dunnettreader + shakespeare   22

BBC Radio 4 - Shakespeare's Restless World - Downloads
Making a selection of objects from the British Museum and collections across the UK, Neil MacGregor uncovers the stories they tell about Shakespeare's world.
Elizabethan  17thC  British_politics  British_history  Shakespeare-influence  English_lit  audio  London  cultural_history  16thC  Shakespeare  social_history 
december 2017 by dunnettreader
Folgerpedia - Folger Shakespeare Library
Founded on 9 July 2014, Folgerpedia is the Folger Shakespeare Library's collaboratively-edited, search-based encyclopedia of all things "Folger." Content of the articles has been contributed by various departments within the institution, as well as Folger readers and other scholars. The articles address each topic as it relates to the Folger and the Folger collection. There is a variety of article types that can be found on Folgerpedia, including: lists; how tos; and encyclopedic entries concerning items in the collection, Shakespeare's works and characters, and his works in performance.

To read more about Folgerpedia, check out the Folger research blog, The Collation.
Reformation  Tudor  stagecraft  printing  political_culture  Italian_lit  English-language  English_lit  Europe-Early_Modern  religious_culture  Shakespeare  James_I  theater  Renaissance  digital_humanities  history_of_book  intellectual_history  British_history  publishing  plays  website  literary_language  cultural_history  actors  London  event  playwrights  Latin_lit  politics-and-literature  Elizabeth 
june 2016 by dunnettreader
Review- Jerry Brotton, This Orient Isle (2016) – Elizabethan England's relationship with the Islamic world | Guardian April 2016
This Orient Isle by Jerry Brotton - Allen Lane , March 2016
Review – Elizabethan England's relationship with the Islamic world
Spies, merchants and chancers: this sparkling book sets out Elizabethan England’s complex and extensive relationship with the Islamic world
cultural_transmission  diffusion  connected_history  theater  voyages  orientalism  16thC  maritime_history  British_foreign_policy  Marlowe  Ottomans  books  Islamic_civilization  diplomatic_history  Elizabethan  Philip_II  English_lit  Spain  cultural_exchange  Shakespeare  cultural_history  reviews  Papacy-English_relations  travel_lit  British_history 
april 2016 by dunnettreader
MELINDA C. FINBERG, Review -- Tiffany Stern, Rehearsal from Shakespeare to Sheridan (OUP 2000) | JSTOR - Eighteenth-Century Studies
Eighteenth-Century Studies, Vol. 43, No. 1 (FALL 2009), pp. 140-141 -- issued in pbk 2007 -- delightful review summarizing the ways the playwright was lowest on the pecking order for producing the "final" version, and the process of actors separately learning lines without run throughs, and adjusting parts to fit the "character" the audience came to see etc -- didn't download
books  reviews  jstor  literary_history  English_lit  theater  Shakespeare  theatre-Restoration  theatre-production  actors  playwrights  audience  16thC  17thC  18thC  Sheridan  theatre-sentimental  Garrick 
november 2015 by dunnettreader
Table of contents - John Sellars, ed. - The Routledge Handbook of the Stoic Tradition (Feb 2016) | Academia.edu
Introduction | Stoicism in Rome | Stoicism in Early Christianity | Plotinus and the Platonic Response to Stoicism | Augustine’s Debt to Stoicism in the Confessions | Boethius and Stoicism | Stoic Themes in Peter Abelard and John of Salisbury | Stoic Influences in the Later Middle Ages | The Recovery of Stoicism in the Renaissance | Stoicism in the Philosophy of the Italian Renaissance | Erasmus, Calvin, and the Faces of Stoicism in Renaissance and Reformation Thought | Justus Lipsius and Neostoicism | Shakespeare and Early Modern English Literature | Medicine of the Mind in Early Modern Philosophy | Stoic Themes in Early Modern French Thought | Spinoza and Stoicism | Leibniz and the Stoics: Fate, Freedom, and Providence | The Epicurean Stoicism of the French Enlightenment | Stoicism and the Scottish Enlightenment | Kant and Stoic Ethics | Stoicism in Nineteenth Century German Philosophy | Stoicism and Romantic Literature | Stoicism in Victorian Culture | Stoicism in America | Stoic Themes in Contemporary Anglo-American Ethics | Stoicism and Twentieth Century French Philosophy | The Stoic Influence on Modern Psychotherapy
books  intellectual_history  Stoicism  ancient_philosophy  Epictetus  Seneca  Early_Christian  late_antiquity  Neoplatonism  Augustine  Abelard  John_of_Salisbury  medieval_philosophy  Renaissance  Italian_Renaissance  Italy  Shakespeare  Shakespeare-influence  Erasmus  Reformation  Calvin  Justus_Lipsius  Neostoicism  philosophy-as-way-of-life  psychology  self  self-examination  self-knowledge  self-development  early_modern  Europe-Early_Modern  16thC  17thC  18thC  19thC  20thC  Spinoza  Leibniz  fate  determinism  Providence  free_will  freedom  French_Enlightenment  Epicurean  Scottish_Enlightenment  Kant-ethics  German_Idealism  German_scholars  neo-Kantian  Romanticism  literary_history  analytical_philosophy  psychoanalysis  phenomenology 
november 2015 by dunnettreader
Craig Kallendorf - The Other Virgil: 'Pessimistic' Readings of the Aeneid in Early Modern Culture | Oxford University Press
"The Other Virgil" tells the story of how a classic like the Aeneid can say different things to different people. As a school text it was generally taught to support the values and ideals of a succession of postclassical societies, but between 1500 and 1800 a number of unusually sensitive readers responded to cues in the text that call into question what the poem appears to be supporting. This book focuses on the literary works written by these readers, to show how they used the Aeneid as a model for poems that probed and challenged the dominant values of their society, just as Virgil had done centuries before. Some of these poems are not as well known today as they should be, but others, like Milton's Paradise Lost and Shakespeare's The Tempest, are; in the latter case, the poems can be understood in new ways once their relationship to the 'other Virgil' is made clear. -- no pbk, but shows ebook available
books  kindle-available  Latin_lit  literary_history  Virgil  epic  politics-and-literature  16thC  17thC  18thC  English_lit  Shakespeare  Milton  influence-literary  imitation  poetry 
june 2015 by dunnettreader
Works by Kenneth Burke | KB Journal - Bibliographies
Lengthy -- divided into categories, e.g. books (non-fiction), essays, poetry, fiction -- notes the main changes and additions to each edition of his major works, including tracking hardback and paperback versions, which is almost impossible to sort out on Amazon -- they note the bibliographies are updated (probably mostly the secondary works page) -- downloaded as pdf to Note
Burke_Kenneth  bibliography  US_history  20thC  intellectual_history  cultural_history  cultural_critique  social_theory  economic_theory  lit_crit  literary_theory  literary_language  rhetoric  rhetoric-political  rhetoric-writing  rhetoric-moral_basis  political_culture  political_sociology  action-theory  philosophy_of_language  epistemology  epistemology-social  dialectic  dialogue  historiography  English_lit  Shakespeare  poetry  poetics  theater  psychology  meaning  perspectivism  pragmatism  progressivism  socialism  communism  entre_deux_guerres  post-WWII  downloaded 
april 2015 by dunnettreader
T.S. Eliot. - "Ben Jonson" - The Sacred Wood; Essays on Poetry and Criticism 1921. | bartleby.com
Attacks reducing Jonson to superficial humours theory - nice analysis of how his characters fit each other driven by action in his invented world rather than Shakespeare’s characters acting on each other in a broader imaginative setting, implying with less discrete boundaries -- again Eliot returns to rhetoric as something to analyze not just cast as contentless term of denigration. Sees Marlowe and Jonson in similar light
books  etexts  17thC  20thC  English_lit  literary_history  lit_crit  poetry  theater  rhetoric  Jonson  Marlowe  Shakespeare  Molière  satire  tragedy  comedy  farce  humours 
august 2014 by dunnettreader
T.S. Eliot. - "Hamlet and His Problems." The Sacred Wood; Essays on Poetry and Criticism 1921. | bartleby.com
The only way of expressing emotion in the form of art is by finding an “objective correlative”; in other words, a set of objects, a situation, a chain of events which shall be the formula of that particular emotion; such that when the external facts, which must terminate in sensory experience, are given, the emotion is immediately evoked. If you examine any of Shakespeare’s more successful tragedies, you will find this exact equivalence; you will find that the state of mind of Lady Macbeth walking in her sleep has been communicated to you by a skilful accumulation of imagined sensory impressions; the words of Macbeth on hearing of his wife’s death strike us as if, given the sequence of events, these words were automatically released by the last event in the series. The artistic “inevitability” lies in this complete adequacy of the external to the emotion; and this is precisely what is deficient in Hamlet. Hamlet (the man) is dominated by an emotion which is inexpressible, because it is in excess of the facts as they appear. -- Why he attempted it at all is an insoluble puzzle; under compulsion of what experience he attempted to express the inexpressibly horrible, we cannot ever know. We need a great many facts in his biography; and we should like to know whether, and when, and after or at the same time as what personal experience, he read Montaigne, II. xii., Apologie de Raimond Sebond. We should have, finally, to know something which is by hypothesis unknowable, for we assume it to be an experience which, in the manner indicated, exceeded the facts. We should have to understand things which Shakespeare did not understand himself.
books  etexts  16thC  17thC  English_lit  literary_history  lit_crit  Shakespeare  Montaigne  Eliot_TS 
august 2014 by dunnettreader
T.S. Eliot - "Notes on the Blank Verse of Christopher Marlowe" - The Sacred Wood; Essays on Poetry and Criticism (1921) | bartleby.com
The comparative study of English versification at various periods is a large tract of unwritten history. To make a study of blank verse alone, would be to elicit some curious conclusions. It would show, I believe, that blank verse within Shakespeare’s lifetime was more highly developed, that it became the vehicle of more varied and more intense art-emotions than it has ever conveyed since; and that after the erection of the Chinese Wall of Milton, blank verse has suffered not only arrest but retrogression. That the blank verse of Tennyson, for example, a consummate master of this form in certain applications, is cruder (not “rougher” or less perfect in technique) than that of half a dozen contemporaries of Shakespeare; cruder, because less capable of expressing complicated, subtle, and surprising emotions. -- The development of blank verse may be likened to the analysis of that astonishing industrial product coal-tar. Marlowe’s verse is one of the earlier derivatives, but it possesses properties which are not repeated in any of the analytic or synthetic blank verses discovered somewhat later.
books  etexts  16thC  17thC  19thC  20thC  English_lit  literary_history  lit_crit  poetry  Elizabethan  Marlowe  Shakespeare  theater  playwrights  Milton  Tennyson  blank_verse  poetics  Eliot_TS 
august 2014 by dunnettreader
Paul E. J. Hammer - Shakespeare's Richard II, the Play of 7 February 1601, and the Essex Rising | JSTOR: Shakespeare Quarterly, Vol. 59, No. 1 (Spring, 2008), pp. 1-35
He's published books on Essex and late Elizabethan politics - not a literary histirian. Extensive bibliography on late Elizabethan politics, the difficulties in Ireland, and factions of courtiers and counselors, not only re administration, public financial difficulties, and the succession, but foreign policy, especially re Spain. -- downloaded pdf to Note
article  jstor  16thC  17thC  1590s  1600s  Elizabeth  British_history  British_politics  Ireland  Ireland-English_exploitation  military_history  courtiers  court_culture  counselors  public_finance  public_disorder  conspiracy  treason  torture  faction  Bolingbroke-family  British_foreign_policy  Anglo-Spanish  Shakespeare  political_culture  nobility  downloaded  EF-add 
june 2014 by dunnettreader
Mark Hutchings - The ' Turk Phenomenon' and the Repertory of the Late Elizabethan Playhouse | Early Modern Literary Studies Special Issue 16 (October, 2007) 10.1-39
"Turk plays" popular up to Charles I - late-Elizabethan theatre drew on a conventional narrative of fear that was also.. one of fascination. ?..also energised by 2 linked events: the Reformation and Elizabeth's promotion of Anglo-Ottoman relations after excommunication by Pope Pius V in 1570. ?..in the last decade or so of the 16thC a sizeable proportion of the playhouse repertory became deeply influenced by this development... a complex artistic, ideological, and commercial phenomenon. -- In shifting from "author"-centred approaches that many theorists believe to be anachronistic to an emphasis on how companies operated, scholars have drawn attention to ...early modern theatre as a collective enterprise. - By its very nature the staging of the Ottoman Empire was sustained by artistic cross-fertilisation that was, in a broader sense collaborative .. as well as competitive. -- These plays were not necessarily mere ciphers of the historical past or present. The Jew of Malta far from endorses the behaviour of the besieged Christians in 1565. It is remarkable for its resistance to the Malta narrative in Christian accounts where the Turkish defeat (like at Lepanto) was celebrated. - While the Tamburlaine plays and their spin-offs called attention to Turkish tyranny and the Ottoman threat, the move away from the Marlovian aesthetic signalled a more ironic approach. Thus in Henry V, Henry's proposal to Katherine that they should produce a son to recapture Constantinople (an anachronism) is undercut by the ambiguous, "Shall we not?" For the audience a deeper irony is available - "the original phrase 'to go to Constantinople to take the Turk by the beard' became a repository for vacuous ideals, a phrase that could only be rehearsed with an increasing sense of self-satire" -- online journal html
article  English_lit  theater  genre  16thC  Tudor  Elizabethan  Marlowe  Shakespeare  Ottomans  cultural_history  playwrights  actors  trade-policy  consumers  exotic  orientalism  diplomatic_history  Reformation  Christendom  Christianity-Islam_conflict  Papacy-English_relations  Counter-Reformation  elite_culture  EF-add 
june 2014 by dunnettreader
Stephen Guy-Bray - Shakespeare and the Invention of the Heterosexual | Early Modern Literary Studies Special Issue 16 (October, 2007) 16.1-28
[A]lmost everything in The Two Gentlemen of Verona can be substituted for something else; indeed, the narrative could be summarised consisting of a chain of substitutions. One effect of Shakespeare's stress on substitution and interchangeability in this play is to undermine the stable and individual self; as a result, in the play the characters tend to have selves composed of fragments. In the last 20 years, many Renaissance scholars have pointed out that our modern concept of what selfhood is cannot really be applied to the 16thC & 17thC, and from this point of view the characters in The Two Gentlemen of Verona do not seem particularly odd. ...a recent book on the subject by Will Fisher's... points out that from the 17thC on, the individual is "conceptualized as an entity that was quite literally in-dividual (in the sense of indivisible). In other words, it had no prosthetic or detachable parts." In contrast, Fisher argues that in Shakespeare's time the individual was to a great extent formed out of detachable parts. His emphasis is primarily on items that could be part of a stage costume (handkerchiefs, codpieces, beards, and hair), but our idea of prostheses could include other things. Specifically, I am thinking of male relations with women. The Two Gentlemen of Verona presents what we would now call heterosexuality as a prosthesis, as part of the equipment or furniture of a man, but Shakespeare ultimately refuses to subordinate homosociality to marriage. - online journal html
article  16thC  17thC  British_history  English_lit  cultural_history  Shakespeare  sexuality  friendship  self  individualism  homosexuality  marriage  love 
june 2014 by dunnettreader
Benedict S. Robinson -Harry and Amurath | JSTOR: Shakespeare Quarterly, Vol. 60, No. 4 (Winter, 2009), pp. 399-424
Before his coronation, as he announces his intention to invade France, and as he proposes marriage to Katharine, Henry V invokes the specter of a Turkish double. These moments in Shakespeare’s play punctuate the major political transitions of his reign; moreover, they condense a pattern of thought vital to these plays, one that concerns the constitution of English nationalist discourse from the often recalcitrant materials of a Christian political imaginary. In the 16thC, Christendom remained the object of powerful emotional cathexis, but the forms of allegiance and action it authorized were in dispute. Henry redirects the energies that once coalesced around the political and communal ideal of a Christian commonwealth to the commonwealth of England. But as Henry invokes the Turk as his opposite, he also suggests his resemblance to that figure. In this, Henry V opens up some serious questions about the “political theology” of the nation. In revealing the constitution of national community as a translated theology, Shakespeare suggests that this is a troubled process. Recent accounts of early modern nationalism have tended to downplay or forget Christendom as a transnational space of belonging both instrumental to the nation and still in competition with it. The strange relations between “Harry” and “Amurath” evoked in 2 Henry IV and Henry V are the traces of a wider struggle between Christendom and the nation as theopolitical spaces, a struggle that takes place in significant measure over the figure of Muslim difference. -- lots of cites to English constitutional history links to national identity (eg Pocock & critics), Blumenberg and Schmitt debates -- paywall
article  jstor  Project_MUSE  paywall  find  16thC  British_history  British_politics  Tudor  national_ID  Christendom  Ottomans  Reformation  Christianity-Islam_conflict  political-theology  Shakespeare  political_culture  religious_culture  politics-and-religion  ancient_constitution  nationalism  EF-add 
june 2014 by dunnettreader
The Loss of Final -e - Harvard Chaucer site
It is worth noting that this aspect of Chaucer's verse was unknown for centuries. By Shakespeare's time the final -e had been lost. That is why, though Shakespeare's pronunciation differed from our own, it is possible to read his works in a modern pronunciation: the rhythm of his lines remains the same, no matter how the vowels are pronounced, because except for a few exceptions ("Out damnéd spot!"), Shakespeare treated what had become in his time the "silent e" in the same way we do. Consequently, when Shakespeare read Chaucer he omitted the final -e, treating it as silent. The meter was ruined; though Shakespeare greatly admired Chaucer, he and his contemporaries thought that Chaucer was an archaic poet who could not write a smooth and pleasing meter in those distant early times. So too did John Dryden, who idolized Chaucer but thought he wrote in "the infancy of our Poetry". Not until the the late eighteenth century did scholars discover and demonstrate the importance of the final -e for Chaucer's versification.
Chaucer  English_lit  poetry  language  meter  Shakespeare  Dryden  14thC  15thC  16thC  17thC  18thC 
may 2014 by dunnettreader
David Randall, review essay - Recent Studies in Print Culture: News, Propaganda, and Ephemera | JSTOR: Huntington Library Quarterly, Vol. 67, No. 3 (September 2004), pp. 457-472
In “Recent Studies in Print Culture: News, Propaganda, and Ephemera,” David Randall reviews several monographs and essays concerning aspects of print culture in early modern Britain. These include (1) Paul J. Voss, Elizabethan News Pamphlets: Shakespeare, Spenser, Marlowe, and the Birth of Journalism (Pittsburgh, 2001); (2) three essays by Sabrina Baron, Michael Mendle, and Daniel Woolf in Brendan Dooley and Sabrina Baron, eds., The Politics of Information in Early Modern Europe (London and New York, 2001); (3) Jason Peacey, Politicians and Pamphleteers: Propaganda during the English Civil Wars and Interregnum (Aldershot, U.K., 2004); and (4) Joad Raymond, Pamphlets and Pamphleteering in Early Modern Britain (Cambridge, 2003). As the review shows, scholars of ephemeral print culture disagree as to just why this material should be studied, and they have come up with different reasons, asked different questions, and therefore developed very different ways of organizing and interpreting printed ephemera. -- didn't download
books  reviews  jstor  cultural_history  literary_history  16thC  17thC  British_history  English_lit  publishing  pamphlets  political_press  political_culture  propaganda  English_Civil_War  Interregnum  Shakespeare  Elizabethan  EF-add 
january 2014 by dunnettreader
David Harris Sacks: Historiography review - Searching for "Culture" in the English Renaissance (1988)
JSTOR: Shakespeare Quarterly, Vol. 39, No. 4 (Winter, 1988), pp. 465-488 -- downloaded pdf to Note -- large number of studies in 1980s cultural history including popular culture of Early Stuarts
books  reviews  historiography  16thC  17thC  cultural_history  popular_culture  political_culture  court_culture  elites  patronage  English_lit  theater  Shakespeare  downloaded  EF-add 
september 2013 by dunnettreader

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