dunnettreader + seneca   15

Ricardo Salles, ed - Metaphysics, Soul, and Ethics in Ancient Thought (2005) - Oxford University Press
Richard Sorabji Bibliography
1. Intellectual autobiography, Richard Sorabji
Metaphysics
2. Intrinsic and relational properties of Atoms in the Democritean ontology, Alexander P. D. Mourelatos
3. Necessitation and Explanation in Philoponus' Aristotelain Physics, Sylvia Berryman
4. A Contemporary Look at Aristotle's Changing Now, Sarah Broadie
5. On the individuation of times and events in orthodox Stoicism, Ricardo Salles
6. Stoic metaphysics at Rome, David Sedley
7. Platonism in the Bible: Numenius of Apamea on Exodus and eternity, Myles Burnyeat
The Senses and the Nature of the Soul
8. Platonic Souls as Persons, A. A. Long
9. Aristotle versus Descartes on the concept of the mental, Charles H. Kahn
10. Perception Naturalized in Aristotle's de Anima, Robert Bolton
11. The Spirit and the letter: Aristotle on perception, V. Caston
12. The discriminating capacity of the soul in Aristotle's theory of learning, Frans A. J. de Haas
13. Alexander of Aphrodisias on the nature and location of vision, Bob Sharples
Ethics
14. Plato's Stoic View of Motivation, Gabriela Roxana Carone
15. The Presence of Socrates and Aristotle in the Stoic Account of Akrasia, Marcelo D. Boeri
16. Extend or identify: Two Stoic Accounts of Altruism, Mary Margaret McCabe
17. Competing Readings of Stoic Emotions, Christopher Gill
18. Were Zeno and Chysippus at odds in analysing emotion?, A. W. Price
19. Seneca on Freedom and Autonomy, Brad Inwood
books  ancient_philosophy  Plato  Aristotle  Stoicism  soul  moral_philosophy  metaphysics  Seneca  Democritus  ancient_Greece  ancient_Rome  Hellenism  mind  Descartes  emotions 
september 2016 by dunnettreader
Matthew Sharpe - Ilsetraut Hadot’s Seneca: ancient philosophy and spiritual direction (2015) | Academia.edu
Abstract: Exegetical and reflective presentation for Sydney conference "In pursuit of wisdom: Ancient Chinese and Greek perspectives on cultivation" on Ilsetraut Hadot's magisterial *Sénèque: Direction Spirituelle et pratique de la philosophie* (2015, Vrin. - Research Interests: Stoicism, Philosophy as Therapy, Roman Stoicism, Philosophy as a way of life, and Pierre Hadot -- downloaded
lecture  ancient_philosophy  Stoicism  Seneca  Hadot  Hadot_  Ilsetraut  philosophy_as_way_of_life  moral_philosophy  cosmology  moral_psychology  Hellenism  books  French_language  reviews  downloaded 
july 2016 by dunnettreader
Matthew Sharpe - [draft slides] Athletes in the Arena: Diderot and his Seneca | Academia.edu
Whereas Seneca's critics argue that his life and alleged compliance with Nero contradicts his Stoic, noble-sounding principles, discrediting the latter; in his two late books on the Stoic, Diderot argues that Seneca's continual attempts to mollify Nero's tyranny betters the philosophy.  Where Diderot's critics reduce the two works on Seneca to veiled attacks on Rousseau, Diderot is critical of those texts wherein Seneca advocated the withdrawal & “leisure of the sage” or the vita contemplativa, while Rome burnt (“Rousseau est la figure moderne et honnie du détachement, qui permet à Diderot de dissocier Sénèque du détachement stoïcien. » (Lojskine 2009))  Whether contra Rousseau or no, Diderot is most attracted—amongst all Seneca's works Diderot examines—to Seneca’s On Benefits, and wants to restore compassion, even justified anger, to Stoicism.  Whether to justify himself for his own naivety in trying to teach Catherine of Russia or not, Diderot defends Seneca’s attempts to mollify Nero, led by De Clementia; he appeals, a la Shaftesbury and others, to Seneca’s “coeur” and compassion, beyond his Stoicism, notably in On Benefits; he criticises Stoic fatalism and appeals to a paraStoic notion of “natural rights” to justify resistance to tyranny; famously celebrating the American revolution as as lesson to all Europe.  So, beneath the "miserable" polemics (Cittion), there remains a good deal of philosophy; beneath the rhetorical smoke, (to use a Stoic-ism) a good deal of theoretical fire.  This paper aims at retrieving this fire, and situating Diderot's mitigated Stoicism as a French avatar of the moral sentimentalist position, with roots in the Stoic idea of oikeosis (and of parental love as the elementary cell of sociablity), as articulated by CIcero. Research Interests: Stoicism, Roman Stoicism, Philosophy of the Enlightenment, and Philosophy as a way of life -- downloaded
paper  Academia.edu  intellectual_history  Enlightenment  18thC  French_Enlightenment  philosophes  ancient_philosophy  ancient_Rome  Hellenism  Stoicism  Seneca  Diderot  Rousseau  moral_philosophy  moral_sentiments  eclecticism  Cicero  emotions  tyranny  Roman_Empire  downloaded 
july 2016 by dunnettreader
John Sellars - Stoic Ontology and Plato's "Sophist" (2010) | Academia.edu
in V. Harte, M.M. McCabe, R.W. Sharples, A. Sheppard, eds, Aristotle and the Stoics Reading Plato, Bulletin of the Institute of Classical Studies, Suppl. 107 (2010), 185-203 -- Keywords: Metaphysics, Plato, and Stoicism -- downloaded pdf to Note
article  Academia.edu  intellectual_history  Stoicism  metaphysics  ancient_philosophy  ancient_Greece  ontology  Being  nothing  ideas-theories  concepts  universals  categories  Plato  Platonism  Seneca  Zenon_of_Citium  commentaries  late_antiquity  ancient_Rome  bibliography  downloaded 
november 2015 by dunnettreader
John Sellars - Seneca's Philosophical Predecessors and Contemporaries (2013) | Academia.edu
in G. Damschen, A. Heil, eds, Brill’s Companion to Seneca (Leiden: Brill, 2013), 97-112. -- Keywords: Stoicism, Seneca, and Roman Philosophy -- downloaded pdf to Note
chapter  Academia.edu  intellectual_history  literary_history  Seneca  Stoicism  Epicurean  Cicero  Lucretius  ancient_philosophy  ancient_Greece  ancient_Rome  Hellenism  Roman_Empire  bibliography  downloaded 
november 2015 by dunnettreader
John Sellars - Stoic Cosmopolitanism and Zeno's Republic | Academia.edu
History of Political Thought 28/1 (2007), 1-29 -- Modern accounts of Stoic politics have attributed to Zeno the ideal of an isolated community of sages and to later Stoics such as Seneca a cosmopolitan utopia transcending all traditional States. By returning to the Cynic background to both Zeno's Republic and the Cosmopolitan tradition, this paper argues that the distance between the two is not as great as is often supposed. This account, it is argued, is more plausible than trying to offer a developmental explanation of the supposed transformation in Stoic political thought from isolated community to cosmopolitan utopia. -- Keywords: Stoicism, Cosmopolitanism, Cicero, Cynicism (Ancient Greek Philosophy), and Zenon of Citium -- downloaded pdf to Note
article  Academia.edu  intellectual_history  political_philosophy  moral_philosophy  cosmology  Stoicism  cynicism  Seneca  Zenon_of_Citium  Diogenes_the_Cynic  ancient_philosophy  ancient_Greece  ancient_Rome  Hellenism  cosmopolitanism  Cicero  imperialism  Roman_Empire  Roman_Republic  Plato-Republic  downloaded 
november 2015 by dunnettreader
John Sellars - Stoic Fate in Justus Lipsius’s De Constantia and Physiologia Stoicorum (2014) | Academia.edu
Publication: Journal of the History of Philosophy, Oct 2014 In his De Constantia of 1584, Justus Lipsius examines the Stoic theory of fate, distancing himself from it by outlining four key points at which it should be modified. The modified theory is often presented as a distinctly Christianized form of Stoicism. Later, in his Physiologia Stoicorum of 1604, Lipsius revisits the Stoic theory, this time offering a more sympathetic reading, with the four modifications forgotten. It is widely assumed that Lipsius’s position shifted between these two works, perhaps due to a better grasp of the Stoic position by the time of the later work. I argue that in fact there is no great distance between the two accounts and that both find only one point of difficulty with the Stoic theory, a point that Lipsius himself presents in both works as merely a matter of expression. -- Keywords: Stoicism, Neostoicism, Justus Lipsius, and Stoic Tradition -- downloaded pdf to Note
article  Academia.edu  intellectual_history  16thC  17thC  Renaissance  Europe-Early_Modern  Stoicism  fate  Providence  free_will  determinism  Justus_Lipsius  Seneca  moral_philosophy  Neostoicism  bibliography  downloaded 
november 2015 by dunnettreader
Table of contents - John Sellars, ed. - The Routledge Handbook of the Stoic Tradition (Feb 2016) | Academia.edu
Introduction | Stoicism in Rome | Stoicism in Early Christianity | Plotinus and the Platonic Response to Stoicism | Augustine’s Debt to Stoicism in the Confessions | Boethius and Stoicism | Stoic Themes in Peter Abelard and John of Salisbury | Stoic Influences in the Later Middle Ages | The Recovery of Stoicism in the Renaissance | Stoicism in the Philosophy of the Italian Renaissance | Erasmus, Calvin, and the Faces of Stoicism in Renaissance and Reformation Thought | Justus Lipsius and Neostoicism | Shakespeare and Early Modern English Literature | Medicine of the Mind in Early Modern Philosophy | Stoic Themes in Early Modern French Thought | Spinoza and Stoicism | Leibniz and the Stoics: Fate, Freedom, and Providence | The Epicurean Stoicism of the French Enlightenment | Stoicism and the Scottish Enlightenment | Kant and Stoic Ethics | Stoicism in Nineteenth Century German Philosophy | Stoicism and Romantic Literature | Stoicism in Victorian Culture | Stoicism in America | Stoic Themes in Contemporary Anglo-American Ethics | Stoicism and Twentieth Century French Philosophy | The Stoic Influence on Modern Psychotherapy
books  intellectual_history  Stoicism  ancient_philosophy  Epictetus  Seneca  Early_Christian  late_antiquity  Neoplatonism  Augustine  Abelard  John_of_Salisbury  medieval_philosophy  Renaissance  Italian_Renaissance  Italy  Shakespeare  Shakespeare-influence  Erasmus  Reformation  Calvin  Justus_Lipsius  Neostoicism  philosophy-as-way-of-life  psychology  self  self-examination  self-knowledge  self-development  early_modern  Europe-Early_Modern  16thC  17thC  18thC  19thC  20thC  Spinoza  Leibniz  fate  determinism  Providence  free_will  freedom  French_Enlightenment  Epicurean  Scottish_Enlightenment  Kant-ethics  German_Idealism  German_scholars  neo-Kantian  Romanticism  literary_history  analytical_philosophy  psychoanalysis  phenomenology 
november 2015 by dunnettreader
Andrea Nightingale and David Sedley, eds. - Ancient Models of Mind: Studies in Human and Divine Rationality | Classical Philosophy | Cambridge University Press (hbk 2010, obk 2015)
In honor of A. A. Long: Publications 1963–2009 -- Table of Contents 1. Plato on aporia and self-knowledge, Andrea Wilson Nightingale -- 2. Cross-examining happiness: reason and community in the Socratic dialogues of Plato Sara Ahbel-Rappe -- 3. Inspiration, recollection, and mimesis in Plato's Phaedrus, Kathryn A. Morgan -- 4. Plato's Theaetetus as an ethical dialogue, David Sedley -- 5. Divine contemplating mind, Allan Silverman -- 6. Aristotle and the history of Skepticism, Alan Code -- 7. Stoic selection: objects, actions, and agents, Stephen White -- 8. Beauty and its relation to goodness in Stoicism, Richard Bett -- 9. How dialectical was Stoic dialectic?, Luca Castagnoli -- 10. Socrates speaks in Seneca, De vita beata 24-28, James Ker -- 11. Seneca's Platonism: the soul and its divine origin, Gretchen Reydams-Schils -- 12. The status of the individual in Plotinus, Kenneth Wolfe -- downloaded marketing materials to Note
books  kindle-available  ancient_philosophy  ancient_Greece  ancient_Rome  Hellenism  Plato  Platonism  Aristotle  Stoicism  Seneca  Plotinus  Neoplatonism  moral_philosophy  epistemology-moral  God-attributes  eudaimonia  aporia  soul  imago_dei  virtue_ethics  virtue  self-knowledge  self-examination  self-development  dialectic  beauty  good  sociability  downloaded 
october 2015 by dunnettreader
Jean Balsamo - « Qual l’alto Ægeo... » : Montaigne et l’essai des poètes italiens | Italique, XI, 2008, p.109-129.
Italique [En ligne], XI | 2008, mis en ligne le 01 février 2012, DOI : 10.4000/italique.213. **--** La poésie est l’expression privilégiée de l’émotion pour Montaigne.1Il cite tout au long des Essais d’innombrables vers, par lesquels il exprime tout ce que sa prose ne peut dire. Ces citations contribuent à un effet d’hétérogénéité stylistique et linguistique, qui définit l’originalité même du livre, dans le cadre d’une « rhétorique des citations » et d’une esthétique de la surprise et de la varietas. Ces vers sont en latin pour la plupart d’entre eux, constituant une véritable anthologie, d’Ovide et de Virgile, cités dès le chapitre 2 du premier livre, à Horace, qui conclut le dernier chapitre du livre III. Montaigne cite également 70 vers de poètes italiens. Ces fragments en langue italienne sont plus importants que les vers français, si l’on excepte, dans les trois premières éditions, le recueil des 29 sonnets d’Etienne de La Boétie, qui constitue à lui seul la matière d’un chapitre dédié à la comtesse de Guiche. La langue italienne, sous le règne de Henri III, était un signe de distinction. De tels vers étaient l’expression ostentatoire d’une culture mondaine, que le livre partageait avec ses lecteurs, dames et gentilshommes dont Montaigne voulait être le pédagogue sans pédantisme. -- downloaded pdf to Note
article  revues.org  French_lit  Italian_lit  Latin_lit  literary_history  intellectual_history  cultural_history  Renaissance  poetry  poetics  vernacular  epic  epigrammes  prose  style-philosophy  Montaigne  intertextual  influence-literary  elite_culture  Petrarch  Ariosto  Dante  Virgil  Tasso  Lucretius  Seneca  Pléiade  downloaded  EF-add 
september 2014 by dunnettreader
Betty Rose Nagle, review - William Fitzgerald, How to Read a Latin Poem: If You Can’t Read Latin Yet (2013) | Bryn Mawr Classical Review 2014.01.07
This engagingly written and cleverly organized book contains sophisticated discussions of a wide range of poets, periods, and genres, primarily in the form of close readings of the Latin originals. By what means, and how successfully, does its author accommodate that hypothetical Latinless reader? He does not do this by dumbing anything down; these are readings from which the proficient can profit, too. The poets and works included come mostly from the “greatest hits” list, but there are some unorthodox choices as well, such as Sulpicia in the chapter on love poetry, several Priapea included with Catullus and Martial in a chapter on invective, and Persius as the featured satirist. The first two chapters treat antithetical topics (love, hate); the middle two treat respectively a collection (Horace’s Odes) and a corpus (Virgil’s works) written during the same period; the fifth treats another pair of contemporaries, the Neronians Petronius [actually Lucan?] and Seneca; and the sixth, thematic again, pairs Lucretius and Ovid as philosophical and narrative “science fiction.” There is also an introduction for his readers, cleverly followed by a “Prelude” discussing two poems addressed to their readers, and a brief “Epilogue,” using Hadrian’s animula as a bridge to a few comments about the very different poetry of Christian hymns. Ancillaries include a pronunciation guide, suggestions for further reading, a glossary of terms, an index of names and topics, and another of poems. -- Oxford University Press - only hdbk on amazon.com - ebook available on Google_Books for c $20 - is OUP having a kindle fight? From Google preview, looks fabulous
books  reviews  buy  Google_Books  Latin_lit  Horace  Virgil  Ovid  Seneca  Lucretius  satire  Augustan_Rome  politics-and-literature  ancient_Rome  Roman_Empire  poetry  EF-add 
july 2014 by dunnettreader
Cécile Alduy, Roland Greene - Forum Introduction - Between Experience and Experiment: Five Articles at an Early Modern Crossroads | Republics of Letters - Volume 1, Issue 2 ( February 2010)
Nice overview of the entangling and untangling of our notions of experience and experiment from Petrarch to Montaigne -- downloaded pdf to Note -- TOC of Forum -- Between Experience and Experiment: Five Articles at an Early Modern Crossroads by Cécile Alduy, by Roland Greene. (1) Artificial Men: Alchemy, Transubstantiation, and the Homunculus by Mary Baine Campbell. (2) Machines in the Garden by Jessica Riskin. (3) Atheism as a Devotional Category by George Hoffmann. (4) Montaigne: The Eclectic Pragmatist by Anthony Long. (5) Putting Experience First by Timothy Hampton
article  Renaissance  14thC  15thC  16thC  epistemology  empiricism  self  metaphor  cultural_history  literary_history  Seneca  Montaigne  scepticism  atheism_panic  pragmatism  alchemy  experimental_philosophy  downloaded  EF-add 
january 2014 by dunnettreader
Elena Russo: Slander and Glory in the Republic of Letters: Diderot and Seneca Confront Rousseau | Republics of Letters: A Journal for the Study of Knowledge, Politics, and the Arts
Citation: Russo, Elena. “Slander and Glory in the Republic of Letters: Diderot and Seneca Confront Rousseau.” Republics of Letters: A Journal for the Study of Knowledge, Politics, and the Arts 1, no. 1 (May 1, 2009): http://rofl.stanford.edu/node/40. -- in " Rethinking the Republic of Letters" issue -- downloaded pdf to Note -- Diderot’s earlier optimism vis-à-vis his status in the Republic of Letters and his role as a public intellectual gave way to a profound identity crisis like the one that gripped his former friend Jean-Jacques Rousseau in his final years, documented in Rousseau juge de Jean-Jacques. By engaging both personally and by proxy in a battle against past and present enemies, Diderot forced himself to confront his own death and legacy, which he no longer imagined to be eulogies and loving praise, as he had in the letter to Falconet, but rather biased judgments of indifferent by-standers and prejudiced readers. In facing his eventual solitude as a writer, however, Diderot found comfort not among his contemporaries, but in the revived memory of the Republic of Letters’ classical past: in his newly discovered affinity for Seneca and in the embrace of his new role as Seneca’s advocate, faithful son, and alter ego.
article  intellectual_history  cultural_history  18thC  France  French_Enlightenment  philosophes  intelligentsia  status  fame  reputation  authenticity  libel  audience  Republic_of_Letters  sociability  alienation  Diderot  Rousseau  Seneca  Stoicism  downloaded  EF-add 
september 2013 by dunnettreader
Pierre Force: Montaigne and the Coherence of Eclecticism (2009)
Project MUSE - Pierre Force. "Montaigne and the Coherence of Eclecticism." Journal of the History of Ideas70.4 (2009): 523-544 -- no abstract -- Because Montaigne writes in the ancient tradition of philosophy as a way of life, one may recall Hadot's suggestion that Foucault's notion of "writing the self" is an intriguing but historically inaccurate description of ancient philosophical practice. But perhaps Hadot agrees with Foucault after all, since in his most recent interviews, he speaks favorably of eclecticism, a notion that is central to Foucault's analysis of self-fashioning through writing. The case of Montaigne is particularly interesting for these purposes, not only because the Essays seem to be the prototypical example of "writing the self," but also because eclecticism is both discussed and practiced throughout the Essays. I propose to take a fresh look at this issue by investigating the status of eclecticism in Montaigne's Essays. This must start with an examination of the philosophical tradition most closely associated with the practice of eclecticism, the Skeptical tradition.
article  Project_MUSE  intellectual_history  ancient_philosophy  16thC  Stoicism  Epicurean  Seneca  Cicero  Montaigne  scepticism  eclecticism  EF-add 
august 2013 by dunnettreader
Peter Stacey: The Sovereign Person in Senecan Political Theory | Republics of Letters (Stanford): 2011
Citation: Stacey, Peter. “The Sovereign Person in Senecan Political Theory.” Republics of Letters: A Journal for the Study of Knowledge, Politics, and the Arts 2, no. 2 (June 1, 2011): http://rofl.stanford.edu/node/98......Downloaded pdf to Note.......

After observing how the allegorical terms of the relationship between the prince andFortuna are established in resoundingly Senecan terms in Petrarch’s moral and political thought, I turn to investigate how the account subsequently becomes even more embroidered by Florentine humanists....... One aspect of Machiavelli’s assault on the prevailing contentions of the ideology of the Renaissance prince is a systematic and highly subversive reorganization of a set of concepts with which it had become conventional to map out the terms of that relationship. An integral part of this work is the brilliant reconfiguration of the Petrarchan—and ultimately Senecan—imagery with which the traditional relationship had been portrayed;
article  political_philosophy  intellectual_history  antiquity  Roman_Empire  Roman_law  Seneca  Stoicism  mirror_for_princes  Italy  Renaissance  Petrarch  humanism  Machiavelli  Bodin  sovereignty  15thC  16thC  downloaded  EF-add 
august 2013 by dunnettreader

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