dunnettreader + scotland   39

Frances Coppola - Brexit Reveals A Deeply Divided Britain
All night, I watched the referendum results rolling in. The BBC relayed the results live, color-coding the decisions on a map of the UK . Yellow for Remain,…
Instapaper  UK_politics  Brexit  Scotland  from instapaper
june 2016 by dunnettreader
The Cromartie Fool − Richard Waitt − Online Collection − National Galleries of Scotland
Richard Waitt (Scottish, active 1708 - died 1733) Waitt specialised in portraiture, but began his career as a decorative painter. His first recorded work is a coat of arms for the Earl of Hopetoun. He may have trained in the Edinburgh studio of the painter John Scougal and seems to have produced several different types of painting, notably still life. He married into a family with Jacobite sympathies and possibly left the country, temporarily, after the 1715 Jacobite Rising. He must have returned by 1722, however, when he resumed work for the Clan Grant based in Castle Grant, Strathspey. Waitt's series of portraits formed a unique clan gallery. -- This grinning man holds a kail stock with a burning candle stuck in the top. This helps identify him as the fool or jester of a Scottish laird, who probably presided over Halloween festivities, such as those described in Robert Burns' poetry. Traditionally, unmarried men and women pulled up kail stocks to confirm the character of their future partner. A candle was then stuck into the end to make a torch. This portrait, painted in 1731, was possibly part of a series depicting Scottish clan members. -- also a video clip of gallery director of portraiture on the painting
video  painting  portraits  art_history  Scotland  elite_culture  18thC  Jacobites  1715_uprising  social_order 
may 2016 by dunnettreader
Clip on influence of Italian Grand Tours in Allan Ramsay - BBC Two - The Story of Scottish Art, Episode 2
The ancient world that allowed artist Allan Ramsay to hone his artistic skills and spark a lifelong passion for the place - full program of 4 episodes not available, only clips - this clip is 4+ mn
video  art_history  Scotland  Scottish_Enlightenment  18thC  Grand_Tour  painting  Ramsay_Allan  neoclassical  Rome  ancient_Rome  ancient_Greece 
may 2016 by dunnettreader
The Story of Scottish Art: Allan Ramsay - Blog − National Galleries of Scotland - 14 October 2015
The Story of Scottish Art: Allan Ramsay
by Geraldine Mackay, Digital Content Curator, 14 October 2015
In the second episode of the BBC series The Story of Scottish Art, Lachlan Goudie visits Rome and looks at the impact that repeated trips to Italy had on Allan Ramsay’s work. While filming the series, the BBC made use of the Scottish National Gallery Print Room that houses the national collection of works on paper. We are privileged to have a number of the sketches Ramsay made during his inspirational Grand Tours of Italy. In part of this episode Lachlan heads to Rome, and just as Ramsay did hundreds of years ago, he creates his own souvenir sketch of the Colosseum.
video  art_history  painting  portraits  18thC  Scotland  Scottish_Enlightenment  Grand_Tour  Ramsay_Allan 
may 2016 by dunnettreader
Alex Massie - When the roses come again - Selkirk Ex-Standard Bearers’ Dinner June 2015
This is a version of a speech I made at the Selkirk Ex-Standard Bearers’ Dinner on June 8th, 2015 at the County Hotel, Selkirk. Chairman Gunn, Provost Anderson,…
Instapaper  Scotland  Scottish_history  tradition  community  from instapaper
june 2015 by dunnettreader
Alex Massie - Queen in the North makes her play - Medium - May 2015
Nicola Sturgeon, the Queen in the North, is mistress of all she surveys. She is, everyone agrees, already the biggest winner in this long, otherwise colourless,…
Instapaper  Scotland  UK_politics  Scottish_politics  Tories  Labour  SNP  Parliament  devolution  local_government  local_politics  1707_Union  political_culture  parties  from instapaper
june 2015 by dunnettreader
Alex Massie - What do they know of Britain who only England (or Scotland) know?
A long, long time ago, in the fading years of the last century, I was one half of a debating team that, representing Trinity College Dublin’s Philosophical…
Instapaper  UK_politics  UK_Government  English_constitution  Scotland  Scottish_politics  British_history  British_politics  political_culture  1707_Union  Tories  Labour  SNP  local_politics  Ireland  from instapaper
june 2015 by dunnettreader
Oren Levintal, Joseph Zeira - Toxic assets in the 18th century | VOX, CEPR’s Policy Portal - 21 September 2009
Problems of regulation appear whenever financial innovations change the ways capital markets operate. This column describes the 18th century emergence of the inconvertible banknote, a "toxic asset” ended by government regulation. The lesson is that free financial markets promote financial innovation, but government must provide adequate regulation keeping the market on track. -- downloaded page as pdf to Note
economic_history  British_history  18thC  financial_innovation  banking  currency  Scotland  free_banking  competition  financial_regulation  financial_crisis  downloaded 
may 2015 by dunnettreader
James Chandler, ed. - The Cambridge History of English Romantic Literature (pbk 2012) | Cambridge University Press
The Romantic period was one of the most creative, intense and turbulent periods of English lit (..) revolution, reaction, and reform in politics, and by the invention of imaginative literature in its distinctively modern form. (..) an engaging account of 6 decades of literary production around the turn of the 19thC. Reflecting the most up-to-date research, (..) both to provide a narrative of Romantic lit and to offer new and stimulating readings of the key texts. (...) the various locations of literary activity - both in England and, as writers developed their interests in travel and foreign cultures, across the world. (..) how texts responded to great historical and social change. (..) a comprehensive bibliography, timeline and index, **--** Choice: 50 years ago, lit studies was awash in big theories of Romanticism, (e.g. M. H. Abrams, Geoffrey Hartman, Harold Bloom); 2 decades later, Marilyn Butler argued that the very label "Romantic" was "historically unsound." This collection suggests that no consensus has yet emerged: instead, the best of the essays suggest continuities with periods before and after. Rather than big theories, (..) kaleidoscopic snapshots of individual genres (the novel, the "new poetry," drama, the ballad, children's literature); larger intellectual currents (Brewer ... on "sentiment and sensibility"); fashionable topics (imperialism, publishing history, disciplinarity); and--most interesting--the varying cultures of discrete localities (London, Ireland, Scotland).(..) an excellent book useful not as a reference resource, (..) but for its summaries of early-21st-century thinking about British lit culture 1770s-1830s. -- downloaded pdfs of front matter and excerpt to Note
books  English_lit  Romanticism  literary_history  literary_language  literary_theory  lit_crit  18thC  19thC  British_history  cultural_history  literature-and-morality  politics-and-literature  French_Revolution-impact  sociology_of_knowledge  Enlightenment  religious_lit  genre  gender_history  historicism  art_history  art_criticism  novels  rhetoric-writing  intellectual_history  morality-conventional  norms  sensibility  social_order  public_sphere  private_life  lower_orders  publishing  publishing-piracy  copyright  British_politics  British_Empire  Scotland  Scottish_Enlightenment  Ireland  Ireland-English_exploitation  landed_interest  landowners-Ireland-Anglo_elite  authors  authors-women  political_culture  elite_culture  aesthetics  subjectivity  self  self-fashioning  print_culture  readership  fashion  credit  poetry  literary_journals  historical_fiction  historical_change  reform-political  reform-social  French_Revolution  anti-Jacobin  Evangelical  literacy  theater  theatre-sentimental  theatre-politics  actors  downloaded 
february 2015 by dunnettreader
JULIAN GOODARE - The debts of James VI of Scotland | JSTOR - The Economic History Review New Series, Vol. 62, No. 4 (NOVEMBER 2009), pp. 926-952
James VI (1567–1625) was chronically indebted, and this caused him frequent problems. This article presents two series of systematic data that together indicate the main contours of his indebtedness: (1) end-of-year deficits, and (2) hived-off debts which the Crown left unpaid for long periods (sometimes permanently). The hived-off debts, reconstructed individually, constitute a narrative of fiscal policy-making. Instead of a large and catastrophic bankruptcy, James in effect had numerous small bankruptcies. He benefited from an emerging structure of Scottish domestic credit. He eventually repaid many of his debts after succeeding to the English throne in 1603. -- huge bibliography, mostly Scottish history -- downloaded pdf to Note
article  jstor  economic_history  political_history  16thC  17thC  James_I  Scotland  Britain  public_finance  fiscal_policy  deficit_finance  sovereign_debt  Crown_finance  financial_system  credit  bankruptcy  bibliography  downloaded  EF-add 
january 2015 by dunnettreader
- DAVID LEWIS JONES - British Parliaments and Assemblies: A Bibliography of Printed Materials (2009) Parliamentary History - Wiley Online Library
Each section a pdf downloaded to Note - combined, c 25,000 entries *--* Section 1: Preface, Introduction, The Westminster Parliament 1-4005. **--** Section 2: The Medieval Parliament 4006-4728 **--** Section 3: Tudor Parliaments 4729-5064 **--* Section 4: Stuart Parliaments 5063-6805 **--** Section 5: The Unreformed Parliament 1714-1832 6806-9589. **--** Section 6: The Reformed Parliament 1832-1918 9590-15067 **--** Section 7: Parliament 1918-2009 15068-21582. **--** Section 8: The Judicial House of Lords 21583-21835. -- The Palace of Westminster 21836-22457. -- The Irish Parliament 22458-23264 -- The Scottish Parliament (to 1707) 23265-23482 -- The New Devolved Assemblies 23483-23686 -- The Scottish Parliament (1999-) 23687-24251 -- Northern Ireland 24252-24563 -- The National Assembly for Wales 24537-24963 -- Minor Assemblies
bibliography  historiography  Medieval  medieval_history  15thC  16thC  17thC  18thC  19thC  20thC  21stC  political_culture  political_philosophy  political_economy  political_history  politics-and-religion  political_participation  political_press  legal_history  legal_system  legal_theory  British_history  British_politics  Britain  British_Empire  British_foreign_policy  English_constitution  British_Empire-constitutional_structure  monarchy  monarchy-proprietary  monarchical_republic  limited_monarchy  Parliament  Parliamentary_supremacy  House_of_Commons  House_of_Lords  sovereignty  government-forms  governing_class  government_finance  government_officials  Scotland  Ireland  Ireland-English_exploitation  elites  elite_culture  common_law  rule_of_law  1690s  1700s  1707_Union  1680s  Glorious_Revolution  Glorious_Revolution-Scotland  English_Civil_War  Three_Kingdoms  composite_monarchies  Absolutism  ancient_constitution  religion-established  Church_of_England  Reformation  reform-legal  reform-political  elections  franchise  state-building  opposition  parties  pa 
december 2014 by dunnettreader
Edward Gregg, review - Daniel Szechi, George Lockhart of Carnwath, 1681-1731: A Study in Jacobitism | JSTOR: The American Historical Review, Vol. 109, No. 1 (February 2004), p. 251
Szechi is best placed to write this bio, and given how it weaves events in Scotland, post-Union Britain and Continental Jacobites, plus House of Hanover, will be a "must" for those interested in 1st 3 decades of 18thC. -- Downloaded pdf to Note
books  reviews  17thC  18thC  British_history  British_politics  Scotland  1707_Union  Jacobites  1715_uprising  Lockhart_George  House_of_Commons  Bolingbroke  Tories  Queen_Anne  downloaded 
october 2014 by dunnettreader
Neil Davidson - The Origins Of Scottish Nationhood (Pluto Critical History Series) (2000) 144 pages | pbk (9780745316086): : Books amazon.com
The traditional view of the Scottish nation holds that it first arose during the Wars of Independence from England in the 13thC & 14thC. Although Scotland was absorbed into Britain in 1707, Scottish identity is supposed to have remained alive through separate institutions of religion, education, and the legal system. Davidson argues otherwise. The Scottish nation did not exist before 1707. The Scottish national consciousness we know today was not preserved by institutions carried over from the pre-Union period, but arose after and as a result of the Union, for only then were the material obstacles to nationhood – most importantly the Highland/Lowland divide – overcome. This Scottish nation was constructed simultaneously with and as part of the British nation, and the 18thC Scottish bourgeoisie were at the forefront of constructing both. The majority of Scots entered the Industrial Revolution with a dual national consciousness, but only one nationalism, which was British. The Scottish nationalism which arose in Scotland during the 20thC is therefore not a revival of a pre-Union nationalism after 300 years, but an entirely new formation. -- Customer review - Davidson refutes Linda Colley's idealist thesis that Protestantism, Francophobia, monarchism and empire formed the British nation. The first three of these were ideas, present, yes, but not formative. Empire was external to Britain, and so it was never part of people's experience of becoming British or Scottish. Scotland was a full partner, not a junior partner in the British (not English) Empire, unlike Ireland. The experience of becoming the workshop of the world formed Britain as a nation, creating our culture and identity. Industry, making things, and organising in our Britain-wide trade unions (which Davidson barely mentions) made us British. -- not on kindle
books  amazon.com  find17thC  18thC  Scotland  British_history  1707_Union  national_ID  nationalism  bourgeoisie  Industrial_Revolution  British_Empire  British_Empire-constitutional_structure  Anglo-Irish_constitution  colonialism  imperialism  history_of_England  Kirk  legal_system  Highlands-Scotland  Lowland-Scotland  Scottish_Enlightenment  Scottish_politics  Britannia 
september 2014 by dunnettreader
Neil Davidson - Discovering The Scottish Revolution 1692-1746 (2003) 400 pages : pbk 9780745320533: Amazon.com: Books
This major new work of historical scholarship offers a groundbreaking reassessment of Scottish politics and society in the late seventeenth and early eighteenth century that is set to become a standard work on the subject. Neil Davidson argues that Scotland experienced a revolution during this period that has rarely been recognised in the existing historiography. Davidson explores the political and economic changes of these years, revealing how social and economic power was transferred from one class to another. He describes how Scotland was transformed from a backward and feudal economy to a new centre of emergent capitalism. He traces the economic and social crisis that led to Scotland's incorporation into the Union in 1707, but argues that the Union did not lead to the transformation of Scottish society. The decisive period was instead the aftermath of the last Jacobite revolt in 1746, whose failure was integral to the survival and consolidation of British, and ultimately global capitalism. 'His opinions are bound to cause controversy and discussion . . . a good thing as Scottish history desperately needs the airing and voicing of new approaches.' John R Young, Albion. 'What is so good about Neil Davidson's brave study is that he brings a Marxist perspective to bear on Scottish history in very clear and readable prose. Quotations and statistics drawn from uncannily wide reading will make this book of great value even to those who disagree with it.' Angus Calder, author of Revolutionary Empire and Revolving Culture: Notes from the Scottish Republic -- not on kindle
books  amazon.com  find  17thC  18thC  Scotland  British_history  Glorious_Revolution-Scotland  1707_Union  landed_interest  aristocracy  feudalism  capitalism  political_economy  political_culture  economic_culture  1745_rebellion  Marxist  change-social  social_order  revolutions  bourgeoisie  Scottish_Enlightenment  Scottish_politics 
september 2014 by dunnettreader
Hector Lewis MacQueen - Scots and English Law c.1603: Uniting or Dividing Kingdoms? (April 24, 2014) :: SSRN
University of Edinburgh - School of Law - Research Paper No. 2014/15 -- A brief discussion of how Scots and English lawyers saw their respective laws and legal systems at the time of the Union of the Crowns, when the prospect of a union of laws was also put before them. Number of Pages in PDF File: 10 -- downloaded pdf to Note
paper  SSRN  legal_history  legal_system  17thC  British_history  British_politics  Scotland  Anglo-Scot  James_I  common_law  civil_law  downloaded  EF-add 
august 2014 by dunnettreader
Hugh Trevor-Roper, The Crisis of the Seventeenth Century - Online Library of Liberty
Hugh Trevor-Roper, The Crisis of the Seventeenth Century: Religion, the Reformation and Social Change (Indianapolis: Liberty Fund, 2001). 07/13/2014. <http://oll.libertyfund.org/titles/719> -- The Crisis of the Seventeenth Century collects nine essays by Trevor-Roper on the themes of religion, the Reformation, and social change. As Trevor-Roper explains in his preface, “the crisis in government, society, and ideas which occurred, both in Europe and in England, between the Reformation and the middle of the seventeenth century” constituted the crucible for what “went down in the general social and intellectual revolution of the mid-seventeenth century.” The Civil War, the Restoration, and the Glorious Revolution in England laid the institutional and intellectual foundations of the modern understanding of liberty, of which we are heirs and beneficiaries. Trevor-Roper’s essays uncover new pathways to understanding this seminal time. Neither Catholic nor Protestant emerges unscathed from the examination to which Trevor-Roper subjects the era in which, from political and religious causes, the identification and extirpation of witches was a central event. -- downloaded pdf to Note -- see his introduction for discussion of historiography on topics covered in each essay since they were written, some from mid 1950s
books  etexts  17thC  Europe-Early_Modern  intellectual_history  historiography  revisionism  Reformation  Catholics-England  Papacy  Church_of_England  Puritans  witchcraft  religious_culture  political_culture  politics-and-religion  religious_wars  Calvinist  Arminian  English_constitution  monarchy  Parliament  Aristotelian  natural_philosophy  science-and-religion  theology  moral_philosophy  human_nature  historiography-17thC  scepticism  colonialism  Scotland  James_I  Charles_I  Thirty_Years_War  France  Germany  Spain  Dutch  Dutch_Revolt  downloaded  EF-add 
july 2014 by dunnettreader
Sarah Mortimer, review - Charles W. A. Prior. A Confusion of Tongues: Britain's Wars of Reformation, 1625-1642 | H-Net Reviews - Sept 2012
His aim is to challenge interpretations of the civil war that prioritize one element of the English mixture and instead that religion, political thought, and law cannot be separated. ...he claims that it was the very confusion and instability that this mixture created, rather than deep ideological divisions, that led to the civil wars. ... “driven by a complex struggle to define the meaning” of the key religious and political texts. Prior argues that we have concentrated too much on the doctrinal divisions... we need to broaden our perspective to include issues of law, ecclesiology, and church history. Prior provides case studies demonstrating the interaction between these subjects. --...issue of religious conformity, which drew together questions of spiritual and temporal obedience; ...the ensuing debate fostered the creation of rival narratives of English religious history. These narratives are then examined in more detail ....the disputes over ceremonies in worship -- the role played by these different versions of history. The Scots had their own, self-conscious, history of ecclesiastical liberty which could be deployed against Charles; and the events of the late 1630s served to link in Scottish minds liberty and purity of doctrine. ....Charles’s position in Dec 1640, when the canons were condemned by the Commons, was weak. Prior’s focus, though, is resolutely on arguments rather than events, and the debate over the canons is, for him, ...an intensification of positions that had been current since at least 1604. .... the tension between the powers of the Crown and bishops, and the institutions of law and Parliament. ....further constitutional questions generated a plurality of narratives, exacerbating the problem. -- the efforts of two men to overcome this tension: Thomas Aston insisted that episcopacy was part of the English constitution, but Henry Parker refused to accept the legitimacy of custom and precedent. Instead he developed a more complicated argument, which, at root, linked authority to the consent of the governed. ?...neither of these attempted solutions worked, and the continuing instability led to war.
books  reviews  historiography  revisionism  intellectual_history  political_philosophy  theology  ecclesiology  legal_history  English_Civil_War  17thC  British_history  British_politics  Scotland  religious_history  church_history  Church_of_England  religion-established  religious_culture  religious_belief  Puritans  Arminian  Presbyterians  common_law  English_constitution  ancient_constitution  historians-and-religion  historians-and-politics  historiography-17thC  historians-and-state  episcopacy  precedent  custom  legitimacy  consent  social_contract  monarchy  divine_right  apostolic_succession  authority  hierarchy  EF-add 
june 2014 by dunnettreader
Adam Marks, review - David Worthington. British and Irish Experiences and Impressions of Central Europe, c. 1560–1688 | H-Net Reviews February 2013
The book moves thematically through the primary components of the various British and Irish diasporas. The first successfully illustrates that travelers from Britain and Ireland did not confine themselves to western Europe and that the Grand Tour was far more than a visit to Italy. Worthington demonstrates that this area was a part of the British experience both in terms of awareness in printed accounts and as a part of the “Grand Tour.” .... the diplomacy undertaken by both the Tudor and Stuart courts, and provides an example of the breadth of diplomacy conducted by the Stuart monarchy. As Worthington writes, these activities serve “as a symbol of the complexity of English and later British foreign policy” and should be a stark warning to those who still perceive Stuart policy exclusively in terms of an axis from Paris to Madrid. ?...a useful account of the soldiers who fought on behalf of the Habsburgs and Poland before, during, and after the Thirty Years’ War. This chapter is perhaps the best example of Worthington’s ability to use contemporary British perspectives to explain central and east European events. ...the Protestant theologians in the area and makes a cursory overview of trade before moving to what is arguably the most effective chapter, dealing with the British and Irish Catholic colleges of the region. This effectively illustrates the crossover and divisions of the various Catholic orders. -- without further research on the English this creates as many questions as it answers. Why did the largest of the kingdoms of Britain and Ireland provide the least number of immigrants to the region? Is it simply that the economics of England meant that fewer felt the need to leave their homeland, or were they moving to other areas, such as the Low Countries, France, Iberia, or Scandinavia? -- British migrants continued to have a significant influence on their homelands through trade and politics, and in some cases by returning to their homelands to participate in open rebellion.
books  reviews  16thC  17thC  British_history  Ireland  Scotland  Catholics-England  Catholics-Ireland  exiles  migration  Grand_Tour  Eastern_Europe  Central_Europe  Reformation  British_foreign_policy  diplomats  diplomatic_history  education-higher  Thirty_Years_War  Wars_of_Religion  diasporas  EF-add 
june 2014 by dunnettreader
Heather Parker, review - Keith M. Brown. Noble Power in Scotland from the Reformation to the Revolution (2007) | H-Net Reviews
In this companion volume to Noble Society in Scotland (2000), Keith M. Brown emphasizes the roles of various power players in the early modern Scottish world. While Noble Society focuses on elements of the lives of nobility, who were generally seen to hold power absolutely, Noble Power provides a new perspective, concentrating not only on the courtiers, lords, and chiefs, but also on the magistrates, soldiers, and governors who vied for power. Brown bookends his evaluation of these roles with two assessments of noble power, beginning the book with a study of politics between 1560 and 1603 and wrapping up the study with an examination of politics in the later period, between 1603 and 1637. Such a structure indicates that the nobles of this period were living in a dynamic political environment. As much as the social institutions described by Brown were similar throughout this period, the political environment was in flux. Noblemen struggled for power at court, and their real power was measured in the number of noble and lairdly followers they could raise to support their causes. Popular support and assistance from neighboring families could supplement this power, but a lack of regional support could cause a situation to quickly turn sour. These interactions demonstrate the limitations of royal authority in the noble world. Blood feud proved a thorn in the side of the monarchs, and its elimination was a pet cause of James VI. It is clear that the political context of this period was one of upheaval.
books  reviews  16thC  17thC  Scotland  political_history  social_history  legal_history  political_culture  legal_culture  Lowland-Scotland  Highlands-Scotland  kinship  clans  James_I  Mary_Queen_of_Scots  nobility  Dunnett  EF-add 
june 2014 by dunnettreader
David Allan - The Age of Pericles in the Modern Athens: Greek History, Scottish Politics, and the Fading of Enlightenment | JSTOR: The Historical Journal, Vol. 44, No. 2 (Jun., 2001), pp. 391-417
This article explores changing responses among late Georgian Scots towards Greek history in general and classical Athens in particular. Tracing the early study of Greece through some of the more innovative Scottish Enlightenment scholars, it argues that Periclean Athens long remained a difficult and controversial topic, mainly because eighteenth-century authors found it hard to offer a fully sympathetic treatment of a historical subject strongly associated with radical political democracy. With the defeat of Napoleon, however, and as new ways were sought to celebrate Scotland's own recent imperial, economic, and intellectual achievements, Athenianism gained in credibility, assisted by the rising tide of cultural Hellenism and political Hellenophilia throughout Britain. Plans were laid for a national monument in Edinburgh, modelled on the Athenian Parthenon. Nevertheless, insufficient support was forthcoming and by 1830 the project had stalled. Not least among the causes of this debacle - popularly known as 'Scotland's Disgrace' - were the contradictions involved in Athenian symbolism: the abandoned monument ultimately served to represent only the failings of Scotland's tory establishment. -- interesting bibliography -- didn't download
article  jstor  intellectual_history  cultural_history  political_culture  historiography-18thC  historiography-19thC  18thC  19thC  Scotland  Scottish_Enlightenment  Scottish_politics  Tories  British_politics  national_ID  Athens  ancient_Greece  Hellenism  bibliography  EF-add 
may 2014 by dunnettreader
Colin Kidd - Race, Empire, and the Limits of 19thC Scottish Nationhood | JSTOR: The Historical Journal, Vol. 46, No. 4 (Dec., 2003), pp. 873-892
Scotland's Unionist culture has already become a world we have lost, investigation of which is hampered by the misleading notion of a 'Celtic fringe'. Nineteenth-century Lowland Scots were not classified as Celts; indeed they vociferously projected a Teutonic racial identity. Several Scots went so far as to claim not only that the Saxon Scots of the Lowlands were superior to the Celts of the Highlands, but that the people of the Lowlands came from a more purely Anglian stock than the population of southern England. For some Scots the glory of Scottish identity resided in the boast that Lowlanders were more authentically 'English' than the English themselves. Moreover, Scottish historians reinterpreted the nation's medieval War of Independence - otherwise a cynosure of patriotism - as an unfortunate civil war within the Saxon race. Curiously, racialism - which was far from monolithic - worked at times both to support and to subvert Scottish involvement in empire. The late nineteenth century also saw the formulation of Scottish proposals for an Anglo-Saxon racial empire including the United States; while Teutonic racialism inflected the nascent Scottish home rule movement as well as the Udal League in Orkney and Shetland. -- Downloaded pdf to Note
article  jstor  18thC  19thC  nationalism  national_ID  British_history  1707_Union  Scotland  Lowland-Scotland  racialism  British_Empire  Teutonic  Anglo-Saxons  Anglo-Scot  Highlands-Scotland  historiography-19thC  downloaded  EF-add 
may 2014 by dunnettreader
David Armitage, ed. - British Political Thought History Literature And Theory 1500-1800 | History of ideas | Cambridge University Press
Downloaded introduction pdf to Note -- The history of British political thought has been one of the most fertile fields of Anglo-American historical writing in the last half-century. David Armitage brings together an interdisciplinary and international team of authors to consider the impact of this scholarship on the study of early modern British history, English literature, and political theory. Leading historians survey the impact of the history of political thought on the 'new' histories of Britain and Ireland; eminent literary scholars offer novel critical methods attentive to literary form, genre, and language; and distinguished political theorists treat the relationship of history and theory in studies of rights and privacy. The outstanding examples of critical practice collected here will encourage the emergence of fresh research on the historical, critical, and theoretical study of the English-speaking world in the period around 1500–1800. This volume celebrates the contribution of the Folger Institute to British studies over many years. -- ebook Adobe not kindle
books  intellectual_history  political_philosophy  English_lit  political_culture  16thC  17thC  18thC  Cambridge_School  British_history  British_politics  British_Empire  American_colonies  American_Revolution  Ireland  Scotland  1707_Union  downloaded  EF-add 
may 2014 by dunnettreader
AARON GRAHAM, review essay -- MERCANTILE NETWORKS IN THE EARLY MODERN WORLD | JSTOR: The Historical Journal, Vol. 56, No. 1 (MARCH 2013), pp. 279-295
Reviewed work(s): ** (1) The capital and the colonies: London and the Atlantic economy, 1660—1700 by Nuala Zahedieh; ** (2) Defying empire: trading with the enemy in colonial New York by Thomas M. Truxes; ** (3) East India patronage and the British state: the Scottish elite and politics in the eighteenth century by George K. McGilvary; ** (4) The familiarity of strangers: the Sephardic diaspora, Livorno and cross-cultural trade in the early modern period by Francesca Trivellato; ** (5) Global trade and commercial networks: eighteenth-century diamond merchants by Tijl Vanneste; ** (6) From the Indian Ocean to the Mediterranean: the global trade networks of Armenian merchants from New Julfa by Sebouh David Aslanian; ** (7) Oceans of wine: Madeira and the emergence of American trade and taste by David Hancock -- lengthy 17 pages -- paywall Cambridge journals
books  reviews  paywall  economic_history  globalization  Europe-Early_Modern  colonialism  17thC  18thC  British_history  British_Empire  American_colonies  West_Indies  Atlantic  India  trading_companies  networks  trust  commerce  trade  East_India_Company  Portugal  Italy  Mediterranean  London  patronage  Scotland  Anglo-Scot  1707_Union  clientelism  EF-add 
january 2014 by dunnettreader
Maria Pia Paganelli, review - Donald Rutherford: In the Shadow of Adam Smith: Founders of Scottish Economics, 1700-1900 | EH.net
Donald Rutherford, In the Shadow of Adam Smith: Founders of Scottish Economics, 1700-1900. New York: Palgrave Macmillan, 2012. vii + 344 pp. $40 (paperback), ISBN: 978-0-230-25210-3. - not on Kindle

Reviewed for EH.Net by Maria Pia Paganelli, Department of Economics, Trinity University. Smith is generally such an immense figure that we may be tempted to think of him as the only voice of eighteenth century Scotland as far as economics is concerned. Attempts to moderate Smith?s grandeur remind us that he may have just systematized previous knowledge. Rutherford offers us the context in which Smith?s presence grew and his legacy developed. He offers us insight into the wide economic knowledge that Smith used (or did not use), added to (or not), and of which he is (just a) part.

The scholarship present in the book is remarkable, even more so because the book is organized by topic, rather than by time or by authors. The topics covered are trade (international trade, exchange economy, value); money (functions of money, paper credit, banking); public finance (functions of government, taxation, national debt); condition of the people (population, property rights and rent, profits and wages, poverty); condition of the economy (economic growth, economic development); and economic ideology (natural liberty, socialism). And to this, Rutherford adds an appendix with biographical sketches of the major Scottish writers.
books  reviews  intellectual_history  economic_history  18thC  19thC  Scotland  Scottish_Enlightenment  Smith  Hutcheson  economic_theory  political_philosophy  moral_philosophy  political_economy  trade-theory  poverty  population  Poor_Laws  unemployment  EF-add 
december 2013 by dunnettreader
Eliga H. Gould - Entangled Atlantic Histories: A Response from the Anglo-American Periphery (2007)
JSTOR: The American Historical Review, Vol. 112, No. 5 (Dec., 2007), pp. 1415-1422 -- downloaded pdf to Note -- overview of shifts in Atlantic historiography re center periphery relations and much more going on in periphery especially where interacts with indigenous populations and other empires
article  jstor  historiography  American_colonies  West_Indies  British_Empire  Three_Kingdoms  Ireland  Scotland  Spanish_Empire  Africa  Dutch  Native_Americans  slavery  political_history  political_culture  British_politics  maritime_history  downloaded  EF-add 
september 2013 by dunnettreader
Michael Braddick: State Formation and Social Change in Early Modern England: A Problem Stated and Approaches Suggested (1991)
JSTOR: Social History, Vol. 16, No. 1 (Jan., 1991), pp. 1-17 -- downloaded pdf to Note -- the theoretical background to Braddick work on local government, taxation, authority and challenges in Three Kingdoms etc -- focus on state building process not on state as entity
article  jstor  historiography  historical_sociology  17thC  British_history  UK_Government  British_politics  social_history  local_government  taxes  fiscal-military_state  state-building  nation-state  English_Civil_War  political_culture  Ireland  Scotland 
september 2013 by dunnettreader
Review by: R. M. Sunter: The British Armed Nation, 1793-1815 by J. E. Cookson (2000)
JSTOR: The Scottish Historical Review, Vol. 79, No. 208 (Oct., 2000), pp. 260-262 -- 1st thorough study of how extensive mobilization of manpower was in British Isles during French Revolutionary and Napoleonic Wars. Lots of stuff on militias, volunteer units, yeomanry in Ireland (Protestants mostly in North East) and England, and fencibles. Throw away comment that how it hooks up with understanding of society at the time runs counter to Linda Colley and John Brewer.
books  reviews  18thC  19thC  British_history  military_history  British_Army  British_Navy  militia  Ireland  Scotland  Irish_Rebellion  Castlereagh  French_Revolutionary_Wars  Napoleonic_Wars  fiscal-military_state  social_history  Britain-invasion  EF-add 
september 2013 by dunnettreader
Jess Edwards, Review: Aino Mäkikalli and Andreas K. E. Mueller eds, Positioning Defoe’s Non-Fiction: Form, Function, Genre | Digital Defoe
What most previous studies of Defoe’s non-fiction have tended not to do, and this includes the editorial introductions to the Pickering and Chatto editions, according to John Richetti, is pay attention to the formal properties of these works in their own right, as products of generic pressures and literary craft (Richetti 38). In their explorations of various kinds of moral challenge and crisis, their attempts to represent the particularities of time and space, and their occasional dramatic dialogues, Defoe’s non-fictional works help us to understand the genesis of his groundbreaking experiments in realist narrative, as well as some of their peculiarities. They also provide us, in their own right, with an opportunity to explore the relationship between history and form. Mäkikalli and Mueller’s collection, Positioning Daniel Defoe’s Non-Fiction, addresses this gap in scholarship.
books  reviews  18thC  English_lit  non-fiction  Defoe  rhetoric  satire  travel  London  1700s  1707_Union  British_history  Scotland  dissenters  conduct  cultural_history  EF-add 
august 2013 by dunnettreader
Richard B. Sher (excerpt):The Enlightenment and the Book: Scottish Authors and Their Publishers in Eighteenth-Century Britain, Ireland, and America | U Chicago Press
Reviews: " 'The Enlightenment and the Book' is the missing link in the history of publishing. It connects the traditions of Britain and America and explains how the people and practices of the book trade shaped the very culture of intellectual tolerance that defined the Enlightenment. This is a remarkable achievement of social and intellectual history that will become a classic." —Barbara M. Benedict, author of Curiosity: A Cultural History of Early Modern Inquiry ----- “This is a pioneering work that constitutes a really important contribution to book history and Enlightenment studies.”—Elizabeth L. Eisenstein, University of Michigan
books  18thC  Enlightenment  Scottish_Enlightenment  publishing  public_sphere  Britain  US_history  Ireland  Scotland  intellectual_history  cultural_history  tolerance  EF-add 
august 2013 by dunnettreader
Kevin McKenna: Scotland has the most inequitable land ownership in the west. Why? | Guardian August 2013
Andy Wightman is author of The Poor Had No Lawyers: Who Owns Scotland (and How They Got It), which has become the primer for those who had always felt something was never quite right about such a concentration of land and unearned privilege in the hands of so few. His book gives depth and academic rigour to the arguments of those seeking meaningful land reform."The land on which many of our lairds sit was stolen in the 17th century," he says. "But these ill-gotten gains were protected by acts which maintained their hegemony after the rest of Europe ditched feudalism and concentrated land ownership."He describes how the aristocracy embraced the 1560 Reformation as a means of getting their hands on land belonging to the "Auld Kirk". They needed to protect their stolen goods with a robust law. The Act of Prescription (1617) did the trick. Thus any land occupied for 40 years or more was indemnified from future legal challenge. The law remains in place and has effectively upheld the gentry's rights to stolen goods for 400 years.
16thC  17thC  18thC  social_history  Scotland  Reformation  Kirk  aristocracy  landowners  UK_politics  EF-add 
august 2013 by dunnettreader

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