dunnettreader + renaissance   116

F R E T W O R K
Early music viol consort - news, calendar, reviews & discography
Purcell  concerts  music_history  Renaissance  reviews  music  audio  Baroque 
december 2017 by dunnettreader
Roger Chartier's emeritus pages - Écrit et cultures dans l'Europe moderne (2006-2016) - Collège de France
Écrit et cultures dans l'Europe moderne (2006-2016) - links to his courses and seminars while he held the chair, and location for subsequent work especially the Débats d'histoire discussions - once a month starting in December 2015 - during the school year (i.e. through May) with announced intention to restart this school year. Joined for several by Patrick Boucheron who arrived (Dec 2015) as Chartier's regular appointment came to an end.
cultural_authority  Roman_Catholicism  Counter-Reformation  lit_crit  French_Enlightenment  religious_history  Europe-Early_Modern  podcast  intellectual_history  postmodern  cultural_capital  critical_theory  history_of_science  cultural_change  connected_history  historiography  theater  circulation-ideas  history_of_book  translation  microhistory  authority  interview  courses  classicism  Renaissance  website  literary_history  global_history  cultural_history  audio  Foucault  video  lecture 
october 2016 by dunnettreader
Paolo Malanima - When did England overtake Italy? Medieval and early modern divergence in prices and wages - European Review of Economic History
When did England overtake Italy? Medieval and early modern divergence in prices and wages PAOLO MALANIMA Institute of Studies on Mediterranean Societies (National Research Council), ISSM-CNR, malanima@issm.cnr.it According to Allen, between 1500 and 1750, a “great divergence” among countries in the level of wages occurred in Europe. Italian real wages were already among the lowest in the late medieval and early modern age. Their relative level diminished even more from the seventeenth century. An analysis of prices and wages in Italy and England does not support this view. Actually, until the beginning of the eighteenth century, Italian real wages were either higher than in England (fourteenth and fifteenth centuries) or more or less equal (sixteenth and seventeenth). It was not until the eighteenth century that England began to overtake Italy. However, the disparity in wages before 1800 was modest. It increased fast from then onwards. Downloaded via iPhone to DBOX
labor_history  Italy  15thC  medieval_history  labor_force_structure  competiveness-labor  wages  economic_history  British_history  14thC  economic_growth  downloaded  Renaissance  16thC  Labor_markets  17thC  article  prices  18thC  England 
september 2016 by dunnettreader
Paolo Malanima - The long decline of a leading economy: GDP in central and northern Italy, 1300–1913 (2013) - European Economic History Review
The long decline of a leading economy: GDP in central and northern Italy, 1300–1913 PAOLO MALANIMA Institute of Studies on Mediterranean Societies (Naples) Italian National Research Council (CNR), malanima@issm.cnr.it The purpose of the article is to present the statistical reconstruction of a series of per capita output in central–northern Italy between 1300 and 1913. The various phases of both the statistical procedure and the results are presented and discussed. From the Renaissance until the 1880s, when modern growth starts, the curve of per capita GDP is downward bent. Output series together with three robustness tests, are collected in the Appendices.
Downloaded via iPhone to DBOX
productivity  economic_growth  17thC  agriculture  18thC  16thC  Renaissance  economic_history  14thC  stats  urbanization  Italy  GDP  manufacturing  GDP-per_capita  economic_decline  downloaded  article  proto-industry  agriculture-productivity  19thC  commerce  15thC 
september 2016 by dunnettreader
Folgerpedia - Folger Shakespeare Library
Founded on 9 July 2014, Folgerpedia is the Folger Shakespeare Library's collaboratively-edited, search-based encyclopedia of all things "Folger." Content of the articles has been contributed by various departments within the institution, as well as Folger readers and other scholars. The articles address each topic as it relates to the Folger and the Folger collection. There is a variety of article types that can be found on Folgerpedia, including: lists; how tos; and encyclopedic entries concerning items in the collection, Shakespeare's works and characters, and his works in performance.

To read more about Folgerpedia, check out the Folger research blog, The Collation.
Reformation  Tudor  stagecraft  printing  political_culture  Italian_lit  English-language  English_lit  Europe-Early_Modern  religious_culture  Shakespeare  James_I  theater  Renaissance  digital_humanities  history_of_book  intellectual_history  British_history  publishing  plays  website  literary_language  cultural_history  actors  London  event  playwrights  Latin_lit  politics-and-literature  Elizabeth 
june 2016 by dunnettreader
Martin Mulsow - Ambiguities of the Prisca Sapientia in Late Renaissance Humanism (2004) | JHI on JSTOR
Journal of the History of Ideas, Vol. 65, No. 1 (Jan., 2004), pp. 1-13 -- the assertion of a concordance between these early philosophies and their accordance with Christianity-in the sense of a Christian Platonism- implied the synthesis of fragementary philosophemes into a fully developed doctrine (...)
This program was formulated in a variety of ways during the 16th-17thC with differing protagonists and with diverse aims. Thus one could supplement the genealogy in a cabalist vein, introduce biblical characters such as Solomon or Moses, or (as was done by Bruno) use it to contest Christian doctrine. The genealogy could be read as culminating in various notable modem figures such as for example, Paracelsus. Aristotle could be included or excluded from it, depending on whether one wanted to assimilate the Aristotelian tradition or to distance oneself from it; and one could leave the end of this genealogical lineage open in order to exhort the necessity of a scientific and moral reform.
(...) the question of what became of this program during the late Renaissance, when two developments took place simultaneously: on the one hand, the utopia of the prisca sapientia set about to conquer the field formerly reserved to the Aristotelians, namely, natural philosophy; on the other hand, the first doubts arose about the overall validity of the historical-philological foundation of the program, especially the dating of the works of Hermes Trismegistus. -- downloaded pdf to Note
article  jstor  intellectual_history  15thC  16thC  17thC  natural_philosophy  Neoplatonism  Aristotelian  Kabbalah  alchemy  prisca_sapientia  Hermes_Trismegistus  Bible-as-history  chronology  ancient_philosophy  ancient_religions  Moses  ancient_Egypt  Renaissance  philology  downloaded 
may 2016 by dunnettreader
Robert Black - Machiavelli and the Humanist Tradition (2013) | Warburg Institute - School of Advanced Study, University of London
Speaker(s):
Robert Black (Professor of Renaissance History, University of Leeds)
Event date:
Wednesday 19 June 2013
The Warburg Institute
Renaissance  video  Machiavelli  Florence  lecture  intellectual_history  humanism  15thC 
march 2016 by dunnettreader
Plutarch through the ages - conference videos (May 2013) | Warburg Institute, School of Advanced Study, University of London
This conference addressed the uses of Plutarch's historical and philosophical works by late antique, medieval and early modern scholars, writers and artists. Speakers: Ewen Bowie (Oxford), Roberto Guerrini (Siena), Constanze Güthenke (Princeton), Edith Hall (King's College London), Judith Mossmann (Nottingham), Frances Muecke (Sydney), John North (Institute of Classical Studies), Marianne Pade (Danish Institute Rome), Chris Pelling (Oxford), Alberto Rigolio (Oxford), Fred Schurink (Northumbria), Frances Titchener (Utah State), Rosie Wyles (King's College London), Sophia Xenophontos (Cyprus) and Alexei Zadorojnyi (Liverpool) **--** Thursday 23 May 2013 - Plutarch's revival in late Byzantium: the case of Theodore Metochites - From Francesco Barbaro to Angelo Poliziano: Plutarch's Roman Questions in the fifteenth century - John Whethamstede and Plutarch - Additional Lives: Hannibal, Scipio and Epaminondas - Plutarch, the Institutio Traiani, and the Social Dynamics of Philosophy in Renaissance England *^--** Friday 24 May 2013 - Plutarch in Scotland - Plutarco, Poussin e l’arte barocca - After Exemplarity: a Map of Plutarchan Scholarship - Plutarch à la Russe: Ancient Heroism and Russian Ideology in Tolstoy’s War and Peace - Plutarch’s Gracchi on the French, English and Irish stages, 1792-1852: From Revolution to Corn Laws and Famine - Welcomed with open arms: Plutarch and the modern Prometheus - Concluding Remarks
Plutarch  class_conflict  Europe-19thC  reception  historiography-19thC  Roman_Empire  video  ancient_Rome  biography  lecture  historiography  Roman_Republic  emulation  historiography-18thC  historiography-antiquity  historiography-17thC  political_history  historiography-Renaissance  Renaissance  translation  19thC  ancient_Greece  intellectual_history  usable_past  humanism  Greek_lit  history_as_examples  conference  Study_and_Uses  medieval_lit  medieval_philosophy  Byzantium 
march 2016 by dunnettreader
Michel Brix - Balzac et l'héritage de Rabelais - Cairn.info 2002 Revue d'Histoire Littéraire de la France
L’article définit la Renaissance comme le théâtre de l’affrontement entre deux courants intellectuels, initiés par le recul de l’Église romaine, laquelle ne règne plus, au XVIe siècle, de façon omnipotente sur les consciences. L’humanisme pétrarquisant, ou ficinien, s’engage sur la voie du Ciel, enfin dégagée, et propose à l’homme de se diviniser dès sa vie terrestre. À l’opposé des conceptions ficiniennes, l’œuvre de Rabelais exploite le recul de l’Église pour poser la question du bonheur terrestre et pour inviter les individus à se réconcilier avec l’existence quotidienne. Ces deux « humanismes » s’affrontent toujours au XIXe siècle : héritier de Rabelais, Balzac blâme les diverses manifestations du règne absolu de l’esprit, tandis que les romantiques hugoliens s’inscrivent dans la filiation des poètes et penseurs pétrarquisants du XVIe siècle. - downloaded via iPhone to DBOX
Renaissance  Romanticism  19thC  article  Neoplatonism  transcendence  Rabelais  French_lit  Ficino  16thC  Balzac  Petrarch  literary_history  humanism  downloaded 
march 2016 by dunnettreader
Vincent Citot - Le processus historique de la Modernité et la possibilité de la liberté (universalisme et individualisme) (2005) - Cairn.info
I - Considérations introductives sur l’essence de la modernité
- L’esprit de la modernité : la liberté, l’universalisme et l’individualisme
- Réflexivité, autonomie et indépendance
- Conséquences : les idées d’égalité et de progrès
II - Les origines antiques de la modernité
- Universalisme et individualisme en Grèce antique
- Le stoïcisme : entre hellénisme et christianisme
- Universalisme, égalitarisme et individualisme chrétien
- L’individualisme du droit romain
III - L’avènement de la modernité et la périodisation de l’ère moderne
- Le monde Ancien et le monde Moderne
- La périodisation de la modernité:
1 - La première modernité : de la Renaissance aux Lumières
2 - La seconde modernité : de la fin du XVIIIème siècle aux années 1960
3 - La troisième modernité : entre postmodernité et hypermodernité
Citot Vincent, « Le processus historique de la Modernité et la possibilité de la liberté (universalisme et individualisme). », Le Philosophoire 2/2005 (n° 25) , p. 35-76
individualism  moral_philosophy  Counter-Enlightenment  16thC  Romanticism  history_of_science  politico-theology  autonomy  scholastics  Renaissance  change-social  democracy  republicanism  modernity-emergence  political_philosophy  democracy_deficit  Stoicism  Reformation  Early_Christian  French_Enlightenment  18thC  republics-Ancient_v_Modern  French_Revolution  periodization  Europe-Early_Modern  universalism  downloaded  subjectivity  political_culture  religious_history  article  Ancients-and-Moderns  community  self  German_Idealism  Counter-Reformation  authority  Enlightenment  metaphysics  ancient_Rome  17thC  Cartesians  cosmology  Descartes  ancient_Greece  Locke  modernity  liberty  Hobbes  intellectual_history  bibliography 
february 2016 by dunnettreader
Suzanne L. Marchand - The Rhetoric of Artifacts and the Decline of Classical Humanism: The Case of Josef Strzygowski | JSTOR - History and Theory ( Dec 1994 )
History and Theory, Vol. 33, No. 4, Theme Issue 33: Proof and Persuasion in History (Dec., 1994), pp. 106-130 -- historians have failed to appreciate an important element of historiographical reorientation at the fin de siecle. This second "revolution" in humanistic scholarship challenged the conviction of the educated elite that European culture was rooted exclusively in classical antiquity in part by introducing as evidence non-textual forms of evidence; the testimony of artifacts allowed writers to reach beyond romantic-nationalist histories toward the identification of cultural areas, defined by morphological similarities, and to disrupt the traditional categories of the civilized and the barbaric. -- Austrian art historian, Josef Strzygowski, insistence upon Europe's dependence on Oriental forms and upon the superior historical value of material, over textual, evidence provided critics of philologically-based humanism with 2 argumentative avenues. He also represents a para-academic type, whose rise to power and prestige contributed to the "decline of the German mandarins." -- show how this "decline" is bound up with the waning institutional and popular status of Renaissance humanism - and a corresponding rise of biologistic Germanophilia - in the 2ntellectual milieux he inhabited (Germany and Austria). -- this antihumanist crusade contributed not only to the articulation of racist historiography, but also ... transference of politico-moral legitimacy to a non-elitist, anthropological definition of culture. -- downloaded pdf to Note
article  jstor  intellectual_history  historiography-19thC  historiography-20thC  cultural_history  cultural_authority  philohellenism  Renaissance  humanism  anti-humanism  epistemology-history  orientalism  racialism  anthropology  archaeology  German_scholarship  German_scholars  entre_deux_guerres  art_history  nationalism  Romanticism  national_tale  Aryanism  bibliography  downloaded 
january 2016 by dunnettreader
THE WARBURG INSTITUTE: Afterlife of Ovid
The Afterlife of Ovid

 7 - 8 March 2013

This conference will investigate the Medieval and Renaissance reading of Ovid and his influence on poetry and painting.

Hosted by: The Warburg Institute and the Institute of Classical Studies 

Organised by: Philip Hardie (Cambridge), Peter Mack (Warburg Institute) and John North (Institute of Classical Studies) 

Speakers: Alessandro Barchiesi (Stanford), Hélène Casanova-Robin (Sorbonne Paris IV), Frank Coulson (Ohio State), Fátima Díez-Platas (Santiago e Compostela), Ingo Gildenhard (Durham), Philip Hardie (Cambridge), Maggie Kilgour (McGill), Gesine Manuwald (UCL), Elizabeth McGrath (Warburg), John Miller (Virginia), Victoria Moul (King’s College), Caroline Stark (Ohio Wesleyan) and Hérica Valladares (John Hopkins)
-- selected presentations available as podcasts
Latin_lit  Renaissance  literary_history  Ovid  17thC  Milton  audio  English_lit  conference 
december 2015 by dunnettreader
Gerard Passannante - Homer Atomized: Francis Bacon and the Matter of Tradition (2009) | JSTOR - ELH
ELH, Vol. 76, No. 4 (Winter, 2009), pp. 1015-1047 -- extensive primary and secondary bibliography from Renaissance philology through Montaigne, Bacon, Vico and 18thC German challenges to Homeric "authorship" as well as ancient literary tradition, epistemology, cosmology and physics - Stoics, Epicureans -- downloaded pdf to Note
article  jstor  intellectual_history  literary_history  historiography  cosmology  epistemology  philology  natural_philosophy  ancient_Greece  ancient_Rome  Hellenism  Homer  atomism  Stoicism  Epicurean  Cicero  Lucretius  authors  author_intention  text_analysis  time  void  chance  Renaissance  humanism  Erasmus  17thC  18thC  scepticism  Montaigne  Bacon  Vico  Nietzsche  tradition  cultural_transmission  knowledge  bibliography  downloaded 
november 2015 by dunnettreader
John Sellars - Augustine and The Stoic Tradition (2013) | Academia.edu
Publication Name: K. Pollmann et al., eds, The Oxford Guide to the Historical Reception of Augustine, 3 vols (Oxford: Oxford University Press, 2013), vol. 3, 1775-79 -- Keywords: Stoicism, Petrarch, Augustine, Blaise Pascal, Malebranche, and 3 more -- downloaded pdf to Note
chapter  Academia.edu  intellectual_history  religious_history  Augustine  Stoicism  Abelard  Renaissance  Petrarch  Pascal  Malebranche  Neostoicism  Justus_Lipsius  16thC  17thC  downloaded 
november 2015 by dunnettreader
John Sellars, review essay - Renaissance Philosophy (2012) | Academia.edu
Review article on Christopher C. Celenza, ed., Angelo Poliziano’s Lamia: Text, Translation, and Introductory Studies, and S. Clucas, P. J. Forshaw, V. Rees, eds, Laus Platonici Philosophi: Marsilio Ficino and His Influence, for British Journal for the History of Philosophy 20/6 (2012), 1195-1204 -- Keywords: Renaissance Philosophy, Angelo Poliziano, and Marsilio Ficino -- complains that work on Early Modern tends to look at links to medieval and back to anciengs, ignoring Renaissance contributions for much of anything beyond translation (e.g. Ficino just regurgitating Neoplatonism) and these 2 volumes help to see both what was going on philosophically, that humanism wasn't just work on ancient texts, as well as links to Early Moderns. Didn't download
books  reviews  article  Academia.edu  intellectual_history  Renaissance  medieval_philosophy  ancient_philosophy  scholasticism  Aristotelian  Neoplatonism  humanism  Ficino  Poliziano  Cambridge_Platonists  More_Henry  identity  Locke-person 
november 2015 by dunnettreader
John Sellars - Pomponazzi contra Averroes on the Intellect | Academia.edu
British Journal for the History of Philosophy (in press) -- This paper examines Pomponazzi’s arguments against Averroes in his De Immortalitate Animae, focusing on the question whether thought is possible without a body. The first part of the paper will sketch the history of the problem, namely the interpretation of Aristotle’s remarks about the intellect in De Anima 3.4-5, touching on Alexander, Themistius, and Averroes. The second part will focus on Pomponazzi’s response to Averroes, including his use of arguments by Aquinas. It will conclude by suggesting that Pomponazzi’s discussion stands as the first properly modern account of Aristotle’s psychology. -- Keywords: Renaissance Philosophy, Renaissance Aristotelianism, Averroes, and Pietro Pomponazzi -- looks like very helpful overview of interpretations of de Anima from Theophrastus onwards through Renaissance and comparing with some recent readings -- downloaded pdf to Note
article  Academia.edu  intellectual_history  soul  immortality  mind  Aristotle  Aristotelian  ancient_philosophy  ancient_Greece  Hellenism  late_antiquity  medieval_philosophy  Renaissance  Italian_Renaissance  commentaries  Islam-Greek_philosophy  Averroes  Pomponazzi  Ficino  rationalist  empiricism  fideism  bibliography  Peripatetics  De_Anima  downloaded 
november 2015 by dunnettreader
John Sellars - Stoic Fate in Justus Lipsius’s De Constantia and Physiologia Stoicorum (2014) | Academia.edu
Publication: Journal of the History of Philosophy, Oct 2014 In his De Constantia of 1584, Justus Lipsius examines the Stoic theory of fate, distancing himself from it by outlining four key points at which it should be modified. The modified theory is often presented as a distinctly Christianized form of Stoicism. Later, in his Physiologia Stoicorum of 1604, Lipsius revisits the Stoic theory, this time offering a more sympathetic reading, with the four modifications forgotten. It is widely assumed that Lipsius’s position shifted between these two works, perhaps due to a better grasp of the Stoic position by the time of the later work. I argue that in fact there is no great distance between the two accounts and that both find only one point of difficulty with the Stoic theory, a point that Lipsius himself presents in both works as merely a matter of expression. -- Keywords: Stoicism, Neostoicism, Justus Lipsius, and Stoic Tradition -- downloaded pdf to Note
article  Academia.edu  intellectual_history  16thC  17thC  Renaissance  Europe-Early_Modern  Stoicism  fate  Providence  free_will  determinism  Justus_Lipsius  Seneca  moral_philosophy  Neostoicism  bibliography  downloaded 
november 2015 by dunnettreader
Table of contents - John Sellars, ed. - The Routledge Handbook of the Stoic Tradition (Feb 2016) | Academia.edu
Introduction | Stoicism in Rome | Stoicism in Early Christianity | Plotinus and the Platonic Response to Stoicism | Augustine’s Debt to Stoicism in the Confessions | Boethius and Stoicism | Stoic Themes in Peter Abelard and John of Salisbury | Stoic Influences in the Later Middle Ages | The Recovery of Stoicism in the Renaissance | Stoicism in the Philosophy of the Italian Renaissance | Erasmus, Calvin, and the Faces of Stoicism in Renaissance and Reformation Thought | Justus Lipsius and Neostoicism | Shakespeare and Early Modern English Literature | Medicine of the Mind in Early Modern Philosophy | Stoic Themes in Early Modern French Thought | Spinoza and Stoicism | Leibniz and the Stoics: Fate, Freedom, and Providence | The Epicurean Stoicism of the French Enlightenment | Stoicism and the Scottish Enlightenment | Kant and Stoic Ethics | Stoicism in Nineteenth Century German Philosophy | Stoicism and Romantic Literature | Stoicism in Victorian Culture | Stoicism in America | Stoic Themes in Contemporary Anglo-American Ethics | Stoicism and Twentieth Century French Philosophy | The Stoic Influence on Modern Psychotherapy
books  intellectual_history  Stoicism  ancient_philosophy  Epictetus  Seneca  Early_Christian  late_antiquity  Neoplatonism  Augustine  Abelard  John_of_Salisbury  medieval_philosophy  Renaissance  Italian_Renaissance  Italy  Shakespeare  Shakespeare-influence  Erasmus  Reformation  Calvin  Justus_Lipsius  Neostoicism  philosophy-as-way-of-life  psychology  self  self-examination  self-knowledge  self-development  early_modern  Europe-Early_Modern  16thC  17thC  18thC  19thC  20thC  Spinoza  Leibniz  fate  determinism  Providence  free_will  freedom  French_Enlightenment  Epicurean  Scottish_Enlightenment  Kant-ethics  German_Idealism  German_scholars  neo-Kantian  Romanticism  literary_history  analytical_philosophy  psychoanalysis  phenomenology 
november 2015 by dunnettreader
Book Announcement: From Aristotle’s teleology to Darwin’s genealogy
see kindle sample - covers why scientific revolution didn't have the sort of impact that mathematization had in physical sciences - claims that yhe cornerstones of thinkijg re human sciences remained essentialist and fixistmore due to late scholastic snd Rensissance incorporation of Aristotelian principles than religiously driven creationusm - they fid converge and, especially in Anglo countries, reinflorced by 18thC "natural theology" - Darwin uses the anomalies that have no adaptationist utility, like sightless moles, to blow up the functionalist teleological foundation of yhe Aristotelian approach to species
Pocket  17thc  18thc  19thc  Darwin  ancient_greece  aristotle  bible-as-history  biology  books  creationist  deism  early_modern  evolution  geology  history_of_science  intellectual_history  kindle-available  medieval  natural_theology  physiology  renaissance  scholasticism  scientific_revolution 
july 2015 by dunnettreader
Alan Jacobs - the three big stories of modernity | TextPatterns July 2015
So far there have been three widely influential stories about the rise of modernity: the Emancipatory, the Protestant, and the Neo-Thomist. (..) all these narrators of modernity see our own age as one in which the consequences of 500-year-old debates conducted by philosophers and theologians are still being played out. I think all of these narratives are wrong. They are wrong because they are the product of scholars in universities who overrate the historical importance and influence of other scholars in universities, and because they neglect ideas that connect more directly with the material world. All of these grands recits should be set aside, and they should not immediately be replaced with others, but with more particular, less sweeping, and more technologically-oriented stories. The technologies that Marshall McLuhan called "the extensions of Man" are infinitely more important for Man's story, for good and for ill, than the debates of the schoolmen and interpreters of the Bible. Instead of grand narratives of the emergence of The Modern we need something far more plural: technological histories of modernity.
Instapaper  cultural_history  cultural_capital  modernity  technology  Tech/Culture  social_theory  intellectual_history  intellectual_history-distorted  religious_history  Thomism-21stC  Reformation  Renaissance  Enlightenment  Enlightenment_Project  Enlightenment-ongoing  modernity-emergence  material_culture  economic_history  Great_Divergence  Industrial_Revolution  colonialism  Military_Revolution  Scientific_Revolution  consumer_revolution  technology-history  historiography  medicine  public_health  public_sphere  public_goods  media  print_culture  history_of_science  history_of_book  history-and-social_sciences  narrative  narrative-contested  from instapaper
july 2015 by dunnettreader
Gerald J. Postema - Jurisprudence, the Sociable Science (Symposium - Jurisprudence and (Its) History) | Virginia Law Review - 101 Va. L. Rev. 869 (2015)
Renaissance jurisprudence strove to be a sociable science. Following Ulpian’s lead, it refused to relegate jurisprudence either to pure speculation or to mere practice. Jurisprudence was a science, a matter of knowledge and of theoretical understanding, not merely an applied art or practice of prudence innocent of theory. It was regarded as the very heart of theoretical studies, drawing to itself all that the traditional sciences of theology, metaphysics, and moral philosophy, as well as the newly emerging humanist sciences of philology and hermeneutics, had to offer. No less resolutely, however, it refused to abandon its foothold in the life of practice. (..) Rather than reject philosophical reflection, (..) Renaissance jurists sought to locate it in concrete human life and experience. (..) Philosophy.., was most true to its vocation, and was most engaged in human life, when its reflections were anchored in the social life acknowledged, comprehended, and informed by and informing law. Jurisprudence, vera philosophia, was ...the point at which the theoretical and the practical intersected (..) at its “sociable” best sought to integrate them. Analytic jurisprudence began as self-consciously, even militantly, “unsociable,” and its matured and much-sophisticated descendant, fin de siècle analytic legal philosophy, remained largely if not exclusively so. (..) It may be time, in this period of self-conscious attention to jurisprudential method, to press beyond the current limits of this debate over method to a reassessment of the ambitions of jurisprudence and of philosophy’s role in it. (..) my aim is not critical but constructive. (..) to recover something of the ideal of jurisprudence as a sociable science, to retrieve as much as our disenchanted age can be challenged to embrace, or at least to entertain, of the ambition of jurisprudence as vera philosophia. -- downloaded pdf to Note
article  jurisprudence  philosophy_of_law  social_theory  social_sciences  intellectual_history  Renaissance  16thC  17thC  18thC  19thC  20thC  common_law  moral_philosophy  morality-conventional  norms  analytical_philosophy  concepts  concepts-change  change-social  change-intellectual  social_order  legal_history  legal_theory  legal_reasoning  pragmatism  Peirce  continuity  historical_change  methodology-qualitative  downloaded 
june 2015 by dunnettreader
Thomas G. Pavel - The Lives of the Novel: A History. (2013 hdbk, 2015 obk) | Princeton University Press
This is a bold and original original history of the novel from ancient Greece to the vibrant world of contemporary fiction. In this wide-ranging survey, Pavel argues that the driving force behind the novel's evolution has been a rivalry between stories that idealize human behavior and those that ridicule and condemn it. Impelled by this conflict, the novel moved from depicting strong souls to sensitive hearts and, finally, to enigmatic psyches. Pavel analyzes more than a hundred novels from Europe, North and South America, Asia, and beyond, resulting in a provocative reinterpretation of its development. According to Pavel, the earliest novels were implausible because their characters were either perfect or villainous. In the 18thC and 19thC, novelists strove for greater credibility by describing the inner lives of ideal characters in minute detail (as in Richardson's case), or by closely examining the historical and social environment (as Scott and Balzac did). Yet the earlier rivalry continued: Fielding held the line against idealism, defending the comic tradition with its flawed characters, while Charlotte Brontë and George Eliot offered a rejoinder to social realism with their idealized vision of strong, generous, and sensitive women. In the twentieth century, modernists like Proust and Joyce sought to move beyond this conflict and capture the enigmatic workings of the psyche. Pavel concludes his compelling account by showing how the old tensions persist even within today's pluralism, as popular novels about heroes coexist with a wealth of other kinds of works, from satire to social and psychological realism. -- Prof. of French, Comparative Literature, and Social Thought at the U. of Chicago, also "Fictional Worlds" and "The Spell of Language." -- downloaded introduction to Note
books  kindle-available  literary_history  literary_theory  lit_crit  novels  fiction  Greek_lit  Latin_lit  Medieval  Renaissance  Cervantes  Fielding  Richardson  Defoe  Scott_Sir_Walter  Balzac  Eliot_George  Proust  satire  cultural_critique  politics-and-literature  cultural_history  sentimentalism  character-fiction  psychology  historical_fiction  realism-literature  Modernism  romances  downloaded 
june 2015 by dunnettreader
Justin E.H. Smith - Nature, Human Nature, and Human Difference: Race in Early Modern Philosophy (2015) | Princeton University Press
People have always been xenophobic, but an explicit philosophical and scientific view of human racial difference only began to emerge during the modern period. Why and how did this happen? Surveying a range of philosophical and natural-scientific texts, dating from the Spanish Renaissance to the German Enlightenment, (Smith) charts the evolution of the modern concept of race and shows that natural philosophy, particularly efforts to taxonomize and to order nature, played a crucial role. Smith demonstrates how the denial of moral equality between Europeans and non-Europeans resulted from converging philosophical and scientific developments, including a declining belief in human nature’s universality and the rise of biological classification. The racial typing of human beings grew from the need to understand humanity within an all-encompassing system of nature, alongside plants, minerals, primates, and other animals. While racial difference as seen through science did not arise in order to justify the enslavement of people, it became a rationalization and buttress for the practices of trans-Atlantic slavery. From the work of François Bernier to Leibniz, Kant, and others, Smith delves into philosophy’s part in the legacy and damages of modern racism. -- Smith is university professor of the history and philosophy of science at the Université Paris Diderot—Paris VII. ...author of Divine Machines: Leibniz and the Sciences of Life (PUP), coeditor and cotranslator of The Leibniz-Stahl Controversy -- downloaded introduction to Note -- only hdbk, will be in ebook
books  kindle-available  intellectual_history  cultural_history  racism  racialism  16thC  17thC  18thC  Europe-Early_Modern  exploration  Spanish_Empire  Spain  Renaissance  natural_philosophy  biology  taxonomies  Latin_America  West_Indies  North_America  Native_Americans  indigenous_peoples  slavery  West_Africa  Africa  African_trade  life_sciences  history_of_science  philosophy_of_science  sociology_of_knowledge  French_Enlightenment  Leibniz  Kant  anatomy  Adam  Scientific_Revolution  scientific_culture  science-and-religion  science-public  science_of_man 
june 2015 by dunnettreader
Brooke Holmes; W. H. Shearin, eds. - Dynamic Reading: Studies in the Reception of Epicureanism - Oxford University Press
(..) examines the reception history of Epicurean philosophy through a series of eleven case studies, (..). Rather than attempting to separate an original Epicureanism from its later readings and misreadings, this collection studies the philosophy together with its subsequent reception, focusing in particular on the ways in which it has provided terms and conceptual tools for defining how we read and respond to texts, artwork, and the world more generally. *--* Introduction, Brooke Holmes and W. H. Shearin -- 1. Haunting Nepos: Atticus and the Performance of Roman Epicurean Death, W. H. Shearin -- 2. Epicurus's Mistresses: Pleasure, Authority, and Gender in the Reception of the Kuriai Doxai in the Second Sophistic, Richard Fletcher -- 3. Reading for Pleasure: Disaster and Digression in the First Renaissance Commentary on Lucretius, Gerard Passannante -- 4. Discourse ex nihilo: Epicurus and Lucretius in 16thC England, Adam Rzepka -- 5. Engendering Modernity: Epicurean Women from Lucretius to Rousseau, Natania Meeker -- 6. Oscillate and Reflect: La Mettrie, Materialist Physiology, and the Revival of the Epicurean Canonic, James Steintrager -- 7. Sensual Idealism: The Spirit of Epicurus and the Politics of Finitude in Kant and Hölderlin, Anthony Adler -- 8. The Sublime, Today?, Glenn Most -- 9. From Heresy to Nature: Leo Strauss's History of Modern Epicureanism, Benjamin Aldes Wurgaft -- 10. Epicurean Presences in Foucault's The Hermeneutics of the Subject, Alain Gigandet -- 11. Deleuze, Lucretius, and the Simulacrum of Naturalism, Brooke Holmes
books  kindle-available  intellectual_history  Latin_lit  literary_history  ancient_philosophy  ancient_Greece  ancient_Rome  Roman_Republic  Roman_Empire  Epicurean  Lucretius  influence-literary  reception  Renaissance  reader_response  readership  reading  16thC  English_lit  materialism  Enlightenment  French_Enlightenment  La_Mettrie  gender  gender_history  German_Idealism  Kant-aesthetics  Kant  Hölderlin  poetry  sublime  naturalism  Strauss  Foucault  Rousseau  Deleuze  lit_crit  new_historicism  subjectivity  finitude  death  literature-and-morality  literary_theory  postmodern  modernity  modernity-emergence  pleasure 
june 2015 by dunnettreader
Maggie Kilgour - Milton and the Metamorphosis of Ovid (2012) | Oxford University Press
Milton and the Metamorphosis of Ovid contributes to our understanding of the Roman poet Ovid, the Renaissance writer Milton, and more broadly the transmission and transformation of classical traditions through history. It examines the ways in which Milton drew on Ovid's oeuvre, as well as the long tradition of reception that had begun with Ovid himself, and argues that Ovid's revision of the past, and especially his relation to Virgil, gave Renaissance writers a model for their own transformation of classical works. Throughout his career Milton thinks through and with Ovid, whose stories and figures inform his exploration of the limits and possibilities of creativity, change, and freedom. Examining this specific relation between two very individual and different authors, Kilgour also explores the forms and meaning of creative imitation. Intertexuality was not only central to the two writers' poetic practices but helped shape their visions of the world. While many critics seek to establish how Milton read Ovid, Kilgour debates the broader question of why does considering how Milton read Ovid matter? How do our readings of this relation change our understanding of both Milton and Ovid; and does it tell us about how traditions are changed and remade through time?
books  kindle-available  Latin_lit  literary_history  Ovid  ancient_Rome  epic  poetry  Renaissance  English_lit  influence-literary  imitation  Virgil 
june 2015 by dunnettreader
Ronald Mellor - Tacitus' Annals (2010) | Oxford University Press
Tacitus' Annals is the central historical source for first-century C.E. Rome. It is prized by historians since it provides the best narrative material for the reigns of Tiberius, Claudius, and Nero, as well as a probing analysis of the imperial system of government. But the Annals should be seen as far more than an historical source, a mere mine for the reconstruction of the facts of Roman history. While the Annals is a superb work of history, it has also become a central text in the western literary, political, and even philosophical traditions - from the Renaissance to the French and American revolutions, and beyond. This volume attempts to enhance the reader's understanding of how this book of history could have such a profound effect. Chapters will address the purpose, form, and method of Roman historical writing, the ethnic biases of Tacitus, and his use of sources. Since Tacitus has been regarded as one of the first analysts of the psychopathology of political life, the book will examine the emperors, the women of the court, and the ambitious entourage of freedmen and intellectuals who surround every Roman ruler. The final chapter will examine the impact of Tacitus' Annals since their rediscovery by Boccaccio in the 14th century.
books  kindle-available  historiography-antiquity  historians-and-politics  Tacitus  Latin_lit  ancient_Rome  Roman_Empire  political_culture  political_philosophy  Renaissance  historiography-Renaissance  historiography-17thC  historiography-18thC  oligarchy  Absolutism  raison-d'-état  government-forms 
june 2015 by dunnettreader
Marc Fumaroli -- Le siècle des Lumières et la naissance du "néoclassicisme" | Canal Académie 2011
Interview (mp3) and article by Canal summarizing points he makes in his introductory essay for the exhibition catalog -- Marc Fumaroli intervient ici sur l’exposition "L’Antiquité rêvée: Innovations et résistances au XVIIIe siècle" qui se tient au musée du Louvre du 2 décembre 2010 au 14 février 2011. Elle illustre à travers un choix de plus de 150 œuvres majeures, la naissance du mouvement dit « néoclassique ». Ce retour à l’Antique fut principalement inspiré par la découverte et le retentissement des fouilles des cités antiques d’Herculanum et de Pompeï. Elles révélèrent à la fois la peinture antique et son contexte, le décor et le quotidien de la vie urbaine des anciens Romains. Nous suivons ainsi les grandes périodes correspondant aux trois principales sections de l’exposition du musée du Louvre, à savoir: I – Le RENOUVEAU du goût pour l’Antique 1730-1770 **--** II – RESISTANCES 1760-1790: Néobaroque – Néomaniérisme – Le Sublime **--** III – NEOCLASSICISMES 1770-1790. Avec, dans chaque section, beaucoup de courants et contre-courants. -- web page to Pocket, includes references to the catalog and related publications
intellectual_history  art_history  aesthetics  Renaissance  17thC  18thC  Ancients_v_Moderns  classicism  neoclassical  baroque  Rococo  painting  sculpture  Republic_of_Letters  Enlightenment  antiquity  ancient_Greece  ancient_Rome  archaeology  Pompeii  sublime  Winkleman  cultural_history  historiography-18thC  lifestyle  decorative_arts  books  museums  exhibition  audio  Pocket 
april 2015 by dunnettreader
Ada Palmer - Reading Lucretius in the Renaissance | JSTOR: Journal of the History of Ideas, Vol. 73, No. 3 (July 2012), pp. 395-416
In the Renaissance, Epicureanism and other heterodox scientific theories were strongly associated with heresy and atheism, and frequently condemned. Yet, when Lucretius’s Epicurean poem De Rerum Natura reappeared in 1417, these associations did not prevent the poem’s broad circulation. A survey of marginalia in Lucretius manuscripts reveals a characteristic humanist reading agenda, focused on philology and moral philosophy, which facilitated the circulation of such heterodox texts among an audience still largely indifferent to their radical content. Notes in later sixteenth century print copies reveal a transformation in reading methods, and an audience more receptive to heterodox science. Article is on Project MUSE - the jstor archive is open through 2011, closed for 2012, and has no later volumes. The jstor page for articles from 2012 has the advantage of the full set of footnotes. I've copied the footnotes to Evernote. -- update, I've downloaded it to Note
article  jstor  bibliography  intellectual_history  Lucretius  Epicurean  heterodoxy  atheism  15thC  16thC  Renaissance  humanism  philology  moral_philosophy  reading  reader_response  readership  atomism  determinism  cosmology  Scientific_Revolution  cultural_change  cultural_transmission  circulation-ideas  Evernote  downloaded 
april 2015 by dunnettreader
Shire Publications - The Tudor Garden (2013)
Author: Twigs Way -- Contrived, colourful and cultured, the Tudor garden was a paradise on earth, given over to pleasurable pastimes and aesthetic effect. Artificiality was the fashion of the age, with clipped and twining plants vying for space with brightly painted woodwork and patterned beds.Renaissance discoveries reared their heads in royal gardens, where gilded and painted heraldic figures mingled with fantastical sundials and glittering fountains. Walls kept out the wild world beyond, while mounts afforded glimpses to new parklands and provided raised platforms for the banqueting houses of the wealthy. Ever-changing with newly introduced exotic plants, yet featuring year-round knot gardens, the Tudor garden was a vibrant pageant, and is given a suitably colourful celebration in this fully illustrated book. -- Paperback; June 2013; 64 pages; ISBN: 9780747812142
books  16thC  17thC  British_history  cultural_history  elite_culture  Tudor  Renaissance  botany  gardens  landscape  castles  country_homes 
march 2015 by dunnettreader
NICOLAS GUILHOT - THE FIRST MODERN REALIST: FELIX GILBERT'S MACHIAVELLI AND THE REALIST TRADITION IN INTERNATIONAL THOUGHT | Modern Intellectual History (Feb 2015) - Cambridge Journals Online
Centre national de la recherche scientifique, New York University E-mail: nicolas.guilhot@nyu.edu -- In the disciplines of political science and international relations, Machiavelli is unanimously considered to be “the first modern realist.” This essay argues that the idea of a realist tradition going from the Renaissance to postwar realism founders when one considers the disrepute of Machiavelli among early international relations theorists. It suggests that the transformation of Machiavelli into a realist thinker took place subsequently, when new historical scholarship, informed by strategic and political considerations related to the transformation of the US into a global power, generated a new picture of the Renaissance. Focusing on the work of Felix Gilbert, and in particular his Machiavelli and Guicciardini, the essay shows how this new interpretation of Machiavelli was shaped by the crisis of the 1930s, the emergence of security studies, and the philanthropic sponsorship of international relations theory. -- * I would like to thank Samuel Moyn and three anonymous reviewers for their comments on a prior version of this paper. I greatly benefited from discussions with Volker Berghahn, Anthony Molho, and Jacques Revel. -- paywall
article  paywall  find  libraries  IR_theory  intellectual_history  IR-realism  20thC  entre_deux_guerres  post-WWII  strategic_studies  Renaissance  15thC  16thC  Machiavelli  Guicciardini  historiography-postWWII  US_foreign_policy  hegemony  EF-add 
february 2015 by dunnettreader
Richard Sennett - Humanism IASC: The Hedgehog Review - Volume 13, No. 2 (Summer 2011)
I have wanted, in sum, to explain in this essay why the label “humanist” is a badge of honor, rather than the name for an exhausted worldview. Humanism’s emphasis on life-narratives, on the enriching experience of difference, and on evaluating tools in terms of human rather than mechanical complexity are all living values—and more, I would say, these are critical measures for judging the state of modern society. Looking back to the origins of these values is not an exercise in nostalgia; it is rather to remind us that we are engaged in a project, still in process, a humanism yet to be realized, of making social experience more open, engaging, and layered. -- downloaded as pdf to Note
article  downloaded  humanism  Renaissance  19thC  technology  communication  Internet  programming  algorithms  robots 
february 2015 by dunnettreader
Paul Silas Peterson - Thomas Pfau and the emergence of the modern individual « The Immanent Frame - Oct 2014
Thomas Pfau’s presentation of modernity in Minding the Modern fails to incorporate both the sociopolitical dimensions of modernity’s emergence and its positive aspects. He sees modernity as the home of the “modern subject” of the Western world, or the “quintessentially modern, solitary individual” in his “palpable melancholy,” both “altogether adrift” and without “interpersonal relations.” (..) a challenge to those whom he sometimes calls the “modern apologists of secular, liberal, Enlightenment society.” -- Pfau draws upon a narrative which might be called the “middle age voluntarism to modern alienation theory.” This has many predecessors in the second half of the 20thC (..). The geopolitical situation in the 1980s and 1990s is one of the important features of the historical context of many of these narratives (..) a variety of intellectual assaults were waged in the Western world against what had become the dominant intellectual paradigm in the West. (..) Over the last 30 years (..) this critical diagnosis of modernity has become more precise; there has been a consolidation of the sources and arguments -- Alasdair MacIntyre, Michael J. Buckley, Charles Taylor, Colin E. Gunton, Stanley Hauerwas, John Milbank, Michael Allen Gillespie, and more recently David B. Hart, Adrian Pabst and Brad S. Gregory. Pfau’s Minding the Modern is a new contribution to this anti-modern diagnosis of contemporary Western culture and the modern individual. (..)some of the arguments can be found in the French Catholic reform theologians of the early 20thC. There were also many German-speaking intellectuals in the 1920s and 1930s who were developing sweeping narratives that cast a dark light on modernity and thus, both implicitly and explicitly, called into question the rationale and legitimacy of the liberal political order. Pfau claims that his book does not provide one of these narratives (..). It does seem to be similar, however, to the classic decline-and-fall narratives. Even the essays at the end of the book about “retrieving the human” are analogous. -- downloaded post as pdf to Note
books  kindle-available  reviews  modernity  modernity-emergence  reform-legal  intellectual_history  medieval_philosophy  theology  Renaissance  humanism  Erasmus  Thomism  Thomism-21stC  voluntarism  Ockham  Luther  liberalism  self  alienation  18thC  Enlightenment  Enlightenment_Project  Counter-Enlightenment  Counter-Reformation  19thC  Coleridge  transcendence  ontology  individualism  17thC  English_Civil_War  religious_wars  religious_culture  Hobbes  20thC  21stC  declinism  MacIntyre  Taylor_Charles  downloaded  EF-add 
november 2014 by dunnettreader
ERIC COCHRANE, The Transition from Renaissance to Baroque: The Case of Italian Historiography | JSTOR: History and Theory, Vol. 19, No. 1 (Feb., 1980), pp. 21-38
The meaning of the term "baroque" has been the subject of much debate. In the field of historiography, historians have not engaged in a dialogue on the subject and have accepted uncritically the value-judgments of eighteenth-century scholarship. One approach to be used in this author's new book, Historians and Historiography in the Italian Renaissance, compares the work of 782 Italian historians from earliest times through the seventeenth century. The humanist historiography of the Italian Renaissance exhibited the concepts of change, contingency, and epoch in history; relied on ancient forms; used methodological principles of causation; and taught moral and political lessons. Italian Baroque historiography, on the other hand, employed the forms of the new bulletins or avvisi, copied the prose style of its contemporaries, discounted its practical utility, and displayed a separation between history as literature and history as research. -- downloaded to Air
article  jstor  historiography  historicism  Renaissance  humanism  historiography-18thC  14thC  15thC  16thC  17thC  18thC  historiography-19thC  19thC  intellectual_history  Italy  Guicciardini  historical_change  contingency  Enlightenment  downloaded  EF-add 
october 2014 by dunnettreader
Srinivas Aravamudan - Enlightenment Orientalism: Resisting the Rise of the Novel (2011) 360 pages | Kindle eBooks @ Amazon.com.
A MUST BUY -- Srinivas Aravamudan here reveals how Oriental tales, pseudo-ethnographies, sexual fantasies, and political satires took Europe by storm during the eighteenth century. Naming this body of fiction Enlightenment Orientalism, he poses a range of urgent questions that uncovers the interdependence of Oriental tales and domestic fiction, thereby challenging standard scholarly narratives about the rise of the novel. More than mere exoticism, Oriental tales fascinated ordinary readers as well as intellectuals, taking the fancy of philosophers such as Voltaire, Montesquieu, and Diderot in France, and writers such as Defoe, Swift, and Goldsmith in Britain. Aravamudan shows that Enlightenment Orientalism was a significant movement that criticized irrational European practices even while sympathetically bridging differences among civilizations. A sophisticated reinterpretation of the history of the novel, Enlightenment Orientalism is sure to be welcomed as a landmark work in eighteenth-century studies.
books  kindle-available  buy  intellectual_history  cultural_history  literary_history  Renaissance  16thC  17thC  18thC  fiction  novels  lit_crit  literary_theory  Enlightenment  English_lit  French_lit  orientalism  Defoe  Swift  Voltaire  Diderot  Montesquieu  Behn  Manley  Montagu_Lady_Mary  realism  empiricism  moral_philosophy  self  subjectivity  self-examination  self-and-other  self-knowledge  travel  romances  satire  utopian  exploration  cultural_critique  Biblical_criticism  philology  antiquaries  comparative_religion  comparative_anthropology  chronology  historiography-17thC  historiography-18thC  historiography-19thC  xenophobia  national_ID  racialism  colonialism  imperialism 
september 2014 by dunnettreader
André Gendre - La Pléiade entre Bembo et l’Arioste | Italique, VI, 2003, p. 7-36
Italique [En ligne], VI | 2003, mis en ligne le 05 octobre 2009, DOI : 10.4000/italique.134 **--** L’imitation, en matière de poésie amoureuse par exemple, n’implique pas toujours la reconnaissance, fût-elle éphémère, d’une doctrine philosophique, d’une expérience commune, d’une affinité de sentiments ; elle est souvent comme un masque du sens qu’on emprunte pour le rendre ensuite. Elle correspond aussi à une séduction formelle momentanée. Ces pratiques aléatoires paraissent condamner la recherche d’une influence très particulière exercée sur nos poètes. Il est vrai que la Pléiade ne choisit souvent Bembo ou l’Arioste que pour leurs lieux communs pétrarquistes.Mais ces modèles sont trop grands poètes pour ne pas déterminer plus spécifiquement ceux qu’ils inspirent. -- Plan -- La sérénité néo-platonicienne de bembo. -- Le pittoresque de bembo -- L’arioste stimul. -- l’imaginaire sensuel des poètes de la pléiade. -- L’arioste et le portrait érotique. -- L’arioste inspire des imitations variées. -- Les Azolains éclairent-ils la composition des recueils français ? -- downloaded pdf to Note
article  revues.org  literary_history  intellectual_history  15thC  16thC  Renaissance  Italy  France  Italian_lit  poetry  poetics  Ariosto  Bembo  French_lit  Pléiade  imitation  influence-literary  bibliography  downloaded  EF-add 
september 2014 by dunnettreader
Thomas Hunkeler - Les « déviations » de l’esprit. Lire Délie de Maurice Scève à la lumière du Dolce Stil Nuovo | Italique, V, 2002, p. 53-75.
Italique [En ligne], V | 2002, mis en ligne le 06 octobre 2009, DOI : 10.4000/italique.146 **--** Aimer l’esprit, madame, c’est aimer la sottise. C’est par ce vers provocant que Ronsard ouvre en 1578, dans la première édition de ses sonnets pour hélène, le procès d’un platonisme qui s’est affadi, du moins de son avis, en un phénomène de cour et en une phraséologie largement dépourvue de portée philosophique. Au moment où Ronsard passe ainsi à l’attaque, le platonisme connaît en effet en France une seconde vague après celle des années 1530-40... Mais si, depuis Ronsard, le platonisme et a fortiori la notion d’amour platonique semblent figurer parmi les ingrédients aussi insipides qu’hypocrites de la littérature sentimentale, ce jugement ne trahit pas seulement un changement de goût ou de mœurs. Il résulte aussi d’une réception partielle, timorée et édulcorée, de la pensée ficinienne, qui a banalisé une pensée bien plus riche et bien plus ambivalente que ne le laisse croire la caricature de Ronsard. Une notion semble résumer à elle seule les enjeux, mais aussi les ambivalences de la pensée ficinienne : l’esprit. En effet, c’est dans la mesure où la notion d’esprit ou de spiritus a été banalisée lors de son importation en France, où on en a évacué tous les aspects qui n’entraient pas dans la tendance à la moralisation et à la spiritualisation qui marquait la réception de Ficin en France, qu’une réaction de rejet comme celle de Ronsard peut se comprendre. C’est dans une telle perspective que j’aimerais analyser, après avoir fait le point sur la notion de spiritus chez Ficin, le rôle que joue la notion d’“esprit” dans la réception de la pensée de Ficin en France entre 1500 et 1550, avant d’aborder plus en détail le cas de Maurice Scève. -- downloaded pdf to Note
article  revues.org  intellectual_history  15thC  16thC  Italy  France  Renaissance  Ficino  Neoplatonism  humanism  moral_psychology  moral_philosophy  sentimentalism  reception  court_culture  elite_culture  Pléiade  bibliography  downloaded  EF-add 
september 2014 by dunnettreader
Corrado Bologna - Le retour des dieux anciens : Giulio Camillo et Fontainebleau | Italique, V, 2002, p109-138.
Italique [En ligne], V | 2002, mis en ligne le 06 octobre 2009, DOI : 10.4000/italique.152 **--** En ce début de XVIème, après des siècles d’absence, les dieux anciens “sont de retour” à Fontainebleau. Ils tapissent les murs, remplissent les bibliothèques, les salons royaux, les salles sévères des écoles universitaires. Leur présence inaugure une nouvelle mythographie et presque une nouvelle théologie païenne. Ce sont des dieux et des héros élégants, sophistiqués, très différents de ceux que, au milieu des années vingt, un grand élève de Raphaël, Giulio Romano, s’inspirant aux modèles antiques, inscrit de leur naturel de chair toute rosée et déjà flasque, où tant de maniéristes et de baroques trouveront leur inspiration, sur les murs de Palazzo Te à Mantoue. .La censure ecclésiastique et aussi politique déchaînent immédiatement une forte polémique (dont, à la fin du siècle et au terme du Concile de Trente, l’ouvrage de Gabriele Paleotti sanctionnera victorieusement la fin) à l’encontre de ce très heureux moment de paganisme potentiellement absolu, subversif, qui me semble proposer non pas tant un “retour à l’Esprit Classique”, qu’un “retour de l’Esprit Classique”. En songeant davantage et d’abord à la “cour païenne” du roi très chrétien à Fontainebleau plutôt qu’à la Rome “ville sacrée” du grand baroque de Bernin, je parlerais donc d’une « Présence réelle » de la mythologie paganisante que certains grands Italiens entent en France. -- gobs of footnotes and references - downloaded pdf to Note
article  revues.org  art_history  literary_history  cultural_history  religious_history  16thC  France  Renaissance  pagans  gods-antiquity  cosmology  hermeticism  Neoplatonism  François_I  Henri_II  elite_culture  court_culture  Italian_influence  Counter-Reformation  baroque  myth  bibliography  artists  exiles  patronage  downloaded  EF-add 
september 2014 by dunnettreader
Matteo Residori - Néoplatonisme et scepticisme dans le Malpiglio secondo du Tasse | Italique, V, 2002, p. 93-108.
« «Del fuggir la moltitudine ». Néoplatonisme et scepticisme dans le Malpiglio secondo du Tasse », Italique [En ligne], V | 2002, mis en ligne le 06 octobre 2009, DOI : 10.4000/italique.150 **--** La composition, en 1584-1585, du dyptique de dialogues consacré à Vincenzo et à Giovanlorenzo Malpiglio semble destinée à illustrer la double vocation de l’œuvre dialogique du Tasse, telle que l’auteur la définit à la même époque dans son discours sur le dialogue.1Le malpiglio overo de la corte, qui a pour protagoniste le gentilhomme lucquois Vincenzo Malpiglio, trésorier du duc de Ferrare, est un exemple parfait de dialogue « civil ou moral », portant sur les problèmes éthiques et politiques de la vie de cour. Le malpiglio secondo overo del fuggir la moltitudine semble pencher plutôt du côté du genre « spéculatif », qui a pour objet les questions concernant « la science et la vérité ». Mais cette définition n’est pas assez précise. En mettant en scène le fils de Vincenzo, Giovanlorenzo, jeune homme brillant qui aspire à l’otium littéraire et philosophique, le Tasse propose dans le malpiglio secondo une réflexion sur les fondements mêmes de l’activité spéculative, et, de ce fait, sur la légitimité de sa propre entreprise littéraire. Dans la lecture du dialogue il faudra tenir compte de cette dimension réflexive, tout en essayant d’en préciser les circonstances et la portée réelle. D’autre part, la complexité du parcours que le Tasse dessine dans le texte, qui compte parmi les plus ambigus des dialogues, demande au lecteur de porter une attention particulière aux modèles qui en organisent la texture composite. C’est dans cette direction que nous avons orienté notre lecture, pour essayer de démonter la machine complexe du malpiglio secondo et d’éclairer ainsi quelques uns de ses enjeux essentiels. -- downloaded pdf to Note
article  revues.org  16thC  literary_history  intellectual_history  cultural_history  Italy  Renaissance  Tasso  dialogue  moral_philosophy  political_philosophy  metaphysics  epistemology  Neoplatonism  scepticism  otium  natural_philosophy  downloaded  EF-add 
september 2014 by dunnettreader
Francisco Rico - Pétrarque au partage de midi | Italique, VII, 2004, 9-26
Italique [En ligne], VII | 2004, mis en ligne le 05 octobre 2009, DOI : 10.4000/italique.124. **--** dans voi ch’ascoltate comme en bien des endroits de l’œuvre de Pétrarque – qu’il s’agisse de prose ou de vers, de latin ou de langue vulgaire –, «errore» constitue à peu de choses près un terme technique emprunté à la tradition stoïcienne pour désigner la falsa opinio qui trouble la vision du commun des mortels, alimente les « speranze », le « dolore » et les autres affectus ou perturbationes animi, provoque la désagrégation de l’esprit en « pensieri » aussi « sparsi » que les rimes venant les refléter. De toute évidence, Pétrarque apparaît ici comme un « altr’ uom » : il n’est plus ce qu’il était autrefois, il arbore désormais l’air grave du sage stoïcien et n’hésite pas à dénoncer les poèmes du canzoniere comme autant de rerum vulgarium fragmenta dans leur fond et dans leur forme, comme de vulgaires morceaux dignes du « popol » ignorant. Il ne s’agit pas ici d’une simple fiction plus ou moins placée sous le signe des précédents bien connus offerts par la littérature latine et les troubadours : à plusieurs reprises, l’illustre Italien dont nous commémorons le septième centenaire a voulu se convertir en « altr’ uom » et y est parvenu. -- J’aimerais attirer un instant votre attention sur un des moments décisifs de cette trajectoire passionnée et émouvante : ce moment du partage de midi où, à la croisée des chemins, déjà à l’âge mûr, Pétrarque résout les incertitudes qui l’avaient hanté durant ses longues années de formation et s’engage d’un pas ferme sur la voie qui le conduira à son plein épanouissement, à la fois en tant qu’écrivain et en tant qu’homme. -- downloaded pdf to Note
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september 2014 by dunnettreader
Alessandra Villa - Le partage des ‘droits’ sur l’œuvre littéraire à la renaissance. Les cas d’Isabella d’Este | Italique, VIII, 2005, p. 45-71
Italique [En ligne], VIII | 2005, mis en ligne le 05 octobre 2009, DOI : 10.4000/italique.116. **--** la marquise s’avéra préférer, lorsqu’une œuvre lui était offerte, l’exclusivité de l’objet et le privilège de posséder une œuvre peu répandue et dont elle pouvait contrôler la diffusion ultérieure. Tout en répondant parfaitement à l’image d’une femme que l’historiographie dépeint véhémente, voire tyrannique, cette idée était très familière aux mécènes de la Renaissance et, à vrai dire, de tous les temps, du fait que la rareté est l’un des critères principaux pour estimer la valeur d’une quelconque collection, qu’elle soit d’œuvres d’art ou de livres. D’autre part, si les reproductions des œuvres d’art ne gardaient pas aux yeux des contemporains toute la valeur des originaux, les œuvres littéraires, ainsi que les œuves théâtrales et musicales, possédaient un haut degré de ‘volatilité’, pouvant être copiées à peu de frais et sans porter préjudice à leur valeur intrinsèque. Leur reproduction n’impliquait pas une perte d’aura. -- Pour protéger les trésors de leurs bibliothèques, les seigneurs se montraient jaloux et méfiants : ils prêtaient peu volontiers, et seulement à des amis fiables, auxquels ils demandaient cependant des garanties, parfois même en argent. Le prêt des œuvres était réglé par la loi du do ut des, et l’emprunteur était soumis au serment, implicite ou explicite, de ne pas trahir la confiance du prêteur en divulguant ultérieurement le manuscrit. Selon Luzio et Renier, on pourrait écrire une histoire de la littérature italienne de la période en étudiant les dédicaces offertes à Isabella. Vu la qualité et la quantité des œuvres et des auteurs intéressés par un tel recensement, cela paraît une affirmation bien fondée. Mais outre l’honneur, Isabella semble avoir réclamé un autre genre de prérogatives, plus matériel et à la fois plus indéterminé : le droit de partager avec l’auteur leur gestion. -- downloaded pdf to Note
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september 2014 by dunnettreader
Arnaud Tripet - Pétrarque, la parole silencieuse | Italique, VIII, 2005, p. 9-25.
Italique [En ligne], VIII | 2005, mis en ligne le 05 octobre 2009, DOI : 10.4000/italique.112. *--* Les historiens s’accordent en général pour attribuer à Pétrarque une place inaugurale dans la culture dite humaniste, une culture qui sacrifie avant tout aux divinités de la parole. On restitue alors celle des Anciens. On valorise le verbe en lui conférant un pouvoir inédit sur les âmes, la capacité de les convertir au bien, au vrai et au beau. Son œuvre tant latine qu’italienne fournirait presque à l’infini des citations où la puissance bienfaisante du discours est proclamée au sein d’une épiphanie antique de la sagesse. Bientôt, et sous son influence, vont se créer en Italie, puis en Europe des écoles parallèles à celles déjà en place. Dans leurs programmes humanistes, le traditionnel trivium ne suffira plus, avec la logique, la rhétorique et la grammaire, pour qualifier les disciplines du langage en vue de la maîtrise ès arts. Va s’ajouter l’étude de l’histoire et de la poésie, laquelle n’existait précédemment que comme une variante de la rhétorique. Le souci d’élégance expressive ira de pair avec une certaine laïcisation des contenus. Humanisme dont on dira en simplifiant outrancièrement qu’il se construit ad maiorem hominis gloriam, de l’homme « parlant » en tout cas, et tenté souvent par une copia un peu complaisante, voire incontinente. Une question se pose alors : le silence va-t-il tempérer cette abondance ? Va-t-il nuancer la tentation de croire que le mot a valeur ontologique, et que l’on est ce qu’on dit ? Va-t-il suggérer que l’on est tout autant ce qu’on tait ? Sans autre préambule, je voudrais produire deux exemples tirés de Pétrarque. Ils parlent d’eux-mêmes et le silence y prend rang avec pleine dignité dans son discours.
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september 2014 by dunnettreader
Lina Bolzoni - Les Asolani de Pietro Bembo, ou le double portrait de l’amour | Italique, IX, 2006, p. 9-27
Italique [En ligne], IX | 2006, mis en ligne le 29 mai 2009, DOI : 10.4000/italique.103. **--** Les Asolani réalisent en outre une synthèse complexe de traditions et de modèles différents, littéraires et philosophiques, anciens et modernes, latins et en langue vulgaire. Ainsi la tradition du dialogue latin, classique et humaniste, est réécrite en vulgaire et utilisée également comme cadre et comme commentaire à un choix de poésies ; si le cadre narratif renvoie à son tour au Décaméron, le choix de poésies s’inspire de plus en plus du Pétrarque du Canzoniere. Différentes traditions philosophiques – en particulier la réflexion moderne sur l’amour des néoplatoniciens florentins – sont utilisées pour donner une nouvelle dignité théorique à la tradition lyrique en vulgaire et en même temps pour réaliser une difficile réconciliation entre vie et littérature, entre autobiographie et création d’un modèle idéal. La célébrité des asolani n’est pas seulement italienne : une traduction française, par Jean Martin, est publiée à Paris en 1545 et elle sera réimprimée plusieurs fois au cours du XVIe siècle.En outre, il ne faut pas oublier que Bembo est le protagoniste du dernier livre du cortegiano grâce justement à l’autorité dont il jouissait pour avoir écrit les asolani ; la célébrité européenne du cortegiano contribue à amplifier aussi la renommée de notre texte. -- downloaded pdf to Note
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september 2014 by dunnettreader
Jean Balsamo - « Qual l’alto Ægeo... » : Montaigne et l’essai des poètes italiens | Italique, XI, 2008, p.109-129.
Italique [En ligne], XI | 2008, mis en ligne le 01 février 2012, DOI : 10.4000/italique.213. **--** La poésie est l’expression privilégiée de l’émotion pour Montaigne.1Il cite tout au long des Essais d’innombrables vers, par lesquels il exprime tout ce que sa prose ne peut dire. Ces citations contribuent à un effet d’hétérogénéité stylistique et linguistique, qui définit l’originalité même du livre, dans le cadre d’une « rhétorique des citations » et d’une esthétique de la surprise et de la varietas. Ces vers sont en latin pour la plupart d’entre eux, constituant une véritable anthologie, d’Ovide et de Virgile, cités dès le chapitre 2 du premier livre, à Horace, qui conclut le dernier chapitre du livre III. Montaigne cite également 70 vers de poètes italiens. Ces fragments en langue italienne sont plus importants que les vers français, si l’on excepte, dans les trois premières éditions, le recueil des 29 sonnets d’Etienne de La Boétie, qui constitue à lui seul la matière d’un chapitre dédié à la comtesse de Guiche. La langue italienne, sous le règne de Henri III, était un signe de distinction. De tels vers étaient l’expression ostentatoire d’une culture mondaine, que le livre partageait avec ses lecteurs, dames et gentilshommes dont Montaigne voulait être le pédagogue sans pédantisme. -- downloaded pdf to Note
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september 2014 by dunnettreader
Volker Kapp - Les Exempla dans les Triumphi et la culture oratoire de Pétrarque | Italique, XII, 2009, p. 9-31.
Italique [En ligne], XII | 2009, mis en ligne le 01 novembre 2012 - DOI : 10.4000/italique.220 *--* Les réserves des lecteurs du XXIe siècle contrastent avec le succès fulminant des Triumphi au Quattrocento dans les domaines littéraire et artistique. Le nombre élevé de manuscrits, ... confirme la haute estime dont ils jouirent pendant la Renaissance...pour ne pas parler des tableaux consacrés au thème du triomphe et influencés, plus ou moins, par Pétrarque. Pour expliquer ce changement surprenant des paramè­tres de la réception, on peut invoquer les divergences qui nous séparent de la civilisation humaniste.-- Et n’est-il pas légitime de renvoyer à la rhétorique qui caractérise l’humanisme européen précisément depuis Pétrarque dont on connaît l’ambition de se détacher par-là de la littérature et de la philosophie médiévales ? ...Nous proposons d’analyser cette problématique en insistant sur la figure rhétorique de l’exemplum. Afin de saisir l’impact de ce procédé à l’intérieur de la culture oratoire de Pétrarque, il faudra identifier quelques figures dans cette poésie, situer celle-ci parmi les formes du discours et évaluer ce qu’on a qualifié de « passion archéologique » de notre auteur, passion, dont relèvent les exempla tant dans son œuvre historique que dans les Triumphi. -- montrer que les exempla servent à mettre en scène le théâtre de la mémoire dans lequel le 'je' lyrique explore les présupposées et les enjeux de son éloge lyrique de Laure. Toute réflexion sur la rhétorique de Pétrarque doit partir de l’affinité entre l’art oratoire et la philosophie morale qu’il ne cesse de postuler. Cette convic­tion qu’il tire de Cicéron marque le dialogue intitulé De eloquentia du De remediis utriusque fortune. -- downloaded pdf to Note
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september 2014 by dunnettreader
Gabriele Bucchi - Au delà du tombeau: Pyrame et Thisbé dans deux réécritures de la Renaissance italienne | Italique, XIII, 2010, p. 53-80
Italique [En ligne], XIII | 2010, mis en ligne le 23 juin 2014, URL : http://italique.revues.org/282 ; DOI : 10.4000/italique.282 *--* La fable de Pyrame et Thisbé tirée des Métamorphoses d’Ovide (iv 55-166) fut pendant le Moyen Âge et la Renaissance une des plus connues parmi celles du poème latin. -- je voudrais prendre en considération deux réécritures, parues à une année de distance l’une de l’autre dans deux recueils poétiques de la Renaissance italienne: la Favola di Piramo e Tisbe des Amori di Bernardo Tasso (1534) et du poème du même titre paru une année plus tard dans les Rime toscane (1535) du mystérieux «Amomo», un poète italien exilé en France, que Nicole Bingen a récemment proposé d’identifier avec le Napolitain Antonio Caracciolo. -- je souhaiterais mettre en évidence la présence d’intertextes qui opèrent dans la réécriture de l’auteur classique. En effet, tout en restant dans un dialogue privilégié avec le texte latin, les deux auteurs se montrent néanmoins sensibles aux suggestions d’autres textes en langue vulgaire qui s’étaient à leur tour inspirés des Métamorphoses. C’est le cas, comme on le verra, de la paraphrase de Boccace dans le De claris mulieribus et surtout de deux épisodes de l’Orlando Furioso, dont le modèle se révèle (surtout pour Amomo) un vrai paradigme pour la scène de l’adieu des amants in articulo mortis. Finalement, je voudrais suggérer une lecture parallèle de l’épisode des funérailles de Clorinde dans la Gerusalemme liberata de Torquato Tasso (xii) avec un passage de la fable ovidienne réécrite par son père. -- downloaded pdf to Note
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september 2014 by dunnettreader
Thomas Hunkeler - Dante à Lyon : des « rime petrose » aux « durs épigrammes » | Italique IX, 2008, p. 9-27
Journal - Italique: poèsie italienne de la Renaissance -- Dante traverse le seizième siècle français de façon spectrale, à l’ombre quasi totale de son plus célèbre confrère et compatriote Pétrarque. Au succès de ce dernier semble répondre négativement ce qu’Arturo Farinelli a appelé, de façon certes un peu schématique, la sfortuna di dante : l’infortune de Dante en France.En effet, l’écart entre ces deux couronnes d’Italie ne cessera de se creuser : tandis que le poète du canzoniere est en passe de donner naissance à une dynamique véritablement européenne, Dante au contraire se trouve relégué, et cela pour de longues années encore, dans la préhistoire poussiéreuse de la seule littérature italienne. Aux yeux des poètes de la Pléiade, Du Bellay et Ronsard en tête, Dante doit être écarté des modèles à imiter ; précisément, pourrait-on dire, parce que son œuvre, et peut-être surtout la divine comédie, paraissent inimitables et inassimilables. Le canzoniere de Pétrarque, en revanche, semble se prêter à merveille à des usages visant en fin de compte l’appropriation de sa substance et de son prestige, et la transformation de ce qui paraît étrange ou étranger en un corpus de référence désormais maîtrisé. Dans la grande entreprise de défense et illustration de la culture française engagée par la Pléiade, Dante ne peut pas avoir de place puisque son œuvre résiste, contrairement à celle de Pétrarque, à toute forme de translatio – même lorsqu’elle est traduite. Mais ce qui est vrai pour la France en général ne l’est pas forcément pour Lyon -- downloaded pdf to Note
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september 2014 by dunnettreader
Niccolo Machiavelli, Il Principe, edited by L. Arthur Burd, with an Introduction by Lord Acton (Oxford: Clarendon Press, 1891) - Online Library of Liberty
Facsimile PDF 23.8 MB This is a facsimile or image-based PDF made from scans of the original book. -- A heavily annotated edition by Burd with the famous introduction by Lord Acton. The text is in the original Italian. -- Burd has an enormous amount of context- historical background for all the players before and after invasion of Italy - and cross-references to other works by Machiavelli, Guicciardini etc -picks up language usage, concepts etc - and comments on previous commentaries on The Prince with which he agrees or has differences -- downloaded pdf to Note -- probably available in Google_Books
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september 2014 by dunnettreader
John Emerich Edward Dalberg, Lord Acton, Historical Essays and Studies, edited by John Neville Figgis and Reginald Vere Laurence (London: Macmillan, 1907) - Online Library of Liberty
A collection of Acton’s articles from journals such as the Quarterly Review, the English Historical Review, the Nineteenth Century, the Rambler, the Home and Foreign Review, the North British Review, and the Bridgnorth Journal. *--* I: WOLSEY AND THE DIVORCE OF HENRY VIII. *-* II: THE BORGIAS AND THEIR LATEST HISTORIAN. &-* III: SECRET HISTORY OF CHARLES II. *-* IV: THE CIVIL WAR IN AMERICA ITS PLACE IN HISTORY. *-* V: THE RISE AND FALL OF THE MEXICAN EMPIRE *-* VI: CALVIN *-* VII: THE CAUSES OF THE FRANCO-PRUSSIAN WAR *-* VIII: THE WAR OF 1870 *-* IX: GEORGE ELIOT’S LIFE. *-* X: MR. BUCKLE’S THESIS AND METHOD. *-* XI: MR. BUCKLE’S PHILOSOPHY OF HISTORY. *-* XII: GERMAN SCHOOLS OF HISTORy. *-* XIII: TALLEYRAND’S MEMOIRS. *-* XIV: THE LIFE OF LORD HOUGHTON *-* XV: A HISTORY OF THE PAPACY DURING THE PERIOD OF THE REFORMATION. *-*. XVI: A SHORT HISTORY OF NAPOLEON THE FIRST. By John Robert Seeley THE FIRST NAPOLEON: A SKETCH, POLITICAL AND MILITARY. By John Codman Ropes. *-* XVII: MABILLON ET LA SOCIÉTÉ DE L’ABBAYE DE SAINT-GERMAIN-DES-PRÉS À LA FIN DU XVIIE SIÈCLE. Par Emmanuel de Broglie. *-* XVIII: A HISTORY OF ENGLAND, 1837-1880.1 By the Rev. J. Franck Bright, D.D., Master of University College, Oxford. *-* XIX: A HISTORY OF THE FRENCH REVOLUTION. By H. Morse Stephens. Vol. II. *-* XX: WILHELM VON GIESEBRECHT -- downloaded kindle version of html
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september 2014 by dunnettreader
John Emerich Edward Dalberg, Lord Acton, Lectures on Modern History, ed. John Neville Figgis and Reginald Vere Laurence (London: Macmillan, 1906) - Online Library of Liberty
These are the lectures given by the great English classical liberal historian, Lord Acton, in the academic years 1899-1901 at Cambridge University. It is a survey of modern history from the rise of the modern nation state to the American Revolution. The book also contains his “Inaugural Lecture” of 1895. *---* INTRODUCTION LORD ACTON AS PROFESSOR *-* INAUGURAL LECTURE ON THE STUDY OF HISTORY *-* I: BEGINNING OF THE MODERN STATE. *-* II: THE NEW WORLD. *-* III: THE RENAISSANCE *-* IV: LUTHER. *-& V: THE COUNTER–REFORMATION. *-* VI: CALVIN AND HENRY VIII. *-* VII: PHILIP II., MARY STUART, AND ELIZABETH. *-* VIII: THE HUGUENOTS AND THE LEAGUE. *-* IX: HENRY THE FOURTH AND RICHELIEU. *-* X: THE THIRTY YEARS’ WAR. *-* XI: THE PURITAN REVOLUTION. *-* XII: THE RISE OF THE WHIGS. *-* XIII: THE ENGLISH REVOLUTION. *-* XIV: LEWIS THE FOURTEENTH. *-* XV: THE WAR OF THE SPANISH SUCCESSION. *-* XVI: THE HANOVERIAN SETTLEMENT. *-* XVII: PETER THE GREAT AND THE RISE OF PRUSSIA. *-* XVIII: FREDERIC THE GREAT. *-* XIX: THE AMERICAN REVOLUTION. *-* APPENDIX I. *-* APPENDIX II - NOTES TO THE INAUGURAL LECTURE ON THE STUDY OF HISTORY -- downloaded kindle version of html
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september 2014 by dunnettreader
Jose Rabasa, Masayuki Sato, Edoardo Tortarolo, Daniel Woolf - The Oxford History of Historical Writing: Volume 3: 1400-1800 : : Amazon.com:
Volume III of The Oxford History of Historical Writing contains essays by leading scholars on the writing of history globally during the early modern era, from 1400 to 1800. The volume proceeds in geographic order from east to west, beginning in Asia and ending in the Americas. It aims at once to provide a selective but authoritative survey of the field and, where opportunity allows, to provoke cross-cultural comparisons. This is the third of five volumes in a series that explores representations of the past from the beginning of writing to the present day, and from all over the world. -- only hdbk
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august 2014 by dunnettreader
Encyclopedia of the Early Modern World, by the Gale Group, Inc. | Answers.com
The history of Europe from the mid-15th century until the French Revolution. Includes notable events such as wars and revolutions as well as broader processes like the Renaissance and the Enlightenment; biographical information on leading figures; individual national histories; and meaningful developments in the arts, religion, politics, exploration and warfare.
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august 2014 by dunnettreader
Jim Hinch on The Swerve : How the World Became Modern - Why Stephen Greenblatt is Wrong — and Why It Matters | The Los Angeles Review of Books
Grotesque distortion of the Middle Ages in order to turn his story into a triumphilist celebration of secular modernism. -- notes Michael Dirda found it a shallow non-fiction potboiler that rubbed him the wrong way but couldn't fully pin down why. Hinch thinks the book garnered the big non-fiction awards because it told the literarati what they wanted to hear about themselves. Hinch does give the tale of finding the manuscript, and its diffusion high marks.
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august 2014 by dunnettreader
John Passmore, The Perfectibility of Man ( 3rd edition 2000) - Online Library of Liberty
John Passmore, The Perfectibility of Man (3rd ed.) (Indianapolis: Liberty Fund, 2000). 07/13/2014. <http://oll.libertyfund.org/titles/670> -- A reviewer of the original edition in 1970 of The Perfectibility of Man well summarizes the scope and significance of this renowned work by one of the leading philosophers of the twentieth century: “Beginning with an analytic discussion of the various ways in which perfectibility has been interpreted, Professor Passmore traces its long history from the Greeks to the present day, by way of Christianity, orthodox and heterodox, the Renaissance, the Enlightenment, anarchism, utopias, communism, psychoanalysis, and evolutionary theories of man and society. Both in its broad sweep and in countless supporting reflections, it is a journey through spiritual scenery of the most majestic and exhilarating kind.” Thoroughly and elegantly, Passmore explores the history of the idea of perfectibility – manifest in the ideology of perfectibilism – and its consequences, which have invariably been catastrophic for individual liberty and responsibility in private, social, economic, and political life. -- downloaded pdf to Note
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july 2014 by dunnettreader
The Works of John Adams, vol. 5 (Defence of the Constitutions Vols. II and III) - Online Library of Liberty
John Adams, The Works of John Adams, Second President of the United States: with a Life of the Author, Notes and Illustrations, by his Grandson Charles Francis Adams (Boston: Little, Brown and Co., 1856). 10 volumes. Vol. 5. 07/12/2014. <http://oll.libertyfund.org/titles/2103> -- A 10 volume collection of Adams’ most important writings, letters, and state papers, edited by his grandson. Vol. 5 contains volumes 2 [Italian Republics of the Middle Ages -Florence and Machiavelli] and 3 [other Italian Republics of the Middle Ages] of Defence of the Constitutions of the US. -- downloaded pdf to Note
books  etexts  18thC  Medieval  13thC  14thC  15thC  Renaissance  Italy  city_states  republicanism  republics-Ancient_v_Modern  Florence  Machiavelli  political_philosophy  political_culture  political_order  faction  class_conflict  social_order  downloaded  EF-add 
july 2014 by dunnettreader
Heinrich Rommen, The Natural Law: A Study in Legal and Social History and Philosophy (1936) trans. Thomas R. Hanley, ed. Russell Hittinger - Online Library of Liberty
Heinrich Rommen, The Natural Law: A Study in Legal and Social History and Philosophy, trans. Thomas R. Hanley. Introduction and Bibliography by Russell Hittinger (Indianapolis: Liberty Fund 1998). 07/11/2014. <http://oll.libertyfund.org/titles/676> -- Originally published in German in 1936, The Natural Law is the first work to clarify the differences between traditional natural law as represented in the writings of Cicero, Aquinas, and Hooker and the revolutionary doctrines of natural rights espoused by Hobbes, Locke, and Rousseau. Beginning with the legacies of Greek and Roman life and thought, Rommen traces the natural law tradition to its displacement by legal positivism and concludes with what the author calls “the reappearance” of natural law thought in more recent times. In seven chapters each Rommen explores “The History of the Idea of Natural Law” and “The Philosophy and Content of the Natural Law.” In his introduction, Russell Hittinger places Rommen’s work in the context of contemporary debate on the relevance of natural law to philosophical inquiry and constitutional interpretation. - part of the German émigrés to the US - he sees the same sort of 17thC break as Strauss - wound up at Georgetown - didn't download
books  etexts  ancient_history  medieval_history  Renaissance  Reformation  17thC  18thC  19thC  20thC  intellectual_history  legal_history  legal_system  legal_theory  natural_law  positivism  modernity  entre_deux_guerres  moral_philosophy  relativism  natural_rights  Strauss 
july 2014 by dunnettreader
Baron John Emerich Edward Dalberg-Acton, Lord Acton - Lectures on Modern History (1921 reprint 1907) - Google Books
Editors - with Introduction, John Neville Figgis, Reginald Vere Laurence -- Contents -- Inaugural Lecture on the Study of History *--* LECTURES ON MODERN HISTORY *--* Beginning of the Modern State *--* The New World *--* The Renaissance *--* Luther *--* The CounterReformation *--* Calvin and Henry VIII *--* The Puritan Revolution *--* The Rise of the Whigs *--* The English Revolution *--* Lewis XIV *--* The War of the Spanish Succession *--* The Hanoverian Settlement *--* Peter the Great and the Rise of Prussia *--* Frederic the Great *--* Philip II Mary Stuart and Elizabeth *--* The Huguenots and the League *--* Henry the Fourth and Richelieu *--* The Thirty Years War *--* The American Revolution *--* Letter to Contributors to the Cambridge Modern History *--* Notes to Inaugural Lecture -- downloaded pdf to Note
books  etexts  Google_Books  historiography-19thC  historians-and-politics  historians-and-religion  religious_history  politics-and-religion  political_history  nation-state  modernity-emergence  Europe-Early_Modern  Reformation  Counter-Reformation  British_history  British_politics  English_Civil_War  Wars_of_Religion  Thirty_Years_War  War_of_Spanish_Succession  Hanoverian_Succession  colonialism  American_Revolution  Louis_XIV  Henry_VIII  Lutherans  Calvinist  Peter_the_Great  Frederick_the_Great  Elizabeth  Mary_Queen_of_Scots  Spanish_Empire  Huguenots  Renaissance  Puritans  Whigs  downloaded  EF-add 
july 2014 by dunnettreader
Baron John Emerich Edward Dalberg-Acton, Lord Acton - Historical essays & studies (1907) - Google Books
Contents -- WOLSEY AND THE DIVORCE OF HENRY VIII. *--* The Borgias and their Latest Historian. *--* Secret History of Charles II. *--* The Civil War in America. *--* The Rise and Fall of the Mexican Empire. *--* Cavour. *--* The Causes of the Franco-Prussian War. *--* The War of 1870 *--* German Schools of History *--* Talleyrands Memoirs. *--* The Life of Lord Houghton. *--* A History of the Papacy during the Period of the Reformation. *--* A Sketch Political and Military. *--* Mabillon et la Société de l'Abbaye de Saint Germain des Pres a la Fin du XVIIeme Siècle. *--* A History of England 1837-1880 *--* A History of the French Revolution. *--* George Eliots Life. *--* Mr Buckles Thesis and Method. *--* Mr Buckles Philosophy of History. *--* Wilhelm von Giesebrecht *--* Appendix - Letter to Bishop Creighton -- downloaded pdf to Note
books  etexts  Google_Books  intellectual_history  19thC  British_history  historiography-19thC  historiography-17thC  historicism  Reformation  Counter-Reformation  Papacy  Henry_VIII  Renaissance  15thC  16thC  17thC  18thC  French_Revolution  Counter-Enlightenment  Romanticism  German_Idealism  philosophy_of_history  US_Civil_War  Italy  diplomatic_history  Talleyrand  Napoleonic_Wars  Napoleon_III  empires  French_Empire  Eliot_George  Franco-German_relations  Franco-Prussian_war  Victorian  Edwardian  downloaded  EF-add 
july 2014 by dunnettreader
Claire Judde de Larivière - The 'Public' and the 'Private' in 16thC Venice: From Medieval Economy to Early Modern State | JSTOR: Historical Social Research / Historische Sozialforschung, Vol. 37, No. 4 (142) (2012), pp. 76-94
This article analyses the Venetian public galleys' expeditions during the sixteenth century, as a case study for understanding the relationships between patricians and the State, and the way in which the 'public' and the 'private' roles were reorganized in the late Middle Ages. Going further the explanations usually given, the article tries to explain the decline of the public galleys, and emphasizes the symbolic, cultural, political and ideological factors that had also led to the abandonment of public navigation. It seeks to reintegrate economic considerations, practices, actions and actors into their social, political and ideological contexts, and thus avoids isolating economic phenomena and economic thinking from their political background. Doing so, it argues that the abandonment of public navigation in Venice was the corollary of the gradual differentiation between the State and the ruling class that was typical of the earliest stages of modernity. -- interesting bibliography ranging from Frederic Lane to Craig Muldrew -- downloaded pdf to Note
article  jstor  economic_history  16thC  Venice  shipping  public_goods  public_enterprise  private_enterprise  elites  stratification  privatization  capitalism  imperialism  political_culture  economic_culture  elite_culture  political_economy  Renaissance  modernity-emergence  social_order  public_finance  financial_economics  financial_innovation  common_good  republicanism  republics-Ancient_v_Modern  mercantilism  empire-and_business  downloaded  EF-add 
june 2014 by dunnettreader
Rachel Trickett - The Difficulties of Defining and Categorizing in the Augustan Period | JSTOR: New Literary History, Vol. 1, No. 2 (Winter, 1970), pp. 163-179
Attacks analysis that, in its own terms and originally is insightful, when elevated to a commonplace that locks works, authors or periods into rigid or inappropriate categories -- examples Eliot re metaphysical poets, Lovejoy Great Chain of Being -- slams Mack for trying to use Great Chain of Being to elevate Essay on Man to Renaissance philosophy. She doesn't think much of the poem apparently, but she's right that Pope uses the metaphor sparingly and in a far more flexible way than Renaissance, appropriate to the empirical natural history and philosophy of his age. Generally lots of useful comments on Restoration and Augustan literature, periodization and lit crit fashions. Downloaded pdf to Note
article  jstor  literary_history  lit_crit  historiography  Renaissance  16thC  17thC  18thC  19thC  Eliot_TS  Donne  Dryden  Pope  Johnson  Essay_on_Man  Lovejoy  Great_Chain_of_Being  diction  meter  couplet  satire  Atterbury  downloaded  EF-add 
june 2014 by dunnettreader
Susan Royal, review - Matthew Milner. The Senses and the English Reformation | H-Net Reviews
Milner points outthat the scholarship on this topic has inherited “protestant” views of late medieval sensuality... the first half of the book is devoted to a deep analysis of the senses and sensual experiences of worship prior to the Reformation. Chapter 1 lays out late medieval theories of sensing, explaining the usurpation of Augustinian principles by the revival of Aristotelian thought (chiefly Thomist). Milner explains the way sight, hearing, smell, taste, and touch affected the components of tripartite anthropology, the body, spirit, and soul. -- ... the Renaissance rationalization of sense experiences, detailing the critique of medieval epistemological hierarchies and ...a shift from the tripartite anthropology of body, spirit, and soul to a dualist model of body and mind. Milner demonstrates the persistence of Aristotelian sensory theories in Tudor thought, -- Chapter 6 focuses mainly on the 1530s and 1540s, ...how reformers grappled with their position on sensual affectivity: while it was easy to reject aspects of traditional piety, it was much harder to describe how English churchgoers were supposed to connect sensibly with newly reformed practices. ...the senses into early doctrinal debates over justification and sanctification that would not be resolved until late in Elizabeth’s reign. ... -- the transition from recognizing abuse and misuse of traditional religion to its complete rejection with iconoclasm as the antidote. ...how parishioners were taught to replace traditional Eucharistic piety with spiritual communion, arguing that this in fact offered an even more sensuous experience of the sacred. -- the complex debates among conformists and nonconformists about sensing during worship in Elizabethan England. Milner argues that divisions ...concerning extemporaneous prayer, set readings, and even preaching were firmly rooted in concerns about hearing practices, and that the vestment controversy and arguments over the sign of the cross at baptism were connected to tensions about sight. Sitting somewhat awkwardly among all of these debates were those evangelicals receptive to the notion of adiaphora,..another source of conflict between conformists and nonconformists.
books  reviews  religious_history  church_history  intellectual_history  15thC  16thC  British_history  Church_of_England  religious_culture  liturgy  Puritans  perception  psychology  moral_psychology  soul  mind-body  Augustinian  Aristotelian  Thomism  Renaissance  salvation  piety  sacraments  EF-add 
june 2014 by dunnettreader
Stuart Elden, 2013 The Birth of Territory, reviewed by Gerry Kearns | Society and Space - Environment and Planning D
The Birth of Territory interrogates texts from various dates to see if they describe rule as the legal control over a determined space. Time after time we learn that a set of political writings that concern land, law, terrain, sovereignty, empire, or related concepts do not articulate a fully-fledged notion of territory. We may end up asking like the proverbial kids in the back of the car: “Are we there yet.” Elden is certainly able to show that earlier formulations are reworked in later periods, as with the discussion of Roman law in the medieval period; there is a lot in the political thought of each period, however, that relates to land and power but does not get reworked in later times. This means that what really holds many of the chapters together is that they are studies of how land and power were discussed at that time, and that is not so very far from taking land and power as quasi-universals. In fact, there is probably a continuum between categories that have greater or lesser historical specificity, rather than there being a clear distinction between the two. Yet, I must admit that this singular focus gives a welcome coherence to the book for all that it seems to discard large parts of the exposition as not required for later chapters. -- see review for Elden views on Westphalia and HRE contra Teschke ; review references classic and recent works on geography, terrain, law,mapping
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june 2014 by dunnettreader
Branko Milanovic - globalinequality: Where I disagree and agree with Debraj Ray’s critique of Piketty’s Capital in the 21s Century - June 2014
Debraj’s error consists...in not realizing that normal capitalist relations of production (where capitalists tend to be rich) are forgotten when we look at economic laws in an abstract manner. Not doing that is precisely a great virtue of Piketty’s book. Surely, (a) if capital/labor proportions were the same across income distribution; (b) if, more extremely, capitalists were poor and workers rich; (c) if capital were state-owned, all of these contradictions would disappear. But none of (a)-(c) conditions holds in contemporary capitalism. So Piketty’s economic laws and contradictions of capitalism do exist. Where do I agree wit Debraj? That Kuznets curve cannot be easily dismissed. I am currently working on the idea that we are now witnessing the upswing of the 2nd Kuznets curve since the Industrial revolution. Moreover I believe this is not only the 2nd but perhaps 5th, 6th or 10th curve over the past 1000 years in the West. Does this agreement on Kuznets then, by itself, imply that my defense of Piketty’s mechanism cannot be right or consistent? Not at all. Piketty isolated the key features of capitalist inequality trends when they are left to themselves: the forces of divergence (inequality) will win. But there are also other forces: capital destruction, wars, confiscatory taxation, hyperinflation, pressure of trade unions, high taxation of capital, rising importance of labor and higher wages, that at different times go the other way, and, in a Kuznets-like fashion, drive inequality down. So, I believe, Piketty has beautifully uncovered the forces of divergence, mentioned some of the forces of convergence, but did not lay to rest the ghost of Kuznets inverted U shaped curve
books  reviews  economic_history  economic_theory  political_economy  Piketty  capitalism  wealth  labor  wages  Marx  macroeconomics  economic_growth  inequality  cliometrics  Kuznets_curve  savings  investment  profit  rentiers  consumers  Medieval  Renaissance  Europe-Early_Modern  Great_Divergence  EF-add 
june 2014 by dunnettreader
Kenan Malik - THE SCIENTIFIC INSTRUMENT AND ITS SOUL | Pandaemonium - May 2014
The science writer Philip Ball recently published a post on his blog Homunculus in which he wondered why modern scientific instruments seem to lack the beauty and soul of those of centuries past. Stephen Curry, professor of structural biology at Imperial College, wrote in response, on Occam’s Corner, the Guardian-hosted science blog, a wonderful little essay, in which he questioned some of Philip’s assumptions but made also a case for scientists to have more than an instrumental relationship to their instruments. Philip Ball then wrote an equally insightful reply in which he argued that scientific instruments are made not simply to do a job but also to express a certain image of science, to ‘employ a particular visual rhetoric’ in his words. The changing character of scientific instruments, he suggested, reflects the changing image of science that scientists wish to covey. -- Ball re visual rhetoric - what, and who, these instruments were for. Even for Galileo, the scientific experiment was still at least as much a demonstration as it was an exploration: it was a way of showing that your ideas were right. ...And in the earliest of the early modern era, during the late Renaissance, scientific instruments were objects of power. They were used by the virtuosi to delight and entertain their noble patrons, and thereby to imply a command of the occult forces of nature. For such a display, it was important that a device be impressive to look at: elegance was the key attribute of the courtly natural philosopher.
intellectual_history  cultural_history  Renaissance  16thC  17thC  Scientific_Revolution  scientific_culture  science-public  virtuosos  patrons  scientific_method  experimental_philosophy  Galileo  Hooke  links  EF-add 
may 2014 by dunnettreader
Samuel Pufendorf - Introduction to the History of the Principal Kingdoms and States of Europe - Online Library of Liberty
Samuel von Pufendorf, An Introduction to the History of the Principal Kingdoms and States of Europe. Translated by Jodocus Crull (1695). Edited and with an Introduction by Michael J. Seidler (Indianapolis: Liberty Fund, 2013). 5/5/2014. <http://oll.libertyfund.org/titles/2594> -- What reviewers like Le Clerc, Rechenberg, Bayle, and (Henri) Basnage de Beauval appreciated about Pufendorf’s historical writing matched his own assessment of what mattered. Most important was the reliance on documentation and first-hand reports, rather than hearsay or speculation. As royal historiographer in Stockholm and Berlin, Pufendorf made thorough use of the archives to which he had privileged access. He also travelled in Europe to obtain source materials, and he attempted sometimes to obtain important records through personal connections—even from parties otherwise unlikely to provide them, such as the court of Rome. Indeed, Pufendorf’s principled reliance on archival materials—that is, his writing of “public” rather than “private” history—sometimes provoked complaints that he had revealed state secrets and led to censorship of certain works for this reason. Other commendations of Pufendorf’s historiographical method noted his avoidance of speculation about the motives of historical actors, and his self-limitation to what he took to be the implications of the documentary evidence. In Tacitean fashion (sine studio et ira: “without bias or malice,” Annals I.1)
etexts  Europe  Europe-Early_Modern  medieval_history  Renaissance  political_history  17thC  historiography-17thC  Pufendorf  evidence  Holy_Roman_Empire  France  Spain  Italy  Germany  Sweden  Denmark  Dutch  Austria  Hungary  Poland  EF-add 
may 2014 by dunnettreader
Decameron Web | Literature index page
(1) Medieval Attitudes toward Literature (2) Literary Relations -- ** Dante and Boccaccio, ** The Proem of the Decameron: Boccaccio between Ovid and Dante, ** Authorship, ** The Decameron and the English Romantics -- (3) Narratology and Structural Exegesis -- ** Numerology in the Decameron, ** The Novella before Boccaccio, ** Performance and Interpretation, ** Performance and Interpretation 2, ** Nightingales and Filostrato's Apologia (V.4), ** The Rubrics of the Decameron, ** Madonna Filippa (VI.7): Feminist Mouthpiece or Misogynistic Tool? -- (4) Hypertext -- ** Hypertext, Hypermedia and the History of the Text, ** Boccaccio Online: Teaching the Decameron as Hypertext at Brown University -- (5) Theoretical Perspectives -- ** Poststructuralism and a Figural Narrative Model, ** Lotman and the Problem of Artistic Space, ** Weinrich and the Grammar of the Frame, ** The Narrative Frame, ** Framing the Decameron, ** Seduction by Silence in the Frame -- (6) La novella tra Testo e Ipertesto: il Decameron come modello
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may 2014 by dunnettreader
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