Strauss after Natural Right and History (1953 pub) - expansion of lecture remarks that were used for What is Political Philosophy. Probably intended for book he planned to follow Natural Right - he worked on the materials in seminars but didn't finish a book. See previous item in Philosophore, also translated by Michael Nafi -- remarks from a Straussian student who put 3 Waves together with a number of other pieces by Strauss for a 1989 printed collection
intellectual_history  modernity  Strauss  political_philosophy 
february 2016 by dunnettreader
Harvey Mansfeld - Political Theory as Historical Artifact, review of Gunnell, The Descent of Political Theory | JSTOR - The Political Review (1996)
Review: Political Theory as Historical Artifact
Reviewed Work: The Descent of Political Theory; The Genealogy of an American Vocation by John G. Gunnell
Review by: Harvey C. Mansfield
The Review of Politics
Vol. 57, No. 2 (Spring, 1995), pp. 372-374 -- meow, it's all those darned Germans who lured us permanently away from the science of the founders
social_sciences-post-WWII  19thC  historiography-19thC  reviews  Arendt  20thC  Nietzsche  political_philosophy  Hegelian  Strauss  Heidegger  intellectual_history  jstor  Hegel  Founders  article 
january 2016 by dunnettreader
Robert Pippin - The Unavailability of the Ordinary: Strauss on the Philosophical Fate of Modernity | JSTOR- Political Theory (2003)
Political Theory, Vol. 31, No. 3 (Jun., 2003), pp. 335-358 -- In Natural Right and History Leo Strauss argues for the continuing "relevance " of the classical understanding of natural right. Since this relevance is not a matter of a direct return, or a renewed appreciation that a neglected doctrine is simply true, the meaning of this claim is somewhat elusive. But it is clear enough that the core of Strauss's argument for that relevance is a claim about the relation between human experience and philosophy. Strauss argues that the classical understanding articulates and is continuous with the "lived experience" of engaged participants in political life, the ordinary, and he argues (in a way quite similar to claims in Heidegger) that such an ordinary or everyday point of view has been "lost." The author presents here an interpretation and critique of such a claim. -- downloaded pdf to Note
article  jstor  intellectual_history  political_philosophy  Strauss  modernity  natural_rights  ancient_philosophy  political_culture  Heidegger  liberalism  liberalism-post-WWII  downloaded 
january 2016 by dunnettreader
Liisi Keedus - Arendt and Strauss as Readers of Hobbes: Liberalism and the Question of "The Proud" | JSTOR - Journal of the History of Ideas (April 2012)
Liberalism and the Question of "The Proud": Hannah Arendt and Leo Strauss as Readers of Hobbes -- Journal of the History of Ideas, Vol. 73, No. 2 (April 2012), pp. 319-341 -- huge useful bibliography
article  jstor  intellectual_history  political_philosophy  17thC  Hobbes  20thC  Arendt  Strauss  liberalism  political_culture  modernity  democracy  bibliography  downloaded 
january 2016 by dunnettreader
ADRIAN BLAU - UNCERTAINTY AND THE HISTORY OF IDEAS | JSTOR - History and Theory (Oct 2011)
History and Theory, Vol. 50, No. 3 (October 2011), pp. 358-372 -- Intellectual historians often make empirical claims, but can never know for certain if these claims are right. Uncertainty is thus inevitable for intellectual historians. But accepting uncertainty is not enough: we should also act on it, by trying to reduce and report it. We can reduce uncertainty by amassing valid data from different sources to weigh the strengths and weaknesses of competing explanations, rather than trying to "prove" an empirical claim by looking for evidence that fits it. Then we should report our degree of certainty in our claims. When we answer empirical questions in intellectual history, we are not telling our readers what happened: we are telling them how strong we think our evidence is—a crucial shift of emphasis. For intellectual historians, then, uncertainty is subjective, as discussed by Keynes and Collingwood; the paper thus explores three differences between subjective and objective uncertainty. Having outlined the theoretical basis of uncertainty, the paper then offers examples from actual research: Noel Malcolm's work shows how to reduce and report uncertainty about composition, and David Wootton's work shows how to reduce and report uncertainty about beliefs. -- VERY Anti Straussian based on extensive bibliography -- downloaded pdf to Note
article  jstor  intellectual_history  historiography  intellectual_history-distorted  philosophy_of_history  hermeneutics  hermeneutics_of_suspicion  Strauss  Straussians  epistemology-history  evidence  coherence  uncertainty  Keynes  Keynes-uncertainty  Collingwood  objectivity  positivism  post-foundational  Cambridge_School  author_intention  reception  audience  bibliography  downloaded 
january 2016 by dunnettreader
Brooke Holmes; W. H. Shearin, eds. - Dynamic Reading: Studies in the Reception of Epicureanism - Oxford University Press
(..) examines the reception history of Epicurean philosophy through a series of eleven case studies, (..). Rather than attempting to separate an original Epicureanism from its later readings and misreadings, this collection studies the philosophy together with its subsequent reception, focusing in particular on the ways in which it has provided terms and conceptual tools for defining how we read and respond to texts, artwork, and the world more generally. *--* Introduction, Brooke Holmes and W. H. Shearin -- 1. Haunting Nepos: Atticus and the Performance of Roman Epicurean Death, W. H. Shearin -- 2. Epicurus's Mistresses: Pleasure, Authority, and Gender in the Reception of the Kuriai Doxai in the Second Sophistic, Richard Fletcher -- 3. Reading for Pleasure: Disaster and Digression in the First Renaissance Commentary on Lucretius, Gerard Passannante -- 4. Discourse ex nihilo: Epicurus and Lucretius in 16thC England, Adam Rzepka -- 5. Engendering Modernity: Epicurean Women from Lucretius to Rousseau, Natania Meeker -- 6. Oscillate and Reflect: La Mettrie, Materialist Physiology, and the Revival of the Epicurean Canonic, James Steintrager -- 7. Sensual Idealism: The Spirit of Epicurus and the Politics of Finitude in Kant and Hölderlin, Anthony Adler -- 8. The Sublime, Today?, Glenn Most -- 9. From Heresy to Nature: Leo Strauss's History of Modern Epicureanism, Benjamin Aldes Wurgaft -- 10. Epicurean Presences in Foucault's The Hermeneutics of the Subject, Alain Gigandet -- 11. Deleuze, Lucretius, and the Simulacrum of Naturalism, Brooke Holmes
books  kindle-available  intellectual_history  Latin_lit  literary_history  ancient_philosophy  ancient_Greece  ancient_Rome  Roman_Republic  Roman_Empire  Epicurean  Lucretius  influence-literary  reception  Renaissance  reader_response  readership  reading  16thC  English_lit  materialism  Enlightenment  French_Enlightenment  La_Mettrie  gender  gender_history  German_Idealism  Kant-aesthetics  Kant  Hölderlin  poetry  sublime  naturalism  Strauss  Foucault  Rousseau  Deleuze  lit_crit  new_historicism  subjectivity  finitude  death  literature-and-morality  literary_theory  postmodern  modernity  modernity-emergence  pleasure 
june 2015 by dunnettreader
March 2011: The Rise and Fall of Neoconservatism - C. Bradley Thompson, Lead Essay | Cato Unbound
Lead Essay -- Neoconservatism Unmasked by C. Bradley Thompson -- Neoconservative intellectuals often describe themselves as having a particular mode of thinking — maybe even just a “mood.” C. Bradley Thompson argues that neoconservatism is much more than that. Its key philosophical inspiration of comes from Irving Kristol, and particularly from Kristol’s engagement with the philosopher Leo Strauss. Thompson argues that, under Straussian influence, neoconservatives champion the rule of a philosophically cunning elite over a population that will never be able to understand their intellectual masters. Instead, the populace is steered toward self-sacrifice, war, and nationalism — as well as a set of religious and moral beliefs that the elites in no way share. Such a doctrine, Thompson charges, points disturbingly toward fascism.
intellectual_history  political_philosophy  20thC  entre_deux_guerres  post-WWII  Germany  Nazis  fascism  liberalism  Strauss  Straussians  neoconservatism  US_politics  Plato-Republic  elites  esotericism  Heidegger  US_history  democracy  relativism  politics-and-religion  nihilism  mass_culture  political_participation  propaganda 
august 2014 by dunnettreader
Ian Ward - Helping the Dead Speak: Leo Strauss, Quentin Skinner and the Arts of Interpretation in Political Thought | JSTOR: Polity, Vol. 41, No. 2 (Apr., 2009), pp. 235-255
In the wake of the "hermeneutical turn" two approaches to textual interpretation have come to wield considerable disciplinary influence in North American political theory circles: those of Leo Strauss and Quentin Skinner. Their respective approaches to texts in the history of political thought are generally regarded as competitor endeavors; indeed, the view that these approaches are downright antithetical enjoys the status of a disciplinary commonplace. I interrogate this commonplace and attempt to clarify what exactly is at stake in the differences between these two thinkers' interpretative approaches. Such efforts are repaid, I believe, by a more nuanced methodological self-awareness that discloses a more cooperative, and less antagonistic, view of the relationship between the two thinkers' hermeneutical understandings. -- check bibliography on jstor information page -- paywall
article  jstor  paywall  intellectual_history  historiography  political_philosophy  Skinner  Strauss  Cambridge_School  Straussians  hermeneutics  Gadamer  concepts  concepts-change  meaning  philosophy_of_language  rhetoric  bibliography  EF-add 
august 2014 by dunnettreader
Michael Oakeshott, Hobbes on Civil Association, foreword by Paul Franco - Online Library of Liberty
Michael Oakeshott, Hobbes on Civil Association, foreword by Paul Franco (Indianapolis: Liberty Fund, 2000). 07/13/2014. <http://oll.libertyfund.org/titles/668> -- Hobbes on Civil Association consists of Oakeshott’s four principal essays on Hobbes and on the nature of civil association as civil association pertains to ordered liberty. The essays are “Introduction to Leviathan” (1946); “The Moral Life in the Writings of Thomas Hobbes” (1960); “Dr. Leo Strauss on Hobbes” (1937); and, “Leviathan : A Myth” (1947). The foreword remarks the place of these essays within Oakeshott’s entire corpus. -- downloaded pdf to Note
books  etexts  17thC  20thC  intellectual_history  political_philosophy  moral_philosophy  Hobbes  Oakeshott  Strauss  natural_law  natural_rights  social_theory  downloaded  EF-add 
july 2014 by dunnettreader
Heinrich Rommen, The Natural Law: A Study in Legal and Social History and Philosophy (1936) trans. Thomas R. Hanley, ed. Russell Hittinger - Online Library of Liberty
Heinrich Rommen, The Natural Law: A Study in Legal and Social History and Philosophy, trans. Thomas R. Hanley. Introduction and Bibliography by Russell Hittinger (Indianapolis: Liberty Fund 1998). 07/11/2014. <http://oll.libertyfund.org/titles/676> -- Originally published in German in 1936, The Natural Law is the first work to clarify the differences between traditional natural law as represented in the writings of Cicero, Aquinas, and Hooker and the revolutionary doctrines of natural rights espoused by Hobbes, Locke, and Rousseau. Beginning with the legacies of Greek and Roman life and thought, Rommen traces the natural law tradition to its displacement by legal positivism and concludes with what the author calls “the reappearance” of natural law thought in more recent times. In seven chapters each Rommen explores “The History of the Idea of Natural Law” and “The Philosophy and Content of the Natural Law.” In his introduction, Russell Hittinger places Rommen’s work in the context of contemporary debate on the relevance of natural law to philosophical inquiry and constitutional interpretation. - part of the German émigrés to the US - he sees the same sort of 17thC break as Strauss - wound up at Georgetown - didn't download
books  etexts  ancient_history  medieval_history  Renaissance  Reformation  17thC  18thC  19thC  20thC  intellectual_history  legal_history  legal_system  legal_theory  natural_law  positivism  modernity  entre_deux_guerres  moral_philosophy  relativism  natural_rights  Strauss 
july 2014 by dunnettreader
Robert J. Antonio - After Postmodernism: Reactionary Tribalism | JSTOR: American Journal of Sociology, Vol. 106, No. 1 (July 2000), pp. 40-87
Revived Weimar‐era “radical conservatism” and fresh “New Right” and “paleoconservative” theories offer a radical cultural critique of global capitalism and liberal democracy. Expressing a broader retribalization and perceived failure of modernization, their defense of communal particularity attacks the multicultural nation‐state, liberal rights, and universal citizenship. This essay links reactionary tribalism to a recurrent 20th‐century theoretical tendency, the “total critique of modernity”—a fusion of oversimplified Nietzschean and Weberian ideas. Historically, total critique has promoted convergence between right and left, such as the current overlapping facets of “radical conservatism” and “strong‐program postmodernism.” Total critique counters the “historicist” method of “internal critique” and the “communication model” characteristic of reflexive social theory. The discussion uncovers the mediating role of social theory in the problematic relationship of science and partially disenchanted public spheres in plural, democratic cultures. -- 200+ references! -- in postmodernism includes range of "end of" thinkers from left and right, and the overlaps between far right and some of the postmodern cultural left -- downloaded pdf to Note
article  jstor  intellectual_history  19thC  20thC  21stC  cultural_history  modernity  irrational  Germany  Weimar  Nazis  Heidegger  Nietzsche  Schmitt  Strauss  neo-Hegelian  right-wing  cultural_pessimism  Leftist  Marxist  historicism  cultural_critique  Habermas  Dewey  pragmatism  liberalism  democracy  patriarchy  nationalism  ethnic_ID  universalism  citizenship  nation-state  multiculturalism  bibliography  downloaded  EF-add 
may 2014 by dunnettreader
Special Issue on the Thought of Leo Strauss | JSTOR: The Review of Politics, Vol. 53, No. 1, Winter, 1991
The entire issue (12 articles and both book reviews) is on Strauss including noted Straussians of several generations(Tarcov, Pangle, Smith). Downloaded Gunnell on Strauss before the Straussians.
journal  article  jstor  intellectual_history  political_philosophy  ancient_philosophy  medieval_philosophy  Aquinas  Machiavelli  17thC  18thC  American_colonies  Early_Republic  Strauss  EF-add 
february 2014 by dunnettreader
Review essay by Susan Shell - Meier on Strauss and Schmitt | JSTOR: The Review of Politics, Vol. 53, No. 1 (Winter, 1991), pp. 219-223
Discussion of Meier book that looks at how Schmitt's Concept of the Political evolved over 3 editions (through 1933) as political context changed and where he appears to have taken on board critique by Strauss in reviews (eg he realizes Hobbes doesn't help him but is, as Strauss intimates, the source of what Schmitt hates). -- Carl Schmitt, Leo Strauss, und "Der Begriff des Politischen": Zu einem Dialog unter Abwesenden. Carl Schmitt, Leo Strauss et la Notion de Politique: Un Dialogue entre Absents by Heinrich Meier; Françoise Manent -- didn't download
books  reviews  article  jstor  intellectual_history  20thC  political_philosophy  political-theology  Schmitt  Strauss  Hobbes  EF-add 
february 2014 by dunnettreader
Herman Siemens and Gary Shapiro - Special Section Introduction: What Does Nietzsche Mean for Contemporary Politics and Political Thought? | JSTOR: Journal of Nietzsche Studies, No. 35/36 (SPRING-AUTUMN 2008), pp. 3-8
Guest Editors' Introduction: What Does Nietzsche Mean for Contemporary Politics and Political Thought?(pp. 3-8) Herman Siemens and Gary Shapiro. *--* (1) Beyond Peoples and Fatherlands: Nietzsche's Geophilosophy and the Direction of the Earth (pp. 9-27) Gary Shapiro. *--* (2) Nietzsche and the Neoconservatives: Fukuyama's Reply to the Last Man (pp. 28-47) Haroon Sheikh. *--* (3) (downloaded) Nietzsche and the Political: Tyranny, Tragedy, Cultural Revolution, and Democracy (pp. 48-66) Tracy B. Strong. *--* (4) The Innocence of Victimhood Versus the "Innocence of Becoming": Nietzsche, 9/11, and the "Falling Man" (pp. 67-85) Joanne Faulkner *--* (book review) Nietzsche's Political Skepticism by Tamsin Shaw (pp. 177-179) - Review by: Saul Tobias. *--* (long book review) Nietzsche and the Political. Thinking the Political series by Daniel W. Conway (pp. 207-216) - Review by: Herman Siemens [both Conway and Siemens are contributors to the special section]
journal  article  books  reviews  jstor  political_philosophy  intellectual_history  19thC  Germany  Nietzsche  globalization  political_economy  political_culture  Strauss  mass_culture  nationalism  nation-state  territory  Europe  Eurocentrism  post-colonial  downloaded  EF-add 
february 2014 by dunnettreader
James Cotton - James Harrington as Aristotelian | JSTOR: Political Theory, Vol. 7, No. 3 (Aug., 1979), pp. 371-389
Rather than Harrington within tradition of Machiavelli and Aristotle (Pocock), Cotton argues for direct appropriation from Aristotle -Oceana as polity, Agrarian Law etc. Contra Strauss who denies Harrington as Aristotelian. -- downloaded pdf to Note
article  jstor  intellectual_history  political_philosophy  17thC  British_politics  Harrington  Machiavelli  civic_humanism  mixed_government  classes  property  Agrarian_Laws  social_order  republicanism  republics-Ancient_v_Modern  Aristotle  Pocock  Strauss  downloaded  EF-add 
january 2014 by dunnettreader
John M. Warner and John T. Scott - Sin City: Augustine and Machiavelli's Reordering of Rome | JSTOR: The Journal of Politics, Vol. 73, No. 3 (JULY 2011), pp. 857-871
We examine Machiavelli's critical appropriation of Augustine's analysis of Rome's decline and fall in order to understand his own interpretation of Rome and the lessons it offers for a successful republic. If Machiavelli's departure from Augustine is obvious, as seen for example in his exculpation of Romulus for the fratricide Augustine condemns, equally illuminating is what Machiavelli borrows from him. For Augustine, Romulus' fratricide discloses the limits of pagan virtue and politics and reveals that the civic republican view of an early virtuous republic is nostalgic if not impossible. Machiavelli agrees with Augustine about the character of Rome, yet embraces the ambitious and acquisitive politics Augustine rebuffs. Machiavelli not only excuses Romulus' fratricide in "ordering" Rome, but makes it the archetypal act that must be repeated through "reordering" to sustain the state against the perennial problem of corruption. We thereby address two of the primary issues in Machiavelli scholarship—the character of his republicanism and the nature and extent of his innovation with regard to his ancient sources—and suggest that the "civic republican" or "neo-Roman" interpretation of Machiavelli is incorrect in its conclusions concerning his republicanism as well as his relationship to his ancient sources. -- paywall Cambridge journals -- see bibliography on jstor information page
article  jstor  paywall  intellectual_history  political_philosophy  Renaissance  Machiavelli  Roman_Republic  Roman_Empire  Livy  Augustine  pagans  civic_virtue  neo-Roman  republicanism  republics-Ancient_v_Modern  Strauss  Skinner  Pocock  Cambridge_School  bibliography  EF-add 
january 2014 by dunnettreader
Carlos Fraenkel's "Philosophical Religions" Reviewed by Peter Gordon | New Republic
In a remarkable and important book, Carlos Fraenkel characterizes Lessing as one of the late exponents for an intellectual tradition of philosophical religion that stretches as far back as late antiquity. This is a tradition that united pagan thinkers such as Plato with Christians (Origen and Eusebius) and Muslims (Al-Fārābī and Averroes) and Jews (Philo and Maimonides) in a shared philosophical vision, according to which historically distinctive religions should not be understood in the literal sense. They must be interpreted instead in allegorical fashion, so as to grasp their higher and purely rational content. This allegorical content is far from self-evident. But those who are incapable of philosophizing, or have not yet arrived at the requisite intellectual maturity, are not lost: the historical forms of a given religion offer just the sort of moral and political instruction most of us need if we are to conduct our lives with virtue and for the common good. Only the philosopher will understand that the historical forms have an educative function
books  reviews  kindle-available  intellectual_history  ancient_philosophy  Plato  Aristotle  Judaism  Islam  Medieval  theology  Early_Christian  Spinoza  allegory  Biblical_criticism  Bible-as-history  Strauss  Enlightenment  Bolingbroke  monotheism  reason  Neoplatonism  Aquinas  scholastics  Deism  EF-add 
november 2013 by dunnettreader
Rafael Major: The Cambridge School and Leo Strauss: Texts and Context of American Political Science (2005)
JSTOR: Political Research Quarterly, Vol. 58, No. 3 (Sep., 2005), pp. 477-485 -- downloaded pdf to Note -- a Straussian accuses the Cambridge School of executing a takeover of US political science while cutting out Leo in all round obfuscating bad faith -- pass the popcorn
article  jstor  intellectual_history  political_philosophy  Cambridge_School  Strauss  social_sciences-post-WWII  downloaded  EF-add 
september 2013 by dunnettreader

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