dunnettreader + royal_society   32

Joanna Picciotto - Reforming the Garden: The Experimentalist Eden and "Paradise Lost" (2005) | JSTOR - ELH
ELH, Vol. 72, No. 1 (Spring, 2005), pp. 23-78 -- very long article with vast numbers of references to literary, naturao philosophy, and religious works of 17thC and early 18thC plus lit survey of work on sociology of knowledge, English lit since the cultural turn, and religious culture. Downloaded pdf to Note
article  jstor  intellectual_history  religious_history  cultural_history  17thC  18thC  British_history  English_lit  experimental_philosophy  Bacon  Boyle  Locke  Milton  Royal_Society  Evelyn  religious_culture  religious_lit  sociology_of_knowledge  sociology_of_science_&_technology  microscope  Scientific_Revolution  scientific_culture  science-and-religion  scientific_method  curiosity  Fall  original_sin  Paradise_Lost  improvement  instruments  Hooke  Donne  poetry  virtuosos  epistemology  virtue_epistemology  nature-mastery  bibliography  downloaded 
november 2015 by dunnettreader
Paul Faulkner - Two-Stage Reliabilism, Virtue Reliabilism, Dualism and the Problem of Sufficiency « Social Epistemology Review and Reply Collective 2 (8): 121-138 (2013)
University of Sheffield -- Special Issue 2: On the Future Direction of Social Epistemology -- Social epistemology should be truth-centred, argues Goldman. Social epistemology should capture the ‘logic of everyday practices’ and describe socially ‘situated’ reasoning, says Fuller. Starting from Goldman’s vision of epistemology, this paper aims to argue for Fuller’s contention. Social epistemology cannot focus solely on the truth because the truth can be got in lucky ways. The same too could be said for reliability. Adding a second layer of epistemic evaluation helps only insofar as the reasons thus specified are appropriately connected to reliability. These claims are first made in abstract, and then developed with regard to our practice of trusting testimony, where an epistemological investigation into the grounds of reliability must inevitably detail the ‘logic of everyday practices’. -- looks like interesting fit with the virtue focus and collective knowledge practices of Boyle, Locke et al -- downloaded pdf to Note
article  epistemology  epistemology-social  analytical_philosophy  sociology_of_knowledge  sociology_of_science  reliabilism  testimony  evidence  Royal_Society  Boyle  Locke  empiricism  virtue_epistemology  downloaded  EF-add 
november 2014 by dunnettreader
The Works of John Locke, vol. 9 (Letters and Misc. Works) - Online Library of Liberty
Letters in Latin reflecting correspondence in Republic of Letters; miscellaneous writings on topics he was interested in, including viticulture for the 1st Earl of Shaftesbury, a history of navigation, and his book collection Of particular interest, a collection published in 1719 - A COLLECTION OF SEVERAL PIECES OF Mr. JOHN LOCKE. published by Mr. DESMAIZEAUX, under the direction of ANTHONY COLLINS, Esq. *-* THE character of Mr. Locke, by Mr. Peter Coste. *-* The fundamental constitutions of Carolina. *-* A letter from a person of quality to his friend in the country; giving an account of the debates and resolutions of the house of lords, in April and May 1675, concerning a bill, intitled, “An act to prevent the dangers which may arise from persons disaffected to the government.” *-* Remarks upon some of Mr. Norris’s books, wherein he asserts F. Malebranche’s opinion of “our seeing all things in God.” *-* A letter to Mr. Oldenburg, secretary to the Royal Society. *-* Letters to Anthony Collins, Esq. *-* A letter to * * * on Dr. Pococke. *-* Letters to the Rev. Mr. Richard King. *-* Rules of a society which met once a week, for their improvement in useful knowledge, and for the promoting of truth and christian charity --- in Vol 2 of this edition, Elements of natural philosophy. *-* Some thoughts concerning reading and study for a gentleman. -- downloaded mobi to Note
books  etexts  downloaded  Liberty_Fund  intellectual_history  17thC  18thC  Locke  natural_philosophy  political_philosophy  British_history  British_politics  Restoration  colonialism  American_colonies  Carolina  constitutions  Republic_of_Letters  Royal_Society  Collins_Anthony  Malebranche  ideas-theories  Whigs  Charles_II  James_II  Shaftesbury_1st_Earl  maritime_history  epistemology  free-thinkers  House_of_Lords  opposition 
august 2014 by dunnettreader
J. V. Golinski - A Noble Spectacle: Phosphorus and the Public Cultures of Science in the Early Royal Society | JSTOR: Isis, Vol. 80, No. 1 (Mar., 1989), pp. 11-39
Huge bibliography of both primary and secondary literature -- chemistry and link to medicine were important for experimental_philosophy, but the flashiness of experiments for the public could both attract public interest and provide ammunition for enemies -- downloaded pdf to Note
article  jstor  intellectual_history  history_of_science  17thC  British_history  Royal_Society  sociology_of_knowledge  experimental_philosophy  natural_philosophy  medicine  chemistry  magic  alchemy  Boyle  Hooke  Harvey  science-public  scientific_culture  Scientific_Revolution  bibliography  downloaded  EF-add 
january 2014 by dunnettreader
Eva Botella-Ordinas - DEBATING EMPIRES, INVENTING EMPIRES: British Territorial Claims Against the Spaniards in America, 1670—1714 | JSTOR: Journal for Early Modern Cultural Studies, Vol. 10, No. 1 (SPRING/SUMMER 2010), pp. 142-168
This essay analyzes the Spanish-British political debate over the right to fell logwood and for the dominion of the Yucatan. It contextualizes archival material as well as printed treatises written by Britons who were engaged in the debate and who gave origin to the ideology of the British Empire before the Union (1707). These writers were members of the Council of Trade and Plantations and of the Royal Society, and they had not only domestic interests but also direct private interests either in the West or the East Indies. John Locke is the main figure in this debate and his concept of property is revised within this new context. Locke and other fellows of the Royal Society and King's councilors argued in favor of British possession of American lands claimed by Spain. Using natural law and political and theological arguments to claim that Spain was unable to improve nature, they described the Spanish as a declining and backward empire and created a successful imperial ideology to bring domestic homogeneity and stability in turbulent times. -- downloaded pdf to Note
article  jstor  17thC  18thC  British_history  British_politics  British_Empire  Anglo-Spanish  Spanish_Empire  Atlantic  Royal_Society  Board_of_Trade  Locke  natural_law  property  dominion  West_Indies  Genesis  Biblical_exegesis  Church_of_England  missionaries  American_colonies  colonialism  imperialism  downloaded  EF-add 
january 2014 by dunnettreader
Adrian Johns - Identity, Practice, and Trust in Early Modern Natural Philosophy | JSTOR: The Historical Journal, Vol. 42, No. 4 (Dec., 1999), pp. 1125-1145
Historians of early modern science face a serious problem, in that there was no science in early modern society. There were, however, other enterprises in the early modern period devoted to the understanding and manipulation of the physical world. This review identifies important trends in historians' attempts to comprehend those enterprises. In particular, it identifies four leading currents. The first is the move to characterize these different enterprises themselves, and in particular to understand natural philosophy and the mathematical sciences as distinct practical endeavours. The second is the attention now being paid to the social identity of the investigator of nature. The third is the attempt to understand the history of science as a history of practical enterprises rather than propositions or theories. The fourth, finally, is the understanding of natural knowledge in terms of systems of trust, and in particular in terms of the credit vested in rival claimants. In a combination of these, the review suggests, lies a future for a discipline that has otherwise lost its subject. -- didn't download
article  jstor  historiography  intellectual_history  history_of_science  sociology_of_knowledge  historical_sociology  17thC  18thC  Scientific_Revolution  science-and-religion  technology  Innovation  Royal_Society  Republic_of_Letters  natural_philosophy  mathematics  mechanism  corpuscular  EF-add 
january 2014 by dunnettreader
J. R. Jacob - Boyle's Atomism and the Restoration Assault on Pagan Naturalism | JSTOR: Social Studies of Science, Vol. 8, No. 2 (May, 1978), pp. 211-233
This paper places Boyle's atomism in its social context, and describes the political motives which underlay it. Boyle's physico-theology was designed to answer the ideological challenges thrown up by the turbulent events of mid-seventeenth-century England. After the Restoration, Boyle and the Royal Society continued to use his natural philosophy to this end. One important example is Boyle's A Free Enquiry... (written in 1666, but not published until 1686). This addresses itself to the heretical implications of scholastic natural philosophy. Scholasticism, argues Boyle, assumes a universe in which a purposive rationality works quite apart from God and divine providence, and in which there is no distinction between 'nature' and 'providence'; this may lead to some form of 'paganizing naturalism', and so must be overthrown. Boyle's strategy is first to show that the scholastic conception is not scientifically valid, and then to offer his corpuscular philosophy as a superior alternative. However, Boyle's real enemy was not scholastic theory per se, but those who relied on it - papists and paganizing deists. In showing that both cherished outmoded assumptions about nature, Boyle attacked both kinds of idolatry simultaneously. The timing of the appearance of A Free Enquiry also added to its effectiveness as a shrewd piece of Anglican apologetics. It was published just when, because of James II's religious policy, the threat of subversion by papists and 'atheists' bulked larger than ever before in the minds of Anglican churchmen. -- extensive bibliography -- didn't download
article  jstor  intellectual_history  history_of_science  religious_history  church_history  natural_philosophy  17thC  Boyle  corpuscular  experimental_philosophy  Royal_Society  pagans  Deism  scholastics  anti-Catholic  natural_religion  Providence  God-attributes  bibliography  EF-add 
january 2014 by dunnettreader
Mark Jenner - The Politics of London Air John Evelyn's Fumifugium and the Restoration | JSTOR: The Historical Journal, Vol. 38, No. 3 (Sep., 1995), pp. 535-551
Historians have commonly described John Evelyn's pamphlet about London smoke pollution, Fumifugium, as a precocious example of environmental concern. This paper argues that such an interpretation is too simple. Evelyn's proposals are shown to be closely related to political allegory and the panegyrics written to welcome the newly restored Charles II. However, the paper also shows that Fumifugium was not simply a literary conceit; rather it exemplified the mid-seventeenth-century English interest in the properties of air that is visible in both the Hartlib circle and the early Royal Society. --didn't download
article  jstor  political_history  political_culture  history_of_science  British_history  Restoration  environment  London  pollution  natural_philosophy  experimental_philosophy  Hartlib_Circle  Royal_Society  Evelyn  bibliography  EF-add 
january 2014 by dunnettreader
Rhoda Rappaport - Hooke on Earthquakes: Lectures, Strategy and Audience | JSTOR: The British Journal for the History of Science, Vol. 19, No. 2 (Jul., 1986), pp. 129-146
Separating Hooke's prescient geology and fossil theories from his other speculative evidence, his manner of presentation etc -- an interesting angle on the scientific culture and social processes of knowledge production and communication
article  jstor  17thC  British_history  cultural_history  intellectual_history  history_of_science  Scientific_Revolution  Hooke  geology  paleontology  cosmology  sociology_of_knowledge  Royal_Society  virtuosos  EF-add 
january 2014 by dunnettreader
Issue TOC - Science and Civilization under William and Mary | JSTOR: Notes and Records of the Royal Society of London, Vol. 43, No. 2, Jul., 1989
TOC -- (1) The Crown, the Public and the New Science, 1689-1702 (pp. 99-116) M. C. W. Hunter. (2) William III and His Two Navies (pp. 117-132) J. R. Bruijn. (3) 'Bright Enough for All Our Purposes': John Locke's Conception of a Civilized Society (pp. 133-153) J. M. Dunn. (4) Clockmaking in Britain and the Netherlands (pp. 155-165)
J. H. Leopold. (5) The Glorious Revolution and Medicine in Britain and the Netherlands (pp. 167-190) Simon Schaffer. (6) Leeuwenhoek and Other Dutch Correspondents of the Royal Society (pp. 191-207) L. C. Palm. (7) Christiaan Huygens and Newton's Theory of Gravitation (pp. 209-222) H. A. M. Snelders. (8) Huygens' 'Traité de la Lumière' and Newton's 'Opticks': Pursuing and Eschewing Hypotheses (pp. 223-247) A. E. Shapiro. (9) The Leeuwenhoek Lecture, 1988. Antoni van Leeuwenhoek 1632-1723 (pp. 249-273) A. R. Hall
article  jstor  intellectual_history  sociology_of_knowledge  history_of_science  science-and-politics  17thC  18thC  British_history  Dutch  Glorious_Revolution  Republic_of_Letters  Royal_Society  community-virtual  Locke  British_Navy  William_III  Nine_Years_War  technology  instruments  Huygens  Newton  medicine  university  optics  EF-add 
january 2014 by dunnettreader
Adrian Johns - Miscellaneous Methods: Authors, Societies and Journals in Early Modern England | JSTOR: The British Journal for the History of Science, Vol. 33, No. 2 (Jun., 2000), pp. 159-186
Historians of science have long acknowledged the important role that journals play in the scientific enterprise. They both secure the shared values of a scientific community and certify what that community takes to be licensed knowledge. The advent of the first learned periodicals in the mid-seventeenth century was therefore a major event. But why did this event happen when it did, and how was the permanence of the learned journal secured? This paper reveals some of the answers. It examines the shifting fortunes of one of the earliest of natural-philosophical periodicals, the "Philosophical Transactions," launched in London in 1665 by Henry Oldenburg. The paper shows how fraught the enterprise of journal publishing was in the Europe of that period, and, not least, it draws attention to a number of publications that arose out of the commercial realm of the Restoration to rival (or parody) Oldenburg's now famous creation. By doing so it helps restore to view the hard work that underpinned the republic of letters. -- didn't download
article  jstor  intellectual_history  history_of_science  17thC  Royal_Society  Republic_of_Letters  journals-academic  publishing  satire-and-science  professionalization  academies  bibliography  EF-add 
january 2014 by dunnettreader
Introduction by Richard Sorrenson to Issue: Did the Royal Society Matter in the 18thC? | JSTOR: The British Journal for the History of Science, Vol. 32, No. 2 (Jun., 1999), pp. 130-132
Nice overview of utility how Royal Society saw itself and others saw it -- to society, to the state, sociability of clubs, interest in "wonder" of natural world, and reputation and acknowledgement local and international. Ftnts have good recent works.
article  jstor  intellectual_history  cultural_history  history_of_science  18thC  British_history  Royal_Society  clubs  sociability  Republic_of_Letters  experimental_philosophy  natural_history  virtuosos  Newtonian  technology  academies  EF-add 
january 2014 by dunnettreader
Al Coppola - Retraining the Virtuoso's Gaze: Behn's "Emperor of the Moon," the Royal Society, and the Spectacles of Science and Politics | JSTOR: Eighteenth-Century Studies, Vol. 41, No. 4 (Summer, 2008), pp. 481-506
Aphra Behn's The Emperor of the Moon (1687), so often marginalized in the wealth of recent criticism of her later career, is a savvy deconstruction of what the author calls-adapting Paula Backscheider's account of Restoration politics-a culture of spectacle in the post-Plot years, in which the feverish political speculations of Whigs and Tories, popular natural philosophy, and "non-rational" entertainments like opera and comedia dell'arte were inextricably enmeshed. A satiric restaging of John Dryden's Albion and Albanius, Behn's farce deliberately stimulates her audience's uncritical wonder in order to retrain it, a strategy it shares with the Musaeum Regalis Societatis. -- downloaded pdf to Note
article  jstor  cultural_history  political_history  British_politics  17thC  theatre-Restoration  Behn  Dryden  Royal_Society  experimental_philosophy  virtuosos  James_II  public_opinion  Tories  Whigs  political_culture  political_spectacle  popular_politics  opera  downloaded  EF-add 
january 2014 by dunnettreader
Richard F. Jones: Science and Criticism in the Neo-Classical Age of English Literature | JSTOR: Journal of the History of Ideas, Vol. 1, No. 4 (Oct., 1940), pp. 381-412
Develops ideas from his 1936 book on the Ancients v Moderns and background to Battle of the Books - contrasting Baconian scepticism and mentality of experimental discovery with the purported iron rules of Aristotle and English literature as influenced by French neoclassical criticism. Dryden as major example of tension between the two mentalities. -- downloaded pdf to Note
article  jstor  intellectual_history  literary_history  lit_crit  Scientific_Revolution  British_history  English_lit  Royal_Society  Dryden  poetry  neoclassical  French_lit  Ancients_v_Moderns  downloaded  EF-add 
january 2014 by dunnettreader
Charles W. J. Withers and Robert J. Mayhew - Rethinking 'Disciplinary' History: Geography in British Universities, c.1580-1887 | JSTOR: Transactions of the Institute of British Geographers, New Series, Vol. 27, No. 1 (2002), pp. 11-29
Downloaded pdf to Note -- Against a background of recent work in the history of geography and of geographical knowledge, the paper considers evidence for the place of geography within British universities before the formal establishment of the first departments of geography. Attention is paid to geography's discursive connections with other subjects within given university curricula, and to the values placed upon its teaching by contemporaries. The paper argues that extant historiographies for British geography should be revised in the light of such evidence. More importantly, the paper raises questions about the sites and intellectual spaces in which geography has been situated and about the content, nature and purpose of writing geography's 'disciplinary' history.
article  jstor  intellectual_history  16thC  17thC  18thC  19thC  British_history  British_Empire  colonialism  exploration  public_sphere  university  history_of_science  geography  sociology_of_knowledge  education  Royal_Society  military_history  maps  downloaded  EF-add 
december 2013 by dunnettreader
Gregory Lynall: Swift and Science: The Satire, Politics and Theology of Natural Knowledge, 1690-1730 (2012) Kindle Store
It is often thought that Jonathan Swift was vehemently opposed to the new science that heralded the beginning of the modern age, but this book interrogates that assumption, bringing new perspectives to his most famous works, and making a case for the intellectual importance of some of his more neglected poems and prose satires. Lynall's study traces the theological, political, and socio-cultural resonances of scientific knowledge in the early eighteenth century, and considers what they can reveal about the growth of Swift's imagination. Taking us to a universe made from clothes, to a place where flowers can talk and men are only trees turned upside down, to an island that hovers high in the clouds, and to a library where a spider predicts how the world will end, the book shows how satire can be an active and unique participant in cultural debates about the methods and purposes of scientific enquiry.
books  kindle-available  18thC  history_of_science  intellectual_history  cultural_history  scientism  Scientific_Revolution  Royal_Society  epistemology  imagination  satire  Swift  EF-add 
september 2013 by dunnettreader
P. Fontes da Costa: The Culture of Curiosity at The Royal Society in the First Half of the Eighteenth Century (2002)
JSTOR: Notes and Records of the Royal Society of London, Vol. 56, No. 2 (May, 2002), pp. 147-166 -- This paper is concerned with the reporting and display of curiosities of nature at the meetings of The Royal Society during the first half of the eighteenth century. It is argued that these activities cannot, as some historians have maintained, be viewed as a mere opportunity for the entertainment of the Fellows. Instead, the reports and exhibitions fulfilled multiple roles, including the promotion of inquiry, education, polite discourse, as well as entertainment, aspects that were intimately connected during that period. Some of the individual and collective interests involved in the reporting and display of curiosities of nature at the Society are also discussed. It is argued that these interests should be considered within the broad context of the culture of curiosity at The Royal Society in this period.
article  jstor  intellectual_history  history_of_science  sociology_of_knowledge  cultural_history  18thC  Britain  Royal_Society  EF-add 
september 2013 by dunnettreader
Bernard Fay: Learned Societies in Europe and America in the Eighteenth Century (1932)
JSTOR: The American Historical Review, Vol. 37, No. 2 (Jan., 1932), pp. 255-266 -- highlights importance of Freemasonry -- suggests 2 streams of Freemasonry in 18thC (1) learning and useful knowledge (stress useful - Ramsay may have been a long-time promoter, since 1730s, of Encyclopédie type project) and (2) mystic with alchemy focus. Focus on local societies on both sides of Atlantic with lists and dates formed. Contrast with more formal and "rigid" scientific Royal Society.
article  jstor  18thC  intellectual_history  cultural_history  Enlightenment  French_Enlightenment  Enlightenment-American  Scottish_Enlightenment  Britain  France  American_colonies  academies  Royal_Society  Encyclopédie  learned_societies  Republic_of_Letters  history_of_science  technology  Freemasonry  Franklin_Ben  Ramsay  EF-add 
september 2013 by dunnettreader
Paula Findlen: Founding a Scientific Academy: Gender, Patronage and Knowledge in Early Eighteenth-Century Milan | Republics of Letters: A Journal for the Study of Knowledge, Politics, and the Arts
Citation: Findlen, Paula. “Founding a Scientific Academy: Gender, Patronage and Knowledge in Early Eighteenth-Century Milan.” Republics of Letters: A Journal for the Study of Knowledge, Politics, and the Arts 1, no. 1 (May 1, 2009): http://rofl.stanford.edu/node/33. IN "Rethinking the Republic of Letters" issue -- downloaded pdf to Note -- By the eighteenth century the Cimento was as a symbolic point of departure for the idea of founding an academy that would restore Italy’s greatness through the pursuit of modern knowledge..... as the great librarian, historian, and guardian of Italy’s intellectual heritage Ludovico Antonio Muratori (1672-1750) noted with disgust in 1704, in his day virtually every Italian city had “an academy, indeed two, three or sometimes even more”—but to what end? In his famous account of the Italian republic of letters, First Sketches of the Republic of Letters of Italy, written under the pseudonym of Lamindio Pritanio, Muratori described the decline of Italy’s academies since the era of the Cimento. .... [Queen Christina] was widely regarded as a great patron of science. Yet these activities had been eclipsed by the creation of the Accademia degli Arcadi, a literary academy founded in Rome in 1690 which claimed Queen Christina as its posthumous patron and rapidly established colonies throughout the Italian peninsula...... The success of Arcadia at the expense of other kinds of scholarly initiatives at the dawn of the eighteenth century was the focal point of Muratori’s condemnation of the current state of the Italian academies and his call for the emergence of a new kind of patron. Grillo Borromeo’s decision to create an academy in Palazzo Borromeo was an attempt to redress this imbalance while also highlighting the prominent role that learned women might play in this new vision of the republic of letters.
article  intellectual_history  cultural_history  17thC  18thC  Enlightenment  academies  Royal_Society  Italy  Milan  Florence  Rome  patronage  Republic_of_Letters  women-intellectuals  Scientific_Revolution  natural_philosophy  poetry  belles-lettres  downloaded  EF-add 
september 2013 by dunnettreader
Joseph Toy Curtiss: Butler's Sidrophel (1929)
JSTOR: PMLA, Vol. 44, No. 4 (Dec., 1929), pp. 1066-1078 -- cultural clues to the key to identities in Hudibras -Sidrophel is astrologer character in later part
article  jstor  English_lit  satire  17thC  Restoration  cultural_history  culture_wars  astrology  Royal_Society  witchcraft  EF-add 
september 2013 by dunnettreader
Laura Linker: Cultivating Philosophy in the 18th-Century Epicurean Garden | 18thC Commons May 2013
Essay on late 17thC Epicureanism and the philosophy of gardens - highlights Sir William Temple. Also interest of Royal Society, not just corpuscularian physics but anatomy, animal spirits, and body and soul connection. Nice links.
British_history  intellectual_history  17thC  Epicurean  gardens  Royal_Society  EF-add 
august 2013 by dunnettreader
Halley's Log | Capt Edmond Halley's logs from HMS Paramore 1698-1701
Edmond Halley FRS (1656–1742) was an astronomer and mathematician, whose work ranged across physics, barometry, meteorology, hydrology, cartography and geophysics. More surprisingly perhaps, he was also a sea captain, undertaking three voyages for scientific purposes between 1698 and 1701.

This blog is a companion to the Twitter feed of the manuscript logs of Edmond Halley’s three voyages in the Paramore and provides background information to the feed (@HalleysLog). The blog and feed are run by Kate Morant (@KateMorant).

Halley was elected Clerk to the Royal Society in 1686, and in 1687 he oversaw – and paid for – the publication of Newton’s Philosophiae Naturalis Principia Mathematica.He served in the regional mint at Chester during the Great Recoinage of the 1690s and in 1698 he set out on the first of his three voyages in HMS Paramore. At the end of these, Halley was soon travelling again, undertaking two missions to survey sites and oversee construction of harbour fortifications in the Adriatic.

In January 1704, Halley was elected Savilian Professor of Geometry at Oxford, and so returned to more scholarly pursuits; he was awarded an honorary Doctor of Civil Laws degree by the university in 1710.

In a paper published in 1705, Astronomiae Cometicae Synopsis, Halley proposed that the comets of 1531, 1607 and 1682 were one and the same and predicted that it would return in 1758. It did, and ever since has been popularly known as ‘Halley’s Comet’ (official designation 1P/Halley).

In 1713 Halley was elected Secretary of the Royal Society, and in 1720 he succeeded John Flamsteed as Astronomer Royal at Greenwich.
British_history  17thC  18thC  Scientific_Revolution  academies  astronomy  British_Navy  exploration  Newton  Tories  Royal_Society  EF-add 
july 2013 by dunnettreader

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