dunnettreader + republic_of_letters   48

Harold Samuel Stone - Vico's Cultural History: The Production and Transmission of Ideas in Naples ...(1997) - Google Books
Based on a U of Chicago thesis supervised by Stephen Toulmin.
A study of the cultural world of Giambattista Vico, one of the most creative social theorists of the eighteenth century. Based on extensive manuscript as well as printed materials, and relying on the methods of book and publishing history, this volume describes Vico's intellectual community. Special attention is paid to the interaction between scholars and Naples' vibrant operatic and artistic community. The first part of the book investigates a controversy concerning an inquisitorial investigation, Neapolitan travel literature, the papers of a scientific academy, and the patronage system for book publication. The second part describes the cultural context of Vico's writings and especially the three editions of "The New Science," This work explains the accomplishments that made Naples one of the great cultural centers of the early Enlightenment.
Habsburgs  Papacy  Cartesians  intellectual_history  18thC  cultural_history  War_of_Spanish_Succession  atomism  patronage  Bourbons  17thC  Italy  Enlightenment  Deism  Naples  books  Republic_of_Letters  Inquisition  history_of_book  Vico 
may 2016 by dunnettreader
THE WARBURG INSTITUTE: Translation
Translation and the Circulation of Knowledge in Early Modern Science

Friday 28 June 2013
Programme - Poster

In recent decades, scholars have offered myriad new insights into the exchange and propagation of scientific ideas in the early modern Republic of Letters. Within this vibrant field, however, the part played by translation and translators remains little studied. This colloquium will explore the role of translation in early modern science, providing a forum for discussion about translations as well as the translators, mediators, agents, and interpreters whose role in the intellectual history of the period remains ill defined and deserves greater attention.

Organized by: Sietske Fransen (Warburg Institute) and Niall Hodson (Durham University)

Keynote speaker: Sven Dupré (Max Planck Institute for the History of Science and Freie Universität Berlin)

Speakers: Felicity Henderson (Royal Society), Charles van den Heuvel (Huygens ING), Niall Hodson (Durham University), Ana Carolina Hosne (Ruprecht-Karls-Universität Heidelberg), Jan van de Kamp (Independent), Clare Griffin (UCL), Margaret O. Meredith (Maastricht University), José Maria Pérez Fernandez (Universidad de Granada), Iolanda Plescia (Sapienza – Università di Roma), Fabien Simon (Université Paris Diderot – Paris 7)
history_of_science  conference  sociology_of_knowledge  video  YouTube  networks-information  translation  Republic_of_Letters  17thC  intellectual_history  natural_philosophy 
december 2015 by dunnettreader
Martin Mulsow - Enlightenment Underground: Radical Germany, 1680-1720, trans., H. C. Erik Midelfort (2015) | Amazon.com
Martin Mulsow’s seismic reinterpretation of the origins of the Enlightenment in Germany won awards and renown in its original German edition, and now H. C. Erik Midelfort's translation makes this sensational book available to English-speaking readers. Mulsow shows that even in the late17thC some thinkers in Germany ventured to express extremely dangerous ideas, but did so as part of a secret underground. Scouring manuscript collections across northern Europe, Mulsow studied the writings of countless hitherto unknown radical jurists, theologians, historians, and dissident students who pushed for the secularization of legal, political, social, and religious knowledge. Often their works circulated in manuscript, anonymously, or as clandestinely published books. Working as a philosophical microhistorian, Mulsow has discovered the identities of several covert radicals and linked them to circles of young German scholars, many of whom were connected with the vibrant radical cultures of the Netherlands, England, and Denmark. The author reveals how radical ideas and contributions to intellectual doubt came from Socinians and Jews, church historians and biblical scholars, political theorists, and unemployed university students. He shows that misreadings of humorous or ironic works sometimes gave rise to unintended skeptical thoughts or corrosively political interpretations of Christianity. This landmark book overturns stereotypical views of the early Enlightenment in Germany as cautious, conservative, and moderate, and replaces them with a new portrait that reveals a movement far more radical, unintended, and puzzling than previously suspected. -- November release date
books  kindle-available  intellectual_history  17thC  18thC  Enlightenment  Radical_Enlightenment  Germany  Republic_of_Letters  Socinians  political_philosophy  Biblical_criticism  secularization  heterodoxy  historiography  microhistory  publishing-clandestine  scepticism  1680s  1690s  1700s  1710s  circulation-ideas 
september 2015 by dunnettreader
Michael Kwass, review essay - Reassessing Enlightenment Economics - Reinert's "Translating Empire" | Books & ideas - 25 March 2013
Reviewed: Sophus A. Reinert, Translating Empire: Emulation and the Origins of Political Economy. Harvard University Press, 438 pp - Resurrecting the life of John Cary’s Essay on the State of England, a book which travelled all over Europe throughout the 18th century, S.A. Reinert challenges our understanding of Enlightenment economics, while calling for a more nuanced and historically-informed understanding of political economy in general. (..) By resurrecting the life of a text that scholars have dismissed as “mercantilist” and repositioning that work at the center of 18th-century political economy, Reinert challenges our basic understanding of Enlightenment economics, so often reduced to the free-trade doctrines of the physiocrats and Adam Smith. He argues that the diffusion of Cary’s work demonstrates that state-centered approaches to the creation of wealth enjoyed wide resonance at the very moment when discussions of economic policy were expanding beyond state chambers to engage a broader public. Far from being eclipsed by theories of laissez-faire economics, as conventional histories of economic thought would have us believe, such approaches became “the absolute mainstream in Europe” by the late 18th century -- downloaded pdf to Note
books  reviews  kindle  18thC  economic_history  intellectual_history  intellectual_history-distorted  political_economy  Enlightenment  economic_theory  mercantilism  laisser-faire  Physiocrats  Smith  British_history  British_foreign_policy  nation-state  economic_growth  development  public_policy  public_goods  government-roles  Italy  Austria  Germany  readership  history_of_book  print_culture  information-intermediaries  networks-information  networks-business  networks-policy  Republic_of_Letters  downloaded 
july 2015 by dunnettreader
Christophe Litwin, review essay - Stéphane Van Damme on Living the Enlightenment | Books & ideas -- French original June 2014, translation May 2015 by Michael C. Behrent
Original French http://www.laviedesidees.fr/La-vie-des-Lumieres.html -- Stéphane Van Damme, À toutes voiles vers la vérité [On Course to the Truth]: Une autre histoire de la philosophie au temps des Lumières, Seuil, 2014, 386 p., 24 €.Van Damme’s project is to write an alternative history of philosophy (...) not by writing a history of ideas, but rather a “historian’s history” of philosophy. Rather than beginning with a canonical body of texts or doctrines (the selection of which is frequently incomplete or ideological), Van Damme, building on Bruno Latour’s work in the history of science and Antoine Lilti’s and Etienne Anheim’s work in the journal Annales, (and..) the historical geographer Jean-Marc Besse, approaches the history of philosophy in a manner that is decidedly contextual, material, and pragmatic. Unlike literature, art, and science, Van Damme notes, philosophy had, until the past decade, largely avoided cultural history’s probing gaze. (..) the recent literature in the field is daunting—(see the..)abundant critical and bibliographical apparatus (305-375)—a history of philosophy conceived as an early modern cultural practice had yet to be written. Where, when, how, and in what circumstances were the activities we refer to by such terms as “knowing,” “living philosophically,” “being a philosopher,” and “teaching,” “doing,” “reading,” and “writing” philosophy practiced? Can the tools and methods of cultural history offer insight, in this way, into Enlightenment philosophy’s distinctive “truth regime”? (..)This pragmatic approach covers a remarkably wide range of topics and methodologies (many in) previously published articles (organized..) by situating philosophical practice in 3 types of spaces: the public sphere, geography, and politics. -- downloaded pdf to Note for both languages
books  reviews  amazon.fr  buy  intellectual_history  cultural_history  18thC  France  Enlightenment  Republic_of_Letters  public_sphere  geography  political_history  political_culture  sociology_of_knowledge  philosophy  philosophy_of_science  philosophy_of_history  natural_philosophy  epistemology  epistemology-social  bibliography  downloaded 
june 2015 by dunnettreader
L'Europe des Lumières - Classiques Garnier - collection directors Michel Delon, Jacques Berchtold et Christophe Martin
De ce qu'on appelle la crise de la conscience européenne à la Révolution française, la littérature et la pensée ont pour espace une Europe, souvent francophone, éprise d'idées nouvelles et d'expérimentations formelles. La collection rend compte de recherches qui sollicitent des disciplines et des méthodes diverses pour mieux connaître et comprendre la vie intellectuelle, scientifique, artistique et littéraire du XVIIIe siècle, ainsi que l'histoire des idées et des représentations. -- From what has been designated as a "crisis of conscience" to the Revolution, literature and thought play in a European space, often French-speaking, entranced by new ideas and formal experiments. The collection covers research which calls on a variety of disciplines and methods in order to better know and understand the intellectual, scientific, artistic and literary life of the 18th century, as well as the history of ideas and representations.
books  18thC  Europe-Early_Modern  Enlightenment  French_Enlightenment  intellectual_history  history_of_science  philosophy_of_science  sociology_of_knowledge  natural_philosophy  art_history  literary_history  Scientific_Revolution  scientific_culture  philosophes  Republic_of_Letters  public_sphere  publishing 
may 2015 by dunnettreader
Caroline Jacot Grapa - Dans le vif du sujet - Diderot, corps et âme ( 2009) | Classiques Garnier - collection L'Europe des Lumières
Ce livre est un essai sur le style du matérialisme de Diderot, sa psychologie, sa métaphysique et sur les figures de l'intériorité des Lumières. La langue de l'intériorité, apanage de la spiritualité, se retrempe au contact sensible des métaphores de l'époque. Elles donnent accès à un savoir nouveau de la vie corporelle. L'actualité de cet essai tient au dialogue qu'il engage avec la phénoménologie et les neurosciences. -- This work is an essay on the style of Diderot's materialism, his psychology and his metaphysics. Its modern pertinence stems from the dialogue established with phenomenology and neurosciences. -- ISBN 978-2-8124-0046-9 -- 504 pages -- looks extremely interesting -- tracking reception of British empiricism, debates over various Cartesian proposals for dealing with animals, and the new directions taken both in life sciences and psychology and the metaphysics of materialism -- downloaded TOC as pdf to Note
books  find  amazon.fr  libraries  intellectual_history  history_of_science  philosophy_of_science  natural_philosophy  18thC  France  Diderot  d'Alembert  d'Holbach  Cartesian  Locke  Newton  Newtonian  Encyclopédie  Republic_of_Letters  philosophes  Scientific_Revolution  Enlightenment  French_Enlightenment  Vitalism  psychology  thinking_matter  anatomy  physiology  scientific_method  organism  subject  subjectivity  phenomenology  neuroscience  materialism  metaphysics  mind  mind-body  soul  human_nature  metaphor  French_language  French_lit  downloaded 
may 2015 by dunnettreader
Marc Fumaroli -- Le siècle des Lumières et la naissance du "néoclassicisme" | Canal Académie 2011
Interview (mp3) and article by Canal summarizing points he makes in his introductory essay for the exhibition catalog -- Marc Fumaroli intervient ici sur l’exposition "L’Antiquité rêvée: Innovations et résistances au XVIIIe siècle" qui se tient au musée du Louvre du 2 décembre 2010 au 14 février 2011. Elle illustre à travers un choix de plus de 150 œuvres majeures, la naissance du mouvement dit « néoclassique ». Ce retour à l’Antique fut principalement inspiré par la découverte et le retentissement des fouilles des cités antiques d’Herculanum et de Pompeï. Elles révélèrent à la fois la peinture antique et son contexte, le décor et le quotidien de la vie urbaine des anciens Romains. Nous suivons ainsi les grandes périodes correspondant aux trois principales sections de l’exposition du musée du Louvre, à savoir: I – Le RENOUVEAU du goût pour l’Antique 1730-1770 **--** II – RESISTANCES 1760-1790: Néobaroque – Néomaniérisme – Le Sublime **--** III – NEOCLASSICISMES 1770-1790. Avec, dans chaque section, beaucoup de courants et contre-courants. -- web page to Pocket, includes references to the catalog and related publications
intellectual_history  art_history  aesthetics  Renaissance  17thC  18thC  Ancients_v_Moderns  classicism  neoclassical  baroque  Rococo  painting  sculpture  Republic_of_Letters  Enlightenment  antiquity  ancient_Greece  ancient_Rome  archaeology  Pompeii  sublime  Winkleman  cultural_history  historiography-18thC  lifestyle  decorative_arts  books  museums  exhibition  audio  Pocket 
april 2015 by dunnettreader
Lucie Campos interview with Gisèle Sapiro - Geopolitics of Translation in Social Sciences and Humanities - Books & ideas - March 2015 (French original 2014)
Translated by Lucy Garnier -- Tags : translation | publishing | Bourdieu -- As publishing markets become increasingly international, sociology looks at the translation of work in the social sciences and humanities. Gisèle Sapiro shows the effects that the crossover between the academic and publishing spheres has on translation practices. -- Gisèle Sapiro is Director of the European Centre for Sociology and Political Science. She edited the collective volumes Pierre Bourdieu, sociologue (Fayard: 2004) and Pour une histoire des sciences sociales (Fayard: 2004) and has written several books of reference on the sociology of knowledge production, the intellectual field, and the international circulation of ideas, including Translatio. Le marché de la traduction en France à l’heure de la mondialisation (CNRS: 2008), Les Contradictions de la globalisation éditoriale (Nouveau Monde: 2009), and L’Espace intellectuel en Europe, XIXe-XXIe siècles: de la formation des États-nations à la mondialisation (La Découverte: 2009). The author and her research team have published a series of reports on literary exchange in the era of globalisation. After Traduire la littérature et les sciences humaines and Paris-New York the latest of these accounts, "Les Sciences humaines et sociales françaises en traduction" published online in July 2014, presents some of the directions taken by the European project she is coordinating on international cooperation in the social sciences and humanities. -' saved in Instapaper
19thC  20thC  21stC  Republic_of_Letters  intellectual_history  translation  social_theory  sociology_of_knowledge  networks  networks-information  intelligentsia  literary_theory  cultural_influence  cultural_exchange  language-national  humanities  publishing  academia  social_sciences  social_sciences-post-WWII  globalization  cosmopolitanism  circulation-ideas  Bourdieu  Foucault  Derrida  humanities-finance  social_sciences-finance  education-higher  education-finance  universal_language-Latin  universal_language-English  books  Instapaper  from instapaper
april 2015 by dunnettreader
Emmanuelle de Champs - Enlightenment and Utility: Bentham in French, Bentham in France (to be released March 2015) | Ideas in Context series | Cambridge University Press
Jeremy Bentham (..) was a seminal figure in the history of modern political thought. This lively monograph presents the numerous French connections of an emblematic British thinker. (..) Placing Bentham's thought in the context of the French-language Enlightenment through to the post-Revolutionary era, (..) the case for a historical study of 'Global Bentham'. Examining previously unpublished sources, she traces the circulation of Bentham's letters, friends, manuscripts, and books in the French-speaking world. (..) transnational intellectual history reveals how utilitarianism, as a doctrine, was both the product of, and a contribution to, French-language political thought at a key time(..). The debates (re) utilitarianism in France cast new light on the making of modern Liberalism. **--** Intro **--** Part I. An Englishman in the Republic of Letters: 1. Languages of Enlightenment *-* 2. Satire and polemics *-* 3. Defining utilitarianism: private connections and correspondence **--** Part II. 'Projet d'un corps de loix complet' and the Reform of Jurisprudence in Europe: 4. The Genesis of Projet *-* 5. Projet in Enlightenment legal thought *-* 6. The politics of legal reform **--** Part III. Reflections for the Revolution in France: 7. Frenchmen and Francophiles: Lord Lansdowne's network *-* 8. British expertise for French legislators *-* 9. Utility, rights and revolution: missed encounters? **--** Part IV. Utile Dulcis? Bentham in Paris, 1802: 10. Dumont's editorship: from the Bibliothèque Britannique to Traités de législation civile et pénale *-* 11. A mixed reception *-* 12. Autumn 1802: Bentham in Paris **--** Part V. Liberty, Utility and Rights (1815–1832): 13. 'For one disciple in this country, I have 50 at least in France' *-* 14. Utilitarian arguments in French politics *-* 15. A Utilitarian moment? French liberals and utilitarianism *-* Epilogue: Bentham in the July Revolution *-* Conclusion -- marketing materials not yet available
books  find  intellectual_history  political_philosophy  political_economy  legal_theory  18thC  19thC  British_history  France  French_Enlightenment  Enlightenment  Bentham  utilitarianism  utility  reform-political  reform-social  reform-legal  reform-economic  jurisprudence  civil_code  Republic_of_Letters  networks-policy  networks-information  Anglo-French  British_foreign_policy  diplomats  diplomacy-environment  francophile  Landsdowne_Marquis_of  faction  British_politics  patrons  patronage  elite_culture  cross-border  cultural_history  cultural_influence  technical_assistance  criminal_justice  liberalism  rights-legal  rights-political  civil_law  civil_liberties  civil_society  French_Revolutionary_Wars  Peace_of_Amiens  Napoleonic_Wars  Restoration-France  bourgeoisie  July_Monarchy  legal_reasoning  positivism-legal 
february 2015 by dunnettreader
Talal Asad - Historical notes on the idea of secular criticism « The Immanent Frame - Jan 2008
I have tried to underline the very different understandings people have had of it in Western history, understandings that can’t be reduced to the simple distinction between secular criticism (freedom and reason) and religious criticism (intolerance and obscurantism). The practice of secular criticism is now a sign of the modern, of the modern subject’s relentless pursuit of truth and freedom, of his or her political agency. It has almost become a duty, closely connected to the right to free expression and communication. But every critical discourse has institutional conditions that define what it is, what it recognizes, what it aims at, what it is destroying – and why. Neither philosophical nor literary criticism can successfully claim to be the privileged site of reason. It matters whether the criticism/critique in question is conducted in the form of parody and satire, confession of sins, political auto-critique, professional criticism, or speech under analysis. One might say that if these are all possible instances of critique/criticism, then what we have here is a family concept for which it is not possible to provide a single theory because the practices that constitute them differ radically. And yet there is, perhaps, something distinctive after all about the historical concept of “critique” that Foucault wanted to identify, something other than the varieties of critical practice to which I have pointed: In some areas of our modern life, there is the insistent demand that reasons be given for almost everything. The relation to knowledge, to action, and to other persons, that results when this demand is taken as the foundation of all understanding, is perhaps what Foucault had in mind when he spoke of critique. “The critical attitude” is the essence of secular heroism. -- downloaded page as pdf to Note
critique  intellectual_history  cultural_history  Europe-Early_Modern  science-and-religion  Scientific_Revolution  scientific_method  Popper  Kant  Foucault  secularism  secular_humanism  concepts-change  Koselleck  rhetoric  rhetoric-moral_basis  epistemology-social  scientific_culture  political_culture  authority  genealogy-method  individualism  agency  Enlightenment-ongoing  Bayle  scepticism  Republic_of_Letters  disciplines  downloaded  EF-add 
november 2014 by dunnettreader
The Works of John Locke, vol. 9 (Letters and Misc. Works) - Online Library of Liberty
Letters in Latin reflecting correspondence in Republic of Letters; miscellaneous writings on topics he was interested in, including viticulture for the 1st Earl of Shaftesbury, a history of navigation, and his book collection Of particular interest, a collection published in 1719 - A COLLECTION OF SEVERAL PIECES OF Mr. JOHN LOCKE. published by Mr. DESMAIZEAUX, under the direction of ANTHONY COLLINS, Esq. *-* THE character of Mr. Locke, by Mr. Peter Coste. *-* The fundamental constitutions of Carolina. *-* A letter from a person of quality to his friend in the country; giving an account of the debates and resolutions of the house of lords, in April and May 1675, concerning a bill, intitled, “An act to prevent the dangers which may arise from persons disaffected to the government.” *-* Remarks upon some of Mr. Norris’s books, wherein he asserts F. Malebranche’s opinion of “our seeing all things in God.” *-* A letter to Mr. Oldenburg, secretary to the Royal Society. *-* Letters to Anthony Collins, Esq. *-* A letter to * * * on Dr. Pococke. *-* Letters to the Rev. Mr. Richard King. *-* Rules of a society which met once a week, for their improvement in useful knowledge, and for the promoting of truth and christian charity --- in Vol 2 of this edition, Elements of natural philosophy. *-* Some thoughts concerning reading and study for a gentleman. -- downloaded mobi to Note
books  etexts  downloaded  Liberty_Fund  intellectual_history  17thC  18thC  Locke  natural_philosophy  political_philosophy  British_history  British_politics  Restoration  colonialism  American_colonies  Carolina  constitutions  Republic_of_Letters  Royal_Society  Collins_Anthony  Malebranche  ideas-theories  Whigs  Charles_II  James_II  Shaftesbury_1st_Earl  maritime_history  epistemology  free-thinkers  House_of_Lords  opposition 
august 2014 by dunnettreader
The Works of John Locke, vol. 2 (An Essay concerning Human Understanding Part 2 and Other Writings) [1824 edition] - Online Library of Liberty
Conclusion of the Essay plus some of his important secondary works re epistemology, education plus Elements of Natural Philosophy *--* OF THE CONDUCT of the UNDERSTANDING. *--* SOME THOUGHTS concerning READING AND STUDY for a GENTLEMAN. *--* ELEMENTS of NATURAL PHILOSOPHY. *--* A NEW METHOD of a COMMON-PLACE-BOOK. translated out of the french from the second volume of the bibliotheque universelle. -- downloaded pdf to Note
books  etexts  Liberty_Fund  downloaded  intellectual_history  17thC  18thC  Locke  epistemology  natural_philosophy  education  gentleman  methodology  scientific_method  Republic_of_Letters 
august 2014 by dunnettreader
GABY MAHLBERG - "LES JUGES JUGEZ, SE JUSTIFIANTS" (1663) AND EDMUND LUDLOW‘S PROTESTANT NETWORK IN 17thC SWITZERLAND (2014). | The Historical Journal, 57, pp 369-396. - Cambridge Journals Online - Abstract -
GABY MAHLBERG - University of Northumbria -- This article aims to locate English republican thought and writing in a wider European context and to understand the personal connections that aided the distribution and reception of English republican ideas abroad. It does so through the case-study of a little-known pamphlet published by the English regicide Edmund Ludlow during his exile in Switzerland after the restoration of the Stuart monarchy in 1660. Les juges jugez, se justifiants (1663) was a French translation of the dying speeches and other miscellaneous texts of some of the English regicides, produced in Geneva and subsequently printed in Yverdon with the help of Ludlow's local Protestant network. Rather than propagating a secular republican ideology, Ludlow offered his work to a European Protestant audience in the language of Geneva, promoting a primarily religious cause in an attempt to make martyrs out of political activists. It is therefore to Ludlow's Protestant networks that we need to turn to find out more about the transmission of English republican ideas in francophone Europe and beyond. - * The author would like to thank Cesare Cuttica, J. C. Davis, Andrew McKenzie-McHarg, and the anonymous readers at the Historical Journal for their helpful comments on earlier drafts of this article.
article  paywall  find  intellectual_history  17thC  Europe-Early_Modern  Protestant_International  republicanism  political_philosophy  British_history  British_politics  Restoration  regicide  martyrs  Geneva  France  Dutch  Huguenots  networks  networks-religious  networks-political  diffusion  Bolingbroke-family  exiles  Republic_of_Letters  EF-add 
august 2014 by dunnettreader
Jonathan Israel - “Radical Enlightenment” – Peripheral, Substantial, or the Main Face of the Trans-Atlantic Enlightenment (1650-1850) | Diametros
“Radical Enlightenment” and “moderate Enlightenment” are general categories which, it has become evident in recent decades, are unavoidable and essential for any valid discussion of the Enlightenment broadly conceived (1650-1850) and of the revolutionary era (1775-1848). Any discussion of the Enlightenment or revolutions that does not revolve around these general categories, first introduced in Germany in the 1920s and taken up in the United States since the 1970s, cannot have any validity or depth either historically or philosophically. “Radical Enlightenment” was neither peripheral to the Enlightenment as a whole, nor dominant, but rather the “other side of the coin” an inherent and absolute opposite, always present and always basic to the Enlightenment as a whole. Several different constructions of “Radical Enlightenment” have been proposed by the main innovators on the topic – Leo Strauss, Henry May, Günter Mühlpfordt, Margaret Jacob, Gianni Paganini, Martin Mulsow, and Jonathan Israel – but, it is argued here, the most essential element in the definition is the coupling, or linkage, of philosophical rejection of religious authority (and secularism - the elimination of theology from law, institutions, education and public affairs) with theoretical advocacy of democracy and basic human rights. -- Keywords - Enlightenment Radical Enlightenment moderate Enlightenment democracy aristocracy universal education equality emancipation republicanism mixed government poverty economic oppression crypto-radicalism positivism American revolution -- downloaded pdf to Note
article  intellectual_history  political_history  political_culture  politics-and-religion  historiography  economic_history  political_economy  17thC  18thC  19thC  Enlightenment  Radical_Enlightenment  French_Enlightenment  religious_culture  authority  anticlerical  Absolutism  secularism  democracy  natural_rights  civil_liberties  egalitarian  American_Revolution  French_Revolution  1848_revolutions  Spinozism  education  aristocracy  poverty  Ancien_régime  mixed_government  tolerance  positivism  natural_law  domination  republicanism  republics-Ancient_v_Modern  natural_philosophy  British_history  Dutch  Germany  Atlantic  American_colonies  Early_Republic  Republic_of_Letters  bibliography  downloaded  EF-add 
july 2014 by dunnettreader
Przemysław Gut - The Legacy of Spinoza. The Enlightenment According to Jonathan Israel | Diametros
Dr hab. Przemysław Gut, Assistant Professor, Department of the History of Modern and Contemporary Philosophy, Institute of Theoretical Philosophy, Faculty of Philosophy, The John Paul II Catholic University of Lublin -- The aim of the paper is to present and analyze the interpretation of the Enlightenment which has recently been proposed by Jonathan Israel, with the focus on its philosophical aspect as opposed to the historical one. The paper consists of two parts. The task of the first part is reconstructive: it attempts to explore Israel’s most characteristic statements concerning the Enlightenment. The second and more extensive part has a polemical character: it endeavours to furnish the reader with an answer to the question of the degree to which the understanding of the Enlightenment proposed by Israel can be considered a satisfying interpretation of this period. The paper suggests that the main problem which may undermine Israel’s account of the Enlightenment is associated with the unduly selective interpretation of Spinoza’s philosophy and its position in the intellectual society of that time. -- Keywords - Enlightenment Spinoza historiography naturalism pantheism atheism human nature -- downloaded pdf to Note
article  intellectual_history  religious_history  historiography  17thC  18thC  Enlightenment  Radical_Enlightenment  Spinoza  Spinozism  natural_philosophy  naturalism  pantheism  atheism  human_nature  political_philosophy  moral_philosophy  Republic_of_Letters  philosophes  downloaded  EF-add 
july 2014 by dunnettreader
Margaret C. Jacob - How Radical Was the Enlightenment? What Do We Mean by Radical? | Diametros
Distinguished Professor of History, UCLA Email: mjacob@history.ucla.edu
-- The Radical Enlightenment has been much discussed and its original meaning somewhat distorted. In 1981 my concept of the storm that unleashed a new, transnational intellectual movement possessed a strong contextual and political element that I believed, and still believe, to be critically important. Idealist accounts of enlightened ideas that divorce them from politics leave out the lived quality of the new radicalism born in reaction to monarchical and clerical absolutism. Taking the religious impulse seriously and working to defang it of bellicosity would require years of labor. First all the world’s religions had to be surveyed, see Picart’s seven folio volumes; and Rousseau’s Savoyard vicar had to both preach and live religion simply as true virtue; and finally Jefferson editing the Bible so as to get the irrational parts simply removed, thus making people more fit to grant a complete religious toleration. Throughout the century all these approaches to revealed religion may be legitimately described as radical. Each produced a different recommendation for its replacement. As I have now come to see, the pantheism I identified in 1981 would lead in many directions, among them lay the search to understand all human religiosity and to articulate a universal natural religion. -- Keywords - Atheism materialism absolutism French Protestant refugees Dutch cities religious toleration Bernard Picart Jonathan Israel English freethinkers Papal condemnation Rousseau pantheism Jefferson -- downloaded pdf to Note
article  intellectual_history  religious_history  cultural_history  political_history  17thC  18thC  Dutch  British_history  Enlightenment  Radical_Enlightenment  French_Enlightenment  political_culture  politics-and-religion  religion-established  religious_belief  comparative_religion  comparative_anthropology  monotheism  natural_religion  natural_philosophy  materialism  tolerance  natural_rights  naturalism  pantheism  atheism  atheism_panic  anticlerical  Absolutism  monarchy  monarchy-proprietary  publishing  public_sphere  Picart  Rousseau  Jefferson  revelation  Biblical_authority  Bible-as-history  Biblical_criticism  Huguenots  free-thinkers  Papacy  papal_infallibility  censorship  Republic_of_Letters  rational_religion  American_colonies  Early_Republic  ecclesiology  querelle_des_rites  virtue  moral_philosophy  downloaded  EF-add 
july 2014 by dunnettreader
Adrian Johns - Identity, Practice, and Trust in Early Modern Natural Philosophy | JSTOR: The Historical Journal, Vol. 42, No. 4 (Dec., 1999), pp. 1125-1145
Historians of early modern science face a serious problem, in that there was no science in early modern society. There were, however, other enterprises in the early modern period devoted to the understanding and manipulation of the physical world. This review identifies important trends in historians' attempts to comprehend those enterprises. In particular, it identifies four leading currents. The first is the move to characterize these different enterprises themselves, and in particular to understand natural philosophy and the mathematical sciences as distinct practical endeavours. The second is the attention now being paid to the social identity of the investigator of nature. The third is the attempt to understand the history of science as a history of practical enterprises rather than propositions or theories. The fourth, finally, is the understanding of natural knowledge in terms of systems of trust, and in particular in terms of the credit vested in rival claimants. In a combination of these, the review suggests, lies a future for a discipline that has otherwise lost its subject. -- didn't download
article  jstor  historiography  intellectual_history  history_of_science  sociology_of_knowledge  historical_sociology  17thC  18thC  Scientific_Revolution  science-and-religion  technology  Innovation  Royal_Society  Republic_of_Letters  natural_philosophy  mathematics  mechanism  corpuscular  EF-add 
january 2014 by dunnettreader
Issue TOC - Science and Civilization under William and Mary | JSTOR: Notes and Records of the Royal Society of London, Vol. 43, No. 2, Jul., 1989
TOC -- (1) The Crown, the Public and the New Science, 1689-1702 (pp. 99-116) M. C. W. Hunter. (2) William III and His Two Navies (pp. 117-132) J. R. Bruijn. (3) 'Bright Enough for All Our Purposes': John Locke's Conception of a Civilized Society (pp. 133-153) J. M. Dunn. (4) Clockmaking in Britain and the Netherlands (pp. 155-165)
J. H. Leopold. (5) The Glorious Revolution and Medicine in Britain and the Netherlands (pp. 167-190) Simon Schaffer. (6) Leeuwenhoek and Other Dutch Correspondents of the Royal Society (pp. 191-207) L. C. Palm. (7) Christiaan Huygens and Newton's Theory of Gravitation (pp. 209-222) H. A. M. Snelders. (8) Huygens' 'Traité de la Lumière' and Newton's 'Opticks': Pursuing and Eschewing Hypotheses (pp. 223-247) A. E. Shapiro. (9) The Leeuwenhoek Lecture, 1988. Antoni van Leeuwenhoek 1632-1723 (pp. 249-273) A. R. Hall
article  jstor  intellectual_history  sociology_of_knowledge  history_of_science  science-and-politics  17thC  18thC  British_history  Dutch  Glorious_Revolution  Republic_of_Letters  Royal_Society  community-virtual  Locke  British_Navy  William_III  Nine_Years_War  technology  instruments  Huygens  Newton  medicine  university  optics  EF-add 
january 2014 by dunnettreader
Robert Mayhew - Mapping Science's Imagined Community: Geography as a Republic of Letters, 1600-1800 | JSTOR: The British Journal for the History of Science, Vol. 38, No. 1 (Mar., 2005), pp. 73-92
This paper extends discussions of the sociology of the early modern scientific community by paying particular attention to the geography of that community. The paper approaches the issue in terms of the scientific community's self image as a Republic of Letters. Detailed analysis of patterns of citation in two British geography books is used to map the 'imagined community' of geographers from the late Renaissance to the age of Enlightenment. What were the geographical origins of authors cited in geography books and how did this change over time? To what extent was scholarship from other cultural arenas integrated into European geography? Such an analysis draws on and interrogates recent work in the history of science and in the history of scholarship more broadly, work which has made important contributions to our understanding of the historical geography of scholarly communities in early modern Europe. -- downloaded pdf to Note
article  jstor  intellectual_history  sociology_of_knowledge  history_of_science  17thC  18thC  Republic_of_Letters  cultural_history  geography  cosmopolitanism  community-virtual  professionalization  downloaded  EF-add 
january 2014 by dunnettreader
Adrian Johns - Miscellaneous Methods: Authors, Societies and Journals in Early Modern England | JSTOR: The British Journal for the History of Science, Vol. 33, No. 2 (Jun., 2000), pp. 159-186
Historians of science have long acknowledged the important role that journals play in the scientific enterprise. They both secure the shared values of a scientific community and certify what that community takes to be licensed knowledge. The advent of the first learned periodicals in the mid-seventeenth century was therefore a major event. But why did this event happen when it did, and how was the permanence of the learned journal secured? This paper reveals some of the answers. It examines the shifting fortunes of one of the earliest of natural-philosophical periodicals, the "Philosophical Transactions," launched in London in 1665 by Henry Oldenburg. The paper shows how fraught the enterprise of journal publishing was in the Europe of that period, and, not least, it draws attention to a number of publications that arose out of the commercial realm of the Restoration to rival (or parody) Oldenburg's now famous creation. By doing so it helps restore to view the hard work that underpinned the republic of letters. -- didn't download
article  jstor  intellectual_history  history_of_science  17thC  Royal_Society  Republic_of_Letters  journals-academic  publishing  satire-and-science  professionalization  academies  bibliography  EF-add 
january 2014 by dunnettreader
Simon Naylor - Introduction: Historical Geographies of Science: Places, Contexts, Cartographies | JSTOR: The British Journal for the History of Science, Vol. 38, No. 1 (Mar., 2005), pp. 1-12
Issue TOC -- (1) Locating Field Science: A Geographical Family Expedition to Glen Roy, Scotland (pp. 13-33) Hayden Lorimer and Nick Spedding. (2) From Lake Nyassa to Philadelphia: A Geography of the Zambesi Expedition, 1858-64 (pp. 35-52) Lawrence Dritsas. (3) Natural History Societies in Late Victorian Scotland and the Pursuit of Local Civic Science (pp. 53-72) Diarmid A. Finnegan. (4) Mapping Science's Imagined Community: Geography as a Republic of Letters, 1600-1800 (pp. 73-92) Robert Mayhew. (5) Talk and Testimony: Geographical Reflections on Scientific Habits. An Afterword (pp. 93-100) David N. Livingstone
article  jstor  intellectual_history  history_of_science  geography  sociology_of_knowledge  17thC  18thC  19thC  Republic_of_Letters  EF-add 
january 2014 by dunnettreader
Introduction by Richard Sorrenson to Issue: Did the Royal Society Matter in the 18thC? | JSTOR: The British Journal for the History of Science, Vol. 32, No. 2 (Jun., 1999), pp. 130-132
Nice overview of utility how Royal Society saw itself and others saw it -- to society, to the state, sociability of clubs, interest in "wonder" of natural world, and reputation and acknowledgement local and international. Ftnts have good recent works.
article  jstor  intellectual_history  cultural_history  history_of_science  18thC  British_history  Royal_Society  clubs  sociability  Republic_of_Letters  experimental_philosophy  natural_history  virtuosos  Newtonian  technology  academies  EF-add 
january 2014 by dunnettreader
Sean Ward, review - (misc) 18thC science of man & geological history to 1750 | JSTOR: Eighteenth-Century Studies, Vol. 32, No. 4 (Summer, 1999), pp. 579-580
Reviewed work(s): (1) Inventing Human Science: Eighteenth-Century Domains by Christopher Fox; Roy Porter; Robert Wokler; (2) When Geologists were Historians, 1665-1750 by Rhoda Rappaport; (3) The Mammoth and the Mouse: Microhistory and Morphology by Florike Egmond; Peter Mason -- didn't download -- The Porter et al looks excellent. High praise for transmission and influence via the Republic of Letters for Rappaport study. Find both
books  reviews  jstor  find  intellectual_history  17thC  18thC  social_sciences  medicine  physiology  psychology  political_economy  political_philosophy  geology  Biblical_criticism  Bible-as-history  Genesis  creation_ex_nilho  Buffon  Republic_of_Letters  EF-add 
january 2014 by dunnettreader
Roger Hahn, review - Margaret C. Jacob, Scientific Culture and the Making of the Industrial West | JSTOR: The American Historical Review, Vol. 105, No. 5 (Dec., 2000), pp. 1793-1794
Good look at how Jacob theories re importance of Newtonianism, its spread, the Republic of Letters and freemasonry had profound effects on mentalities beyond the scientific and philosophical elites - in this narrative linking it to technology and industrial innovation. -- didn't download
books  reviews  intellectual_history  sociology_of_knowledge  17thC  18thC  Scientific_Revolution  experimental_philosophy  Newtonian  technology  Innovation  Industrial_Revolution  Republic_of_Letters  Freemasonry  EF-add 
january 2014 by dunnettreader
James Livesey: Calvet's Web: Enlightenment and the Republic of Letters in Eighteenth-Century France by L. W. B. Brockliss | JSTOR: The British Journal for the History of Science, Vol. 38, No. 1 (Mar., 2005), pp. 109-110
Downloaded pdf to Note -- extremely detailed study of a provincial member of the Republic of Letters in the 18thC. Brockliss claims no real difference between the philosophes and the Republic - there wasn't an Enlightenment. Livesey sees the selection of Calvet as unrepresentative of even the Republic of Letters. The review has some interesting remarks on 18thC Republic, even in the provinces where critical thought and challenge to authority was possible if not universal.
books  reviews  jstor  intellectual_history  18thC  France  French_Enlightenment  Republic_of_Letters  provinces  philosophes  biology  Linnaeus  Académie_des_Inscriptions  downloaded  EF-add 
december 2013 by dunnettreader
Meredith Hindley - Mapping the Republic of Letters | Humanities Nov 2013
Long article on Dan Edelstein and Paula Findlen mapping the Republic of Letters project - working first with Electronic Enlightenment Voltaire correspondence, extended with other European correspondence and itinrrary information on individuals who traveled, now adding Ben Franklin trove.

As news started to trickle out about what the Mapping the Republic of Letters project was up to, other scholars clamored to use the tools. Unfortunately, those requests had to be turned down because the tools were still prototypes—bare bones with no instructions and no Coleman at hand to fix any glitches that arose. With the help of an NEH Digital Humanities Implementation Grant, the project began work this fall on an open source web application that will allow historians and other humanists to apply visualization techniques to datasets. The application, named Athanasius, will debut in 2015.

Re Voltaire network -- Oe of the dominant narratives of the Enlightenment posits a direct line connecting John Locke to the Glorious Revolution to the advent of liberty and freedom of expression in England, which is then transferred to France, where Voltaire and others run with it. Scholars frequently portray Voltaire as having a special connection to England and are fond of highlighting Voltaire’s letters to Jonathan Swift and Alexander Pope. The map, however, showed only a tiny number of letters between France and England. At first, Edelstein thought it might be a data problem, but when he used “Ink” to drill down into the nationalities of Voltaire’s correspondents, he found few Englishmen. Voltaire’s primary English correspondents are Sir Everard Fawkener, a silk merchant he met before his London exile, and George Keate, an English poet he met in Rome and Geneva. As for Swift and Pope, you can count those letters on one hand.

Looking for an answer, Edelstein went back to Voltaire’s writings. “It’s right there in front of us. Voltaire is pretty clear that after the death of Newton nothing interesting is happening in England.” The England problem was a clear example of the map and visualizations serving a discovery function. It’s inspired Edelstein to rethink the place of English thought in Voltaire's work. -- BUT NOT a surprise - nothing new intellectually in England -- Scotland took over. England remained important for Voltaire for politics and publishing but not source of new ideas - his French colleagues were all Lockeans & Cartesian vs Newtonian happening in France.
Bolingbroke  Voltaire  French_Enlightenment  Enlightenment  correspondence  digital_humanities  Republic_of_Letters  philosophes  Locke  EF-add 
november 2013 by dunnettreader
Special Issue: When Is a Public Sphere? JSTOR: Criticism, Vol. 46, No. 2, Spring 2004
--**-- Introduction: Charting Habermas's "Literary" or "Precursor" Public Sphere(pp. 201-205)  JOSEPH LOEWENSTEIN and PAUL STEVENS. --**-- Public Sphere/Contact Zone: Habermas, Early Print, and Verse Translation(pp. 207-222)  A.E.B. COLDIRON. --**-- Women, the Republic of Letters, and the Public Sphere in the Mid-Seventeenth Century(pp. 223-240)  DAVID NORBROOK. --**-- The Bourgeois Public Sphere and the Concept of Literature(pp. 241-256)  KEVIN PASK. --**-- How Music Created a Public(pp. 257-271)  HAROLD LOVE. --**-- Parsing Habermas's "Bourgeois Public Sphere"(pp. 273-277)  MICHAEL MCKEON
article  jstor  literary_history  music_history  lit_crit  17thC  18thC  Habermas  public_sphere  Republic_of_Letters  women-intellectuals  EF-add 
september 2013 by dunnettreader
Bernard Fay: Learned Societies in Europe and America in the Eighteenth Century (1932)
JSTOR: The American Historical Review, Vol. 37, No. 2 (Jan., 1932), pp. 255-266 -- highlights importance of Freemasonry -- suggests 2 streams of Freemasonry in 18thC (1) learning and useful knowledge (stress useful - Ramsay may have been a long-time promoter, since 1730s, of Encyclopédie type project) and (2) mystic with alchemy focus. Focus on local societies on both sides of Atlantic with lists and dates formed. Contrast with more formal and "rigid" scientific Royal Society.
article  jstor  18thC  intellectual_history  cultural_history  Enlightenment  French_Enlightenment  Enlightenment-American  Scottish_Enlightenment  Britain  France  American_colonies  academies  Royal_Society  Encyclopédie  learned_societies  Republic_of_Letters  history_of_science  technology  Freemasonry  Franklin_Ben  Ramsay  EF-add 
september 2013 by dunnettreader
Antoine Lilti - The Kingdom of Politesse: Salons and the Republic of Letters in Eighteenth-Century Paris | Republics of Letters: A Journal for the Study of Knowledge, Politics, and the Arts
Citation: Lilti, Antoine. “The Kingdom of Politesse: Salons and the Republic of Letters in Eighteenth-Century Paris.” Republics of Letters: A Journal for the Study of Knowledge, Politics, and the Arts 1, no. 1 (May 1, 2009): http://rofl.stanford.edu/node/38. -- in "Rethinking the Republic of Letters" -- downloaded pdf to Note; a copy already in Ef -- The bibliography on the Republic of Letters is long, but most scholars would agree the notion has a double meaning: on the one hand, the Republic of Letters is a historiographical tool to refer to networks of scholars organized around academic institutions, learned journals, informal gatherings and epistolary exchanges; on the otherhand, it is the normative ideal of a community of scholars and writers who have egalitarian and personal relationships, autonomous from political power, from religious solidarities and from national identities. In Anne Goldgar’s words, the Republic of Letters is a “reflexive event.” I would like to suggest that Parisian salons did not fit any of these definitions. As a site for sociability, they were, above all, venues of entertainment for polite elites, and were deeply rooted in court society. The ideal which guided the writers who attended these salons—Morellet, Thomas, Marmontel, and many others—was not the Republic of Letters, but Parisian high society (le monde), where some men of letters, polite and successful, were welcomed because they conformed to aristocratic norms. In other words, they were dreaming about the kingdom of politesse rather than the Republic of Letters.
article  intellectual_history  18thC  French_Enlightenment  Republic_of_Letters  salons  cultural_history  aristocracy  elites  politeness  sociability  social_capital  women-intellectuals  downloaded  EF-add 
september 2013 by dunnettreader
Bianca Chen: Digging for Antiquities with Diplomats: Gisbert Cuper (1644-1716) and his Social Capital | Republics of Letters: A Journal for the Study of Knowledge, Politics, and the Arts
Citation: Chen, Bianca. “Digging for Antiquities with Diplomats: Gisbert Cuper (1644-1716) and his Social Capital.” Republics of Letters: A Journal for the Study of Knowledge, Politics, and the Arts 1, no. 1 (May 1, 2009): http://rofl.stanford.edu/node/36. -- in "Rethinking the Republic of Letters" issue -- downloaded pdf to Note -- Gisbert Cuper’s career and his rise to fame allow us to examine the working practices of the Republic of Letters and reconsider how to judge a scholar’s merits in a historical context other than our own. First appointed professor of history and rhetoric at a provincial Athenaeum in Deventer (1668), Cuper subsequently became Rector of the institute (1672), burgomaster (mayor) of the city (1674), a delegate of the city to the meetings of the provincial States (the States of Overijssel), a delegate of the province to the States General of the Dutch Republic (1681-1694) and finally, for that highest governing body, a commissioner in the field during the War of the Spanish Succession (1706)...... This article will examine how the concurrence of politics and letters was important for the advancement of scholarship and how it led to the perception of Cuper as a particularly significant cultural intermediary in the Republic of Letters. I will refer to the concept of social capital to emphasize the importance of networks of patronage and the exchange of services within any community, including within the Republic of Letters. Explicitly stressing the value of correspondence to the Republic of Letters in general and to Cuper in particular, I will pay special attention to his large and diverse network of correspondents from different backgrounds. Ultimately this article seeks to demonstrate how successfully Cuper bridged the world of politics and letters by employing his social capital for the sake of learning and the subsequent benefits for his reputation in the Republic of Letters.
article  intellectual_history  political_history  cultural_history  political_culture  intelligentsia  Republic_of_Letters  Enlightenment  social_capital  networks  patronage  correspondence  diplomacy  diplomats  politicians  status  antiquaries  Dutch  War_of_Spanish_Succession  Peace_of_Utrecht  downloaded  EF-add 
september 2013 by dunnettreader
Gary Marker: Standing in St. Petersburg Looking West, Or, Is Backwardness All There Is? | Republics of Letters: A Journal for the Study of Knowledge, Politics, and the Arts
Citation: Marker, Gary. “Standing in St. Petersburg Looking West, Or, Is Backwardness All There Is?.” Republics of Letters: A Journal for the Study of Knowledge, Politics, and the Arts1, no. 1 (May 1, 2009): http://rofl.stanford.edu/node/35. -- in "Rethinking the Republic of Letters" issue -- downloaded pdf to Note -- This strange symbiosis of Russia and Europe, at least from the sixteenth century onward, has been conveyed primarily through metaphors of teleology: primitive (or not), uncivil (or not); ignorant, crude, superstitious, uneducated, undeveloped. In short, backward. For European (and many Russian) literati “backward” and “Russian” were virtually interchangeable in the eighteenth and nineteenth centuries, and as such they resided in a state of misfortune needing to be overcome.
article  intellectual_history  17thC  18thC  19thC  Russia  Peter_the_Great  cultural_history  Republic_of_Letters  Enlightenment  Franklin_Ben  nationalism  historians-and-state  history_of_science  natural_philosophy  development  modernization  academies  language-politics  education  downloaded  EF-add 
september 2013 by dunnettreader
Anthony Grafton: A Sketch Map of a Lost Continent: The Republic of Letters | Republics of Letters: A Journal for the Study of Knowledge, Politics, and the Arts
Citation: Grafton, Anthony. “A Sketch Map of a Lost Continent: The Republic of Letters.”Republics of Letters: A Journal for the Study of Knowledge, Politics, and the Arts 1, no. 1 (May 1, 2009): http://rofl.stanford.edu/node/34. -- In "Rethinking the Republic of Letters" issue -- downloaded pdf to Note -- The citizens of the early modern Republic of Letters created a virtual community not of those who shared beliefs, but of those who differed. They made up rules for civility: rules that could be used to judge the conduct of all those who offered their intellectual wares for sale in the new, largely free market. They developed new tolerances, for thinkers who disagreed with them on fundamental matters and for facts that challenged their most basic verities. What unified these efforts was a shared, if inchoate and incomplete, respect for truth, for civility, and for the integrity of the human being—a respect not founded, perhaps, on deep philosophical or theological arguments, and often violated in practice, but solid enough to make them bold when they confronted what they saw as superstitions...... Though its story has often been treated as coextensive with that of the eighteenth-century Enlightenment, such accounts foreshorten the traditions of scholarship, debate and sociability that connect the humanist sodalities of Renaissance Florence and Rome to the academies, public libraries, Masonic lodges and salons of the seventeenth and eighteenth centuries. This complex and inspiring history remains to be written.
article  intellectual_history  cultural_history  16thC  17thC  18thC  Republic_of_Letters  Erasmus  Reformation  Huguenots  Jesuits  travel  intelligentsia  scholarship  Enlightenment  érudits  humanism  downloaded  EF-add 
september 2013 by dunnettreader
Paula Findlen: Founding a Scientific Academy: Gender, Patronage and Knowledge in Early Eighteenth-Century Milan | Republics of Letters: A Journal for the Study of Knowledge, Politics, and the Arts
Citation: Findlen, Paula. “Founding a Scientific Academy: Gender, Patronage and Knowledge in Early Eighteenth-Century Milan.” Republics of Letters: A Journal for the Study of Knowledge, Politics, and the Arts 1, no. 1 (May 1, 2009): http://rofl.stanford.edu/node/33. IN "Rethinking the Republic of Letters" issue -- downloaded pdf to Note -- By the eighteenth century the Cimento was as a symbolic point of departure for the idea of founding an academy that would restore Italy’s greatness through the pursuit of modern knowledge..... as the great librarian, historian, and guardian of Italy’s intellectual heritage Ludovico Antonio Muratori (1672-1750) noted with disgust in 1704, in his day virtually every Italian city had “an academy, indeed two, three or sometimes even more”—but to what end? In his famous account of the Italian republic of letters, First Sketches of the Republic of Letters of Italy, written under the pseudonym of Lamindio Pritanio, Muratori described the decline of Italy’s academies since the era of the Cimento. .... [Queen Christina] was widely regarded as a great patron of science. Yet these activities had been eclipsed by the creation of the Accademia degli Arcadi, a literary academy founded in Rome in 1690 which claimed Queen Christina as its posthumous patron and rapidly established colonies throughout the Italian peninsula...... The success of Arcadia at the expense of other kinds of scholarly initiatives at the dawn of the eighteenth century was the focal point of Muratori’s condemnation of the current state of the Italian academies and his call for the emergence of a new kind of patron. Grillo Borromeo’s decision to create an academy in Palazzo Borromeo was an attempt to redress this imbalance while also highlighting the prominent role that learned women might play in this new vision of the republic of letters.
article  intellectual_history  cultural_history  17thC  18thC  Enlightenment  academies  Royal_Society  Italy  Milan  Florence  Rome  patronage  Republic_of_Letters  women-intellectuals  Scientific_Revolution  natural_philosophy  poetry  belles-lettres  downloaded  EF-add 
september 2013 by dunnettreader
Jacob Soll: Jean-Baptiste Colbert’s Republic of Letters | Republics of Letters: A Journal for the Study of Knowledge, Politics, and the Arts
Citation: Soll, Jacob. “Jean-Baptiste Colbert’s Republic of Letters.” Republics of Letters: A Journal for the Study of Knowledge, Politics, and the Arts 1, no. 1 (May 1, 2009): http://rofl.stanford.edu/node/28. -- in "Rethinking the Republic of Letters" -- downloaded pdf to Note -- Few figures better represent the world of scholarship at the turn of the seventeenth century than Bernard de Montfaucon, the French maurist monk and antiquarian who lived from 1655–1741..... Montfaucon wrote what was to become the central work on antiquarianism at the beginning of the Enlightenment: L'antiquité expliquée et représentée en figures (1719–24), which attempted to catalogue and show in engravings all known ancient sculptures and carvings. He also wrote on the collection of ancient manuscripts. For his work, Montfaucon was complimented by Bossuet and made royal confessor. Indeed, he represents a world of ecclesiastical scholarship, in the strain of Dom Jean Mabillon, that mixed antiquarianism, ecclesiastical scholarship and loyal service to royal power......[ Gave eulogy for Foucault who] began his career as Jean-Baptiste Colbert’s administrative assistant. In the early days working for Colbert, Foucault did not share information amongst public scholars. In fact, he was known for seizing books, and for the coerced conversions of Protestant nobles. And as he did this dirty work for the state, he learned and gained a taste for antiquarianism.The case of Foucault opens the door onto an aspect of the Republic of Letters that has been little discussed: the role of the state and coercive political power in relation to the phenomenon of the Republic of Letters.
article  intellectual_history  political_history  political_culture  religious_culture  intelligentsia  scholarship  clerisy  Republic_of_Letters  17thC  18thC  antiquaries  historians-and-state  historians-and-religion  church_history  religious_history  ancient_history  philology  Biblical_criticism  Bible-as-history  French_government  Colbert  intellectual_freedom  Bossuet  academies  Académie_des_Inscriptions  patronage  downloaded  EF-add 
september 2013 by dunnettreader
Elena Russo: Slander and Glory in the Republic of Letters: Diderot and Seneca Confront Rousseau | Republics of Letters: A Journal for the Study of Knowledge, Politics, and the Arts
Citation: Russo, Elena. “Slander and Glory in the Republic of Letters: Diderot and Seneca Confront Rousseau.” Republics of Letters: A Journal for the Study of Knowledge, Politics, and the Arts 1, no. 1 (May 1, 2009): http://rofl.stanford.edu/node/40. -- in " Rethinking the Republic of Letters" issue -- downloaded pdf to Note -- Diderot’s earlier optimism vis-à-vis his status in the Republic of Letters and his role as a public intellectual gave way to a profound identity crisis like the one that gripped his former friend Jean-Jacques Rousseau in his final years, documented in Rousseau juge de Jean-Jacques. By engaging both personally and by proxy in a battle against past and present enemies, Diderot forced himself to confront his own death and legacy, which he no longer imagined to be eulogies and loving praise, as he had in the letter to Falconet, but rather biased judgments of indifferent by-standers and prejudiced readers. In facing his eventual solitude as a writer, however, Diderot found comfort not among his contemporaries, but in the revived memory of the Republic of Letters’ classical past: in his newly discovered affinity for Seneca and in the embrace of his new role as Seneca’s advocate, faithful son, and alter ego.
article  intellectual_history  cultural_history  18thC  France  French_Enlightenment  philosophes  intelligentsia  status  fame  reputation  authenticity  libel  audience  Republic_of_Letters  sociability  alienation  Diderot  Rousseau  Seneca  Stoicism  downloaded  EF-add 
september 2013 by dunnettreader
The Nature of Early Eighteenth-Century Religious Radicalism | Republics of Letters: A Journal for the Study of Knowledge, Politics, and the Arts
Citation: Jacob, Margaret . “The Nature of Early Eighteenth-Century Religious Radicalism.” Republics of Letters: A Journal for the Study of Knowledge, Politics, and the Arts 1, no. 1 (May 1, 2009): http://rofl.stanford.edu/node/42. -- in "Rethinking the Republic of Letters" issue -- downloaded pdf to Note In 1981 I had focused on the Dutch-French-English nexus, and saw a select cast of major seventeenth-century thinkers as influencing the arguments put forward by French refugees and English Whigs for religious freedom, republican government, freedom of the press, habeas corpus, and against monarchical absolutism as practiced by the French king and clergy. These arguments appeared in the journals, books, and clandestine manuscripts originating in both London and Amsterdam. The origin of these new polemics owed much to a particular reading of Hobbes, to Locke, to a heretical reading of Newtonian science (Toland’s distinctive contribution), and of course to Bruno, Spinoza, as well as the English republican thinkers of the 1650s. In 2001 all of those influences were collapsed by Jonathan Israel into an ideengeschichte that fixated on the intellectual legacy of Spinoza to the exclusion of any significant English or French component.But if I think that Israel’s simplification of the way intellectual influence and human agency work—an idealist rendering that also effaces the political—will not stand up under scrutiny, so too I think aspects of my own youthful thinking are in need of a reformulation. The power of the Enlightenment—from this early coterie to latter thinkers like Rousseau and Jefferson—lay in understanding the force of organized religion, and then searching for a set of beliefs which deists, and perhaps even atheists of the age, could live with and accept. As I have now come to see, the pantheism I identified in 1981 would lead in many directions, among them the search to understand all human religiosity and to articulate a universal natural religion.
article  intellectual_history  historiography  17thC  18thC  Enlightenment  French_Enlightenment  Radical_Enlightenment  Freemasonry  religious_history  theology  political_philosophy  republicanism  Republic_of_Letters  philosophes  church_history  tolerance  heterodoxy  Spinoza  Hobbes  Locke  Toland  Bayle  Huguenots  Edict_of_Nantes  Louis_XIV  Newtonian  Rousseau  Jefferson  Bolingbroke  Picart  sociology_of_religion  Deism  natural_religion  rational_religion  downloaded  EF-add 
september 2013 by dunnettreader
Dan Edelstein: Humanism, l’Esprit Philosophique, and the Encyclopédie | Republics of Letters: A Journal for the Study of Knowledge, Politics, and the Arts
Citation: Edelstein, Dan. “Humanism, l’Esprit Philosophique, and the Encyclopédie.”Republics of Letters: A Journal for the Study of Knowledge, Politics, and the Arts 1, no. 1 (May 1, 2009): http://rofl.stanford.edu/node/27. -- In "Rethinking the Republic of Letters" issue -- downloaded pdf to Note -- also downloaded attachments (1) Edelstein-Appendix1_citation_index.xls (2) Edelstein-Appendix2_discarded_names.xls (3) Edelstein- Appendix3_Etat_de_Nature_comparison_with_Locke.pdf -- Humanism, in this interpretation, no longer appears in opposition to the Enlightenment, but can be seen to lie at the heart of the philosophical project to diffuse knowledge and “change the common way of thinking.” The classification, extraction, and compilation of texts and ideas had indeed been elevated to an art form, if not a science, by early-modern scholars; their techniques could now serve the philosophical good of disseminating “general Enlightenment [lumières générales].” This important role, however, remained a fairly invisible one, given that a collège education had made humanist practices almost second nature for Enlightenment scholars. In fact, they often did not even seem aware of their debt to the past: 
article  intellectual_history  Enlightenment  French_Enlightenment  16thC  17thC  18thC  humanism  érudits  scholarship  reading  philosophes  Encyclopédie  Diderot  Voltaire  Montesquieu  Republic_of_Letters  ancient_philosophy  antiquity  belles-lettres  French_lit  historiography  Locke  downloaded 
september 2013 by dunnettreader
Alfred Hiatt: Alfred Hiatt: Diplomatic Arts: Hickes against Mabillon in the Republic of Letters (2009)
JSTOR: Journal of the History of Ideas, Vol. 70, No. 3 (Jul., 2009), pp. 351-373 -- disputes re documentary evidence standards in Republic of Letters between French and Continental followers of Mabillon and English scholars -- downloaded pdf to Note
article  jstor  17thC  18thC  Enlightenment  historiography  historians  antiquaries  evidence  Republic_of_Letters  downloaded  EF-add 
august 2013 by dunnettreader
Dániel Margócsy - Encyclopedias, the Exchange of Curiosities, and Practices of Identification before Linnaeus (2010)
Project MUSE - Dániel Margócsy. ""Refer to folio and number": Encyclopedias, the Exchange of Curiosities, and Practices of Identification before Linnaeus." Journal of the History of Ideas 71.1 (2010): 63-89. Project MUSE. Web. 28 Aug. 2013. <http://muse.jhu.edu/>...... Available as html and pdf...... The Swiss natural historian Johann Amman came to Russia in 1733 to take a position as professor of botany and natural history at the St. Petersburg Academy of Sciences. As part of the job, he corresponded, and exchanged plant specimens, with the English merchant collector Peter Collinson in London, and the Swedish scholar Carolus Linnaeus, among others. After briefly reviewing Amman's correspondence with these scholars and the growing commerce in exotic specimens of natural history, I explore how encyclopedias came to facilitate the exchange of zoological specimens in particular. I argue that, during the seventeenth century, a new genre of zoological encyclopedias appeared on the scene whose design was particularly well-suited for the purposes of identification, a key practice in long-distance exchanges.

?....-- Of interest on several counts. 1) classification and taxonomy process extending Foucault observation re shift from Renaissance representation to Enlightenment classification - not just driven by demands for new forms of intelligibility, but parallel to what happening in commerce, need to support communications needed for ling distance exchange. 2) stages leading to Linnaeus. 3) encyclopedia phenomenon more generally as Republic of Letters expands geographically and in membership and becomes increasingly specialized. How new types of authority asserted, contested and accepted. Also suggestive re how garden, herb, exotic specimens ID'd, info circulated internationally - Bolingbroke's grandmother, Trumbull letter, Pope's gardening.
article  Project_MUSE  17thC  18thC  intellectual_history  cultural_history  biology  species  natural_history  publishing  commerce  Republic_of_Letters  Scientific_Revolution  gardens  Foucault  Linnaeus  Bolingbroke  Pope  EF-add 
august 2013 by dunnettreader
Avi Lifschitz, Language and Enlightenment: The Berlin Debates of the Eighteenth Century (2012) - Oxford University Press
What is the role of language in human cognition? Could we attain self-consciousness and construct our civilisation without language? Such were the questions at the basis of eighteenth-century debates on the joint evolution of language, mind, and culture. Language and Enlightenment highlights the importance of language in the social theory, epistemology, and aesthetics of the Enlightenment. While focusing on the Berlin Academy under Frederick the Great, Avi Lifschitz situates the Berlin debates within a larger temporal and geographical framework. He argues that awareness of the historicity and linguistic rootedness of all forms of life was a mainstream Enlightenment notion rather than a feature of the so-called 'Counter-Enlightenment'. Enlightenment authors of different persuasions investigated whether speechless human beings could have developed their language and society on their own. Such inquiries usually pondered the difficult shift from natural signs like cries and gestures to the artificial, articulate words of human language. This transition from nature to artifice was mirrored in other domains of inquiry, such as the origins of social relations, inequality, the arts and the sciences. By examining a wide variety of authors - Leibniz, Wolff, Condillac, Rousseau, Michaelis, and Herder, among others - Language and Enlightenment emphasises the open and malleable character of the eighteenth-century Republic of Letters. The language debates demonstrate that German theories of culture and language were not merely a rejection of French ideas. New notions of the genius of language and its role in cognition were constructed through a complex interaction with cross-European currents, especially via the prize contests at the Berlin Academy.
books  18thC  Enlightenment  Republic_of_Letters  Germany  France  Frederick_the_Great  language  cognition  human_nature  Leibniz  Condillac  Rousseau  social_theory  epistemology  Counter-Enlightenment  academies  EF-add 
august 2013 by dunnettreader
The evolution of language and society | OUPblog June 2013
Avi Lifschitz is Lecturer in Early Modern European History at University College London (UCL); in 2012/13 he is Research Fellow at the Institute for Advanced Study (Wissenschaftskolleg) in Berlin. He is the author of Language and Enlightenment: The Berlin Debates of the Eighteenth Century, available in print from Oxford University Press and online from Oxford Scholarship Online, and co-editor of Epicurus in the Enlightenment (2009)

From Riga to Glasgow and from Berlin down to Naples, Enlightenment authors asked themselves how language could have evolved among initially animal-like human beings. Some of them suggested some continuities between bestial and human communication, though most thinkers pointed to a strict barrier separating human language from vocal and gestural exchange among animals. In broad lines, this period witnessed a transition from an earlier theory of language, which saw our words as mirroring self-standing ideas, to the modern notion that signs are precisely what enables us to form our ideas in the first place. Such signs had, however, to be artificially crafted by human beings themselves; after all, natural sounds and gestures are also used by animals.

The open and malleable character of the eighteenth-century Republic of Letters is found in a wide variety of authors: Leibniz, Wolff, Condillac, Rousseau, Michaelis, and Herder, among others. The language debates demonstrate that German theories of culture and language were not merely a rejection of French ideas. New notions of the genius of language and its role in cognition were constructed through a complex interaction with cross-European currents, especially via the prize contests at the Berlin Academy.

Introduction
1. The mutual emergence of language, mind, and society: an Enlightenment debate
2. Symbolic cognition from Leibniz to the 1760s: theology, aesthetics, and history
3. The evolution and genius of language: debates in the Berlin Academy
4. J. D. Michaelis on language and vowel points: from confessional controversy to naturalism
5. A point of convergence and new departures: the 1759 contest on language and opinions
6. Language and cultural identity: the controversy over Premontval's Preservatif
7. Tackling the naturalistic conundrum: instincts and conjectural history to 1771
8. Conclusion and a glimpse into the future
books  18thC  Enlightenment  language  Leibniz  Condillac  Rousseau  Herder  France  Germany  Republic_of_Letters  human_nature  anthropology  academies  ideas-theories  EF-add 
june 2013 by dunnettreader
EE Colloquium 2010: Isabelle C. DeMarte | Open letters - Voltaire, Diderot, Rousseau
In order to explore the role which these letters, when read as letters, may have played in advancing that project, we proceed in four stages. The first one situates Voltaire’s, Diderot’s, and Rousseau’s open letters against other epistolary outlets to see how open letters turn the model of the private conversation into a public medium. The second one situates them against the epistolary novel as the prevailing literary form of published letters to reveal greater similarities than might first appear between these two kinds of letter writing. The third one applies literary theory to open letters as a means to understand better why, and how they ought to be read as letters. Finally, the fourth and last stage focuses on the epistolary situation (who writes to whom) in each of theLettres, and examines it as the place where communication and creation allowed Voltaire, Diderot, and Rousseau to both reflect and inflect the Enlightenment’s attempt to put man and his ability to reason at the center of the universe.
EF-add  18thC  Enlightenment  Republic_of_Letters  publishing  Voltaire  Diderot  Rousseau  lit_crit  epistolary 
june 2013 by dunnettreader

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