dunnettreader + seven_years_war   9

Anthony Page - The Seventy Years War, 1744–1815, and Britain’s Fiscal-Naval State | War and Society, 34:3 (8 2015), pp. 162-186
Anthony.Page@utas.edu.au -- University of Tasmania -- DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1179/0729247315Z.00000000053 -- This article argues that we should view Britain as fighting a ‘Seventy Years War’ with France between the battles of Fontenoy in 1745 and Waterloo in 1815. Through years of hot and cold war, Britain struggled to build the military power needed to prevent it from falling under the domination of France. In hindsight, many view the British as inevitable imperialists, confidently building towards their global empire of the 19thC. In reality, 18thC Britons frequently fretted about the threat of invasion, military weakness, possible financial collapse, and potential revolution. Historical developments only look inevitable in hindsight and with the aid of the social sciences. The struggle to defend itself in Europe during the Seventy Years War saw Britain develop a ‘fiscal-naval state’ that built a global empire.
Keywords: Britain, ancien regime, warfare, eighteenth century.
article  paywall  18thC  British_history  British_Empire  British_Navy  British_foreign_policy  Anglo-French  War_of_Austrian_Succession  Seven_Years_War  American_Revolution  French_Revolutionary_Wars  Napoleonic_Wars  balance_of_power  fiscal-military_state  colonialism  imperialism  English_Channel  French_foreign_policy  French_army  French_Navy  French_Empire  blue_water_strategy  British_Empire-military  British_Army  Britain-invasion  Britain-Continent 
january 2016 by dunnettreader
John Richard Moores - Representations of France and the French in English satirical prints, c. 1740-1832 (2011 PhD thesis) - White Rose Etheses Online - University of York
This thesis explores representations of France and the French in English satirical prints in the period c. 1740-1832. This was an era of rivalry and conflict between the two nations. It has been suggested that hostility towards France at this time contributed to the formation of English, or British, national identity. This coincided with England’s ‘golden age of caricature’. While much of the satirical art produced focussed on France, most studies of this material have dealt with how the English portrayed themselves and each other. Those which have discussed representations of the French have promoted the view that English perceptions of the French were principally hostile. While there is a temptation to employ such prints as evidence of English Francophobia, a closer investigation reveals greater satirical complexities at work which do not simply conceptualise and employ the French ‘Other’ as target of hatred. Informed by war and rivalry, as well as by trade, travel, and cultural exchange, the prints projected some positive characteristics onto the French ‘Other’, they contain varying degrees of sympathy and affinity with the French, and are demonstrative of a relationship more distinct and intimate than that shared with any other nation. At the same time, the prints expose many of the tensions and divisions that existed within Britain itself. French characters were employed to directly attack British political figures, while in other instances domestic anxieties were projected onto images of the French. -- downloaded pdf to Note
thesis  18thC  19thC  British_history  British_politics  France  Anglo-French  satire  cultural_history  social_history  national_ID  francophile  xenophobia  prints  popular_culture  popular_politics  War_of_Austrian_Succession  Seven_Years_War  American_Revolution  French_Revolution  French_Revolutionary_Wars  Napoleonic_Wars  travel  fashion  political_culture  political_press  art_history  caricature  British_Empire  British_foreign_policy  Restoration-France  July_Monarchy  reform-political  anti-Catholic  Catholic_emancipation  émigrés  exiles  ruling_class  bibliography  downloaded  EF-add 
january 2015 by dunnettreader
Clarissa Campbell Orr, historiographical review - New Perspectives on Hanoverian Britain | JSTOR: The Historical Journal, Vol. 52, No. 2 (Jun., 2009), pp. 513-529
Reviewed work: War, State and Society in Mid-Eighteenth-Century Britain and Ireland by Stephen Conway; Georgian Monarchy: Politics and Culture, 1714-1760 by Hannah Smith; Britain, Hanover and the Protestant Interest, 1688-1756 by Andrew C. Thompson; Hanover and the British Empire, 1700-1837 by Nick Harding -- paywall Cambridge journals -- quite long and looks very useful
books  reviews  jstor  bookshelf  paywall  18thC  19thC  British_history  British_politics  British_foreign_policy  Britain-Continent  Hanover-Britain_relations  Hanoverian_Succession  George_I  George_II  George_III  limited_monarchy  Absolutism  monarchy  diplomatic_history  court_culture  Ireland  Ireland-English_exploitation  political_culture  popular_politics  religious_culture  Whigs-oligarchy  Protestant_International  nationalism  national_ID  military_history  British_Empire  British_Army  British_Navy  War_of_Austrian_Succession  Seven_Years_War  American_Revolution  Anglo-French  Anglo-Dutch  Holy_Roman_Empire  Austria  Prussia 
june 2014 by dunnettreader
Kevin Linch and Matthew McCormack, eds - Britain’s Soldiers: Rethinking War and Society, 1715–1815 | Liverpool University Press
The British soldier was a fascinating and complex figure in the century between the Hanoverian accession and the Battle of Waterloo. The ‘war and society’ approach has shed much light on Britain’s frequent experience of conflict in this period, but Britain’s Soldiers argues that it is time to refocus our attention on the humble redcoat himself, and rethink historical approaches to soldiers’ relationship with the society and culture of their day. Using approaches drawn from the histories of the military, gender, art, society, culture and medicine, this volume presents a more rounded picture of the men who served in the various branches of the British armed forces. This period witnessed an unprecedented level of mass mobilisation, yet this was largely achieved through novel forms of military service outside of the regular army. Taking a wide definition of soldiering, this collection examines the part-time and auxiliary forces of the period, as well as looking at the men of the British Army both during their service and once they had been discharged from the army. Chapters here explore the national identity of the soldier, his sense of his rights within systems of military discipline, and his relationships with military hierarchies and honour codes. They also explore the welfare systems available to old and wounded soldiers, and the ways in which soldiers were represented in art and literature. In so doing, this book sheds new light on the processes through which soldiers were ‘made’ during this crucial period of conflict
books  18thC  British_history  British_Empire  British_Army  British_foreign_policy  militia  military_history  fiscal-military_state  cultural_history  social_history  Seven_Years_War  American_Revolution  French_Revolutionary_Wars  British_Empire-military  working_class  medicine 
may 2014 by dunnettreader
Crisis Chronicles: The Commercial Credit Crisis of 1763 and Today’s Tri-Party Repo Market - Liberty Street Economics
Crisis Chronicles: The Commercial Credit Crisis of 1763 and Today’s Tri-Party Repo Market. -- James Narron and David Skein -- During the economic boom and credit expansion that followed the Seven Years’ War (1756-63), Berlin was the equivalent of an emerging market, Amsterdam’s merchant bankers were the primary sources of credit, and the Hamburg banking houses served as intermediaries between the two. But some Amsterdam merchant bankers were leveraged far beyond their capacity. When a speculative grain deal went bad, the banks discovered that there were limits to how much risk could be effectively hedged. In this issue of Crisis Chronicles, we review how “fire sales” drove systemic risk in funding markets some 250 years ago and explain why this could still happen in today’s tri-party repo market.
economic_history  18thC  Prussia  Dutch  banking  money_market  financial_crisis  leverage  liquidity  Seven_Years_War  EF-add 
february 2014 by dunnettreader
Review by: J. G. A. Pocock - Hume's Philosophical Politics by Duncan Forbes (1978)
JSTOR: The American Political Science Review, Vol. 72, No. 2 (Jun., 1978), pp. 638-639 -- downloaded pdf to Note -- Finds Forbes writing and analysis both hopelessly confused -- some great stuff re where Hume sits vis à vis various flavors of Whigs, Tories and political historians at different times from 1740s onwards. Here's where Pocock's idée fixe on corrupting commerce is useful in explaining how the Essays fit with History of England -- not just against "vulgar Whiggism" (by time Hume wrote History based on Modern constitution theory of the Court Whigs, both oligarchic and radical Whigs had returned to Ancient Constitution) but pro the civilizing virtues of economic development. His target is the austere civic virtue of the republicans. Here's where Pocock misses -- Britain post Fletcher had few austere republicans - only found among idolators of Sparta on the Continent. That there was a luxury debate across the 18thC in both Continental Europe and Britain is clear, but it's not a debate re republicanism -- it's about the new "civil society", about foundation of morals if not biblicalrevelation or fear of hell, it's about human nature, and it's involved in comparative anthropology (geographic and historical) In short, it's about the science of man. Pocock's terrific observations re time, and the shift from anxiety re inevitable decline to possibility of progress fits in the science of man luxury and corruption debates that go far wider and deeper than classical republicanism. Though on Continent it takes on more of a republican angle after Montesquieu.
books  reviews  Pocock  Hume  18thC  historiography-18thC  political_philosophy  historians-and-politics  historiography-Whig  Whigs-oligarchy  Tories  clientelism  British_politics  British_history  commerce-doux  fiscal-military_state  sovereign_debt  parties  UK_government-colonies  War_of_Austrian_Succession  Seven_Years_War  Pitt_the_Elder  British_Empire  political_economy  downloaded  EF-add  bookshelf 
september 2013 by dunnettreader

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