dunnettreader + spanish_empire   20

David Wheat - Atlantic Africa and the Spanish Caribbean, 1570-1640 (2016) | UNC Press
This work resituates the Spanish Caribbean as an extension of the Luso-African Atlantic world from the late sixteenth to the mid-seventeenth century, when the union of the Spanish and Portuguese crowns facilitated a surge in the transatlantic slave trade. After the catastrophic decline of Amerindian populations on the islands, two major African provenance zones, first Upper Guinea and then Angola, contributed forced migrant populations with distinct experiences to the Caribbean. They played a dynamic role in the social formation of early Spanish colonial society in the fortified port cities of Cartagena de Indias, Havana, Santo Domingo, and Panama City and their semirural hinterlands. David Wheat is the first scholar to establish this early phase of the "Africanization" of the Spanish Caribbean two centuries before the rise of large-scale sugar plantations. With African migrants and their descendants comprising demographic majorities in core areas of Spanish settlement, Luso-Africans, Afro-Iberians, Latinized Africans, and free people of color acted more as colonists or settlers than as plantation slaves. These ethnically mixed and economically diversified societies constituted a region of overlapping Iberian and African worlds, while they made possible Spain's colonization of the Caribbean. -- David Wheat is assistant professor of history at Michigan State University
books  16thC  17thC  Spanish_Empire  Portugal  Spanish_Caribbean  settler_colonies  African_trade  migration-Early_Modern  ports  slavery-Africans 
september 2015 by dunnettreader
Erik Loomis - Book Review: Neil Foley, Mexicans in the Making of America | LG&M - August 2015
You are here: Home » General » U.S. border agents stop Mexican immigrants crossing into United States, 1948 Neil Foley has written what I believe to be the…
Instapaper  books  reviews  US_history  19thC  20thC  Mexico  Spanish_Empire  North_America  Hispanic  social_order  demography  property_rights  status  hierarchy  labor_history  from instapaper
august 2015 by dunnettreader
Justin E.H. Smith - Nature, Human Nature, and Human Difference: Race in Early Modern Philosophy (2015) | Princeton University Press
People have always been xenophobic, but an explicit philosophical and scientific view of human racial difference only began to emerge during the modern period. Why and how did this happen? Surveying a range of philosophical and natural-scientific texts, dating from the Spanish Renaissance to the German Enlightenment, (Smith) charts the evolution of the modern concept of race and shows that natural philosophy, particularly efforts to taxonomize and to order nature, played a crucial role. Smith demonstrates how the denial of moral equality between Europeans and non-Europeans resulted from converging philosophical and scientific developments, including a declining belief in human nature’s universality and the rise of biological classification. The racial typing of human beings grew from the need to understand humanity within an all-encompassing system of nature, alongside plants, minerals, primates, and other animals. While racial difference as seen through science did not arise in order to justify the enslavement of people, it became a rationalization and buttress for the practices of trans-Atlantic slavery. From the work of François Bernier to Leibniz, Kant, and others, Smith delves into philosophy’s part in the legacy and damages of modern racism. -- Smith is university professor of the history and philosophy of science at the Université Paris Diderot—Paris VII. ...author of Divine Machines: Leibniz and the Sciences of Life (PUP), coeditor and cotranslator of The Leibniz-Stahl Controversy -- downloaded introduction to Note -- only hdbk, will be in ebook
books  kindle-available  intellectual_history  cultural_history  racism  racialism  16thC  17thC  18thC  Europe-Early_Modern  exploration  Spanish_Empire  Spain  Renaissance  natural_philosophy  biology  taxonomies  Latin_America  West_Indies  North_America  Native_Americans  indigenous_peoples  slavery  West_Africa  Africa  African_trade  life_sciences  history_of_science  philosophy_of_science  sociology_of_knowledge  French_Enlightenment  Leibniz  Kant  anatomy  Adam  Scientific_Revolution  scientific_culture  science-and-religion  science-public  science_of_man 
june 2015 by dunnettreader
Stephen Conway - ‘Founded in Lasting Interests’: British Projects for European Imperial Collaboration in the Age of the American Revolution (2015) | The International History Review - Volume 37, Issue 1 - T&A Online
This article examines various British proposals for co-operation with other European imperial powers to counter the rebellion of the American colonies or curb the pretentions of the new United States. Historians have paid little attention to these projects, mainly because none of them eventuated in the co-operation their authors envisaged. But their lack of success is not a reason to dismiss them as unimportant; their failure reveals much about British attitudes at the time. -- Keywords - European imperial co-operation, American Revolution, eighteenth century
article  paywall  18thC  diplomatic_history  American_Revolution  British_history  British_foreign_policy  colonialism  France  French_foreign_policy  French_Empire  Spain  Spanish_Empire  North_America 
may 2015 by dunnettreader
Eva Botella-Ordinas & Domingo Centenero de Arce & Antonio Terrasa Lozano, « Une tradition hispanique de démocratie locale. Les cabildos abiertos du XVIe siècle à nos jours » | La Vie des idées - Oct 2011
« Occupe la place ! », scandent les Indignés. Selon trois historiens, ce recours aux assemblées locales s’ancre dans une tradition hispanique puissante et ancienne. Les formes locales de républicanisme participatif auraient persisté depuis le Moyen-âge, malgré les efforts constants pour les réduire. -- downloaded pdf to Note
article  political_history  political_culture  Spain  Spanish_Empire  comparative_history  republicanism  democracy  democracy_deficit  political_participation  social_history  social_order  local_government  local_politics  radicals  revolutions  Europe-Early_Modern  Enlightenment  French_Revolution  Europe-19thC  medieval_history  16thC  17thC  18thC  19thC  20thC  21stC  downloaded  EF-add 
january 2015 by dunnettreader
Florencia Peyrou - La longue histoire de la démocratie espagnole | La Vie des idées - May 2011
Les mobilisations actuelles pour une « vraie démocratie » en Espagne s’ancrent-elles dans une culture démocratique plus ancienne qu’il n’y paraît ? Florencia Peyrou revient sur l’histoire du républicanisme espagnol : elle le compare aux autres mouvements radicaux et républicains européens, et montre à la fois sa radicalité, ses apports et ses contradictions. La Vie des Idées publie également deux témoignages sur le mouvement social actuel, qui font écho aux débats passés entre démocratie directe et démocratie représentative en Espagne : La démocratie directe de la Puerta del Sol, par Eva Botella-Ordinas, article précédé d’une chronique du 15M par Juan Luis Simal. -- downloaded pdf to Note
article  political_history  political_culture  Spain  Spanish_Empire  comparative_history  republicanism  democracy  democracy_deficit  political_participation  social_history  social_order  local_government  local_politics  radicals  revolutions  Enlightenment  French_Revolution  Europe-19thC  20thC  21stC  downloaded  EF-add 
january 2015 by dunnettreader
John Emerich Edward Dalberg, Lord Acton, Historical Essays and Studies, edited by John Neville Figgis and Reginald Vere Laurence (London: Macmillan, 1907) - Online Library of Liberty
A collection of Acton’s articles from journals such as the Quarterly Review, the English Historical Review, the Nineteenth Century, the Rambler, the Home and Foreign Review, the North British Review, and the Bridgnorth Journal. *--* I: WOLSEY AND THE DIVORCE OF HENRY VIII. *-* II: THE BORGIAS AND THEIR LATEST HISTORIAN. &-* III: SECRET HISTORY OF CHARLES II. *-* IV: THE CIVIL WAR IN AMERICA ITS PLACE IN HISTORY. *-* V: THE RISE AND FALL OF THE MEXICAN EMPIRE *-* VI: CALVIN *-* VII: THE CAUSES OF THE FRANCO-PRUSSIAN WAR *-* VIII: THE WAR OF 1870 *-* IX: GEORGE ELIOT’S LIFE. *-* X: MR. BUCKLE’S THESIS AND METHOD. *-* XI: MR. BUCKLE’S PHILOSOPHY OF HISTORY. *-* XII: GERMAN SCHOOLS OF HISTORy. *-* XIII: TALLEYRAND’S MEMOIRS. *-* XIV: THE LIFE OF LORD HOUGHTON *-* XV: A HISTORY OF THE PAPACY DURING THE PERIOD OF THE REFORMATION. *-*. XVI: A SHORT HISTORY OF NAPOLEON THE FIRST. By John Robert Seeley THE FIRST NAPOLEON: A SKETCH, POLITICAL AND MILITARY. By John Codman Ropes. *-* XVII: MABILLON ET LA SOCIÉTÉ DE L’ABBAYE DE SAINT-GERMAIN-DES-PRÉS À LA FIN DU XVIIE SIÈCLE. Par Emmanuel de Broglie. *-* XVIII: A HISTORY OF ENGLAND, 1837-1880.1 By the Rev. J. Franck Bright, D.D., Master of University College, Oxford. *-* XIX: A HISTORY OF THE FRENCH REVOLUTION. By H. Morse Stephens. Vol. II. *-* XX: WILHELM VON GIESEBRECHT -- downloaded kindle version of html
books  etexts  Liberty_Fund  downloaded  intellectual_history  historiography  historiography-17thC  historians  historiography-19thC  Mabillon  historicism  German_scholarship  Eliot_George  Henry_VIII  Reformation  Papacy  Restoration  Charles_II  US_Civil_War  biography-writing  Calvin  Franco-Prussian_war  Napoleon  British_history  French_Revolution  Spanish_Empire  Latin_America  imperialism  Renaissance  15thC  16thC  17thC  18thC  19thC  reviews  diplomatic_history  Napoleonic_Wars  Congress_of_Vienna  Talleyrand  EF-add 
september 2014 by dunnettreader
Encyclopedia of the Early Modern World, by the Gale Group, Inc. | Answers.com
The history of Europe from the mid-15th century until the French Revolution. Includes notable events such as wars and revolutions as well as broader processes like the Renaissance and the Enlightenment; biographical information on leading figures; individual national histories; and meaningful developments in the arts, religion, politics, exploration and warfare.
books  etexts  reference  Europe-Early_Modern  Renaissance  exploration  colonialism  16thC  17thC  18thC  British_history  British_politics  Atlantic  American_colonies  France  Germany  Italy  Spain  Spanish_Empire  British_Empire  Dutch  Dutch_Revolt  Reformation  Counter-Reformation  Netherlands  Holy_Roman_Empire  Austria  Denmark  Sweden  Russia  Poland  Ottomans  commerce  intellectual_history  Scientific_Revolution  Enlightenment  Scottish_Enlightenment  French_Enlightenment  Absolutism  Thirty_Years_War  Wars_of_Religion  Louis_XIV  military_history  political_culture  political_history  politics-and-religion  art_history  religious_history 
august 2014 by dunnettreader
Baron John Emerich Edward Dalberg-Acton, Lord Acton - Lectures on Modern History (1921 reprint 1907) - Google Books
Editors - with Introduction, John Neville Figgis, Reginald Vere Laurence -- Contents -- Inaugural Lecture on the Study of History *--* LECTURES ON MODERN HISTORY *--* Beginning of the Modern State *--* The New World *--* The Renaissance *--* Luther *--* The CounterReformation *--* Calvin and Henry VIII *--* The Puritan Revolution *--* The Rise of the Whigs *--* The English Revolution *--* Lewis XIV *--* The War of the Spanish Succession *--* The Hanoverian Settlement *--* Peter the Great and the Rise of Prussia *--* Frederic the Great *--* Philip II Mary Stuart and Elizabeth *--* The Huguenots and the League *--* Henry the Fourth and Richelieu *--* The Thirty Years War *--* The American Revolution *--* Letter to Contributors to the Cambridge Modern History *--* Notes to Inaugural Lecture -- downloaded pdf to Note
books  etexts  Google_Books  historiography-19thC  historians-and-politics  historians-and-religion  religious_history  politics-and-religion  political_history  nation-state  modernity-emergence  Europe-Early_Modern  Reformation  Counter-Reformation  British_history  British_politics  English_Civil_War  Wars_of_Religion  Thirty_Years_War  War_of_Spanish_Succession  Hanoverian_Succession  colonialism  American_Revolution  Louis_XIV  Henry_VIII  Lutherans  Calvinist  Peter_the_Great  Frederick_the_Great  Elizabeth  Mary_Queen_of_Scots  Spanish_Empire  Huguenots  Renaissance  Puritans  Whigs  downloaded  EF-add 
july 2014 by dunnettreader
Mark Noll, review essay - His Kingdom Stretch from Shore to Shore - Christianity worldwide 16thC-18thC | Books and Culture
Books review : David Hempton, The Church in the Long Eighteenth Century: The I.B.Tauris History of the Christian Church; Dale T. Irvin, ed, History of the World Christian Movement, Vol. 2: Modern Christianity from 1454-1800 -- .. intriguing that books written for such different ends coalesce in making some of the same larger judgments. Both books, thus, stress the delicate interplay between Christian expansion outside Europe and the fragmentation of Christianity within Europe. ...how, as divisions within Europe hardened between Catholics and Protestants, and soon between established churches and sectarian opponents of state churches, Christianity became the genuinely world religion. Hempton is equally perceptive on how 18th-century Europe witnessed intellectual, social, and political "challenges from which Christianity at least among educated elites, has never fully recovered," even as Western Protestants initiated the missionary efforts that successfully planted Christian faith around the globe. Both books also agree that the Jesuits were the era's most farsighted and effective "world Christians." ..the particular disaster for Latin America when Spanish and Portuguese officials sent the Jesuits packing in order to preserve the top-down, exploitative, and often syncretistic faith that best served the colonizers' interests. And they record the significance of the Moravians—so to speak, married Jesuits with children—who pushed Protestants beyond the identification of Christianity as such with European Christianity. The books are also agreed that the great Christian scandal of the early modern era was slavery. - ... both books clarify what most centrally defines the Christian faith itself. For Hempton it is the recognition at "the most profound level that Christianity is in its essence a missionary religion." For Irvin and Sunquist, it is the claim that Christian faith can never be adequately grasped except as a "world movement." Walls describes this dual character as "the indigenous principle" in constant tension with "the pilgrim principle."
books  reviews  religious_history  Christianity  16thC  17thC  18thC  exploration  colonialism  missionaries  Jesuits  Moravians  Reformation  Counter-Reformation  religious_culture  religious_belief  Latin_America  Africa  African_trade  West_Indies  China  querelle_des_rites  theology  heterodoxy  Papacy  sectarianism  slavery  Enlightenment  Spanish_Empire  universalism  monotheism  intellectual_history  social_history  church_history  enthusiasm  spirituality  self  rational_religion  ecclesiology  Protestants  EF-add 
june 2014 by dunnettreader
The Difference that Nature Makes: Empire and Natural History in Contemporary Political Theory by Mauro Caraccioli :: SSRN
Contemporary political theory’s interest in empire seems bounded by its encounter and current fascination with liberalism. What role then, if any, does nature have in political theory’s turn to empire? In this paper, I engage the status of empire and nature in political theory, pointing to the difference that turning to the early modern Spanish encounter with nature makes in studying the history of political thought. I argue that in the early accounts of Spanish ethnographers, cartographers, and natural philosophers with the New World environment, one finds the origins of crucial debates over the boundaries of nature, society, and the formation of modern empire. Nature was not so much the setting, as it was the means through which modern imperial projects were made possible. My contention is that greater attention to the experiences emerging from Spanish naturalist writings contributes to further reconstructing many of the debates found at the origins of early modern political thought. Striking amongst these debates is the boundary between nature and society as marking the rise of modern civilization and science. The value added to political theory by turning towards these fields consists of broadening Enlightenment metanarratives on the origins of modernity, while carving out a space for first-hand accounts on early modern changes in nature-society interaction.
paper  SSRN  political_philosophy  empires  Europe-Early_Modern  Spanish_Empire  ecology  nature  territory  environment  downloaded 
january 2014 by dunnettreader
Eliga Gould - Entangled Histories, Entangled Worlds: The English-Speaking Atlantic as a Spanish Periphery | American Historical Review 2007
On the morning of August 19, 1741, Peter Vezian, quartermaster of the Boston sloop Revenge, appeared before a British judge on New Providence Island to request permission to sell four black prisoners taken on board a Spanish privateer. By all accounts, one of the prisoners, Francisco Menéndez, was a man of high rank, having commanded a Spanish unit of black soldiers during the relief of the British siege of St. Augustine in 1740, and a pair of witnesses claimed that the other three prisoners, who had served in Menéndez's company, were also freemen. Exploiting inconsistencies in the testimony, Vezian insisted that neither witness was to be believed. Instead, he invoked the indisputable evidence of skin color. “Does not their Complexion and features,” Vezian asked the Bahamian court, “tell all the world that they are of the blood of Negroes and have suckt Slavery and Cruelty from their Infancy?” Vezian also reminded his listeners of the “barbarous Action[s]” allegedly committed by Menéndez's soldiers during the siege of St. Augustine—a record, he maintained, which showed that their perpetrators knew nothing of either “Liberty or Christianity.” On this basis alone, Vezian hoped that the judge would accept Menéndez's status as a slave, and he urged the court to follow the “old Law of Nations” in sentencing the others, whereby “all Prisoners of War, nay Even their posterity are Slaves.”1 Stories such as those of Menéndez and his fellow prisoners have long served as an example of the rich potential in comparative history, especially histories that take as their subject the inhabitants of the Spanish and British empires.
article  paywall  political_history  social_history  cultural_history  economic_history  legal_history  empires  Atlantic  17thC  18thC  British_Empire  Spanish_Empire  Anglo-Spanish  British_foreign_policy  American_colonies  West_Indies  EF-add 
january 2014 by dunnettreader
Eva Botella-Ordinas - DEBATING EMPIRES, INVENTING EMPIRES: British Territorial Claims Against the Spaniards in America, 1670—1714 | JSTOR: Journal for Early Modern Cultural Studies, Vol. 10, No. 1 (SPRING/SUMMER 2010), pp. 142-168
This essay analyzes the Spanish-British political debate over the right to fell logwood and for the dominion of the Yucatan. It contextualizes archival material as well as printed treatises written by Britons who were engaged in the debate and who gave origin to the ideology of the British Empire before the Union (1707). These writers were members of the Council of Trade and Plantations and of the Royal Society, and they had not only domestic interests but also direct private interests either in the West or the East Indies. John Locke is the main figure in this debate and his concept of property is revised within this new context. Locke and other fellows of the Royal Society and King's councilors argued in favor of British possession of American lands claimed by Spain. Using natural law and political and theological arguments to claim that Spain was unable to improve nature, they described the Spanish as a declining and backward empire and created a successful imperial ideology to bring domestic homogeneity and stability in turbulent times. -- downloaded pdf to Note
article  jstor  17thC  18thC  British_history  British_politics  British_Empire  Anglo-Spanish  Spanish_Empire  Atlantic  Royal_Society  Board_of_Trade  Locke  natural_law  property  dominion  West_Indies  Genesis  Biblical_exegesis  Church_of_England  missionaries  American_colonies  colonialism  imperialism  downloaded  EF-add 
january 2014 by dunnettreader
Brenna Moore - Beyond the Catholic-Protestant divide - review of Brad Gregory’s The Unintended Reformation « The Immanent Frame - Nov 2013
Gregory seems to think if Europe had avoided theological split all would have been well,maybe even avoid modernity and its evils - ignores Catholic relations with other religions and Christianity entanglement with colonialism and economic imperialism -- Also ignores important 20thC European Catholic rethinking of relations with others, support for eg human rights etc that Gregory disparages, ignoring Catholic links -- quote: With this twentieth-century European Catholic scholarly tradition as a backdrop, it appears all the more remarkable that Gregory did not follow its lead in thinking through the role of Christianity’s relationship to non-Christian religions in the making of modernity. Modern civilization, including secularization and consumerism, is incomprehensible when defined as a debate between Protestants and Catholics alone. Christians’ encounters with religious others shaped their own self-understanding in the early modern period and beyond, and the interactions between religiously diverse people must be central to any genealogy of our present. These encounters—sometimes violent, sometimes deeply humane—between Catholics and Jews, between missionaries and those they met on the frontier, between the orientalists and their archives, have to be at the center (or at least included somewhere!) of any analysis of the Christian roots of contemporary global capitalism and consumerism. Maritain and his cohort faced this head-on. José Casanova and Saba Mahmood have leveled similar critiques at Charles Taylor’s A Secular Age. In short, it is impossible to understand the historical trajectory of Christianity without understanding its contact with non-Christian others. Why does Gregory, like Taylor, bracket all of this? Had he not, what difference might it have made for the conclusions of The Unintended Reformation?

John W. O’Malley’s work has shown that few areas of sixteenth-century Catholicism were more significant than the intense upheavals caused by the missionary activity that began with the Portuguese and Spanish conquests and explorations and lasted through the seventeenth century. Catholics, he argues, were not always as fixated on Protestant reforms as we tend to assume (hence his preference for the label “early modern Catholicism” rather than “the Counter-Reformation”).
books  reviews  kindle-available  religious_history  intellectual_history  modernity  Christianity  Catholics  Reformation  16thC  17thC  20thC  comparative_religion  Judaism  colonialism  Spanish_Empire  Netherlands  tolerance  Counter-Reformation  Islam  EF-add 
december 2013 by dunnettreader
Eliga H. Gould - Entangled Atlantic Histories: A Response from the Anglo-American Periphery (2007)
JSTOR: The American Historical Review, Vol. 112, No. 5 (Dec., 2007), pp. 1415-1422 -- downloaded pdf to Note -- overview of shifts in Atlantic historiography re center periphery relations and much more going on in periphery especially where interacts with indigenous populations and other empires
article  jstor  historiography  American_colonies  West_Indies  British_Empire  Three_Kingdoms  Ireland  Scotland  Spanish_Empire  Africa  Dutch  Native_Americans  slavery  political_history  political_culture  British_politics  maritime_history  downloaded  EF-add 
september 2013 by dunnettreader
W. Frank Craven: The Earl of Warwick, a Speculator in Piracy (1930)
JSTOR: The Hispanic American Historical Review, Vol. 10, No. 4 (Nov., 1930), pp. 457-479 -- downloaded pdf to Note
article  jstor  17thC  British_history  Bolingbroke  naval_history  West_Indies  Spanish_Empire  colonialism  piracy  mercantilism  British_Navy  downloaded  EF-add 
september 2013 by dunnettreader

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