dunnettreader + spinoza   46

Adrian Moore interview with Richard Marshall - Modern Metaphysics - the Analytic/Continental Mix - 3AM - June 2017
Interview by Richard Marshall. ‘ Many contemporary scientists would still need persuading that it was anything other than a pointless exercise—perhaps because…
Evernote  metaphysics  Deleuze  Husserl  Heidegger  Derrida  Spinoza  Hegel  Nietzsche  Bergson  continental_philosophy  from instapaper
june 2017 by dunnettreader
Spinoza Research Network - Home
The Spinoza Research Network was set up in 2008 and funded by an AHRC Networks Grant between 2008 and 2010 at the University of Dundee. The funded project focused on contemporary interdisciplinary connections to seventeenth-century philosopher Baruch Spinoza and built up a membership of over 200 members in Philosophy, Politics, Law, Literature, Music, Psychology, History, Medicine, Gender Studies, Education, and many other academic and non-academic disciplines.

The grant has now expired, but the Network continues as an interdisciplinary group of academics, students, and others interested in Spinoza around the world. Working together, sharing research and developing new projects, we investigate how Spinoza is used both within philosophy and beyond it, both inside and outside of academia.

As of 2013 the Network is based at the University of Aberdeen.
moral_philosophy  politics-and-religion  Hobbes  website  philosophy_of_religion  monism  immanence  logic  Spinoza  religious_belief  epistemology  metaphysics  bibliography  political_philosophy  Judaism  Descartes  17thC  religion-established  tolerance  history_of_science  Biblical_exegesis  Biblical_authority  scepticism  transcendence  intellectual_history 
october 2016 by dunnettreader
Grell and Porter eds. - Toleration in Enlightenment Europe (2000) | Cambridge University Press
The Enlightenment is often seen as the great age of religious and intellectual toleration, and this 1999 volume is a systematic European survey of the theory, practice, and very real limits to toleration in eighteenth-century Europe. A distinguished international team of contributors demonstrate how the publicists of the European Enlightenment developed earlier ideas about toleration, gradually widening the desire for religious toleration into a philosophy of freedom seen as a fundamental attribute and a precondition for a civilized society. Nonetheless Europe never uniformly or comprehensively embraced toleration during the eighteenth century: although religious toleration was central to the Enlightenment project, advances in toleration were often fragile and short-lived. -- excerpt contains TOC and full Chapter 1 - Intro - including ftnts to Chapter 1 - downloaded via iPhone to DBOX
High_Church  1730s  Papacy  French_Enlightenment  civil_liberties  Enlightenment  Church_of_England  Church-and-State  Holy_Roman_Empire  Locke  philosophes  Spain  Spinoza  Toland  Italy  British_history  tolerance  anti-Semitism  political_philosophy  Dutch  downloaded  Germany  citizenship  Austria  Inquisition  18thC  religious_history  17thC  church_history  intellectual_history  enlightened_absolutism  books 
may 2016 by dunnettreader
Lawrence Cahoone - The Modern Intellectual Tradition: From Descartes to Derrida | The Great Courses
Modern Intellectual Tradition: From Descartes to Derrida
Professor of Philosophy at Holy Cross - PhD from SUNY
36 lectures, starting with 17thC scientific revolution
He devotes a lot to the period starting with fin de sciècle (analytic, pragmatism, Whitehead)
- has a whole lecture on Heidegger's rejection of "humanism" after 1 on existentialism and the Frankfurt School
- but entre dieux guerres and post WWII isn't a total downer - an entire lecture on Dewey
- though Derrida sounds like the endpoint, he's more the endpoint of the trend through Heidegger's version of phenomenology
- he then turns to Rorty's "end of philosophy" and says, not so fast
- he works through several themes from earlier that are re-emerging post-postmodern
- he goes back to Cassirer, Whitehead and the pragmatists - different orientations but working within what he terms pragmatic realism - with emergence and complexity part of the realist story
- my main question re that narrative arc is where is Deluze?
- but the whole show gets uniformly rave reviews - except that he works off a teleprompter which some thought was awkward - looks like audio download is the way to go
analytical_philosophy  18thC  Putnam  pragmatism  existentialism  Marxist  Wittgenstein  technology  Quine  mind  Frege  phenomenology  Frankfurt_School  Marx  Habermas  science-and-religion  Romanticism  philosophy_of_history  Spinoza  Husserl  buy  Sartre  epistemology  Hume  Rorty  emergence  neo-Kantian  biocultural_evolution  humanism  intellectual_history  dualism  James_William  Enlightenment_Project  historiography-Marxist  German_Idealism  Enlightenment  17thC  Hegel  Nietzsche  political_philosophy  Logical_Positivism  mind-body  video  Whitehead  individualism  French_Enlightenment  empiricism  modernity  Derrida  ordinary_language_philosophy  anti-foundationalism  20thC  Kierkegaard  philosophy_of_language  Heidegger  human_nature  truth  Descartes  Kant  complexity  philosophy_of_science  Berkeley  postmodern  philosophy_of_religion  21stC  19thC  Cassirer  metaphysics  Dewey  self  audio  anti-humanism  courses  Locke 
april 2016 by dunnettreader
Davide Panagia - Theory Syllabus, Winter 2016, UCLA (Political Theory) graduate study| Academia.edu
Two guiding themes in our investigations and readings will be that theories of affect are (1.) a radicalization of modern moral sentimental theories of sociality (think David Hume on associationism, Adam Smith on sympathy, and Jane Austen on agreeableness); and (2.) a response to the hermeneutic turn in literary and political analysis. Thus, an important site of consideration will be the contributions that theories of affect make to issues of political equality, solidarity, mediation, and language.

The first half of the course is dedicated to selected writings of Gilles Deleuze and Gilbert Simondon, to Simondon’s influence on Deleuze’s account of assemblages (agencement), and to the latter’s unique articulation of a process theory of difference and repetition. The idea here is that Deleuze on repetition and Simondon on disparation offer the ontological grounds for affect theory.

The second half of the course is dedicated to the exploration of diverse writers in/around affect theory and their critics – all of whom, in direct or indirect ways, take up some of the ideas articulated and explored in the first half of the course. Important to this second half of the course will be the function of political and aesthetic judgment to affect theory.
Downloaded 2 versions with somewhat different reading lists and class schedules
syllabus  political_philosophy  moral_philosophy  moral_sentiments  affect_theory  cultural_studies  downloaded  Spinoza  Deluze  Hume  Smith  Simondon  cultural_critique  cultural_change 
march 2016 by dunnettreader
Stéphane Madelrieux, review - David Lapoujade, Fictions du pragmatisme. William et Henry James - La Vie des idées -27 juin 2008
Recensé : David Lapoujade, Fictions du pragmatisme. William et Henry James, Paris, Les Éditions de Minuit, 2008, 287 pages, 29 €. -- Qu’est-ce que Henry et William James ont en commun, à part d’être frères ? Peut-être d’avoir partagé une même vision du pragmatisme. Le livre de David Lapoujade renouvelle la comparaison entre l’œuvre de l’écrivain et celle du philosophe à travers une analyse deleuzienne qui ne le cède en rien aux approches biographiques. -- downloaded pdf to Note
books  reviews  French_language  intellectual_history  19thC  20thC  James_William  James_Henry  pragmatism  Deleuze  Bergson  perspectivism  mind-theory_of  alienation  Spinoza  Nietzsche  norms  epistemology  downloaded 
december 2015 by dunnettreader
John Sellars - An Ethics of the Event: Deleuze’s Stoicism (2006) | Academia.edu
Angelaki, Journal of the Theoretical Humanities, Vol 11, No. 3, (Dec 2006) -- I may finally start to figure out what Deluze's project was from how Sellars positions him! -- downloaded pdf to Note
article  Academia.edu  intellectual_history  20thC  post-WWII  France  French_intellectuals  Deleuze  Stoicism  empiricism  James_William  Whitehead  Spinoza  Nietzsche  Kierkegaard  style-philosophy  metaphysics  ontology  ethics  bibliography  downloaded 
november 2015 by dunnettreader
Table of contents - John Sellars, ed. - The Routledge Handbook of the Stoic Tradition (Feb 2016) | Academia.edu
Introduction | Stoicism in Rome | Stoicism in Early Christianity | Plotinus and the Platonic Response to Stoicism | Augustine’s Debt to Stoicism in the Confessions | Boethius and Stoicism | Stoic Themes in Peter Abelard and John of Salisbury | Stoic Influences in the Later Middle Ages | The Recovery of Stoicism in the Renaissance | Stoicism in the Philosophy of the Italian Renaissance | Erasmus, Calvin, and the Faces of Stoicism in Renaissance and Reformation Thought | Justus Lipsius and Neostoicism | Shakespeare and Early Modern English Literature | Medicine of the Mind in Early Modern Philosophy | Stoic Themes in Early Modern French Thought | Spinoza and Stoicism | Leibniz and the Stoics: Fate, Freedom, and Providence | The Epicurean Stoicism of the French Enlightenment | Stoicism and the Scottish Enlightenment | Kant and Stoic Ethics | Stoicism in Nineteenth Century German Philosophy | Stoicism and Romantic Literature | Stoicism in Victorian Culture | Stoicism in America | Stoic Themes in Contemporary Anglo-American Ethics | Stoicism and Twentieth Century French Philosophy | The Stoic Influence on Modern Psychotherapy
books  intellectual_history  Stoicism  ancient_philosophy  Epictetus  Seneca  Early_Christian  late_antiquity  Neoplatonism  Augustine  Abelard  John_of_Salisbury  medieval_philosophy  Renaissance  Italian_Renaissance  Italy  Shakespeare  Shakespeare-influence  Erasmus  Reformation  Calvin  Justus_Lipsius  Neostoicism  philosophy-as-way-of-life  psychology  self  self-examination  self-knowledge  self-development  early_modern  Europe-Early_Modern  16thC  17thC  18thC  19thC  20thC  Spinoza  Leibniz  fate  determinism  Providence  free_will  freedom  French_Enlightenment  Epicurean  Scottish_Enlightenment  Kant-ethics  German_Idealism  German_scholars  neo-Kantian  Romanticism  literary_history  analytical_philosophy  psychoanalysis  phenomenology 
november 2015 by dunnettreader
Carlos Fraenkel - Spinoza on Miracles and the Truth of the Bible (JHI 2013) | Academia.edu
Journal of the History of Ideas, Volume 74, Number 4, October 2013,pp. 643-658 (Article) -- DOI: 10.1353/jhi.2013.0038. -- "the God of the Bible is the God of the philosophers" -- reason and revelation have to be totally separate - Maimonides applying reason to Hebrew scripture was in error of "dogmatism" -- downloaded pdf to Note
article  intellectual_history  religious_history  Bible-as-history  Biblical_authority  Biblical_criticism  politics-and-religion  politico-theology  Spinoza  Judaism  reason  religious_belief  miracles  downloaded 
october 2015 by dunnettreader
Cécile Nicco-Kerinvel, review essay Spinozisme et sciences sociales - La Vie des idées- 28 avril 2008
Recensé : Spinoza et les sciences sociales, De la puissance de la multitude à l’économie des affects. Sous la direction de Yves Citton et Frédéric Lordon, collection « Caute ! », éditions Amsterdam, 2008. -- Dossier(s) : Pierre Bourdieu et la culture -- Mots-clés : sociologie économique | sciences sociales | spinozisme. -- Quels rapports entre la philosophie de Spinoza et les sciences sociales ? L’ouvrage collectif dirigé par Yves Citton et Frédéric Lordon montre qu’ils sont nombreux et éclairants. Spinoza a en effet pensé des thèmes-clés pour les sciences sociales comme l’économie des affects ou la constitution des corps politiques et leurs crises, et ses concepts peuvent être réinvestis dans des problématiques sociologiques. Il y a donc bien lieu de faire dialoguer Spinoza avec Tarde, Foucault, Bourdieu, Mauss ou Durkheim. -- downloaded pdf to Note
books  reviews  social_theory  intellectual_history  political_philosophy  moral_philosophy  political_economy  sociology  government-forms  governmentality  anthropology  17thC  19thC  20thC  economic_sociology  social_sciences  social_order  culture  Spinoza  Durkheim  Foucault  Bourdieu  downloaded 
april 2015 by dunnettreader
Entretien avec Pierre-François Moreau par Pascal Sévérac & Ariel Suhamy - À quoi sert l’histoire de la philosophie? - new edition of Spinoza | La Vie des idées 30 juin 2009
Le tome I de la nouvelle édition intégrale des œuvres de Spinoza, contenant les deux ouvrages de jeunesse, est paru cette année aux Presses Universitaires de France. Pierre-François Moreau, qui dirige cette édition qui fait d’ores et déjà référence, en expose les principes fondamentaux. C’est l’occasion de mettre en lumière ce que l’histoire de la philosophie apporte à la philosophie. - also available as video -- downloaded pdf to Note
interview  intellectual_history  philosophy  historiography  17thC  Spinoza  downloaded 
january 2015 by dunnettreader
Charlie Huenemann, review - Matthew J. Kisner and Andrew Youpa (eds.), Essays on Spinoza's Ethical Theory (OUP) // Notre Dame Philosophical Reviews // September 09, 2014
This volume presents a cohesive and engaging set of essays, converging on the question: was Spinoza frowning or smiling? ...as he surveyed the wide range of human moral phenomena, did he merely bemoan our superstitious beliefs and ignorant behaviors? Or did he see some of it as truly virtuous? But how can anything be virtuous, if all human actions are completely determined by an infinite substance that doesn't give a damn what happens? --...Charles Jarrett's essay forcefully presents the challenges of finding genuine morality in Spinoza's philosophy. As Jarrett reads him, Spinoza left himself no room to construct a meaningful "ideal" of human behavior. Indeed, "good" itself is misleading, as Spinoza "advocates or recommends that we take a perspective from which good and evil cannot be conceived. He thus seems... to advocate, a transcendence of ethics". -- Several essays take up Jarrett's challenge. -- Some of the essays are concerned with saving the possibility of Spinoza's morality from other doctrines he espoused. Michael LeBuffe ("Necessity and the Commands of Reason in the Ethics") -- Karolina Hübner rescues meaningful discourse about humanity as a whole in the face of Spinoza's disdain for universals. Eugene Marshall ("Man is a God to Man: How Humans can be Adequate Causes") defends the intelligibility, within Spinoza's determinism, that some actions can be autonomous and hence "free". -- Some of the essays provide broad and masterful perspective... meditations on the nature and significance of Spinoza's ethical project. -- A final trio of essays connects Spinoza's morality with the claims regarding "eternity" in Part V of the Ethics. These are especially welcome, as Spinoza's mystical claims are sometimes treated as an embarrassment or as a separate island of befuddlement. -- there is not a single clunker in the lot. The introduction is a thoughtful overview of the terrain that also provides a useful integration of the chapters that follow. If you are studying Spinoza's ethical theory, you need this book.
books  reviews  intellectual_history  17thC  Spinoza  metaphysics  moral_philosophy  determinism  free_will  causation  good  evil  infinity  virtue 
september 2014 by dunnettreader
Yitzhak Y. Melamed, review - Joseph Almog, Everything in Its Right Place: Spinoza and Life by the Light of Nature // Notre Dame Philosophical Reviews - September 11, 2014
Joseph Almog, Everything in Its Right Place: Spinoza and Life by the Light of Nature, Oxford University Press, 2014, 143pp.,-- Yitzhak Y. Melamed, Johns Hopkins University -- one can easily trace the influence of "continental" figures such as Étienne Balibar and Antonio Negri on Almog's reading. But Almog is an acolyte of no one (except Nature, and to a lesser extent, Spinoza). The book is marked by the freshness of an independently thinking mind, a mind which appears at some moments to be celebrating a quasi-religious "new-birth." This book is rich in genuine insights, though it does not engage in patient, close analysis of arguments and texts. Toward the end Almog unfolds his discontent with the "dissective philosopher" who "run[s] his deductions, and feel[s] the gratification of being the master of a domain of propositions" (107). For Almog, Part I of Spinoza's Ethics is a paradigm of such "dissective philosophy," and the philosophical key is letting go of such an analytic attitude and "letting instead the key come to you by way of understanding informally 'love of God (Nature)'" (107). I do not share these views, and I will shortly explain why. More importantly, I believe this "New Age" attitude really harms the work, which could have been even more impressive than it is.
books  reviews  intellectual_history  17thC  Spinoza  style-philosophy  continental_philosophy  nature  anthropocentrism  human_nature  humanism  mathematics  Platonism  political_philosophy  sociability  moral_philosophy 
september 2014 by dunnettreader
Jeff McDonough's CV - Harvard University - Philosophy Department
Areas of Specialization: Early Modern Philosophy, History and Philosophy of Science. -- Areas of Competence:Medieval Philosophy, Metaphysics, Philosophy of Religion -- papers, conference presentations focus on Leibniz with some Berkeley, Hume
academia  intellectual_history  history_of_science  philosophy_of_science  metaphysics  philosophy_of_religion  17thC  18thC  Leibniz  Berkeley  causation  teleology  theodicy  Descartes  Spinoza  Hume  Malebranche  bibliography 
september 2014 by dunnettreader
Michael LeBuffe - SPINOZISTIC PERFECTIONISM | JSTOR: History of Philosophy Quarterly, Vol. 27, No. 4 (OCTOBER 2010), pp. 317-333
Perfectionism seems to imply simply capable of improvement -- explains Spinoza's Ethics as differing from the virtue ethics sort as not based on something like the essence of humans -- the article gives an outline of what he thinks are the attractive features of Spinoza's moral_philosophy disentangled from some of the more obscure or less plausible parts of Spinoza's system, while recognizing that since Spinoza is a super systematic philosopher, some of his metaphysical concepts are key to his moral_philosophy, which LeBuffe attempts to spell out -- downloaded pdf to Note
article  jstor  intellectual_history  17thC  20thC  21stC  moral_philosophy  moral_psychology  human_nature  virtue_ethics  virtue  good  hedonistic  happiness  improvement  perfectibility  Spinoza  morality-conventional  morality-objective  perspectivism  bibliography  downloaded  EF-add 
august 2014 by dunnettreader
Lennon, Thomas M., Stainton, Robert J. (Eds.) 2008 The Achilles of Rationalist Psychology
Downloaded Introduction pdf to Note -- Series: Studies in the History of Philosophy of Mind, Vol. 7 -- newly written papers addressing each of the main contributors to the discussion of the Achilles. Despite the historical importance and intrinsic interest of the argument, very little has been written about it. *--* Contents. *--* Did Plato Articulate the Achilles Argument?. *-- Aristotle on the Unity of Consciousness. *-- The Neoplatonic Achilles. *-- The Unity of the Soul and Contrary Appetites in Medieval Philosophy. *-- Hume, Spinoza and the Achilles Inference. *-- Locke and the Achilles Argument. *-- The Reverse Achilles in Locke. *-- Cudworth and Bayle: An Odd Couple?. *-- The Achilles Argument and the Nature of Matter in the Clarke Collins Correspondence. *-- Leibniz’s ‘Achilles’. *-- Hume’s Reply to the Achilles Argument. *-- Kant and Mendelssohn on the Implications of the ‘I Think’. *-- Kant on the Achilles Argument. *-- William James and the Achilles Argument. *-- The Binding Problem: Achilles in the 21st Century.
books  intellectual_history  mind  mind-body  consciousness  perception  thinking_matter  materialism  soul  immortality  substance  Plato  Neoplatonism  Aristotle  Aquinas  Duns_Scotus  Ockham  Augustine  Descartes  Spinoza  Malebranche  Cartesian  Bayle  Locke  Clarke  Collins_Anthony  Leibniz  Hume  Kant  Mendelssohn  Fichte  cognition  neuroscience  psychology  natural_philosophy  metaphysics  rationalist  James_William  history_of_science  downloaded  EF-add 
july 2014 by dunnettreader
"Adventures in Rationalism" by Michael Della Rocca
Michael Della Rocca, Yale University -- Rationalism is the thesis that the world and all the things in the world are intelligible, through and through. Nothing happens for no reason. On the contrary, whatever takes place, whatever exists, takes place or exists for a reason. Everything. On this view there are no brute facts. Each thing that exists has a reason that is sufficient for explaining the existence of the thing. According to perhaps the most extreme implication of this view, even the world itself, the totality of all that exists, exists for a reason, has an explanation. Many philosophers today think that rationalism is a crazy view. However, this paper argues in support of rationalism, and explores its implications. -- Della Rocca, Michael (2013) "Adventures in Rationalism," Philosophic Exchange: Vol. 43: Iss. 1, Article 1. -- downloaded pdf to Note
intellectual_history  metaphysics  rationalist  causation  cosmology  Leibniz  Spinoza  downloaded  EF-add 
july 2014 by dunnettreader
Przemysław Gut - The Legacy of Spinoza. The Enlightenment According to Jonathan Israel | Diametros
Dr hab. Przemysław Gut, Assistant Professor, Department of the History of Modern and Contemporary Philosophy, Institute of Theoretical Philosophy, Faculty of Philosophy, The John Paul II Catholic University of Lublin -- The aim of the paper is to present and analyze the interpretation of the Enlightenment which has recently been proposed by Jonathan Israel, with the focus on its philosophical aspect as opposed to the historical one. The paper consists of two parts. The task of the first part is reconstructive: it attempts to explore Israel’s most characteristic statements concerning the Enlightenment. The second and more extensive part has a polemical character: it endeavours to furnish the reader with an answer to the question of the degree to which the understanding of the Enlightenment proposed by Israel can be considered a satisfying interpretation of this period. The paper suggests that the main problem which may undermine Israel’s account of the Enlightenment is associated with the unduly selective interpretation of Spinoza’s philosophy and its position in the intellectual society of that time. -- Keywords - Enlightenment Spinoza historiography naturalism pantheism atheism human nature -- downloaded pdf to Note
article  intellectual_history  religious_history  historiography  17thC  18thC  Enlightenment  Radical_Enlightenment  Spinoza  Spinozism  natural_philosophy  naturalism  pantheism  atheism  human_nature  political_philosophy  moral_philosophy  Republic_of_Letters  philosophes  downloaded  EF-add 
july 2014 by dunnettreader
Sebastian Gardner - Spinoza, Enlightenment, and Classical German Philosophy | Diametros
This paper offers a critical discussion of Jonathan Israel’s thesis that the political and moral ideas and values which define liberal democratic modernity should be regarded as the legacy of the Radical Enlightenment and thus as deriving from Spinoza. What I take issue with is not Israel’s map of the actual historical lines of intellectual descent of ideas and account of their social and political impact, but the accompanying conceptual claim, that Spinozism as filtrated by the naturalistic wing of eighteenth-century French thought, is conceptually sufficient for the ideology of modernity. The post-Kantian idealist development, I argue, qualifies as radical, and hinges on Spinoza, but its construal of Spinoza does not fit Israel’s thesis, and reflects an appreciation of the limitations, for the purpose of creating a rational modernity, of the naturalistic standpoint represented by thinkers such as d’Holbach. -- Keywords Spinoza (Radical) Enlightenment Kant Schelling Hegel idealism naturalism -- downloaded pdf to Note
article  intellectual_history  cultural_history  political_history  political_philosophy  17thC  18thC  19thC  Enlightenment  Radical_Enlightenment  German_Idealism  Spinoza  Kant  Hegel  Schelling  naturalism  materialism  French_Enlightenment  d'Holbach  democracy  egalitarian  modernity-emergence  Spinozism  downloaded  EF-add 
july 2014 by dunnettreader
Justyna Miklaszewska, Anna Tomaszewska - The Radicalism of the Enlightenment. An Introduction to the Special Edition | Diametros
From the Department of the History of Philosophy, Institute of Philosophy, Jagiellonian University, Krakow, Poland --This brief “Introduction” to the volume discusses the general idea of the special edition of the journal, which is dedicated to the radicalism of the Enlightenment in the context of Jonathan Israel’s recent work on the Enlightenment, and highlights the topics of the articles contained in the edition.
journal  intellectual_history  17thC  18thC  Enlightenment  French_Enlightenment  Spinoza  Spinozism  Voltaire  Toland  Radical_Enlightenment  modernity-emergence  downloaded  EF-add 
july 2014 by dunnettreader
Alfred Caldecott, Hugh Ross Mackintosh, eds. - Selections from the Literature of Theism (1904 - 472 pgs) - Google Books
Thomas Aquinas *--* Descartes *--* Spinoza *--* The Cambridge Platonists *--* Berkeley *--* Kant *--* Schleiermacher *--* Cousin *--* Comte *--* Mansel *--* Lotze *--* Martineau *--* Janet *--* Ritschl -- each author introduced by brief essay but more interesting intellectual framework of the editors comes out in their footnotes -- not exactly a companion to Caldecott history of British and American philosophy of religion, since his history covers a large number of thinkers and doesn't include Continental except as needed to explain the Anglo-American authors, but still useful for the intellectual framework of increasingly confident academic approach to philosophy of religion as distinct from theology -- downloaded pdf to Note
books  etexts  Google_Books  intellectual_history  theology  philosophy_of_religion  17thC  18thC  19thC  Descartes  Spinoza  Spinozism  Cambridge_Platonists  Berkeley  Kant  Schleiermacher  Comte  German_Idealism  British_Idealism  Hegelian  hermeneutics  moral_philosophy  cosmology  materialism  mind-body  metaphysics  God-attributes  God-existence  realism  scepticism  intuitionism  sociology_of_religion  phenomenology  Fin-de-Siècle  modernity  Victorian  Edwardian  downloaded  EF-add 
july 2014 by dunnettreader
Kenan Malik - Interview with Jonathan Israel - TO CAST THE ENLIGHTENMENT IN A RADICAL LIGHT | Pandaemonium - June 2013
In Israel’s view, what he calls the ‘package of basic values’ that defines modernity... derives principally from the claims of the Radical Enlightenment. It is, as might be expected, a controversial and contested thesis. The resurrection of the old-fashioned history of ideas, the unashamed celebration of the Enlightenment, the trenchant critique of religion, the dismissal of previously venerated figures such as Locke, Hume and Kant, the seeming obsession with Spinoza, the supposed lack of nuance in both the philosophical understanding and historical account – all have drawn criticism from many historians and philosophers. Others, however, myself included, while accepting that many of these criticisms are valid, have found Israel’s account a revelation,.. an illuminating way of rethinking the Enlightenment and its legacy. -- What makes Israel’s trilogy striking is the story ... of the semi-clandestine Spinozist network ... through which his influence spread across the Continent and through the Enlightenment. ‘Nobody knew about this network’, Israel observes, ‘unless they could read articles and research in Dutch – and there wasn’t much of that till the 1980s. A lot of this research was completely unknown to French, British and other scholars. I learnt about this because I had been asked to write a general history of the Dutch Republic. I started reading this literature. And that’s how I came eventually to write a history of the Enlightenment.’
intellectual_history  historiography  modernity  17thC  18thC  Enlightenment  Radical_Enlightenment  French_Enlightenment  Scottish_Enlightenment  Spinoza  Spinozism  Dutch  tolerance  Locke-religion  EF-add 
may 2014 by dunnettreader
A BOOK IN PROGRESS [PART 10]: SPINOZA’S ETHICS | Pandaemonium
C Chapter 11, which explores the ethical claims of Thomas Hobbes and Baruch Spinoza. The rise of the market economy and the growth of religious scepticism had, by the seventeenth century, corroded the ability of both God and community to warrant moral behaviour. Who or what could now authorize moral rules? This was the question now facing moral philosophers. One answer was revolutionary: humans could. Human nature, needs, desires, aspirations and possibilities would act as warrant for the moral good. But how human nature would play this role remained perplexing. -- Hobbes and Spinoza gave very different answers to this challenge, answers that were both to be highly influential. Hobbes helped launch a British tradition of moral philosophy; in his wake come Shaftesbury, Locke, Hume, Bentham and Mill. Spinoza helped shape what is now often called the ‘Continental’ tradition. Thinkers as diverse as Rousseau, Kant, Hegel, Marx and Nietzsche were all in his debt. The distinctions between the two traditions are often overplayed. Nevertheless, the ideas of Hobbes and Spinoza were to shape the way that the modern world came to look at the question of moral rules through the distinct answers they gave as to what should warrant moral behaviour. -- This extract is taken from the section on Spinoza’s Ethics.
intellectual_history  17thC  moral_philosophy  political_philosophy  Spinoza  human_nature  moral_psychology  metaphysics  Descartes  mechanism  dualism  mind-body  necessity  free_will  change-social  continental_philosophy  Enlightenment  EF-add 
may 2014 by dunnettreader
Reviewed by Omri Boehm - Jonathan I. Israel, Democratic Enlightenment: Philosophy, Revolution, and Human Rights 1750-1790 // Notre Dame Philosophical Reviews // Feb 2012
Omri Boehm, The New School for Social Research -- Spinoza was no passionate supporter of revolutions. He argues in the Theological-Political Treatise that they are bound to fail: a people used to illegitimate rule would forever overthrow one tyrant only to replace him by another (TTP 18, 235). The reason for this tendency, Spinoza explains, is that the masses are too quickly pleased by novelties -- new tyrants -- that have "not yet proved illusory" (TTP Preface, 16). This argument is directed at political revolutions, but the point applies equally well to 'revolutions of the mind'. Anyone following Spinoza's spirit would have to ask whether enlightenment modernity did not overthrow the tyranny of revelation only to replace it by a novel tyranny -- reason's -- whose authority had not yet proved illusory. This question is especially disquieting when Spinoza's own, radical, revolutionary Enlightenment is concerned; and this raises some doubts about the ultimate success of Jonathan Israel's bold, masterfully comprehensive trio -- hardly requiring an introduction -- now culminating in the third volume, Democratic Enlightenment: Philosophy, Revolution, and Human Rights 1750-1790.
books  reviews  kindle-available  intellectual_history  political_philosophy  17thC  18thC  Enlightenment  Spinoza  Spinozism  French_Enlightenment  French_Revolution  EF-add 
may 2014 by dunnettreader
Dean Moyar, review - Brady Bowman, Hegel and the Metaphysics of Absolute Negativity // Notre Dame Philosophical Reviews // Dec 2013
Brady Bowman frames his account as part of this pro-metaphysical counter-wave [against Pippin's anti-metaphysical reading of Hegel completing Kant]. His excellent book represents a major contribution to the project of reestablishing Hegel's metaphysical credentials, and it deserves close study by anyone engaged with Hegel's theoretical philosophy. It is part of the boldness of Bowman's project that rather than shying away from the active logical concepts, he builds his entire account around them. While taking Hegel's Kantianism seriously, Bowman's argument pays equal attention to the agenda set by Spinoza, and by F. H. Jacobi's critical reading of Spinoza. Bowman does not attempt to tame Hegel's thought for consumption by a wider audience, instead emphasizing that "Hegel's own speculative metaphysics is emphatically revisionary" (7). A major worry with such a heavily metaphysical approach is that the account will remain too close to Hegel's terminology to add anything philosophically new to our understanding of his texts. But Bowman brings a rich constellation of extra-Hegelian concepts to the project and manages thereby to avoid the overly textual brand of hermeticism. - the review is heavy going as are the quotes from Bowman. The Spinoza angle looks interesting -Hegel accepted most of Jacobi critique of Spinoza and its leading to nihilism - Bowman argues Hegel amends Spinoza successfully re the nihilism critique
books  reviews  kindle-available  intellectual_history  18thC  19thC  Kant  Spinoza  Hegel  metaphysics 
march 2014 by dunnettreader
Olli Koistinen - Spinoza's Proof of Necessitarianism | JSTOR: Philosophy and Phenomenological Research, Vol. 67, No. 2 (Sep., 2003), pp. 283-310
This paper consists of four sections. The first section considers what the proof of necessitarianism in Spinoza's system requires. Also in the first section, Jonathan Bennett's (1984) reading of 1p16 as involving a commitment to necessitarianism is presented and accepted. The second section evaluates Bennett's suggestion how Spinoza might have been led to conclude necessitarianism from his basic assumptions. The third section of the paper is devoted to Don Garrett's (1991) interpretation of Spinoza's proof. I argue that Bennett's and Garrett's interpretations of Spinoza's necessitarianism have short-comings which justify an attempt to offer an alternative proof. In the proof given in the fourth section, it is argued that Spinoza derived necessitarianism from the conjunction of the following principles: (i) necessary existence of the substances; (ii) substance-property ontology; (iii) superessentialism; and (iv) the 'no shared attribute' thesis. -- didn't download
article  jstor  intellectual_history  17thC  Spinoza  metaphysics  substance  properties  ontology  necessity  EF-add 
february 2014 by dunnettreader
Review by: Steven B. Smith - The Hebrew Republic: Jewish Sources and the Transformation of European Political Thought by Eric Nelson | JSTOR: Perspectives on Politics, Vol. 8, No. 4 (December 2010), pp. 1217-1219
Has same question I did - how relates to his earlier Greek influence book, including on same cast of characters like Harrington. Smith disagrees with painting Spinoza as an Erastian clone of Hobbes, and that to extent Old Testament is relevant, Spinoza's civil religion doesn't come from Hebrew Republic but from Moses as legislator founder.
books  reviews  kindle  intellectual_history  British_history  British_politics  Dutch  17thC  Old_Testament  republicanism  Harrington  Hobbes  Spinoza  Milton  Agrarian_Laws  property  monarchy  mixed_government  EF-add 
february 2014 by dunnettreader
Walter H. Sokel - On the Dionysian in Nietzsche | JSTOR: New Literary History, Vol. 36, No. 4 (Autumn, 2005), pp. 501-520
Dionysian unity - Heraclitus not Spinozist monist substance - as foundational theme even though not explicit after Birth of Tragedy. Sees Nietzsche as protofascist aesthetic and bridge between humanism and postmodernism -- downloaded pdf to Note
article  jstor  intellectual_history  aesthetics  metaphysics  humanism  postmodern  fascism  Nietzsche  Schopenhauer  Dionysian  tragedy  ancient_Greece  Heraclitus  Spinoza  pantheism  monism  downloaded  EF-add 
january 2014 by dunnettreader
Kenan Malik - THE ENLIGHTENMENT – AND WHY IT STILL MATTERS | Pandaemonium May 2013
The contemporary debate about the EU pits a liberal Europeanism, through which is expressed, all too often, contempt for the electorate and an ambiguous view of the democratic process, against rightwing Euroscepticism, in which hostility to the European project is fuelled by nationalism and xenophobia. Were Spinoza or Diderot, or another thinker from the Radical Enlightenment tradition, present today, he would probably see himself as a democratic Europhile, as someone who wants to break down national barriers but to do it through popular support and the extension of democratic institutions. A contemporary debate between what are in effect aristocratic cosmopolitans, democratic cosmopolitans and xenophobic anti-cosmopolitans, a debate that in many ways echoes the eighteenth century conflict between the moderate Enlightenment, the Radical Enlightenment and the counter-Enlightenment, reveals the continuing relevance of not simply of the Enlightenment but also of the debates within it. The Enlightenment matters because, as both Pagden and Israel observe, it helped shape much of the political and moral foundations of the modern world. It matters also because the political and moral issues over which eighteenth century thinkers fought remain so often the political and moral issues over which we continue to tussle.
books  kindle  bookshelf  reviews  Enlightenment  Radical_Enlightenment  cosmopolitanism  elites  aristocracy  enlightened_absolutism  EU  democracy  populism  Hobbes  Spinoza  EF-add 
december 2013 by dunnettreader
Carlos Fraenkel's "Philosophical Religions" Reviewed by Peter Gordon | New Republic
In a remarkable and important book, Carlos Fraenkel characterizes Lessing as one of the late exponents for an intellectual tradition of philosophical religion that stretches as far back as late antiquity. This is a tradition that united pagan thinkers such as Plato with Christians (Origen and Eusebius) and Muslims (Al-Fārābī and Averroes) and Jews (Philo and Maimonides) in a shared philosophical vision, according to which historically distinctive religions should not be understood in the literal sense. They must be interpreted instead in allegorical fashion, so as to grasp their higher and purely rational content. This allegorical content is far from self-evident. But those who are incapable of philosophizing, or have not yet arrived at the requisite intellectual maturity, are not lost: the historical forms of a given religion offer just the sort of moral and political instruction most of us need if we are to conduct our lives with virtue and for the common good. Only the philosopher will understand that the historical forms have an educative function
books  reviews  kindle-available  intellectual_history  ancient_philosophy  Plato  Aristotle  Judaism  Islam  Medieval  theology  Early_Christian  Spinoza  allegory  Biblical_criticism  Bible-as-history  Strauss  Enlightenment  Bolingbroke  monotheism  reason  Neoplatonism  Aquinas  scholastics  Deism  EF-add 
november 2013 by dunnettreader
Ian Hunter, review: The return of sacred history - Brad Gregory’s "The Unintended Reformation" « The Immanent Frame
Finally, let us return to the twin claims on which Gregory’s account is based: first, his claim that Protestant anti-sacramentalism facilitated a historical process by which “metaphysical univocity in combination with Occam’s razor opened a path that would lead through deism to Weberian disenchantment and modern atheism”; and, second, his claim that despite the “Western hyperpluralism” to which it gave rise, he can provide a true account of this history on the basis of a concept of a “transcendent creator God” whose compatibility with “all possible scientific findings” is grounded in a metaphysics that demonstrates God’s immanent presence in all scientific domains. How should we view these claims in light of the preceding evidences and observations? Well, the prima facie incompatibility between Gregory’s first claim and an array of significant historical evidence—taken in tandem with his relegation of anti-anachronist historiography altogether—suggests that his account should not be regarded as a contribution to trans-confessional historiography. Rather, it should be located, like Charles Taylor’s A Secular Age, in the genre of Catholic confessional metaphysical hermeneutics, where historical narratives are composed as unfoldings of predetermined metaphysical or theological doctrines.
books  reviews  religious_history  intellectual_history  cultural_history  Catholics  theology  metaphysics  Reformation  science-and-religion  Spinoza  monism  Deism  atheism  Hegelian  securitization  secularism  modernity  apostolic_succession  Thomism  historiography  historians-and-religion  church_history  history_of_science  Europe-Early_Modern  Germany  Biblical_criticism  philology  historicism  historiography-17thC  humanism  Duns_Scotus  God-attributes  transcendence  immanence  creation_ex_nilho  Early_Christian  Neoplatonism  Dioysius-Pseudo  forgeries  sacraments 
september 2013 by dunnettreader
James Chappel review of Brad Gregory’s The Unintended Reformation - An intended absence? Democracy and The Unintended Reformation « The Immanent Frame Sept 5, 2013
This persistent closed-mindedness—the insistence that any and every text and phenomenon be read back into one grand Manichean narrative—is not a problem unique to Gregory: indeed, the work that his resembles more than any other is Jonathan Israel’s Radical Enlightenment, a clarion call for a robust secularity. Both of these books were written by venerable, erudite early modern scholars, convinced that the die of modernity were cast somewhere around 1650. They are both inordinately long—some of the longest nonfiction works published for mass consumption in the last few years. They are both obsessed with Spinoza. And both authors adopt the pose of a Cassandra, howling obvious truths into a world too blinkered by its iPhones to understand. Their great length, and unending cascade of details, stands in for a paucity of theoretical complexity. For both of them, the story itself is extremely simple: in the seventeenth century, there was a grand parting of the ways, and ever since then the children of light have been combating the children of darkness.
books  reviews  historiography  Reformation  Europe-Early_Modern  16thC  17thC  18thC  19thC  20thC  religious_history  intellectual_history  history_of_science  economic_history  cultural_history  church_history  political_history  democracy  Catholics  Protestants  Spinoza  monism  atheism  secularism  tolerance  metaphysics  theology  modernity  EF-add 
september 2013 by dunnettreader
Jeffrey Hipolito  : Coleridge, Hermeneutics, and the Ends of Metaphysic (2004) | T & F Online
European Romantic Review, Volume 15, Issue 4, 2004, pages 547- 565, Available online: 17 Aug 2006DOI: 10.1080/1050958042000312027 -- paywall -- starts with discussion that Schleiermacher more influenced by Spinoza and the Pantheism fight than Gadamer acknowledges, as he puts Schleiermacher extending Biblical_criticism to the broader hermeneutics of understanding
article  paywall  intellectual_history  18thC  19thC  Spinoza  pantheism  monism  Kant  German_Idealism  Schleiermacher  hermeneutics  metaphysics  Coleridge  EF-add 
september 2013 by dunnettreader
The Nature of Early Eighteenth-Century Religious Radicalism | Republics of Letters: A Journal for the Study of Knowledge, Politics, and the Arts
Citation: Jacob, Margaret . “The Nature of Early Eighteenth-Century Religious Radicalism.” Republics of Letters: A Journal for the Study of Knowledge, Politics, and the Arts 1, no. 1 (May 1, 2009): http://rofl.stanford.edu/node/42. -- in "Rethinking the Republic of Letters" issue -- downloaded pdf to Note In 1981 I had focused on the Dutch-French-English nexus, and saw a select cast of major seventeenth-century thinkers as influencing the arguments put forward by French refugees and English Whigs for religious freedom, republican government, freedom of the press, habeas corpus, and against monarchical absolutism as practiced by the French king and clergy. These arguments appeared in the journals, books, and clandestine manuscripts originating in both London and Amsterdam. The origin of these new polemics owed much to a particular reading of Hobbes, to Locke, to a heretical reading of Newtonian science (Toland’s distinctive contribution), and of course to Bruno, Spinoza, as well as the English republican thinkers of the 1650s. In 2001 all of those influences were collapsed by Jonathan Israel into an ideengeschichte that fixated on the intellectual legacy of Spinoza to the exclusion of any significant English or French component.But if I think that Israel’s simplification of the way intellectual influence and human agency work—an idealist rendering that also effaces the political—will not stand up under scrutiny, so too I think aspects of my own youthful thinking are in need of a reformulation. The power of the Enlightenment—from this early coterie to latter thinkers like Rousseau and Jefferson—lay in understanding the force of organized religion, and then searching for a set of beliefs which deists, and perhaps even atheists of the age, could live with and accept. As I have now come to see, the pantheism I identified in 1981 would lead in many directions, among them the search to understand all human religiosity and to articulate a universal natural religion.
article  intellectual_history  historiography  17thC  18thC  Enlightenment  French_Enlightenment  Radical_Enlightenment  Freemasonry  religious_history  theology  political_philosophy  republicanism  Republic_of_Letters  philosophes  church_history  tolerance  heterodoxy  Spinoza  Hobbes  Locke  Toland  Bayle  Huguenots  Edict_of_Nantes  Louis_XIV  Newtonian  Rousseau  Jefferson  Bolingbroke  Picart  sociology_of_religion  Deism  natural_religion  rational_religion  downloaded  EF-add 
september 2013 by dunnettreader
JOHN LOCKE AND THE NOT-QUITE-GLORIOUS REVOLUTION | Pandaemonium August 2013
Kenan Malik's take on Locke's "politique" approach to toleration (freedom of conscience to choose own path to salvation, limited by governance concerns) including the anti-Catholic bigotry of the Whigs
17thC  Britain  British_politics  politics-and-religion  tolerance  Glorious_Revolution  Locke  Spinoza 
september 2013 by dunnettreader
Harold J. Cook - Body and Passions: Materialism and the Early Modern State | JSTOR: Osiris, 2nd Series, Vol. 17 (2002), pp. 25-48
A group of works written in the mid-seventeenth-century Netherlands shows many defenders of commerce and republicanism embracing some of the most unsettling tenets of the new and experimental philosophy. Their political arguments were based on a view consonant with Cartesianism, in which the body and its passions for the most part dominate reason, instead of the prevailing idea that reason could and should dominate the passions and through them the body. These arguments were in turn related to some of the new claims about the body that flowed from recent anatomical investigations, in a time and place comfortable with materialism. If ever there were a group of political theorists who grounded their views on contemporary science, this is it: Johann de Witt, the brothers De la Court, and Spinoza. They believed that the new philosophy showed it was unnatural and impoverishing to have a powerful head of state, natural and materially progressive to allow the self-interested pursuit of life, liberty, and happiness. --downloaded pdf to Note
article  jstor  intellectual_history  political_philosophy  history_of_science  political_history  17thC  Dutch  Cartesian  Spinoza  de_Witt  mind-body  emotions  materialism  mechanism  experimental_philosophy  medicine  political_economy  commerce-doux  republicanism  bibliography  EF-add 
august 2013 by dunnettreader
Leo Catana: Lovejoy's Readings of Bruno: Or How Nineteenth-century History of Philosophy was "Transformed" into the History of Ideas
Project MUSE - Leo Catana. "Lovejoy's Readings of Bruno: Or How Nineteenth-century History of Philosophy was "Transformed" into the History of Ideas." Journal of the History of Ideas71.1 (2010): 91-112. Project MUSE. Web. 28 Aug. 2013. <http://muse.jhu.edu/>.....Available as html and pdf. Arthur O. Lovejoy made rather grand methodological statements about the nature of history of ideas in his Great Chain of Being (1936). These statements were, it is argued, rhetorical declarations, intended to produce the conviction in the minds of his readers that history of ideas was distinct from history of philosophy and thus deserved institutional independence; they were not adequate descriptions of the method actually practiced. Instead, Lovejoy's historiographical practice can be contextualized within nineteenth-century general histories of philosophy. His studies on Giordano Bruno, dating from 1904 and 1936 respectively, illustrate this historiographical continuity.
article  Project_MUSE  intellectual_history  19thC  20thC  Bruno  Spinoza  Bayle  Neoplatonism  metaphysics  eclecticism  Lovejoy  concepts  EF-add  historiography  Cambridge_School  18thC  Germany  Renaissance 
august 2013 by dunnettreader
books forged in hell etc: Steven Nadler interviewed by Richard Marshall » 3:AM Magazine
But that’s the fun of it: trying to figure out not only what Descartes or Leibniz or Malebranche or Spinoza meant to say, but also how they would or could respond to our reconstructions and critiques. I’m a big fan of the “what would/could/should dead philosopher x say about this?” style of doing history of philosophy, although there’s always the danger that it veers into anachronism.Incidentally, this is what I think distinguishes doing history of philosophy from doing intellectual history. We who do history of philosophy are philosophers, and have the philosopher’s interest in understanding and evaluating theses (for their truth) and arguments (for their validity or soundness). We want to know, for example, not only what Descartes believed accounts for the intentionality of mental acts, but also whether his explanation of this makes decent philosophical sense. Similarly, it is fascinating to examine the various aspects of Leibniz’s solution to the problem of evil, not so much as a species of Christian apologetics, but as a particularly good entry-point for understanding a rich and intriguing metaphysics.
EF-add  17thC  philosophy  intellectual_history  Spinoza  Leibniz  Malebranche  Descartes  metaphysics  metaethics  mind  theodicy 
june 2013 by dunnettreader

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