dunnettreader + queen_anne   27

Scott Sowerby, review - Brian Cowan, The State Trial of Doctor Henry Sacheverell | H-Albion, H-Net Reviews. August, 2014.
Cowan’s erudite edition of primary sources charts contemporary reactions to the Sacheverell trial. Cowan sees the trial as an instance of the personalization of political ideas, as long-standing debates about church and state became “focused on one figure—Sacheverell, who could now be cast as either a hero or a scoundrel, depending upon one’s politics” (p. 15, emphasis in original). Unlike so many studies of print culture that focus on production, this volume is attuned to reception, with reproductions of commonplace books and marginalia that alternately endorsed and disputed the standard printed accounts of the trial. Cowan’s edition assembles sources from eleven libraries on two continents. Most of his selections are from unpublished manuscripts; five are from publications so rare that they are found in only one repository. The footnotes alone are worth the price of admission, providing a blow-by-blow account of the trial for the uninitiated. The volume is splendidly illustrated, with photographs of manuscripts, satirical prints, engravings of Sacheverell’s portrait, and depictions of the courtroom. The extended introduction surveys the history of printed transcripts of the trial, from Jacob Tonson’s official record to competing accounts by Tory and Whig authors. A helpful timeline and a comprehensive biographical guide round out the edition.
books  reviews  find  18thC  British_history  British_politics  Sacheverell  1710s  1720s  parties  Tories  Whig_Junto  Whigs  Church_of_England  tolerance  comprehension-church  Protestant_International  church-in-danger  Queen_Anne  impeachment  Parliament  House_of_Commons  House_of_Lords  political_press  public_sphere  public_opinion  Revolution_Principles  Walpole  print_culture  reception  Tonson  rhetoric-political  politics-and-religion  religion-established  Church-and-State  manuscripts  primary_sources 
january 2016 by dunnettreader
Melinda S. Zook - Turncoats and Double Agents in Restoration and Revolutionary England: The Case of Robert Ferguson, the Plotter (2009) | JSTOR - Eighteenth-Century Studies
Eighteenth-Century Studies, Vol. 42, No. 3 (Spring, 2009), pp. 363-378 -- The propagandist and conspirator, Robert Ferguson, so-called, The Plotter, has always been something of a puzzle to historians; his conversion from Whig to Jacobite following the Glorious Revolution has always been particularly troubling. This essay argues that Ferguson's winding career was far from unusual in the late Stuart era. Many politicians, prelates, playwrights and publicists altered their principles or even their religion within the fast changing political environment of Restoration and Revolution England. Secondly, this essay takes Ferguson seriously as a sophisticated political theorist, arguing that his political principles, from Whig to Jacobite, remained fairly consistent and revolve around his understanding of England's ancient constitution. His political life took many twists and turns, but his basic ideology remained the same. -- article published after her Radical Whigs and conspiracies book -- downloaded pdf to Note
article  jstor  political_history  British_history  British_politics  17thC  18thC  Restoration  Popish_Plot  Exclusion_Crisis  Glorious_Revolution  Jacobites  Whigs  Whigs-Radicals  Whig_Junto  conspiracy  James_II  James_III  William_III  Queen_Anne  1715_uprising  ancient_constitution  ideology  political_philosophy  political_culture  bibliography  downloaded 
november 2015 by dunnettreader
Robert P. Irvine - Labor and Commerce in Locke and Early 18thC English Georgic (2009) | JSTOR - ELH
ELH, Vol. 76, No. 4 (Winter, 2009), pp. 963-988 -- importance of (agricultural) labor from Locke’s 2nd Treatise to "naturakize" money not just within the economy but within politics of the mercantilist imperial state - comparing Virgil use of georgics to encompass the Roman imperial state. Contrasts political agendas of Philips (Cyder 1707) and Pope (Windsor Forest 1713) in their use of georgics, both working within the Lockean framework of property. Extensive lit survey - lots of recent work on 18thC georgics to say nothing of cultural dimensions of political economy of expanding trade, commercialization and imperialism. -- downloaded pdf to Note
article  jstor  literary_history  English_lit  18thC  intellectual_history  political_philosophy  moral_philosophy  Locke-2_Treatises  property  mercantilism  imperialism  trade  commerce  commerce-doux  civility-political  politeness  civil_society  public_sphere  nature  parties  partisanship  Whigs  Whig_Junto  City  Tories  gentry  landed_interest  national_ID  national_interest  War_of_Spanish_Succession  Queen_Anne  Spectator  Addison  political_culture  economic_culture  British_politics  British_Empire  poetry  poetics  nature-poetry  nature-mastery  Virgil  Pope  1700s  1710s  peace  Peace_of_Utrecht  labor_theory_of_value  labor  agriculture  Davenant  political_economy  bibliography  downloaded 
november 2015 by dunnettreader
Michael Schaich, ed. - Monarchy and Religion: The Transformation of Royal Culture in 18thC Europe (2007) - Oxford University Press
OUP/German Historical Institute London Studies of the German Historical Institute London -- 509 pages | 978-0-19-921472-3 | Hardback | This collection of essays is a pioneering survey of the spiritual dimensions of kingship in 18thC Europe. It investigates the role of clergymen in the mechanics of the court, the religious observances of monarchs and their entourages, and the importance of religious images and ceremonial in underpinning royal power. The volume compares the British, French, Russian, and some of the German monarchies in order to allow comparisons to be drawn between different national and especially confessional settings. Based on original research and new source material, the 15 essays by established scholars chart mostly unknown territory. Previous research on the subject has focused on the 16thC and 17thC at the expense of the age of Enlightenment which has widely been regarded as a period of desacralization of monarchy. The essays open up new perspectives on the function of court clerics, conspicuous and internalized forms of aulic devotion, the gendered framing of religion, the purpose of court ritual, and the divide between the public and private spheres of monarchy. Overall the essays maintain that despite the gradual decline of monarchy by divine right, religion still permeated almost all aspects of court life and monarchical representation. The volume thus challenges received wisdom about the disenchantment of kingship and the rise of more rationalized forms of absolutist government during the period between c.1688 and 1789. -- surprise, surprise, leads off with an "ancien régime" essay by JCD Clark
books  cultural_history  religious_history  political_history  political_culture  politics-and-religion  17thC  18thC  Enlightenment  Ancien_régime  secularization  monarchy  monarchy-proprietary  Absolutism  divine_right  court_culture  authority  cultural_authority  cultural_change  gender  religion-established  gender-and-religion  British_history  Glorious_Revolution  Jacobites  courtiers  Jacobite_court  propaganda  art_history  patronage-artistic  William_III  Queen_Anne  Hanoverian_Succession  George_I  George_II  George_III  royal_families  société_des_princes  kingship  Louis_XIV  Louis_XV  Louis_XVI  France  Russia  Holy_Roman_Empire  Catherine_the_Great  Prussia  Frederick_the_Great  Germany  Austria  Spain  ritual 
april 2015 by dunnettreader
- DAVID LEWIS JONES - British Parliaments and Assemblies: A Bibliography of Printed Materials (2009) Parliamentary History - Wiley Online Library
Each section a pdf downloaded to Note - combined, c 25,000 entries *--* Section 1: Preface, Introduction, The Westminster Parliament 1-4005. **--** Section 2: The Medieval Parliament 4006-4728 **--** Section 3: Tudor Parliaments 4729-5064 **--* Section 4: Stuart Parliaments 5063-6805 **--** Section 5: The Unreformed Parliament 1714-1832 6806-9589. **--** Section 6: The Reformed Parliament 1832-1918 9590-15067 **--** Section 7: Parliament 1918-2009 15068-21582. **--** Section 8: The Judicial House of Lords 21583-21835. -- The Palace of Westminster 21836-22457. -- The Irish Parliament 22458-23264 -- The Scottish Parliament (to 1707) 23265-23482 -- The New Devolved Assemblies 23483-23686 -- The Scottish Parliament (1999-) 23687-24251 -- Northern Ireland 24252-24563 -- The National Assembly for Wales 24537-24963 -- Minor Assemblies
bibliography  historiography  Medieval  medieval_history  15thC  16thC  17thC  18thC  19thC  20thC  21stC  political_culture  political_philosophy  political_economy  political_history  politics-and-religion  political_participation  political_press  legal_history  legal_system  legal_theory  British_history  British_politics  Britain  British_Empire  British_foreign_policy  English_constitution  British_Empire-constitutional_structure  monarchy  monarchy-proprietary  monarchical_republic  limited_monarchy  Parliament  Parliamentary_supremacy  House_of_Commons  House_of_Lords  sovereignty  government-forms  governing_class  government_finance  government_officials  Scotland  Ireland  Ireland-English_exploitation  elites  elite_culture  common_law  rule_of_law  1690s  1700s  1707_Union  1680s  Glorious_Revolution  Glorious_Revolution-Scotland  English_Civil_War  Three_Kingdoms  composite_monarchies  Absolutism  ancient_constitution  religion-established  Church_of_England  Reformation  reform-legal  reform-political  elections  franchise  state-building  opposition  parties  pa 
december 2014 by dunnettreader
Edward Gregg, review - Daniel Szechi, George Lockhart of Carnwath, 1681-1731: A Study in Jacobitism | JSTOR: The American Historical Review, Vol. 109, No. 1 (February 2004), p. 251
Szechi is best placed to write this bio, and given how it weaves events in Scotland, post-Union Britain and Continental Jacobites, plus House of Hanover, will be a "must" for those interested in 1st 3 decades of 18thC. -- Downloaded pdf to Note
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october 2014 by dunnettreader
BRENT S. SIROTA -- THE OCCASIONAL CONFORMITY CONTROVERSY, MODERATION, AND THE ANGLICAN CRITIQUE OF MODERNITY, 1700–1714 (2014) | The Historical Journal, 57, pp 81-105 - Cambridge Journals Online - Abstract
BRENT S. SIROTA - North Carolina State University -- The occasional conformity controversy during the reign of Queen Anne has traditionally been understood as a straightforward symptom of the early eighteenth-century ‘rage of party’. For all the pious rhetoric concerning toleration and the church in danger, the controversy is considered a partisan squabble for short-term political gain. This traditional interpretation has, however, never been able to account for two features of the controversy: first, the focus on ‘moderation’ as a unique characteristic of post-Revolutionary English society; and second, the prominence of the Anglican nonjurors in the debate. This article revisits the occasional conformity controversy with an eye toward explaining these two related features. In doing so, it will argue that the occasional conformity controversy comprised a referendum on the Revolution settlement in church and state. Nonjurors lit upon the practice of occasional conformity as emblematic of the broader malady of moderation afflicting post-Revolutionary England. From their opposition to occasional conformity, the nonjurors, and soon the broader Anglican high-church movement, developed a comprehensive critique of religious modernity that would inform the entire framework of debate in the early English Enlightenment. -* I thank James Vaughn, Steve Pincus, Bill Bulman, Robert Ingram, and the participants in the ‘God and the Enlightenment’ conference at Ohio University in October 2012 for their generous engagement with earlier drafts of this article. Thanks also to Phil Withington and the anonymous reviewers for their assistance in shaping this article into its final form.
article  paywall  find  18thC  British_history  British_politics  1700s  1710s  occasional_conformity  nonjurors  High_Church  Church_of_England  religious_history  church_history  religious_culture  religion-established  politics-and-religion  political_press  pamphlets  political_participation  tolerance  latitudinarian  secularization  atheism_panic  partisanship  Tories  Whigs  dissenters  Whig_Junto  moderation  modernity  Enlightenment  Queen_Anne  Harley  Bolingbroke  comprehension-church  Convocation  church-in-danger  sermons  religious_lit  cultural_critique  Atterbury  popular_politics  popular_culture  Revolution_Principles  Glorious_Revolution  EF-add 
august 2014 by dunnettreader
Kevin Sharpe, review essay - Print, Polemics, and Politics in 17thC England | JSTOR: Journal of British Studies, Vol. 41, No. 2 (Apr., 2002), pp. 244-254
Writing and Society: Literacy, Print and Politics in Britain, 1590-1660 by Nigel Wheale; Whores of Babylon: Catholicism, Gender and Seventeenth-Century Print Culture by Frances E. Dolan; Political Passions: Gender, The Family and Political Argument in England, 1680-1714 by Rachel Weil; The Age of Faction: Court Politics, 1660-1702 by Alan Marshall -- downloaded pdf to Note
books  bookshelf  reviews  jstor  17thC  18thC  British_history  British_politics  cultural_history  publishing  print_culture  public_sphere  political_press  anti-Catholic  gender_history  family  patriarchy  Restoration  Elizabeth  James_I  Charles_I  Charles_II  James_II  William_III  Queen_Anne  partisanship  faction  parties  court_culture  courtiers  Whigs  Whig_Junto  Tories  Glorious_Revolution  English_Civil_War  literacy  downloaded  EF-add 
may 2014 by dunnettreader
Paulina Kewes - "The State Is out of Tune": Nicholas Rowe's "Jane Shore" and the Succession Crisis of 1713-14 | JSTOR: Huntington Library Quarterly, Vol. 64, No. 3/4 (2001), pp. 283-308
Well done analysis of the political topicality that Rowe exploited while avoiding a factional position. Identifies areas that had some resonance but Rowe avoided making direct allegory, analogy or character personation, including the Duchess of Marlborough and Abigail Masham flaps with Queen Anne. Includes discussion of several lines deleted by the censor that was made infamous in 1730s when Bolingbroke accused of hypocrisy for being a censor in 1710s -- most references to literary criticism point to failure to pick up political relevance - other references to some bits of cultural, literary or political history during last 4 years of Queen Anne -- downloaded pdf to Note
article  jstor  cultural_history  political_history  political_culture  literary_history  English_lit  18thC  1700s  Hanoverian_Succession  Queen_Anne  Harley  Bolingbroke  Marlborough_Duchess  Masham_Lady  Richard_III  Rowe_Nicholas  theatre-politics  Whigs  Tories  Jacobites  James_III  succession  Parliament  censorship  bibliography  downloaded  EF-add 
january 2014 by dunnettreader
Richard R. Johnson: Politics Redefined: An Assessment of Recent Writings on the Late Stuart Period of English History, 1660 to 1714 (1978)
JSTOR: The William and Mary Quarterly, Third Series, Vol. 35, No. 4 (Oct., 1978), pp. 691-732 -- downloaded pdf to Note -- doesn't look fabulous analytically, but fabulous collection of works after c 1960 including links to lots of studies of economic data -- although his critique of Plumb waiting for the appearance "of that portly deus ex machina" is delicious
article  jstor  historiography  bibliography  17thC  18thC  Restoration  Exclusion_Crisis  Glorious_Revolution  William_III  Queen_Anne  1680s  1690s  1700s  1710s  Hanoverian_Succession  political_history  economic_history  social_history  religious_history  downloaded  EF-add 
september 2013 by dunnettreader
Review by: J. G. A. Pocock: Revolution Principles: The Politics of Party, 1689-1720 by J. P. Kenyon (1978)
JSTOR: The Journal of Modern History, Vol. 50, No. 3 (Sep., 1978), pp. 509-513 -- downloaded pdf to Note -- after agreeing that most of the turmoil was about vulnerability and power grabs or fears of the other side which produced an authoritarian oligarchy that proscribed its enemies he is still looking for neo-Harringtonians -- but now Defoe
books  bookshelf  reviews  Pocock  intellectual_history  political_philosophy  17thC  18thC  British_politics  parties  Glorious_Revolution  Tories  Whigs  Whig_Junto  William_III  Queen_Anne  Whigs-oligarchy  Whigs-Radicals  Hanoverian_Succession  Bolingbroke  Walpole  Whigs-opposition  Country_Party  downloaded  EF-add 
september 2013 by dunnettreader
Review essay: Linda Colley and Mark Goldie - The Principles and Practice of Eighteenth-Century Party (1979)
JSTOR: The Historical Journal, Vol. 22, No. 1 (Mar., 1979), pp. 239-246 -- downloaded pdf to Note --Works reviewed: --**-- Parliament, Policy and Politics in the Reign of William III by Henry Horwitz;  --**-- The Growth of Parliamentary Parties 1689-1742 by B. W. Hill; Stability and Strife 1714-1760 by W. A. Speck;  --**-- Revolution Principles: The Politics of Party 1689-1720 by J. P. Kenyon; --**--  Liberty and Property: Political Ideology in Eighteenth Century Britain by H. T. Dickinson
books  bookshelf  reviews  jstor  17thC  18thC  political_history  Britain  British_history  British_politics  parties  Whigs  Whig_Junto  Tories  William_III  Queen_Anne  George_I  George_II  Walpole  Bolingbroke  provinces  local_government  elections  Country_Party  Whigs-opposition  ideology  elites  public_opinion  political_press  political_culture  downloaded  EF-add 
september 2013 by dunnettreader
J. G. A. Pocock: The Atlantic Republican Tradition: The Republic of the Seven Provinces | Republics of Letters: A Journal for the Study of Knowledge, Politics, and the Arts
Citation: Pocock, J. G. A.. “The Atlantic Republican Tradition: The Republic of the Seven Provinces.” Republics of Letters: A Journal for the Study of Knowledge, Politics, and the Arts2, no. 1 (December 15, 2010): http://rofl.stanford.edu/node/72. In "Limits of the Atlantic Republican Tradition" issue -- downloaded pdf to Note-- Hence the debate between ancient and modern liberty, to be found in Britain a century before it was taken up by Benjamin Constant. It was a debate by no means uniquely British, but in the form it took in Britain a class of free landholders, whose history could be traced back through Gothic to classic and Greco-Roman times, played a crucial role. The image of the republic, it needs repeating, was not presented as a norm to be imitated; it was a bench­mark for the interpretation of history, for measuring the gains and losses of movement away from it. This narrative, shaped by a succession of historians from Bruni to Robertson, developed concurrently with a “philosophic” history of human (but European) society, based on the stadial sequence from hunter-gatherers to merchants and capitalists and culminating in the political economy of Adam Smith. In this complex historiography, the role of medieval leagues of merchant republics, Lombard, Hanseatic, and Dutch, was important but problematic; and it is here that the anglophone and Atlantic reader, rightly or wrongly, finds the key to the problem of Dutch republican thought.
article  16thC  17thC  18thC  intellectual_history  political_history  political_culture  historiography  lessons-of-history  republicanism  Machiavelli  Britain  British_politics  American_colonies  American_Revolution  Dutch  city_states  Holy_Roman_Empire  commerce  trade  landed_interest  burghers  oligarchy  corruption  civic_virtue  William_III  Queen_Anne  George_III  tyranny  Stadholder  republics-Ancient_v_Modern  downloaded  EF-add 
september 2013 by dunnettreader
Review of Nicola Parsons, Reading Gossip in Early Eighteenth-Century England | Digital Defoe
Parsons follows in the hallowed footsteps of Jürgen Habermas’s The Structural Transformation of the Public Sphere (German 1962; English 1989) and its most eminent recent endorsement, Michael McKeon’s The Secret History of Domesticity (2005). In Reading Gossip in Early Eighteenth-Century England, Nicola Parsons identifies Queen Anne’s reign (1702–14) as a pivotal moment of political reorganization wherein a residual absolutist ideology predicated on state secrets (arcana imperii) completed its transition to a new order in which there was a demand that political processes be subjected to public scrutiny. Parsons argues that in works by Delarivier Manley, Sir Richard Steele, Daniel Defoe, and Jane Barker gossip functioned to negotiate the as-yet-tenuous split between public and private. The crux of Reading Gossip is, in many respects, the development discussed in Parsons’s chapter on the fall-out of the Sacheverell riots in 1710 and Defoe’s modification of the secret history genre in response to the backlash against his patron, Robert Harley, following Anne’s death. In line with Rebecca Bullard’s recent Politics of Disclosure (2009), Parsons resists analyses of the secret history that produce a neat account of the rise of liberalism, instead proposing that the Sacheverell riots posed a dilemma for the Whig party, which needed to adopt Tory anti-mob rhetoric to maintain civic order, while maintaining its traditional stance that vox populi dictated polity. The Tories and Whigs therefore unwittingly “collaborated in the rhetorical construction of a more or less unified ‘public’” (78) and consolidated a political class with its own interests over against the public at large. The test case is Defoe’s sequence of three pamphlets entitled The Secret History of the White-Staff (1714–1715),
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august 2013 by dunnettreader
Kevin Sharpe: Rebranding Rule: 1660-1720 | Kindle Store
In the climactic part of his three-book series exploring the importance of public image in the Tudor and Stuart monarchies, Kevin Sharpe employs a remarkable interdisciplinary approach that draws on literary studies and art history as well as political, cultural, and social history to show how this preoccupation with public representation met the challenge of dealing with the aftermath of Cromwell's interregnum and Charles II's restoration, and how the irrevocably changed cultural landscape was navigated by the sometimes astute yet equally fallible Stuart monarchs and their successors.
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july 2013 by dunnettreader

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