dunnettreader + reformation   74

BBC Radio 4 - Germany: Memories of a Nation, Reichstag
Neil MacGregor, director of the British Museum, explores 600 years of Germany's complex and often challenging history using objects, art, landmarks and literature.
audio  entre_deux_guerres  15thC  German_unification  design  Reformation  20thC  18thC  19thC  Holy_Roman_Empire  Nazis  art_history  Modernism  Weimar  16thC  Bismarck  Europe-Early_Modern  social_history  medieval_history  cultural_history  Germany  post-WWII  17thC 
december 2017 by dunnettreader
Patrick Collinson - John Foxe as Historian | The Acts and Monuments Online
John Foxe as Historian
by Patrick Collinson
John Foxe disowned the title of 'martyrologist', the label most often attached to his name, almost to the extent that for English writers and readers of history it belongs to nobody else. Foxe wanted to be known as a 'story teller', which is to say, an historian. (How we distinguish between story tellers and historians, and even whether we should make such a distinction, are questions to which we shall have to return.) What was 'history' for those who inhabited the sixteenth century?
Evernote  16thC  Foxe-Book_of_Martyrs  Reformation  historiography-Renaissance  humanism  historiography  ancient_history  church_history  Eusebius  Elizabeth  Church_of_England  persecution  martyrs  objectivity  historians-and-religion  historians-and-state  intellectual_history  Protestants  Early_Christian  More_Sir_Thomas  Bacon  antiquaries  antiquity-source_of_narratives  history_of_England  Holinshed_Chronicles  nshed  rhetoric-writing  Cicero 
september 2017 by dunnettreader
Bibliographical Aspects of the Acts and Monuments - Julian Roberts & Elizabeth Evenden | The Acts and Monuments Online
Bibliographical Aspects of the Acts and Monuments
by Julian Roberts and Elizabeth Evenden
This section is concerned less with the editorial problems posed by the Acts and Monuments than with what happened to the masses of manuscript and print which John Foxe brought, at approximately seven year intervals into the printing house of John Day in Aldersgate. (...) The kind of material which Foxe produced, how much of it was in the hands of his various transcribers, how much in the form of letters by or about the principal actors, and how much in his own hand, is a matter for editors and other analysts to determine. Here we can only offer some clues as to how that material was mediated by the printer, in the light of the known practices of an Elizabethan printing house. This knowledge has hitherto been only partial, and partly reconstructed from the descriptions of Joseph Moxon a century later, but it has been considerably augmented in the course of the present study.
Evernote  16thC  British_history  Protestants  Reformation  printing  print_culture  history_of_book 
september 2017 by dunnettreader
David Loades - Foxe in theological context | The Acts and Monuments Online
Foxe in theological context
by David Loades
The issues covered by the trials and inquisitions which Foxe narrates in these books are limited and endlessly repetitive. Christology is hardly ever discussed. The taking of oaths and obedience to secular authority are raised in some cases, usually when the inquisitors are trying to pin charges of anabaptism on their victims. In the unusual case of Cranmer considerable use is made of 'lawful authority', because of his own high profile insistence upon obedience to the Royal Supremacy. Foxe is always at pains to ensure that his martyrs insist upon the lawfulness of oaths. Obedience is more difficult, and the normal response is 'we must obey God rather than man'. However this is always qualified by some statement to the effect that a Christian who is required by his conscience to disobey a lawful command will submit willingly to the penalties prescribed. Foxe is extremely sensitive to the catholic charge that protestantism is a religion of disobedience.The issues which dominate the great majority of trials are: vernacular liturgy and scripture, and the nature and number of the sacraments.
Evernote  16thC  British_history  Reformation  Protestants  religious_belief  religious_practices  sacraments  transubstantiation  priestcraft  priesthood  priests-authority  hierarchy  ecclesiology  Papacy  purgatory  indulgences  dogmatism  church_history  sola_scriptura 
september 2017 by dunnettreader
John Foxe - The Acts and Monuments Online | johnfoxe.org
Welcome to The Acts and Monuments Online [TAMO], John Foxe’s protestant martyrology. You can browse and compare the unabridged texts of the four editions of this massive work published in John Foxe’s lifetime (1563, 1570, 1576, 1583). Each edition changed significantly as Foxe sought to incorporate new material, answer his critics, and adjust its polemical force to the needs of the moment. You can search and view modern transcriptions that keep as close as possible to the original texts. You can identify the individuals and places that are mentioned in the text. You can explore the latest scholarship to understand the sources upon which it was based, and the purposes for which they were deployed. Facsimiles of all the woodcut illustrations in the text can be viewed along with commentaries. Significant passages in Latin and Greek are translated. TAMO is both an instrument of scholarship and a tool for anyone who wants to explore this remarkable work, a milestone in the history of the English printed book and a signal achievement of its printer, John Day.
website  16thC  British_history  Reformation  printing  Protestants  Protestant_International  Foxe-Book_of_Martyrs  etexts 
september 2017 by dunnettreader
DUMAS, Alexandre – La Dame de Monsoreau | Litterature audio.com
Reader: Gustave - 28 hr 42 mn
La Dame de Monsoreau, roman publié en 1846, fait suite à La Reine Margot et précède Les Quarante-cinq. Il met en parallèle l’histoire d’amour entre Louis de Clermont, seigneur de Bussy d’Amboise et Diane de Méridor, épouse du comte de Monsoreau, et les troubles politiques et religieux du règne d’Henri III, notamment la rivalité qui l’oppose à son frère François, duc d’Alençon, personnage intrigant et sans honneur. On y trouve les figures attachantes de Chicot, fou du roi moins fou qu’il n’y paraît car il déjoue les intrigues menées contre son roi, ou son ami le moine Gorenflot, naïf et lâche épicurien. Ce roman en trois volumes, l’un des plus attachants de Dumas, a donné lieu dès 1971 à une série télévisée de l’ORTF, avant une nouvelle version en 2009, avec Esther Nubiola et Thomas Jouannet.
audio-books  downloaded  16thC  France  Wars_of_Religion  diplomatic_history  Reformation  Huguenots  Catholics  Dumas  novels  historical_fiction  French_lit  French_language  19thC 
june 2017 by dunnettreader
DUMAS, Alexandre – Les Quarante-cinq | Litterature audio.com
Reader: Gustave - 27 hr 41 mn
Les Quarante-cinq, rédigé entre 1847-1848 avec l’aide de Maquet, est le troisième roman de la trilogie des Valois, faisant suite à La Reine Margot et La Dame de Monsoreau. Les Quarante-Cinq, gentilshommes gascons engagés par d’Épernon pour la garde d’Henri III, y tiennent d’ailleurs moins de place que les personnages de Chicot et de Diane de Monsoreau. Dumas prend ici bien des libertés avec les dates et les faits historiques, réunissant pour les besoins de sa narration la prise de Cahors par Henri de Navarre, la déroute d’Anjou devant Anvers ou la mort de ce prince. Le roman n’aura pas de suite, en dépit d’évidentes pistes ouvertes dans l’intrigue et les personnages.
audio-books  16thC  Reformation  Wars_of_Religion  France  novels  historical_fiction  Dumas  Henri_IV  Huguenots  Catholics  downloaded  French_lit  French_language  19thC 
june 2017 by dunnettreader
Folgerpedia - Folger Shakespeare Library
Founded on 9 July 2014, Folgerpedia is the Folger Shakespeare Library's collaboratively-edited, search-based encyclopedia of all things "Folger." Content of the articles has been contributed by various departments within the institution, as well as Folger readers and other scholars. The articles address each topic as it relates to the Folger and the Folger collection. There is a variety of article types that can be found on Folgerpedia, including: lists; how tos; and encyclopedic entries concerning items in the collection, Shakespeare's works and characters, and his works in performance.

To read more about Folgerpedia, check out the Folger research blog, The Collation.
Reformation  Tudor  stagecraft  printing  political_culture  Italian_lit  English-language  English_lit  Europe-Early_Modern  religious_culture  Shakespeare  James_I  theater  Renaissance  digital_humanities  history_of_book  intellectual_history  British_history  publishing  plays  website  literary_language  cultural_history  actors  London  event  playwrights  Latin_lit  politics-and-literature  Elizabeth 
june 2016 by dunnettreader
Grell and Scriber eds. -Tolerance and Intolerance in the European Reformation (1996) | Cambridge University Press
This volume offers a re-interpretation of the role of tolerance and intolerance in the European Reformation. It questions the traditional notion of a progressive development towards greater religious toleration from the beginning of the sixteenth century onwards. Instead, it places incidents of religious tolerance and intolerance in their specific social and political contexts. Fifteen leading scholars offer a comprehensive interpretation of this subject, covering all the regions of Europe that were directly affected by the Reformation in the crucial period between 1500, when northern humanism had begun to make an impact, and 1648, the end of the Thirty Years War. In this way, Tolerance and Intolerance in the European Reformation provides a dramatically different view of how religious toleration and conflict developed in early modern Europe. - excerpt is TOC and full Intro including ftnts - downloaded via iPhone to DBOX
Lutherans  persecution  politiques  social_movements  Huguenots  Erastianism  church_history  Europe-Early_Modern  change-social  Calvinism  religious_wars  heresy  Kirk  religion-established  books  legitimacy  Thirty_Years_War  networks-religious  Papacy  iconoclasm  Counter-Reformation  16thC  Church-and-State  anti-Calvinists  religious_history  godly_persons  Church_of_England  social_order  politico-theology  Wars_of_Religion  Socinians  downloaded  Arminians  religious_belief  Inquisition  religious_culture  17thC  religious_lit  Thirty-Nine_Articles  Reformation  tolerance  Puritans  heterodoxy 
may 2016 by dunnettreader
Vincent Citot - Le processus historique de la Modernité et la possibilité de la liberté (universalisme et individualisme) (2005) - Cairn.info
I - Considérations introductives sur l’essence de la modernité
- L’esprit de la modernité : la liberté, l’universalisme et l’individualisme
- Réflexivité, autonomie et indépendance
- Conséquences : les idées d’égalité et de progrès
II - Les origines antiques de la modernité
- Universalisme et individualisme en Grèce antique
- Le stoïcisme : entre hellénisme et christianisme
- Universalisme, égalitarisme et individualisme chrétien
- L’individualisme du droit romain
III - L’avènement de la modernité et la périodisation de l’ère moderne
- Le monde Ancien et le monde Moderne
- La périodisation de la modernité:
1 - La première modernité : de la Renaissance aux Lumières
2 - La seconde modernité : de la fin du XVIIIème siècle aux années 1960
3 - La troisième modernité : entre postmodernité et hypermodernité
Citot Vincent, « Le processus historique de la Modernité et la possibilité de la liberté (universalisme et individualisme). », Le Philosophoire 2/2005 (n° 25) , p. 35-76
individualism  moral_philosophy  Counter-Enlightenment  16thC  Romanticism  history_of_science  politico-theology  autonomy  scholastics  Renaissance  change-social  democracy  republicanism  modernity-emergence  political_philosophy  democracy_deficit  Stoicism  Reformation  Early_Christian  French_Enlightenment  18thC  republics-Ancient_v_Modern  French_Revolution  periodization  Europe-Early_Modern  universalism  downloaded  subjectivity  political_culture  religious_history  article  Ancients-and-Moderns  community  self  German_Idealism  Counter-Reformation  authority  Enlightenment  metaphysics  ancient_Rome  17thC  Cartesians  cosmology  Descartes  ancient_Greece  Locke  modernity  liberty  Hobbes  intellectual_history  bibliography 
february 2016 by dunnettreader
Table of contents - John Sellars, ed. - The Routledge Handbook of the Stoic Tradition (Feb 2016) | Academia.edu
Introduction | Stoicism in Rome | Stoicism in Early Christianity | Plotinus and the Platonic Response to Stoicism | Augustine’s Debt to Stoicism in the Confessions | Boethius and Stoicism | Stoic Themes in Peter Abelard and John of Salisbury | Stoic Influences in the Later Middle Ages | The Recovery of Stoicism in the Renaissance | Stoicism in the Philosophy of the Italian Renaissance | Erasmus, Calvin, and the Faces of Stoicism in Renaissance and Reformation Thought | Justus Lipsius and Neostoicism | Shakespeare and Early Modern English Literature | Medicine of the Mind in Early Modern Philosophy | Stoic Themes in Early Modern French Thought | Spinoza and Stoicism | Leibniz and the Stoics: Fate, Freedom, and Providence | The Epicurean Stoicism of the French Enlightenment | Stoicism and the Scottish Enlightenment | Kant and Stoic Ethics | Stoicism in Nineteenth Century German Philosophy | Stoicism and Romantic Literature | Stoicism in Victorian Culture | Stoicism in America | Stoic Themes in Contemporary Anglo-American Ethics | Stoicism and Twentieth Century French Philosophy | The Stoic Influence on Modern Psychotherapy
books  intellectual_history  Stoicism  ancient_philosophy  Epictetus  Seneca  Early_Christian  late_antiquity  Neoplatonism  Augustine  Abelard  John_of_Salisbury  medieval_philosophy  Renaissance  Italian_Renaissance  Italy  Shakespeare  Shakespeare-influence  Erasmus  Reformation  Calvin  Justus_Lipsius  Neostoicism  philosophy-as-way-of-life  psychology  self  self-examination  self-knowledge  self-development  early_modern  Europe-Early_Modern  16thC  17thC  18thC  19thC  20thC  Spinoza  Leibniz  fate  determinism  Providence  free_will  freedom  French_Enlightenment  Epicurean  Scottish_Enlightenment  Kant-ethics  German_Idealism  German_scholars  neo-Kantian  Romanticism  literary_history  analytical_philosophy  psychoanalysis  phenomenology 
november 2015 by dunnettreader
Alan Jacobs - the three big stories of modernity | TextPatterns July 2015
So far there have been three widely influential stories about the rise of modernity: the Emancipatory, the Protestant, and the Neo-Thomist. (..) all these narrators of modernity see our own age as one in which the consequences of 500-year-old debates conducted by philosophers and theologians are still being played out. I think all of these narratives are wrong. They are wrong because they are the product of scholars in universities who overrate the historical importance and influence of other scholars in universities, and because they neglect ideas that connect more directly with the material world. All of these grands recits should be set aside, and they should not immediately be replaced with others, but with more particular, less sweeping, and more technologically-oriented stories. The technologies that Marshall McLuhan called "the extensions of Man" are infinitely more important for Man's story, for good and for ill, than the debates of the schoolmen and interpreters of the Bible. Instead of grand narratives of the emergence of The Modern we need something far more plural: technological histories of modernity.
Instapaper  cultural_history  cultural_capital  modernity  technology  Tech/Culture  social_theory  intellectual_history  intellectual_history-distorted  religious_history  Thomism-21stC  Reformation  Renaissance  Enlightenment  Enlightenment_Project  Enlightenment-ongoing  modernity-emergence  material_culture  economic_history  Great_Divergence  Industrial_Revolution  colonialism  Military_Revolution  Scientific_Revolution  consumer_revolution  technology-history  historiography  medicine  public_health  public_sphere  public_goods  media  print_culture  history_of_science  history_of_book  history-and-social_sciences  narrative  narrative-contested  from instapaper
july 2015 by dunnettreader
Steve Shapin - The Virtue of Scientific Thinking | Boston Review - Jan 2015
scientific reeearch may not make you more vitruous, or scientists as a group better people, but the disenchantment (severing assumed link between divine design of the cosmos and our ability to learn more and better understand how man fits in) described hy Weber in Vocation priduces a few worrisome trends. One is the hubris of "playing God" scientism, The Sam Harris and Steve Pinker types that think science can explain enough about hiw humans got to whete we are and how we function in modernity to be philosopher-kings on defining moral values and how our political and social structures should operate for what ends. The other disturbing consequence of cutting the link is the loss of discipline via internalized norms of the religious and miral worth of disinyetested inquiry. As profit and funding increasingly drive all levels of scientific research, and the rnds are increasingly narrowed to technology that can be exploited for profit or power (or both in the military-industrial-( academia) complex, what's to distinguish scientists from bankers. The foundation of trust in scientific results is at extreme risk. The only positive, which ashapin doesn't drvelop, is scepticism re the trustworthiness of the scientific enterprise may threaten the future of the planet via climate change, but few will be eager to put their trust in tge claims of the candidates nominating themselves as philosopher-kings.
Social_Darwinism  Pocket  cosmology  18thC  morality  virtue  scientism  post-WWII  moral_philosophy  17thC  21stC  19thC  history_of_science  mioitary-industrial_complex  20thC  cultural_history  Cold_War  morality-objective  curiosity  is-ought  natural_theology  norms  Reformation  intellectual_history  sociology_of_knowledge  morality-conventional 
february 2015 by dunnettreader
The Reformation in Global Perspective
Abstract Concepts and methods introduced by the “new world history” present important opportunities to contextualize the European Reformation in transregional frames of reference. A global approach allows historians to situate the Reformation more fully within the orbit of people, ideas, and cultural goods that interacted with one another across the early modern world. A number of historians who study missionary encounters, especially those of Jesuits, have already initiated global methodologies in analyzing the Reformation overseas. Other scholars have pointed to ways in which an engagement with the wider world influenced European societies. These works indicate the rich possibilities for looking at the Reformation with new eyes. In assessing this scholarship, this article discusses the prospects and challenges for adopting global perspectives in the study of the Reformation.
religious_history  missionaries  cultural_history  latin  america  article  16thc  east  asia  historiography  china  reformation  catholics  africa  colonialism  world  history  counter-reformation  17thc  north  protestants  india  mena  paywall  cross-border 
january 2015 by dunnettreader
- DAVID LEWIS JONES - British Parliaments and Assemblies: A Bibliography of Printed Materials (2009) Parliamentary History - Wiley Online Library
Each section a pdf downloaded to Note - combined, c 25,000 entries *--* Section 1: Preface, Introduction, The Westminster Parliament 1-4005. **--** Section 2: The Medieval Parliament 4006-4728 **--** Section 3: Tudor Parliaments 4729-5064 **--* Section 4: Stuart Parliaments 5063-6805 **--** Section 5: The Unreformed Parliament 1714-1832 6806-9589. **--** Section 6: The Reformed Parliament 1832-1918 9590-15067 **--** Section 7: Parliament 1918-2009 15068-21582. **--** Section 8: The Judicial House of Lords 21583-21835. -- The Palace of Westminster 21836-22457. -- The Irish Parliament 22458-23264 -- The Scottish Parliament (to 1707) 23265-23482 -- The New Devolved Assemblies 23483-23686 -- The Scottish Parliament (1999-) 23687-24251 -- Northern Ireland 24252-24563 -- The National Assembly for Wales 24537-24963 -- Minor Assemblies
bibliography  historiography  Medieval  medieval_history  15thC  16thC  17thC  18thC  19thC  20thC  21stC  political_culture  political_philosophy  political_economy  political_history  politics-and-religion  political_participation  political_press  legal_history  legal_system  legal_theory  British_history  British_politics  Britain  British_Empire  British_foreign_policy  English_constitution  British_Empire-constitutional_structure  monarchy  monarchy-proprietary  monarchical_republic  limited_monarchy  Parliament  Parliamentary_supremacy  House_of_Commons  House_of_Lords  sovereignty  government-forms  governing_class  government_finance  government_officials  Scotland  Ireland  Ireland-English_exploitation  elites  elite_culture  common_law  rule_of_law  1690s  1700s  1707_Union  1680s  Glorious_Revolution  Glorious_Revolution-Scotland  English_Civil_War  Three_Kingdoms  composite_monarchies  Absolutism  ancient_constitution  religion-established  Church_of_England  Reformation  reform-legal  reform-political  elections  franchise  state-building  opposition  parties  pa 
december 2014 by dunnettreader
Victoria Kahn - Stacking the deck: Thomas Pfau’s strange history of the West « The Immanent Frame - Oct 2014
Kahn continues her attack on anti-modernity readings of Renaissance, Reformation and Early Modern intellectual history to justify claims for the "necessity" of political theology, with emphasis on (Catholic Thomist) theology as the foundation and organizing thread. Pfau goes beyond the Schmitt readings of the illegitimacy of the post French Revolution secular political to deny post Ockham intellectual legitimacy to any theorist who follows Ockham's voluntarism -- while totally ignoring the social, political, cultural and religious changes. The result is a Hobbes as villain of the piece that conveniently ignores a century and a half of religious warfare. And as she notes, she neither recognizes herself in any of the roles in Pfau’s morality play, nor can she see where he even offers a place for contemporary secular women. Downloaded post as pdf to Note
books  reviews  kindle-available  intellectual_history  theology  modernity  self  Thomism  Thomism-21stC  voluntarism  Hobbes  secularism  political-theology  Reformation  Europe-Early_Modern  political_philosophy  religious_wars  religious_culture  religious_belief  downloaded  EF-add 
november 2014 by dunnettreader
Paul Silas Peterson - Pluralism and consensus in the modern Western world vs Brad Gregory's "The Unintended Reformation" attack on "hyperpluralism" « The Immanent Frame - Oct 2013
Gregory's "hyperpluralism" is MacIntyre-eque - there's no longer a shared notion of the summum bonnum. This anti-modernity can't tell the difference between liberal pluralism and the bogeyman of relativism. Peterson's response is one of the better since it accepts the basic frame of the need for some shared values -- "the structuring principles [for political and social life] of modern Western societies are not arbitrary assertions but rather principles that are connected with one another, interwoven with historical developments and representative of human life and ideals." He shows 8 points of "soft consensus" and ..."While it would be possible to claim that these points are not... what Gregory calls the “Life Questions,” [they] rest upon basic values that have correlations with views of the person and conceptions of the good." -- "The entire Western world has agreed (1) to live with a modern democratic political order, (2) to enforce concepts of unalienable human rights, (3) to uphold the rule of law, and (4) to secure the separation of powers. (...) the high view of the individual, and thus the high view of that individual’s opinion, is presumed [...and is also a] 5th point. (...) There are many other values which follow from the high view of the individual (...) they presume the value of freedom.. [which is both...] a presupposition of 3 and 4 and a 6th point. (...) The law is a concrete representation of the norms and regulations that are held to be not only equitable, just, and good, but also reasonable. The importance of reason and rational justification therefore belongs in the soft consensus as a presupposition of the rule of law, but also as [a] 7th point. (...) [The] idea of the separation of powers (...) [presumes] cooperation in the formal execution of power, administration, and management. A high regard for cooperation therefore belongs in the soft consensus as a presupposition of the separation of powers, but also as an 8th point. The most effective cooperation [depends] upon general agreements regarding shared goals and a basic goodwill between the cooperating parties."
21stC  political_philosophy  moral_philosophy  theology  social_theory  declinism  Thomism-21stC  modernity  intellectual_history  Reformation  common_good  Christendom  Christianity  theocracy  politics-and-religion  liberalism  rule_of_law  separation-of-powers  civil_liberties  human_rights  liberty  liberty-negative  liberalism-public_reason  liberty-positive  welfare_state  MacIntyre  Counter-Reformation  pluralism  relativism  good  downloaded  EF-add 
november 2014 by dunnettreader
Special Issue in Memory of Charles Tilly (1929–2008): Cities, States, Trust, and Rule - Contents | JSTOR: Theory and Society, Vol. 39, No. 3/4, May 2010
1 - Cities, states, trust, and rule: new departures from the work of Charles Tilly - Michael Hanagan and Chris Tilly [d-load] *-* 2 - Cities, states, and trust networks: Chapter 1 of 'Cities and States in World History' - Charles Tilly [d-load] *-* 3 - Unanticipated consequences of "humanitarian intervention": The British campaign to abolish the slave trade, 1807-1900 - Marcel van der Linden [d-load] *-* 4 - Is there a moral economy of state formation? Religious minorities and repertoires of regime integration in the Middle East and Western Europe, 600-1614 - Ariel Salzmann [d-load] *-* 5 - Inclusiveness and exclusion: trust networks at the origins of European cities - Wim Blockmans [d-load] *-* 6 - Colonial legacy of ethno-racial inequality in Japan - Hwaji Shin. *-* 7 - Legacies of empire? - Miguel Angel Centeno and Elaine Enriquez. *-* 8 - Cities and states in geohistory - Edward W. Soja [d-load] *-* 9 - From city club to nation state: business networks in American political development - Elisabeth S. Clemens [d-load] *-* 10 - Irregular armed forces, shifting patterns of commitment, and fragmented sovereignty in the developing world - Diane E. Davis *-* 11 - Institutions and the adoption of rights: political and property rights in Colombia - Carmenza Gallo *-* 12 - Taking Tilly south: durable inequalities, democratic contestation, and citizenship in the Southern Metropolis - Patrick Heller and Peter Evans *-* 13 - Industrial welfare and the state: nation and city reconsidered - Smita Srinivas *-* 14 - The forms of power and the forms of cities: building on Charles Tilly - Peter Marcuse [d-load] *-* 15 - Was government the solution or the problem? The role of the state in the history of American social policy
journal  article  jstor  social_theory  political_sociology  contention  social_movements  change-social  historical_sociology  nation-state  cities  city_states  urban_politics  urban_elites  urbanization  urban_development  economic_sociology  institutions  institutional_change  property_rights  civil_liberties  civil_society  political_participation  political_culture  inequality  class_conflict  development  colonialism  abolition  medieval_history  state-building  religious_culture  politics-and-religion  MENA  Europe-Early_Modern  Reformation  networks-business  US_history  US_politics  US_economy  welfare_state  power-asymmetric  power-symbolic  elites  elite_culture  imperialism  empires  trust  networks-social  networks-religious  networks  14thC  15thC  16thC  17thC  18thC  19thC  20thC  geohistory  moral_economy  military_history  militia  guerrillas  mercenaires  sovereignty  institution-building 
october 2014 by dunnettreader
Michael Seidler, review essay - Religion, Populism, and Patriarchy: Political Authority from Luther to Pufendorf | JSTOR: Ethics, Vol. 103, No. 3 (Apr., 1993), pp. 551-569
Review of volumes in Cambridge University Press series of history of political thought classic texts (Skinner, Tuck et al series editors) -- Luther and Calvin on Secular Authority by Martin Luther; John Calvin; Harro Hopfl; *--* The Radical Reformation by Michael G. Baylor; *--* Political Writings by Francisco de Vitoria; Anthony Pagden; Jeremy Lawrance; *--* Patriarcha and Other Writings by Robert Filmer; Johann P. Sommerville; *--* On the Duty of Man and Citizen According to Natural Law by Samuel Pufendorf; James Tully; Michael Silverthorne -- lengthy essay that discusses the works themselves and the political-theology issues emerging in the aftermath of the Reformation across the 16thC and 17thC -- downloaded pdf to Note
article  jstor  books  reviews  intellectual_history  political_philosophy  moral_philosophy  theology  politics-and-religion  Reformation  Lutherans  Calvin  Calvinist  Absolutism  divine_right  divine_command  office  ecclesiology  religion-established  religious_history  religious_culture  religious_belief  religious_wars  scholastics  Filmer  Pufendorf  natural_law  Holy_Roman_Empire  Germany  British_history  British_politics  English_Civil_War  secularization  Erastianism  resistance_theory  bibliography  downloaded  EF-add 
october 2014 by dunnettreader
Andrew Koppelman - Naked Strong Evaluation - Dissent, p. 105, Winter 2009 :: SSRN
Andrew Koppelman -Northwestern University School of Law -- Northwestern Public Law Research Paper No. 14-49 -- A review, for Dissent magazine, of Charles Taylor’s book, A Secular Age. - Number of Pages in PDF File: 6 - Keywords: Charles Taylor, Religion, Secularism -- downloaded pdf to Note
books  reviews  Taylor_Charles  historical_sociology  sociology_of_religion  cultural_history  intellectual_history  secularism  secularization  Reformation  Counter-Reformation  Protestants  Enlightenment  Enlightenment_Project  downloaded  EF-add 
september 2014 by dunnettreader
Jean Balsamo - Dante, l’Aviso piacevole et Henri de Navarre | Italique, I, 1998, p. 79-94.
Italique [En ligne], I | 1998, mis en ligne le 05 mars 2009, DOI : 10.4000/italique.89. **--** re reception of Dante in France - in fight against Papacy, both French Catholics and Huguenots could use his attacks on the Papacy -- a familiar publication that combined anti -Papal comments in Date, Boccaccio and Petrarch, had a bizarre history linked to Henry IV- -' L’Aviso piacevole était une des nombreuses variations sur ce lieu rhétorique de la pensée protestante. Ce livre étrange, composé d’une matière italienne, édité en Angleterre, opportunément publié pour servir l’action de Henri de Navarre, était destiné à des lecteurs italiens ou italianisants de Genève, de Bâle, de Londres ou de Paris plus qu’aux Italiens de Florence ou de Rome qu’il ne pouvait guère toucher. Le nonce Ragazzoni, dans deux lettres adressées au cardinal Rusticucci, évoquait les autres livres suscités par le bref de Sixte Quint, le Brutum Fulmen de Hotman et le traité de Pierre de Belloy, dont il désignait le commanditaire, le garde des Sceaux Cheverny. Ces deux ouvrages, que le nonce avait eu beaucoup de peine à se procurer furent immédiatement mis à l’Index. L’Aviso piacevole au contraire semble être passé presque inaperçu. Il ne put échapper toutefois ... à la vigilance de Robert Bellarmin, venu en France avec la légation du cardinal Caetani. Bellarmin citait le recueil dans son appendix au traité De summo Pontefice publié dans le De Controversiis christianae fidei, et il entreprit de le réfuter. -- downloaded pdf to Note
article  revues.org  literary_history  religious_history  Dante  reception  16thC  France  Wars_of_Religion  Henri_IV  Gallican  Huguenots  Protestant_International  publishing  publishing-clandestine  Papacy  Reformation  Counter-Reformation  Machiavelli  republicanism  downloaded  EF-add 
september 2014 by dunnettreader
John Emerich Edward Dalberg, Lord Acton, The History of Freedom and Other Essays, ed. John Neville Figgis and Reginald Vere Laurence (London: Macmillan, 1907). - Online Library of Liberty
Acton never completed his projected History of Liberty. We do have however several collections of his writings such as this one which contains 2 chapters from this planned history – on liberty in antiquity and Christianity – and many book reviews where one can piece together Acton’s approach to the writing of such a history. This volume consists of articles reprinted from the following journals: The Quarterly Review, The English Historical Review, The Nineteenth Century, The Rambler, The Home and Foreign Review, The North British Review, The Bridgnorth Journal. *--* CHRONICLE. *-* INTRODUCTION. *-* I: THE HISTORY OF FREEDOM IN ANTIQUITY. *-* II: THE HISTORY OF FREEDOM IN CHRISTIANITY. *-* III: SIR ERSKINE MAY’S DEMOCRACY IN EUROPE. *-* IV: THE MASSACRE OF ST. BARTHOLOMEW. *-* V: THE PROTESTANT THEORY OF PERSECUTION *-* VI: POLITICAL THOUGHTS ON THE CHURCH. *-* VII: INTRODUCTION TO L. A. BURD’S EDITION OF IL PRINCIPE BY MACHIAVELLI. *-* VIII: MR. GOLDWIN SMITH’S IRISH HISTORY. *-* IX: NATIONALITY. *-* X: DÖLLINGER ON THE TEMPORAL POWER. *-* XI: DÖLLINGER’S HISTORICAL WORK. *-* XII: CARDINAL WISEMAN AND THE HOME AND FOREIGN REVIEW. *'* XIII: CONFLICTS WITH ROME. *-* XIV: THE VATICAN COUNCIL. *-* XV: A HISTORY OF THE INQUISITION OF THE MIDDLE AGES. By Henry Charles Lea. *-* XVI: THE AMERICAN COMMONWEALTH. By James Bryce. *-* XVII: HISTORICAL PHILOSOPHY IN FRANCE AND FRENCH BELGIUM AND SWITZERLAND. By Robert Flint. -- downloaded kindle version of html
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september 2014 by dunnettreader
John Emerich Edward Dalberg, Lord Acton, Historical Essays and Studies, edited by John Neville Figgis and Reginald Vere Laurence (London: Macmillan, 1907) - Online Library of Liberty
A collection of Acton’s articles from journals such as the Quarterly Review, the English Historical Review, the Nineteenth Century, the Rambler, the Home and Foreign Review, the North British Review, and the Bridgnorth Journal. *--* I: WOLSEY AND THE DIVORCE OF HENRY VIII. *-* II: THE BORGIAS AND THEIR LATEST HISTORIAN. &-* III: SECRET HISTORY OF CHARLES II. *-* IV: THE CIVIL WAR IN AMERICA ITS PLACE IN HISTORY. *-* V: THE RISE AND FALL OF THE MEXICAN EMPIRE *-* VI: CALVIN *-* VII: THE CAUSES OF THE FRANCO-PRUSSIAN WAR *-* VIII: THE WAR OF 1870 *-* IX: GEORGE ELIOT’S LIFE. *-* X: MR. BUCKLE’S THESIS AND METHOD. *-* XI: MR. BUCKLE’S PHILOSOPHY OF HISTORY. *-* XII: GERMAN SCHOOLS OF HISTORy. *-* XIII: TALLEYRAND’S MEMOIRS. *-* XIV: THE LIFE OF LORD HOUGHTON *-* XV: A HISTORY OF THE PAPACY DURING THE PERIOD OF THE REFORMATION. *-*. XVI: A SHORT HISTORY OF NAPOLEON THE FIRST. By John Robert Seeley THE FIRST NAPOLEON: A SKETCH, POLITICAL AND MILITARY. By John Codman Ropes. *-* XVII: MABILLON ET LA SOCIÉTÉ DE L’ABBAYE DE SAINT-GERMAIN-DES-PRÉS À LA FIN DU XVIIE SIÈCLE. Par Emmanuel de Broglie. *-* XVIII: A HISTORY OF ENGLAND, 1837-1880.1 By the Rev. J. Franck Bright, D.D., Master of University College, Oxford. *-* XIX: A HISTORY OF THE FRENCH REVOLUTION. By H. Morse Stephens. Vol. II. *-* XX: WILHELM VON GIESEBRECHT -- downloaded kindle version of html
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september 2014 by dunnettreader
John Emerich Edward Dalberg, Lord Acton, Lectures on Modern History, ed. John Neville Figgis and Reginald Vere Laurence (London: Macmillan, 1906) - Online Library of Liberty
These are the lectures given by the great English classical liberal historian, Lord Acton, in the academic years 1899-1901 at Cambridge University. It is a survey of modern history from the rise of the modern nation state to the American Revolution. The book also contains his “Inaugural Lecture” of 1895. *---* INTRODUCTION LORD ACTON AS PROFESSOR *-* INAUGURAL LECTURE ON THE STUDY OF HISTORY *-* I: BEGINNING OF THE MODERN STATE. *-* II: THE NEW WORLD. *-* III: THE RENAISSANCE *-* IV: LUTHER. *-& V: THE COUNTER–REFORMATION. *-* VI: CALVIN AND HENRY VIII. *-* VII: PHILIP II., MARY STUART, AND ELIZABETH. *-* VIII: THE HUGUENOTS AND THE LEAGUE. *-* IX: HENRY THE FOURTH AND RICHELIEU. *-* X: THE THIRTY YEARS’ WAR. *-* XI: THE PURITAN REVOLUTION. *-* XII: THE RISE OF THE WHIGS. *-* XIII: THE ENGLISH REVOLUTION. *-* XIV: LEWIS THE FOURTEENTH. *-* XV: THE WAR OF THE SPANISH SUCCESSION. *-* XVI: THE HANOVERIAN SETTLEMENT. *-* XVII: PETER THE GREAT AND THE RISE OF PRUSSIA. *-* XVIII: FREDERIC THE GREAT. *-* XIX: THE AMERICAN REVOLUTION. *-* APPENDIX I. *-* APPENDIX II - NOTES TO THE INAUGURAL LECTURE ON THE STUDY OF HISTORY -- downloaded kindle version of html
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september 2014 by dunnettreader
Encyclopedia of the Early Modern World, by the Gale Group, Inc. | Answers.com
The history of Europe from the mid-15th century until the French Revolution. Includes notable events such as wars and revolutions as well as broader processes like the Renaissance and the Enlightenment; biographical information on leading figures; individual national histories; and meaningful developments in the arts, religion, politics, exploration and warfare.
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august 2014 by dunnettreader
RICHARD REX -- THE RELIGION OF HENRY VIII (2014) | The Historical Journal, 57, pp 1-32. - Cambridge Journals Online - Abstract
RICHARD REX - University of Cambridge --This article takes issue with the influential recent interpretation of Henry VIII's religious position as consistently ‘Erasmian’. Bringing to the discussion not only a re-evaluation of much familiar evidence but also a considerable quantity of hitherto unknown or little-known material, it proposes instead that Henry's religious position, until the 1530s, sat squarely within the parameters of ‘traditional religion’ and that the subsequent changes in his attitudes to the cult of the saints, monasticism, and papal primacy were so significant as to be understood and described by Henry himself in terms of a veritable religious ‘conversion’. This conversion, which was very much sui generis, is not easily to be fitted within the confessional frameworks of other sixteenth-century religious movements (though it was by no means unaffected by them). It hinged upon Henry's new understanding of kingship as a supreme spiritual responsibility entrusted to kings by the Word of God, but long hidden from them by the machinations of the papacy. His own providential deliverance from blindness was, he believed, but the beginning of a more general spiritual enlightenment
article  paywall  religious_history  church_history  16thC  British_history  British_politics  Henry_VIII  Reformation  Erastianism  religion-established  religious_belief  Church_of_England  divine_right  kingship  Papacy  Papacy-English_relations  Erasmus  Providence  Absolutism  Tudor  EF-add 
august 2014 by dunnettreader
Steven D. Smith, review essay - Discourse in the Dusk: The Twilight of Religious Freedom? | JSTOR: Harvard Law Review, Vol. 122, No. 7 (May, 2009), pp. 1869-1907
Reviewed work(s): Religion and the Constitution — Volume 2: Establishment and Fairness by Kent Greenawalt -- Smith claims a millennium of tradition re church and state is unraveling (a la MacIntyre decadent tradition) and US policy and jurisprudence tends to ignore erosion of their fundamental justifications -- starts with Pope Gregory and Henry IV and investiture controversy -- downloaded pdf to Note
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july 2014 by dunnettreader
Diarmaid MacCulloch - Putting the English Reformation on the Map: The Prothero Lecture | JSTOR: Transactions of the Royal Historical Society, Sixth Series, Vol. 15 (2005), pp. 75-95
The essay examines how the international Protestant identity of the English Church came to be in tension with the later assertion of sacramentalist or Catholic values within it. It chronicles how the Reformation in England came to align not with Lutheranism but with Reformed Protestantism, and compares Henry VIII's reforms with contemporary Reformations in mainland Europe seeking a 'middle way'. Edward VI's Church is contrasted with the temperature perceptible in Elizabeth I's religious settlement - which nevertheless asserted Protestant values with no concessions to Catholicism. The anomalous role of the cathedrals in England is identified as a major source of the English Church's later deviation from mainstream European Reformed Protestantism, which itself produced attempts to recreate a Reformed Church in the English north American colonies. -- tackles branch of Anglican historiography that buries the Protestant Reformation aspects of the Church of England especially the 16thC -- didn't download
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july 2014 by dunnettreader
"Trinitarian Thought in the Early Modern Era" by Ulrich Lehner in The Oxford Handbook of the Trinity (2011)
Ulrich Lehner, Marquette University -- Published version. "Trinitarian Thought in the Early Modern Era" in The Oxford Handbook of the Trinity. Eds. Gilles Emery, and Matthew Levering. Oxford; New York: Oxford University Press, 2011: 240-253. DOI: 10.1093/oxfordhb/9780199557813.001.0001. Copyright © 2011 Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. Used with permission. -- This article explores Catholic and Protestant Trinitarian theology from 1550 to 1770. It discusses various issues, from the mystical visions of Ignatius of Loyola to the Augustinian approach of Jonathan Edwards. It considers the growing variety of eclectic views and the influence of anti-Trinitarian thinkers, beginning with Michael Servetus and Faustus Socinus. It also highlights the rise of confessionalism and anti-Trinitarianism and the explosion of mystical theology during this period. -- downloaded pdf to Note
religious_history  theology  Reformation  Counter-Reformation  16thC  17thC  18thC  Trinity  anti-Trinitarian  heterodoxy  Jesuits  Augustinian  Edwards_Jonathan  Socinians  confessionalization  mysticism  Calvinist  Christology  soteriology  downloaded  EF-add 
july 2014 by dunnettreader
The Collected Papers of Frederic William Maitland, vol. 3 of 3 (1911) - Online Library of Liberty
Frederic William Maitland, The Collected Papers of Frederic William Maitland, ed. H.A.L. Fisher (Cambridge University Press, 1911). 3 Vols. Vol. 3. 07/17/2014. <http://oll.libertyfund.org/titles/873> -- Vol. 3 of a three volume collection of the shorter works of the great English legal historian, including many essays on aspects of medieval law and some biographical essays. Includes trusts and corporations, canon law, miscellaneous bits on Elizabethan period, especially relations with Papacy-- downloaded mobi version of book scan OCR
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july 2014 by dunnettreader
Hugh Trevor-Roper, The Crisis of the Seventeenth Century - Online Library of Liberty
Hugh Trevor-Roper, The Crisis of the Seventeenth Century: Religion, the Reformation and Social Change (Indianapolis: Liberty Fund, 2001). 07/13/2014. <http://oll.libertyfund.org/titles/719> -- The Crisis of the Seventeenth Century collects nine essays by Trevor-Roper on the themes of religion, the Reformation, and social change. As Trevor-Roper explains in his preface, “the crisis in government, society, and ideas which occurred, both in Europe and in England, between the Reformation and the middle of the seventeenth century” constituted the crucible for what “went down in the general social and intellectual revolution of the mid-seventeenth century.” The Civil War, the Restoration, and the Glorious Revolution in England laid the institutional and intellectual foundations of the modern understanding of liberty, of which we are heirs and beneficiaries. Trevor-Roper’s essays uncover new pathways to understanding this seminal time. Neither Catholic nor Protestant emerges unscathed from the examination to which Trevor-Roper subjects the era in which, from political and religious causes, the identification and extirpation of witches was a central event. -- downloaded pdf to Note -- see his introduction for discussion of historiography on topics covered in each essay since they were written, some from mid 1950s
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july 2014 by dunnettreader
Heinrich Rommen, The Natural Law: A Study in Legal and Social History and Philosophy (1936) trans. Thomas R. Hanley, ed. Russell Hittinger - Online Library of Liberty
Heinrich Rommen, The Natural Law: A Study in Legal and Social History and Philosophy, trans. Thomas R. Hanley. Introduction and Bibliography by Russell Hittinger (Indianapolis: Liberty Fund 1998). 07/11/2014. <http://oll.libertyfund.org/titles/676> -- Originally published in German in 1936, The Natural Law is the first work to clarify the differences between traditional natural law as represented in the writings of Cicero, Aquinas, and Hooker and the revolutionary doctrines of natural rights espoused by Hobbes, Locke, and Rousseau. Beginning with the legacies of Greek and Roman life and thought, Rommen traces the natural law tradition to its displacement by legal positivism and concludes with what the author calls “the reappearance” of natural law thought in more recent times. In seven chapters each Rommen explores “The History of the Idea of Natural Law” and “The Philosophy and Content of the Natural Law.” In his introduction, Russell Hittinger places Rommen’s work in the context of contemporary debate on the relevance of natural law to philosophical inquiry and constitutional interpretation. - part of the German émigrés to the US - he sees the same sort of 17thC break as Strauss - wound up at Georgetown - didn't download
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july 2014 by dunnettreader
Jon Wright , review - Eamon Duffy - Fires of Faith: Catholic England under Mary Tudor
further work on Mary Tudor's reign - in addition to cleaning up her reputation, builds on rehabilitation of Reginald Pole by T Mayer
books  reviews  16thC  Tudor  Catholics-English  Reformation  Papacy  Church_of_England  Counter-Reformation  Bolingbroke 
july 2014 by dunnettreader
Baron John Emerich Edward Dalberg-Acton, Lord Acton - Lectures on Modern History (1921 reprint 1907) - Google Books
Editors - with Introduction, John Neville Figgis, Reginald Vere Laurence -- Contents -- Inaugural Lecture on the Study of History *--* LECTURES ON MODERN HISTORY *--* Beginning of the Modern State *--* The New World *--* The Renaissance *--* Luther *--* The CounterReformation *--* Calvin and Henry VIII *--* The Puritan Revolution *--* The Rise of the Whigs *--* The English Revolution *--* Lewis XIV *--* The War of the Spanish Succession *--* The Hanoverian Settlement *--* Peter the Great and the Rise of Prussia *--* Frederic the Great *--* Philip II Mary Stuart and Elizabeth *--* The Huguenots and the League *--* Henry the Fourth and Richelieu *--* The Thirty Years War *--* The American Revolution *--* Letter to Contributors to the Cambridge Modern History *--* Notes to Inaugural Lecture -- downloaded pdf to Note
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july 2014 by dunnettreader
Baron John Emerich Edward Dalberg-Acton, Lord Acton - Historical essays & studies (1907) - Google Books
Contents -- WOLSEY AND THE DIVORCE OF HENRY VIII. *--* The Borgias and their Latest Historian. *--* Secret History of Charles II. *--* The Civil War in America. *--* The Rise and Fall of the Mexican Empire. *--* Cavour. *--* The Causes of the Franco-Prussian War. *--* The War of 1870 *--* German Schools of History *--* Talleyrands Memoirs. *--* The Life of Lord Houghton. *--* A History of the Papacy during the Period of the Reformation. *--* A Sketch Political and Military. *--* Mabillon et la Société de l'Abbaye de Saint Germain des Pres a la Fin du XVIIeme Siècle. *--* A History of England 1837-1880 *--* A History of the French Revolution. *--* George Eliots Life. *--* Mr Buckles Thesis and Method. *--* Mr Buckles Philosophy of History. *--* Wilhelm von Giesebrecht *--* Appendix - Letter to Bishop Creighton -- downloaded pdf to Note
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july 2014 by dunnettreader
Adam Marks, review - David Worthington. British and Irish Experiences and Impressions of Central Europe, c. 1560–1688 | H-Net Reviews February 2013
The book moves thematically through the primary components of the various British and Irish diasporas. The first successfully illustrates that travelers from Britain and Ireland did not confine themselves to western Europe and that the Grand Tour was far more than a visit to Italy. Worthington demonstrates that this area was a part of the British experience both in terms of awareness in printed accounts and as a part of the “Grand Tour.” .... the diplomacy undertaken by both the Tudor and Stuart courts, and provides an example of the breadth of diplomacy conducted by the Stuart monarchy. As Worthington writes, these activities serve “as a symbol of the complexity of English and later British foreign policy” and should be a stark warning to those who still perceive Stuart policy exclusively in terms of an axis from Paris to Madrid. ?...a useful account of the soldiers who fought on behalf of the Habsburgs and Poland before, during, and after the Thirty Years’ War. This chapter is perhaps the best example of Worthington’s ability to use contemporary British perspectives to explain central and east European events. ...the Protestant theologians in the area and makes a cursory overview of trade before moving to what is arguably the most effective chapter, dealing with the British and Irish Catholic colleges of the region. This effectively illustrates the crossover and divisions of the various Catholic orders. -- without further research on the English this creates as many questions as it answers. Why did the largest of the kingdoms of Britain and Ireland provide the least number of immigrants to the region? Is it simply that the economics of England meant that fewer felt the need to leave their homeland, or were they moving to other areas, such as the Low Countries, France, Iberia, or Scandinavia? -- British migrants continued to have a significant influence on their homelands through trade and politics, and in some cases by returning to their homelands to participate in open rebellion.
books  reviews  16thC  17thC  British_history  Ireland  Scotland  Catholics-England  Catholics-Ireland  exiles  migration  Grand_Tour  Eastern_Europe  Central_Europe  Reformation  British_foreign_policy  diplomats  diplomatic_history  education-higher  Thirty_Years_War  Wars_of_Religion  diasporas  EF-add 
june 2014 by dunnettreader
Dale Van Kley, review essay, Where the Rot Started? - Brad S. Gregory, The Unintended Reformation: How a Religious Revolution Secularized Society - | Books and Culture
Excellent essay -- Gregory places almost all blame on the Protestants for the disunity of Christendom, marginalization of religious institutions and thought, and horrors of modern age, including moral relativism and global warming. Like Gillespie, puzzling stress on Dun Scotus ("univocal being") and William of Ockham (nominalism) for (enabling? producing?) a cosmos in which scientific inquiry could dispense with God. Gregory omits a number of factors on the Catholic side (beyond the Lutheran Reformation itself that the Papacy might have handled via reforms instead of confrontation and denial of fallibility). Van Kley's list of factors (especially French) that Gregory omits -- (1) splits in Catholicism throughout middle ages, e.g. frequent appearance of latent heresies if reformers couldn't get a new order founded; (2) Papal alliance with secular rulers to stamp out conciliar movement and reinforce papal infallibility - made compromise with Luther etc impossible and still inhibits any meaningful ecumenism; (3) Counter-Reformation shift from assessing theological grounds of specific doctrines to asserting absolute unchallengable authority based on external marks (as defined by Catholics) of the true church - a style of argument that wasn't going to survive sola scriptura, new science, Enlightenment etc; (4) Papal overreaction that stamped out Gallican and liberal Catholicism, which in turn stimulated anticlericalism and anti-regime sentiments from both left and right, thereby reducing the flexibility of the Ancien Regime to address social and economic problems or reform institutions; (5) a counter-revolutionary anti-intellectual unholy alliance between Papacy and Jansénistes that produced the uncompromising radicalism of laïcité. And that's not all Van Kley covers.
books  reviews  kindle-available  historiography  religious_history  church_history  intellectual_history  theology  ecclesiology  Christianity  Reformation  16thC  17thC  18thC  19thC  20thC  21stC  Catholics  Papacy  Protestants  modernity  relativism  science-and-religion  Scientific_Revolution  Enlightenment  French_Enlightenment  Jansenists  Counter-Enlightenment  Counter-Reformation  counter-revolution  politics-and-religion  secularization  secularism  heterodoxy  heresy  Gallican  Absolutism  liberalism  self  morality-divine_command  morality-Christian  natural_law  nominalism  Duns_Scotus  medieval_philosophy  EF-add 
june 2014 by dunnettreader
Matthew Milliner, review essay - Lenten Reading - Ephraim Radner, A Brutal Unity: The Spiritual Politics of the Christian Church | Books and Culture 2013
Radner, a Protestant, [argues] that something in our modern world has gone wrong. However, he places the blame less on an elusive pattern of secularization (Taylor) or on Protestant fragmentation (Gregory) than on the much wider phenomenon of Christian disunity... Christian disunity is what gave birth to—or rather, miscarried—the liberal democratic state. These are massive claims, and Radner marshals the erudition... A Brutal Unity is ..an "eristology," which Radner defines as "the study of hostility in its disordering forms and forces." -- Radner [opens with a] polemic against Wm Cavanaugh's The Myth of Religious Violence, [which] unjustifiably absolves Christians from their share in the violence of the liberal state. ...the nations as we know them arose from the inability of Christians to refrain from mutual murder. Radner marches his readers deep into the Rwandan genocide and the Holocaust.... "[Nazi death squads] were Protestants and Catholics both." To suggest otherwise—whether to exonerate Pope Pius XII or to overemphasize the role of Bonhoeffer—is to succumb to "hallucinogenic fantasy." "The dead bodies, as it were, are already gathered by the time churches admit to complicity in their murder." Radner explores Catholic and Protestant .. attempts to deny the reality of Christian disunity by carving out an inviolable space of "the Church as such"... The saving of the church from her own sins by concocting an invisible or elusive sanctity is, admittedly, a traditional theological move, but... were this approach employed Christologically, it would be plainly Gnostic. - Radner [makes] the villain of his story Ephiphanius of Salamis (d. 403), who listed heresies and distanced the church from her enemies, especially the Jews. ?..inaugurated the "Epiphanian paradigm" and its program of exclusionary violence...the church's "brutal unity." Providentialism and proceduralism are the [church's] blinders... The former is the notion that God was somehow at work in church councils, however violent; the latter is the idea that somehow bureaucratic decisions and parliamentary process betray the hand of God. We should, Radner believes, trust neither.
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june 2014 by dunnettreader
Mark Noll, review essay - His Kingdom Stretch from Shore to Shore - Christianity worldwide 16thC-18thC | Books and Culture
Books review : David Hempton, The Church in the Long Eighteenth Century: The I.B.Tauris History of the Christian Church; Dale T. Irvin, ed, History of the World Christian Movement, Vol. 2: Modern Christianity from 1454-1800 -- .. intriguing that books written for such different ends coalesce in making some of the same larger judgments. Both books, thus, stress the delicate interplay between Christian expansion outside Europe and the fragmentation of Christianity within Europe. ...how, as divisions within Europe hardened between Catholics and Protestants, and soon between established churches and sectarian opponents of state churches, Christianity became the genuinely world religion. Hempton is equally perceptive on how 18th-century Europe witnessed intellectual, social, and political "challenges from which Christianity at least among educated elites, has never fully recovered," even as Western Protestants initiated the missionary efforts that successfully planted Christian faith around the globe. Both books also agree that the Jesuits were the era's most farsighted and effective "world Christians." ..the particular disaster for Latin America when Spanish and Portuguese officials sent the Jesuits packing in order to preserve the top-down, exploitative, and often syncretistic faith that best served the colonizers' interests. And they record the significance of the Moravians—so to speak, married Jesuits with children—who pushed Protestants beyond the identification of Christianity as such with European Christianity. The books are also agreed that the great Christian scandal of the early modern era was slavery. - ... both books clarify what most centrally defines the Christian faith itself. For Hempton it is the recognition at "the most profound level that Christianity is in its essence a missionary religion." For Irvin and Sunquist, it is the claim that Christian faith can never be adequately grasped except as a "world movement." Walls describes this dual character as "the indigenous principle" in constant tension with "the pilgrim principle."
books  reviews  religious_history  Christianity  16thC  17thC  18thC  exploration  colonialism  missionaries  Jesuits  Moravians  Reformation  Counter-Reformation  religious_culture  religious_belief  Latin_America  Africa  African_trade  West_Indies  China  querelle_des_rites  theology  heterodoxy  Papacy  sectarianism  slavery  Enlightenment  Spanish_Empire  universalism  monotheism  intellectual_history  social_history  church_history  enthusiasm  spirituality  self  rational_religion  ecclesiology  Protestants  EF-add 
june 2014 by dunnettreader
Dewey D. Wallace, Jr., historiographical review - Via Media? A Paradigm Shift | JSTOR: Anglican and Episcopal History, Vol. 72, No. 1 (March 2003), pp. 2-21
Very useful - he was working in the same stream as Tyacke before publication of Anti-Calvinists. Follows subsequent work that's developed the approach of the Elizabethan church as Reformed with a hankering for bits of Kutheranism. Notes the parallels in tensions between established Erastian church and the hotter sort who wanted to push a second Reformation, following the Reformed scholasticim and the more extreme version of Calvinism post Calvin. Notes different versions of where the via media develooed (the anti Puritan divines connected with James I court, the Oxford Movement? ) - Wallace seems to think it's a Restoration phenomenon, when Hooker is "canonized", and later groups like the Oxford Movement reinforced the claim that the Church of England had pursued the via media, at least by Elizabeth, as a means of marginalizing the evangelical stream. -- downloaded pdf to Note
article  jstor  historiography  religious_history  church_history  16thC  17thC  Reformation  Church_of_England  Calvinist  Lutherans  Arminian  via_media  Laudian  Elizabeth  clergy  godly_persons  Puritans  predestination  Erastianism  politics-and-religion  parish  local_politics  James_I  Charles_I  Restoration  High_Church  dissenters  anti-Catholic  popery  bibliography  downloaded  EF-add 
june 2014 by dunnettreader
Mark Hutchings - The ' Turk Phenomenon' and the Repertory of the Late Elizabethan Playhouse | Early Modern Literary Studies Special Issue 16 (October, 2007) 10.1-39
"Turk plays" popular up to Charles I - late-Elizabethan theatre drew on a conventional narrative of fear that was also.. one of fascination. ?..also energised by 2 linked events: the Reformation and Elizabeth's promotion of Anglo-Ottoman relations after excommunication by Pope Pius V in 1570. ?..in the last decade or so of the 16thC a sizeable proportion of the playhouse repertory became deeply influenced by this development... a complex artistic, ideological, and commercial phenomenon. -- In shifting from "author"-centred approaches that many theorists believe to be anachronistic to an emphasis on how companies operated, scholars have drawn attention to ...early modern theatre as a collective enterprise. - By its very nature the staging of the Ottoman Empire was sustained by artistic cross-fertilisation that was, in a broader sense collaborative .. as well as competitive. -- These plays were not necessarily mere ciphers of the historical past or present. The Jew of Malta far from endorses the behaviour of the besieged Christians in 1565. It is remarkable for its resistance to the Malta narrative in Christian accounts where the Turkish defeat (like at Lepanto) was celebrated. - While the Tamburlaine plays and their spin-offs called attention to Turkish tyranny and the Ottoman threat, the move away from the Marlovian aesthetic signalled a more ironic approach. Thus in Henry V, Henry's proposal to Katherine that they should produce a son to recapture Constantinople (an anachronism) is undercut by the ambiguous, "Shall we not?" For the audience a deeper irony is available - "the original phrase 'to go to Constantinople to take the Turk by the beard' became a repository for vacuous ideals, a phrase that could only be rehearsed with an increasing sense of self-satire" -- online journal html
article  English_lit  theater  genre  16thC  Tudor  Elizabethan  Marlowe  Shakespeare  Ottomans  cultural_history  playwrights  actors  trade-policy  consumers  exotic  orientalism  diplomatic_history  Reformation  Christendom  Christianity-Islam_conflict  Papacy-English_relations  Counter-Reformation  elite_culture  EF-add 
june 2014 by dunnettreader
Benedict S. Robinson -Harry and Amurath | JSTOR: Shakespeare Quarterly, Vol. 60, No. 4 (Winter, 2009), pp. 399-424
Before his coronation, as he announces his intention to invade France, and as he proposes marriage to Katharine, Henry V invokes the specter of a Turkish double. These moments in Shakespeare’s play punctuate the major political transitions of his reign; moreover, they condense a pattern of thought vital to these plays, one that concerns the constitution of English nationalist discourse from the often recalcitrant materials of a Christian political imaginary. In the 16thC, Christendom remained the object of powerful emotional cathexis, but the forms of allegiance and action it authorized were in dispute. Henry redirects the energies that once coalesced around the political and communal ideal of a Christian commonwealth to the commonwealth of England. But as Henry invokes the Turk as his opposite, he also suggests his resemblance to that figure. In this, Henry V opens up some serious questions about the “political theology” of the nation. In revealing the constitution of national community as a translated theology, Shakespeare suggests that this is a troubled process. Recent accounts of early modern nationalism have tended to downplay or forget Christendom as a transnational space of belonging both instrumental to the nation and still in competition with it. The strange relations between “Harry” and “Amurath” evoked in 2 Henry IV and Henry V are the traces of a wider struggle between Christendom and the nation as theopolitical spaces, a struggle that takes place in significant measure over the figure of Muslim difference. -- lots of cites to English constitutional history links to national identity (eg Pocock & critics), Blumenberg and Schmitt debates -- paywall
article  jstor  Project_MUSE  paywall  find  16thC  British_history  British_politics  Tudor  national_ID  Christendom  Ottomans  Reformation  Christianity-Islam_conflict  political-theology  Shakespeare  political_culture  religious_culture  politics-and-religion  ancient_constitution  nationalism  EF-add 
june 2014 by dunnettreader
Stephen Alford, historiographical review - Politics and Political History in the Tudor Century | JSTOR: The Historical Journal, Vol. 42, No. 2 (Jun., 1999), pp. 535-548
Recent writing on the Tudor century emphasizes the importance to the history of politics of the study of political processes. Tudor historians are, for the most part, less willing than hitherto to describe bureaucracies or institutions of government, and more concerned to present politics as something dynamic rather than static. Although their work remains rooted in the archives, Tudor specialists are increasingly receptive to the significance of (for example) political language, iconography, and literature. This article examines a number of recent contributions, in the context of post-war Tudor historiography. It accepts that the insights of other disciplines can enhance the study of sixteenth-century politics, and welcomes the intellectual and cultural turn in recent writing, but maintains that Tudor culture is not always being reconstructed with the sensitivity it needs. -- downloaded pdf to Note
article  jstor  historiography  political_history  cultural_history  intellectual_history  iconography  political_philosophy  political_culture  social_process  change-social  16thC  British_history  British_politics  Tudor  monarchy  monarchy-proprietary  Reformation  politics-and-religion  Parliament  downloaded  EF-add 
may 2014 by dunnettreader
Robert B. Ekelund, Jr. and Robert F. Hébert - Interest Groups, Public Choice and the Economics of Religion | JSTOR: Public Choice, Vol. 142, No. 3/4 (Mar., 2010), pp. 429-436
This article reviews Bob Tollison's conjoint contributions to the burgeoning area of the economics of religion, underscoring his integration of public choice and interestgroup themes into the microeconomic analysis of faith-based organizational architecture, institutional decision making and doctrinal innovation. Beginning with study of the medieval Catholic Church, moving forward to the Protestant Reformation and beyond, it supplies a timeline of developments and the major findings of each phase of his research program. -- hegemonic ambition of public choice school -- downloaded pdf to Note
article  jstor  religious_history  sociology_of_religion  economics_of_religion  public_choice  interest_groups  rent-seeking  church_history  Roman_Catholicism  Reformation  Protestants  Counter-Reformation  secularization  organizations  institutional_economics  behavioral_economics  downloaded  EF-add 
january 2014 by dunnettreader
Review by: Maurice Cranston - Edmund Leites, ed, Conscience and Casuistry in Early Modern Europe | JSTOR: The English Historical Review, Vol. 106, No. 421 (Oct., 1991), pp. 1005-1006
Quite useful review that highlights what each contributor adds to dismantling the association of casuistry with Roman Catholicism and Jesuits, 10 Commandments (supposedly Protestant) vs seven deadly sins (supposedly Catholic, though individual Catholics found it handy in weighing up sins in preparation for annual confession) - paragraph devoted to moral philosophy of Hobbes by Tuck -- didn't download
books  reviews  jstor  find  intellectual_history  religious_history  Reformation  Counter-Reformation  Jesuits  casuistry  conscience  character  sin  EF-add 
january 2014 by dunnettreader
Anthony J. La Vopa - The Philosopher and the "Schwärmer" from Luther to Kant | JSTOR - Huntington Library Quarterly (1997)
The Philosopher and the "Schwärmer": On the Career of a German Epithet from Luther to Kant -- Huntington Library Quarterly, Vol. 60, No. 1/2, Enthusiasm and Enlightenment in Europe, 1650-1850 (1997), pp. 85-115 -- downloaded pdf to Note
article  jstor  intellectual_history  religious_history  cultural_history  16thC  17thC  18thC  religious_culture  religious_belief  enthusiasm  Pietist  Reformation  politics-and-religion  sectarianism  Luther  Kant  imagination  rationality  rational_religion  clergy  authority  self  self-knowledge  self-control  public_sphere  public_disorder  status  downloaded 
january 2014 by dunnettreader
PETER MARSHALL - JOHN CALVIN AND THE ENGLISH CATHOLICS, c. 1565-1640 | JSTOR: The Historical Journal, Vol. 53, No. 4 (DECEMBER 2010), pp. 849-870
This article examines the assessments of John Calvin's life, character, and influence to be found in the polemical writings of English Catholics in the Elizabethan and early Stuart periods. It demonstrates the centrality of Calvin to Catholic claims about the character and history of the established church, and the extent to which Catholic writings propagated a vibrant 'black legend' of Calvin's egotism and sexual depravity, drawing heavily not only on the writings of the French Calvinist-turned-Catholic Jerome Bolsee, but also on those of German Lutherans. The article also explores how, over time, Catholic writers increasingly identified some common ground with anti-puritans and anti-Calvinists within the English church, and how claims about the seditious character of Calvin, and by extension Calvinism, were used to articulate the contrasting 'loyalty' of Catholics and their right to occupy a place within the English polity. -- big bibliography - paywall
article  jstor  paywall  intellectual_history  religious_history  church_history  Reformation  Church_of_England  Catholics-England  Calvinist  anti-Calvinists  Lutherans  politics-and-religion  political_culture  religious_culture  religion-established  bibliography  EF-add 
january 2014 by dunnettreader
Anne McLaren - Rethinking Republicanism: "Vindiciae, contra tyrannos" in Context | JSTOR: The Historical Journal, Vol. 49, No. 1 (Mar., 2006), pp. 23-52
The article takes issue with current orthodoxy concerning early modern republicanism, centred on Quentin Skinner's model of classical republicanism. I argue that historians of political thought need to return to first principles in their practice in order to understand early modern republicanism, and I provide an example by using those principles to reassess one canonical text, Philippe de Plessis Mornay's Vindiciae, contra tyrannos. Reading the Vindiciae in context reveals it as a work whose radicalism lies, not in its engagement with the Roman law tradition, but in its express conviction that each and every individual is responsible for maintaining a covenanted relationship with God. My reassessment tracks the political, and specifically regicidal, consequences of commitment to that belief in England from the late sixteenth through the mid-seventeenth centuries. It destabilizes the anachronistic distinction between 'political' and 'religious' modes of thought that historians of political thought too often use to characterize early modern political discourse, and it points to the common ground shared and articulated by theorists including, inter alia, John Ponet, George Buchanan, and John Milton. The conclusion considers what this investigation reveals about republicanism as a political phenomenon in Europe and America from the sixteenth through the eighteenth centuries. -- downloaded pdf to Note
article  jstor  historiography  intellectual_history  political_philosophy  religious_history  politics-and-religion  political-theology  16thC  17thC  18thC  Europe-Early_Modern  France  British_history  British_politics  American_colonies  American_Revolution  Wars_of_Religion  English_Civil_War  monarchy  republicanism  neo-Roman  civic_humanism  Buchanan  Milton  Reformation  Skinner  downloaded  EF-add 
january 2014 by dunnettreader
Graham Maddox - The Secular Reformation and the Influence of Machiavelli | JSTOR: The Journal of Religion, Vol. 82, No. 4 (Oct., 2002), pp. 539-562
Over 100 references -- extends republicanism and democracy discussion to US and Tocqueville with asides for Levellers and Puritans especially in American colonies. Looks like lots of political theory historiography debates with religious filter -- didn't download
article  jstor  intellectual_history  political_philosophy  religious_history  religious_culture  politics-and-religion  17thC  18thC  19thC  British_history  American_colonies  Early_Republic  English_Civil_War  Interregnum  Puritans  bibliography  secularization  Reformation  EF-add 
january 2014 by dunnettreader
Alexandra Walsham - The Reformation and 'The Disenchantment of the World' Reassessed | JSTOR: The Historical Journal, Vol. 51, No. 2 (Jun., 2008), pp. 497-528
This essay is a critical historiographical overview of the ongoing debate about the role of the Protestant Reformation in the process of 'the disenchantment of the world'. It considers the development of this thesis in the work of Max Weber and subsequent scholars, its links with wider claims about the origins of modernity, and the challenges to this influential paradigm that have emerged in the last twenty-five years. Setting the literature on England within its wider European context, it explores the links between Protestantism and the transformation of assumptions about the sacred and the supernatural, and places renewed emphasis on the equivocal and ambiguous legacy left by the upheavals of the sixteenth and seventeenth centuries. Attention is also paid to the ways in which the Reformation converged with other intellectual, cultural, political, and social developments which cumulatively brought about subtle, but decisive, transformations in individual and collective mentalities. It is suggested that thinking in terms of cycles of desacralization and resacralization may help to counteract the potential distortions of a narrative that emphasizes a linear path of development.
article  jstor  social_theory  modernity  secularization  Weber  Reformation  historical_sociology  historiography  16thC  17thC  Europe-Early_Modern  religious_history  religious_culture  social_history  intellectual_history  political_history  scepticism  religious_wars  church_history  bibliography  downloaded  EF-add 
january 2014 by dunnettreader
Michael Hattem - The “War on Christmas” in Early America « The Junto Dec 2013
And so the first English dissenters who settled New England in the early seventeenth century were, like their brethren back home, decidedly anti-Christmas. Puritans were keenly aware of the holiday’s pagan origins, as Increase Mather wrote in A Testimony against Several Prophane and Superstitious Customs, Now Practiced by Some in New England: [3] (fascinating quote from Increase Mather). .... Even after the Revolution, the Congress was known to meet on Christmas Day, if they were in session. Throughout the nineteenth century, as well, there are numerous reports from all over the United States attesting to the lack Christmas observance, particularly by various Protestant and German Pietist sects.
religious_history  religious_culture  legal_history  British_history  British_politics  American_colonies  US_history  17thC  18thC  19thC  21stC  Puritans  Pietist  Interregnum  Reformation  Christianity  right-wing  EF-add 
december 2013 by dunnettreader
Brenna Moore - Beyond the Catholic-Protestant divide - review of Brad Gregory’s The Unintended Reformation « The Immanent Frame - Nov 2013
Gregory seems to think if Europe had avoided theological split all would have been well,maybe even avoid modernity and its evils - ignores Catholic relations with other religions and Christianity entanglement with colonialism and economic imperialism -- Also ignores important 20thC European Catholic rethinking of relations with others, support for eg human rights etc that Gregory disparages, ignoring Catholic links -- quote: With this twentieth-century European Catholic scholarly tradition as a backdrop, it appears all the more remarkable that Gregory did not follow its lead in thinking through the role of Christianity’s relationship to non-Christian religions in the making of modernity. Modern civilization, including secularization and consumerism, is incomprehensible when defined as a debate between Protestants and Catholics alone. Christians’ encounters with religious others shaped their own self-understanding in the early modern period and beyond, and the interactions between religiously diverse people must be central to any genealogy of our present. These encounters—sometimes violent, sometimes deeply humane—between Catholics and Jews, between missionaries and those they met on the frontier, between the orientalists and their archives, have to be at the center (or at least included somewhere!) of any analysis of the Christian roots of contemporary global capitalism and consumerism. Maritain and his cohort faced this head-on. José Casanova and Saba Mahmood have leveled similar critiques at Charles Taylor’s A Secular Age. In short, it is impossible to understand the historical trajectory of Christianity without understanding its contact with non-Christian others. Why does Gregory, like Taylor, bracket all of this? Had he not, what difference might it have made for the conclusions of The Unintended Reformation?

John W. O’Malley’s work has shown that few areas of sixteenth-century Catholicism were more significant than the intense upheavals caused by the missionary activity that began with the Portuguese and Spanish conquests and explorations and lasted through the seventeenth century. Catholics, he argues, were not always as fixated on Protestant reforms as we tend to assume (hence his preference for the label “early modern Catholicism” rather than “the Counter-Reformation”).
books  reviews  kindle-available  religious_history  intellectual_history  modernity  Christianity  Catholics  Reformation  16thC  17thC  20thC  comparative_religion  Judaism  colonialism  Spanish_Empire  Netherlands  tolerance  Counter-Reformation  Islam  EF-add 
december 2013 by dunnettreader
Thomas Pfau - History without hermeneutics: Brad Gregory’s unintended modernity « The Immanent Frame Nov 2013
It is precisely in the material practices of religious communities that we witness a hermeneutic of what a “sacramental worldview” concretely meant, something of far greater reality and presence than can be captured by any body of theological propositions. Invariably, though, the gravitational pull of The Unintended Reformation is away from social and material historiography and toward philosophical theology, which itself, in the two centuries leading up to the Reformation, becomes a far more fragmented enterprise than Gregory acknowledges.

Instead, the emergence of univocal forms of theological predication—a line of argument lately revived in stridently absolutist terms by the “Nottingham School” (particularly by John Milbank and Catherine Pickstock)—seems to receive disproportionate emphasis. In passing, one should also note that Richard Cross (incidentally a colleague of Brad Gregory at Notre Dame) has seriously challenged the allegedly pivotal impact of Duns Scotus’ univocalism on the genesis of modern thought. To be sure, somewhere in late Scholasticism—and here I would think, above all, of Ockham, Gabriel Biel, and Nicolas Autrecourt—we do, indeed, observe a momentous shift, whereby God is placed on the same ontological plane as all created, particular existence, and where a quasi-legalistic theological concern with divine omnipotence (potentia absoluta) trumps, and implicitly jeopardizes, the rational order (potentia ordinata) wrought by God. The impression is that of a conspicuous failure on the part of late Scholastic theologians to imagine and embrace God’s absolute transcendence as post-Nicaean Patristic thinkers all the way up to Anselm and Aquinas had been able to do.

Yet even if one were to restrict one’s understanding of medieval Christianity to its theological and philosophical superstructure, a book pursuing aims as ambitious as those of The Unintended Reformation owes its readers a more fully realized account of how, specifically, this momentous conceptual shift came about.
books  kindle-available  reviews  intellectual_history  religious_history  theology  metaphysics  nominalism  medieval_history  Renaissance  scholastics  Reformation  modernity  secularism  liberalism  EF-add 
november 2013 by dunnettreader
Peter E. Gordon - The Unintended Reformation (review series): Has modernity failed? « The Immanent Frame Sept 2013
[Brad Gregory's] His real concern, on my reading, is that modernity cannot survive if it refuses the meta-ethical ideal that once served as the organizing principle for medieval Christianity. But what philosophical or historical arguments could convince us that this ideal was special? And why should we not continue to believe that our own modern ideals only need to be realized with greater fidelity? Here we confront a certain asymmetry in the way Gregory writes about the various “failures” of distinctive ethical schemes: He seems to think that the modern alternatives have all failed because of their intrinsic defects, whereas the Christian ideal failed only because we failed to measure up to its demands. In the one case the failure points to a basic flaw in the metaphysical scheme itself; in the other case the failure was merely one of execution.
books  kindle-available  reviews  intellectual_history  religious_history  Medieval  Christianity  Catholics  Reformation  modernity  secularism  liberalism  metaphysics  moral_philosophy  EF-add 
november 2013 by dunnettreader
Reviews [series] of Brad Gregory, The Unintended Reformation « The Immanent Frame
Brad S. Gregory’s The Unintended Reformation traces the absence of any substantive common good—and the triumph of capitalism, consumerism, and individualism—to the long-term effects of the Protestant Reformation. Yet can the social and political ills of modern societies be understood as more or less direct, if unforeseeable, consequences of the Reformation? What is the contemporary import of thinking of modernity as the degradation of an earlier, more wholesome age? What sort of philosophical or theological premises underlie Gregory’s understanding of history, and how are political and socioeconomic factors to be incorporated into his account of modernization? We have invited scholars to respond to these and other questions, to evaluate Gregory’s thesis, and to offer their critiques of how his work might fit into broader historical patterns of interpreting the relationship of modernity to its past.

Series started with Clapper, September 2013. As of Pabst (Sept 24) all reactions have ranged from impressed with the scope of the intellectual history to attacking Gregory’s history as tenditious by omissions if not commissions, and for Gregory’s agenda (legitimating religious providentialism or metaphysics in historiographical evidence? or reimposing Catholicism (which? ) as politically and culturally authoritative? or just another anti modernity cri de coeur?) the reactions range from politely unenthusiastic to aggressively hostile.

Secular supercessionism and alternative modernity -Adrian Pabst

Get over it - Victoria Kahn

Has modernity failed? - Peter E. Gordon

The return of sacred history - Ian Hunter

An intended absence? Democracy and The Unintended Reformation - James Chappe
books  reviews  kindle-available  religious_history  intellectual_history  medieval_history  Renaissance  Reformation  Counter-Reformation  Enlightenment  Counter-Enlightenment  democracy  modernity  Aquinas  nominalism  secularism  modernization  common_good  pluralism  relativism  EF-add 
october 2013 by dunnettreader
Ian Hunter, review: The return of sacred history - Brad Gregory’s "The Unintended Reformation" « The Immanent Frame
Finally, let us return to the twin claims on which Gregory’s account is based: first, his claim that Protestant anti-sacramentalism facilitated a historical process by which “metaphysical univocity in combination with Occam’s razor opened a path that would lead through deism to Weberian disenchantment and modern atheism”; and, second, his claim that despite the “Western hyperpluralism” to which it gave rise, he can provide a true account of this history on the basis of a concept of a “transcendent creator God” whose compatibility with “all possible scientific findings” is grounded in a metaphysics that demonstrates God’s immanent presence in all scientific domains. How should we view these claims in light of the preceding evidences and observations? Well, the prima facie incompatibility between Gregory’s first claim and an array of significant historical evidence—taken in tandem with his relegation of anti-anachronist historiography altogether—suggests that his account should not be regarded as a contribution to trans-confessional historiography. Rather, it should be located, like Charles Taylor’s A Secular Age, in the genre of Catholic confessional metaphysical hermeneutics, where historical narratives are composed as unfoldings of predetermined metaphysical or theological doctrines.
books  reviews  religious_history  intellectual_history  cultural_history  Catholics  theology  metaphysics  Reformation  science-and-religion  Spinoza  monism  Deism  atheism  Hegelian  securitization  secularism  modernity  apostolic_succession  Thomism  historiography  historians-and-religion  church_history  history_of_science  Europe-Early_Modern  Germany  Biblical_criticism  philology  historicism  historiography-17thC  humanism  Duns_Scotus  God-attributes  transcendence  immanence  creation_ex_nilho  Early_Christian  Neoplatonism  Dioysius-Pseudo  forgeries  sacraments 
september 2013 by dunnettreader
James Chappel review of Brad Gregory’s The Unintended Reformation - An intended absence? Democracy and The Unintended Reformation « The Immanent Frame Sept 5, 2013
This persistent closed-mindedness—the insistence that any and every text and phenomenon be read back into one grand Manichean narrative—is not a problem unique to Gregory: indeed, the work that his resembles more than any other is Jonathan Israel’s Radical Enlightenment, a clarion call for a robust secularity. Both of these books were written by venerable, erudite early modern scholars, convinced that the die of modernity were cast somewhere around 1650. They are both inordinately long—some of the longest nonfiction works published for mass consumption in the last few years. They are both obsessed with Spinoza. And both authors adopt the pose of a Cassandra, howling obvious truths into a world too blinkered by its iPhones to understand. Their great length, and unending cascade of details, stands in for a paucity of theoretical complexity. For both of them, the story itself is extremely simple: in the seventeenth century, there was a grand parting of the ways, and ever since then the children of light have been combating the children of darkness.
books  reviews  historiography  Reformation  Europe-Early_Modern  16thC  17thC  18thC  19thC  20thC  religious_history  intellectual_history  history_of_science  economic_history  cultural_history  church_history  political_history  democracy  Catholics  Protestants  Spinoza  monism  atheism  secularism  tolerance  metaphysics  theology  modernity  EF-add 
september 2013 by dunnettreader
George Hoffmann, Atheism as a Devotional Category | Republics of Letters: A Journal for the Study of Knowledge, Politics, and the Arts
Citation: Hoffmann, George. “Atheism as a Devotional Category.” Republics of Letters: A Journal for the Study of Knowledge, Politics, and the Arts 1, no. 2 (April 3, 2010): http://rofl.stanford.edu/node/55. -- in "Experiment and Experience" -- downloaded pdf to Note -- Occurrences of “atheist” spread quickly during the Reformation conflicts, riding on top of struggles that reshaped what it meant to believe. .... The division of Christianity into discrete confessions, abutting or overlapping one another, meant that post-Reformation creeds could no longer merely depend on social conformity to guarantee religious discipline. In communities riven between competing creeds, making a commitment to one’s faith came to entail something more deliberate than tacit consent, something more purposeful than weaving a web of local loyalties. Confessional formalization transformed the nature of religious affiliation from unspecified and potentially unreflective to explicit and volitional.Within such a climate, the hypothetical absence of faith allowed believers to construe their own devotion as an intentional act, such that their faith might appear a willful “choice.” Atheism allowed followers to view themselves as electing their faith, however coercive their adhesion in fact proved—in fact, countervailing evidence suggested increased pressures toward religious conformity: new social structures arose, prayer books multiplied, churches were remodeled, and everywhere missals, catechisms, and printed professions of faith sought to mold the content of belief.This antagonistic climate of confessional competition depended upon the theoretical option of atheism in order to make such coercion feel consensual.
article  intellectual_history  religious_history  religious_culture  religious_belief  Reformation  confessionalization  atheism  dissenters  heterodoxy  16thC  17thC  downloaded  EF-add 
september 2013 by dunnettreader
Anthony Grafton: A Sketch Map of a Lost Continent: The Republic of Letters | Republics of Letters: A Journal for the Study of Knowledge, Politics, and the Arts
Citation: Grafton, Anthony. “A Sketch Map of a Lost Continent: The Republic of Letters.”Republics of Letters: A Journal for the Study of Knowledge, Politics, and the Arts 1, no. 1 (May 1, 2009): http://rofl.stanford.edu/node/34. -- In "Rethinking the Republic of Letters" issue -- downloaded pdf to Note -- The citizens of the early modern Republic of Letters created a virtual community not of those who shared beliefs, but of those who differed. They made up rules for civility: rules that could be used to judge the conduct of all those who offered their intellectual wares for sale in the new, largely free market. They developed new tolerances, for thinkers who disagreed with them on fundamental matters and for facts that challenged their most basic verities. What unified these efforts was a shared, if inchoate and incomplete, respect for truth, for civility, and for the integrity of the human being—a respect not founded, perhaps, on deep philosophical or theological arguments, and often violated in practice, but solid enough to make them bold when they confronted what they saw as superstitions...... Though its story has often been treated as coextensive with that of the eighteenth-century Enlightenment, such accounts foreshorten the traditions of scholarship, debate and sociability that connect the humanist sodalities of Renaissance Florence and Rome to the academies, public libraries, Masonic lodges and salons of the seventeenth and eighteenth centuries. This complex and inspiring history remains to be written.
article  intellectual_history  cultural_history  16thC  17thC  18thC  Republic_of_Letters  Erasmus  Reformation  Huguenots  Jesuits  travel  intelligentsia  scholarship  Enlightenment  érudits  humanism  downloaded  EF-add 
september 2013 by dunnettreader
Kevin McKenna: Scotland has the most inequitable land ownership in the west. Why? | Guardian August 2013
Andy Wightman is author of The Poor Had No Lawyers: Who Owns Scotland (and How They Got It), which has become the primer for those who had always felt something was never quite right about such a concentration of land and unearned privilege in the hands of so few. His book gives depth and academic rigour to the arguments of those seeking meaningful land reform."The land on which many of our lairds sit was stolen in the 17th century," he says. "But these ill-gotten gains were protected by acts which maintained their hegemony after the rest of Europe ditched feudalism and concentrated land ownership."He describes how the aristocracy embraced the 1560 Reformation as a means of getting their hands on land belonging to the "Auld Kirk". They needed to protect their stolen goods with a robust law. The Act of Prescription (1617) did the trick. Thus any land occupied for 40 years or more was indemnified from future legal challenge. The law remains in place and has effectively upheld the gentry's rights to stolen goods for 400 years.
16thC  17thC  18thC  social_history  Scotland  Reformation  Kirk  aristocracy  landowners  UK_politics  EF-add 
august 2013 by dunnettreader

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