dunnettreader + pocock   25

André Lang - La part maudite du politique chez Machiavel, ou le retour aux origines (2005) - Cairn.info
I - L’anacyclosis révisée
II - Les constitutions à l’épreuve de l’histoire
III - Le retour au principe
IV - Le moment Romuléen et le moment Numéen
V - Le principe comme puissance de régénération
VI - Les exécutions ou l’équivoque politique du retour à l’origine
VII - Brutus ou la part souveraine de la violence des principes
De l’exécution à l’exécutif : conclusion et perspectives
Pour citer cet article

Lang André, « La part maudite du politique chez Machiavel, ou le retour aux origines. », Le Philosophoire 2/2005 (n° 25) , p. 213-230
URL : www.cairn.info/revue-le-philosophoire-2005-2-page-213.htm.
DOI : 10.3917/phoir.025.0213.
Aristotle  class_conflict  political_participation  Pocock  Polybius  corruption  state_of_exception  republicanism  violence  article  norms  dialectic-historical  common_good  political_philosophy  Machiavelli  interest_groups  civic_virtue  downloaded  politics-and-history  mixed_government  historical_change  history_as_examples  cyclical_history  rule_of_law  cycles  republics-Ancient_v_Modern 
february 2016 by dunnettreader
John Gunnell, review essay - On historiography and theory confusion in Political Theory and its texts | JSTOR - The American Political Science Review (1986)
Reviewed Works: Texts in Context: Revisionist Methods for Studying the History of Political Theory by David Boucher; The Status and Appraisal of Classic Texts: An Essay on Political Theory, Its Inheritance, and the History of Ideas by Conal Condren
Review by: John G. Gunnell
The American Political Science Review
Vol. 80, No. 2 (Jun., 1986), pp. 631-639
behavioralism  intellectual_history  hermeneutics  political_philosophy  historiography  Skinner  contextualism  reviews  downloaded  books  social_theory  Cambridge_School  Pocock  article 
january 2016 by dunnettreader
Dorothy Ross - Pocock’s Machiavellian Moment (1975) and Mine | s-usih.org - Nov 2015
Classics Series J.G.A. Pocock’s Machiavellian Moment: Florentine Political Thought and the Atlantic Republican Tradition (1975) When asked about a classic work… nice look at the ripple effects on both historiography of US political culture and intellectual history methods -- downloaded as pdf to Note
reviews  books  bookshelf  Pocock  civic_humanism  republicanism  US_history  US_politics  18thC  19thC  20thC  intellectual_history  historiography  Cambridge_School  American_colonies  American_Revolution  Early_Republic  liberalism-republicanism_debates  downloaded  from instapaper
november 2015 by dunnettreader
Review - Skinner and Pocock in Context: Early Modern Political Thought Today | JSTOR: History and Theory, Vol. 48, No. 1 (Feb., 2009), pp. 113-121
Reviewed works: (1) Rethinking the Foundations of Modern Political Thought by Annabel Brett; James Tully; Holly Hamilton-Bleakley; (2) The Political Imagination in History: Essays concerning J. G. A. Pocock by D. N. DeLuna; Perry Anderson; Glenn Burgess -- the fairly lengthy essay is unsigned except "Wesleyan University", the journal's home -- downloaded pdf to Note
books  reviews  jstor  kindle  intellectual_history  historiography  Cambridge_School  Skinner  Pocock  downloaded  EF-add 
august 2014 by dunnettreader
Mark Kishlansky - Tyranny Denied: Charles I, Attorney General Heath, and the Five Knights' Case | JSTOR: The Historical Journal, Vol. 42, No. 1 (Mar., 1999), pp. 53-83
This article exonerates Charles I and Attorney General Sir Robert Heath from charges that they tampered with the records of the court of King's Bench in the Five Knights' Case. It refutes allegations made by John Selden in the parliament of 1628 and repeated by modern historians. Selden's attack on Heath and the king's government was based on a fundamental misunderstanding of the nature of King's Bench enrolments and a radical view of the crown's intentions in imprisoning loan resisters. The view that Charles was attempting to establish the prerogative right to imprison opponents without remedy at common law has no basis in either the arguments presented during the Five Knights' Case or the king's behaviour both before and during the parliament. By accepting the most radical critique of Caroline government at face value, historians have concluded that Charles was attempting to establish a `legal tyranny'. This article rejects these views. -- among other criticisms, notes that historians following Pocock have elevated a "common law mentality" to the heart of 17thC political culture, thereby underestimating the radicalism of Selden, Coke et al in forcing the confrontation that converted the Petition of Right into a non-negotiable statue that was subsequently used in proceedings against the king's actions during Personal Rule -- didn't download
article  jstor  17thC  British_history  British_politics  Charles_I  Parliament  taxes  counselors  Selden  common_law  prerogative  Pocock  ancient_constitution  Coke  political_culture  judiciary  habeas_corpus  sovereign_debt  public_finance  British_foreign_policy  Petition_of_Right  legislation  bibliography  revisionism  EF-add 
june 2014 by dunnettreader
Alan Cromartie - Harringtonian Virtue: Harrington, Machiavelli, and the Method of the Moment | JSTOR: The Historical Journal, Vol. 41, No. 4 (Dec., 1998), pp. 987-1009
This article presents a reinterpretation of James Harrington's writings. It takes issue with J. G. A. Pocock's reading, which treats him as importing into England a Machiavellian `language of political thought'. This reading is the basis of Pocock's stress on the republicanism of eighteenth-century opposition values. Harrington's writings were in fact a most implausible channel for such ideas. His outlook owed much to Stoicism. Unlike the Florentine, he admired the contemplative life; was sympathetic to commerce; and was relaxed about the threat of `corruption' (a concept that he did not understand). These views can be associated with his apparent aims: the preservation of a national church with a salaried but politically impotent clergy; and the restoration of the royalist gentry to a leading role in English politics. Pocock's hypothesis is shown to be conditioned by his method; its weaknesses reflect some difficulties inherent in the notion of `languages of thought'. -- downloaded pdf to Note
article  jstor  intellectual_history  historiography  political_philosophy  17thC  18thC  British_history  British_politics  English_Civil_War  Interregnum  Harrington  landed_interest  Machiavelli  republicanism  republics-Ancient_v_Modern  commerce  common_good  civic_virtue  civic_humanism  Stoicism  gentry  Royalists  mixed_government  English_constitution  politics-and-theory  religion-established  religious_culture  politics-and-religion  Church_of_England  corruption  Cambridge_School  Pocock  downloaded  EF-add 
june 2014 by dunnettreader
Tom Jones - Pope's "Epistle to Bathurst" and the Meaning of Finance | JSTOR: Studies in English Literature, 1500-1900, Vol. 44, No. 3 (Summer, 2004), pp. 487-504
This article attempts to show that Alexander Pope's argument and poetic technique in the Epistle to Bathurst challenge the idea that words are like money or other economic tokens. Reading against the recent characterization of Pope's work as nostalgic, this piece takes issue with the corollary established by J. G. A. Pocock and others between financial change and linguistic uncertainty in the early eighteenth century. It presents Pope as a skeptical thinker aware of the radical contingency of all human values, more in line with David Hume than earlier writers on money. It suggests that Pope's imitative meter is an investigation of this contingency of value. -- Yeah ! -- downloaded pdf to Note
article  jstor  18thC  English_lit  Pope  political_economy  moral_economy  finance_capital  financial_innovation  language  semiotics  values  historical_change  scepticism  contingency  morality-conventional  social_order  Pocock  commerce  downloaded  EF-add 
may 2014 by dunnettreader
James Cotton - James Harrington as Aristotelian | JSTOR: Political Theory, Vol. 7, No. 3 (Aug., 1979), pp. 371-389
Rather than Harrington within tradition of Machiavelli and Aristotle (Pocock), Cotton argues for direct appropriation from Aristotle -Oceana as polity, Agrarian Law etc. Contra Strauss who denies Harrington as Aristotelian. -- downloaded pdf to Note
article  jstor  intellectual_history  political_philosophy  17thC  British_politics  Harrington  Machiavelli  civic_humanism  mixed_government  classes  property  Agrarian_Laws  social_order  republicanism  republics-Ancient_v_Modern  Aristotle  Pocock  Strauss  downloaded  EF-add 
january 2014 by dunnettreader
John M. Warner and John T. Scott - Sin City: Augustine and Machiavelli's Reordering of Rome | JSTOR: The Journal of Politics, Vol. 73, No. 3 (JULY 2011), pp. 857-871
We examine Machiavelli's critical appropriation of Augustine's analysis of Rome's decline and fall in order to understand his own interpretation of Rome and the lessons it offers for a successful republic. If Machiavelli's departure from Augustine is obvious, as seen for example in his exculpation of Romulus for the fratricide Augustine condemns, equally illuminating is what Machiavelli borrows from him. For Augustine, Romulus' fratricide discloses the limits of pagan virtue and politics and reveals that the civic republican view of an early virtuous republic is nostalgic if not impossible. Machiavelli agrees with Augustine about the character of Rome, yet embraces the ambitious and acquisitive politics Augustine rebuffs. Machiavelli not only excuses Romulus' fratricide in "ordering" Rome, but makes it the archetypal act that must be repeated through "reordering" to sustain the state against the perennial problem of corruption. We thereby address two of the primary issues in Machiavelli scholarship—the character of his republicanism and the nature and extent of his innovation with regard to his ancient sources—and suggest that the "civic republican" or "neo-Roman" interpretation of Machiavelli is incorrect in its conclusions concerning his republicanism as well as his relationship to his ancient sources. -- paywall Cambridge journals -- see bibliography on jstor information page
article  jstor  paywall  intellectual_history  political_philosophy  Renaissance  Machiavelli  Roman_Republic  Roman_Empire  Livy  Augustine  pagans  civic_virtue  neo-Roman  republicanism  republics-Ancient_v_Modern  Strauss  Skinner  Pocock  Cambridge_School  bibliography  EF-add 
january 2014 by dunnettreader
Dan Engster - The Montaignian Moment | JSTOR: Journal of the History of Ideas, Vol. 59, No. 4 (Oct., 1998), pp. 625-650
Modification of Pocock's theory - Montaigne's moderation and self knowledge, self-control as 2nd paradigm influencing further political thought - a stage between the activism of civic humanism and state-centered in Hobbes
article  jstor  intellectual_history  political_philosophy  16thC  17thC  Machiavelli  Montaigne  Hobbes  republicanism  civic_humanism  raison-d'-état  nation-state  Pocock  downloaded  EF-add 
january 2014 by dunnettreader
Natasha Glaisyer - "A due Circulation in the Veins of the Publick": Imagining Credit in Late 17thC and Early 18thC England | JSTOR: The Eighteenth Century, Vol. 46, No. 3 (FALL 2005), pp. 277-297
Thinks too much has been made of fickle Lady Credit and Pocock's Machiavelli reading of anti commerce. Shows other metaphors, eg circulation of blood, and rich pamphlet literature of proposals for dealing with credit necessary for commercial prosperity as well as state financing - shows people weren't such ninnies as Pocock's version would have it. -- downloaded pdf to Note
article  jstor  economic_history  economic_culture  political_economy  17thC  18thC  British_history  sovereign_debt  credit  money_supply  capital_markets  money_market  political_press  public_opinion  public_finance  public_policy  fiscal-military_state  commerce  Pocock  downloaded  EF-add 
january 2014 by dunnettreader
Review essay by: John E. Toews - Intellectual History after the Linguistic Turn: The Autonomy of Meaning and the Irreducibility of Experience (1987)
Heavily cited, see jstor info page - downloaded pdf to Note -- JSTOR: The American Historical Review, Vol. 92, No. 4 (Oct., 1987), pp. 879-907 -- downloaded pdf to Note -- Works reviewed: --**-- Worlds Apart: The Market and the Theater in Anglo-American Thought, 1550-1750 by Jean-Christophe Agnew; --**-- In the American Province: Studies in the History and Historiography of Ideas by David A. Hollinger;  --**-- Marxism and Totality: The Adventures of a Concept from Lukacs to Habermas by Martin Jay;  --**-- Munich and Theatrical Modernism: Politics, Playwriting and Performance, 1890-1914 by Peter Jelavich;  --**-- Modern European Intellectual History: Reappraisals and New Perspectives by Dominick LaCapra; --**-- Steven L. Kaplan;  --**-- Rethinking Intellectual History: Texts, Contexts, Language by Dominick LaCapra;  --**-- History and Criticism by Dominick LaCapra; --**-- Prophets of Extremity: Nietzsche, Heidegger, Foucault, Derrida by Allan Megill;  --**-- Virtue, Commerce and History: Essays on Political Thought and History, Chiefly in the Eighteenth Century by J. G. A. Pocock;  --**-- Foucault, Marxismm and History: Mode of Production versus Mode of Information by Mark Poster;  --**-- Philosophy in History by Richard Rorty; J. B. Schneewind; Quentin Skinner;  --**-- The Return of Grand Theory in the Human Sciences by Quentin Skinner
books  bookshelf  historiography  intellectual_history  cultural_history  anthropology  language  social_sciences-post-WWII  Cambridge_School  Pocock  downloaded  EF-add 
september 2013 by dunnettreader
Review by: J. G. A. Pocock: Revolution Principles: The Politics of Party, 1689-1720 by J. P. Kenyon (1978)
JSTOR: The Journal of Modern History, Vol. 50, No. 3 (Sep., 1978), pp. 509-513 -- downloaded pdf to Note -- after agreeing that most of the turmoil was about vulnerability and power grabs or fears of the other side which produced an authoritarian oligarchy that proscribed its enemies he is still looking for neo-Harringtonians -- but now Defoe
books  bookshelf  reviews  Pocock  intellectual_history  political_philosophy  17thC  18thC  British_politics  parties  Glorious_Revolution  Tories  Whigs  Whig_Junto  William_III  Queen_Anne  Whigs-oligarchy  Whigs-Radicals  Hanoverian_Succession  Bolingbroke  Walpole  Whigs-opposition  Country_Party  downloaded  EF-add 
september 2013 by dunnettreader
Review by: J. G. A. Pocock -- Bolingbroke and His Circle: The Politics of Nostalgia in the Age of Walpole by Isaac Kramnick (1970)
JSTOR: The Journal of Modern History, Vol. 42, No. 2 (Jun., 1970), pp. 251-254 -- Yikes! Bolingbroke as Goldwater leading a bunch of paranoid Birchers. Bolingbroke's genius was to invent "the paranoid style" of populist politics no less. "No wonder Burke despised him" says the historian who thinks Burke is the cat's meow. And Swift, Pope, Gay and Voltaire were a bunch of right wing whackos. Here's where Pocock gets totally confused between financial capital and commerce and doesn't know enough economics to understand what Bolingbroke was arguing re productive and distributive effects of debt and incidence of types of taxes, trade, colonial settlements etc. And everyone Post WWII has forgotten the regulatory response to the Great Depression and thinks financial capital is progressive and benign. Also everyone seems to have bought Lovejoy's Great Chain of Being as if Bolingbroke was some sort of hierarchy freak. Unlike say... Burke? Jeez Louise!
books  bookshelf  reviews  Pocock  Bolingbroke 
september 2013 by dunnettreader
Review by: J. G. A. Pocock - Virtue Transformed: Political Argument in England, 1688-1740 by Shelley Burtt (1993)
JSTOR: The American Historical Review, Vol. 98, No. 3 (Jun., 1993), pp. 869-871 -- downloaded pdf to Note -- a generous review since she set out to "prove" Pocock wrong. His description of the republican position within the moral and political economy debates across the 18thC is far more nuanced than his summary anti-commerce has been taken. Still, both she and he seem to think Bolingbroke was a fraud who was scaring his audience with fantasies of corruption and the horrors of public debt. Ignoring the reality Bolingbroke knew in 18thC and swallowing neoliberalism in the 20thC. He had more legitimate grounds than Niall Ferguson today.
bookshelf  books  reviews  Pocock  18thC  intellectual_history  political_philosophy  republicanism  civic_virtue  liberalism  downloaded  EF-add 
september 2013 by dunnettreader
Review by: J. G. A. Pocock: Voltaire Historian by J. H. Brumfitt (1958)
JSTOR: The Historical Journal, Vol. 1, No. 2 (1958), pp. 192-194 -- slams it for not adequately putting Voltaire's priorities and view of historical change in adequate context -- not just Pyrrhonism quarrels but loss of authority of past for Moderns
books  reviews  Pocock  Voltaire  historiography  18thC  French_Enlightenment  historians  érudits  Ancients_v_Moderns  EF-add 
september 2013 by dunnettreader
Review by: J. G. A. Pocock - Hume's Philosophical Politics by Duncan Forbes (1978)
JSTOR: The American Political Science Review, Vol. 72, No. 2 (Jun., 1978), pp. 638-639 -- downloaded pdf to Note -- Finds Forbes writing and analysis both hopelessly confused -- some great stuff re where Hume sits vis à vis various flavors of Whigs, Tories and political historians at different times from 1740s onwards. Here's where Pocock's idée fixe on corrupting commerce is useful in explaining how the Essays fit with History of England -- not just against "vulgar Whiggism" (by time Hume wrote History based on Modern constitution theory of the Court Whigs, both oligarchic and radical Whigs had returned to Ancient Constitution) but pro the civilizing virtues of economic development. His target is the austere civic virtue of the republicans. Here's where Pocock misses -- Britain post Fletcher had few austere republicans - only found among idolators of Sparta on the Continent. That there was a luxury debate across the 18thC in both Continental Europe and Britain is clear, but it's not a debate re republicanism -- it's about the new "civil society", about foundation of morals if not biblicalrevelation or fear of hell, it's about human nature, and it's involved in comparative anthropology (geographic and historical) In short, it's about the science of man. Pocock's terrific observations re time, and the shift from anxiety re inevitable decline to possibility of progress fits in the science of man luxury and corruption debates that go far wider and deeper than classical republicanism. Though on Continent it takes on more of a republican angle after Montesquieu.
books  reviews  Pocock  Hume  18thC  historiography-18thC  political_philosophy  historians-and-politics  historiography-Whig  Whigs-oligarchy  Tories  clientelism  British_politics  British_history  commerce-doux  fiscal-military_state  sovereign_debt  parties  UK_government-colonies  War_of_Austrian_Succession  Seven_Years_War  Pitt_the_Elder  British_Empire  political_economy  downloaded  EF-add  bookshelf 
september 2013 by dunnettreader
Peter Milker: The Ancient Constitution and the Genealogist: Momigliano, Pocock, and Peiresc’s Origines Murensis Monasterii (1618) | Republics of Letters: A Journal for the Study of Knowledge, Politics, and the Arts
Citation: Miller, Peter. “The Ancient Constitution and the Genealogist: Momigliano, Pocock, and Peiresc’s Origines Murensis Monasterii (1618).” Republics of Letters: A Journal for the Study of Knowledge, Politics, and the Arts 1, no. 1 (May 1, 2009): http://rofl.stanford.edu/node/37. -- in "Rethinking the Republic of Letters" -- downloaded pdf to Note -- Momigliano’s essay,was actually not a history of antiquarianism. Its point was to seek an anti-relativist platform for historical scholarship that could be deployed to counter the kind of racist obscurantism that passed as radical skepticism in the 1930s. By focusing on the history of classical scholarship and largely ignoring the beginnings of medieval historical scholarship, it was also relatively simple for Momigliano to present his scholars as more-or-less apolitical, above the fray. He closes the essay by arguing that perhaps the greatest legacy of the antiquarian was an “ethical” one, quoting Mabillon on the need for a “coeur dégagé des passions.” But yet his was a political argument, albeit with a small “p” because his target was a politics of relativism and nihilism. What follows is really a small sketch towards what it might have looked like if Pocock had met Momigliano at the Warburg Institute in 1950, or really grappled with his great essay in the years that followed—but with one important change. What I propose by the term “genealogist” is to go a step towards redefining early modern antiquarianism, not so much away from the Classical world that was so dear to Momigliano, and so important for the many art historians who have mostly been responsible for returning antiquarianism to the scholarly agenda in the last decade or so, as towards the middle ages.
article  intellectual_history  historiography  17thC  18thC  antiquaries  ancient_history  ancient_Greece  ancient_Rome  medieval_history  scepticism  historians-and-state  historians-and-religion  Pocock  downloaded  EF-add 
september 2013 by dunnettreader
Margaret Jacob: Was the Eighteenth-Century Republican Essentially Anticapitalist? | Republics of Letters: A Journal for the Study of Knowledge, Politics, and the Arts
Citation: Jacob, Margaret . “Was the Eighteenth-Century Republican Essentially Anticapitalist?.” Republics of Letters: A Journal for the Study of Knowledge, Politics, and the Arts 2, no. 1 (December 15, 2010): http://rofl.stanford.edu/node/66. -- In "Limits of Atlantic Republican Tradition" issue -- downloaded pdf to Note -- With considerable insight in chapter thirteen of The Machiavellian Moment, Pocock interrogated the many Augustan responses to the reality of markets and credit. Where we have parted ways concerns the assertion that “civic humanist values . . . virtually defined rentier and entrepreneur as corrupt.” The rage against stockjobbers or actionists was so intense on both sides of the Channel, I would suggest, precisely because the republican imagination had come to accept the mercantile entrepreneur as a model citizen characterized by caution and probity, by cooperation in social relations, an exemplar of stability.
article  intellectual_history  political_economy  political_culture  economic_culture  political_philosophy  republicanism  Pocock  Machiavelli  17thC  18thC  Britain  British_politics  Dutch  capital_markets  bubbles  South_Sea_Crisis  international_finance  civic_virtue  corruption  commerce  monied_interest  merchants  monopolies  Cato's_Letters  downloaded  EF-add 
september 2013 by dunnettreader
Mark Bevir: The Errors of Linguistic Contextualism (1992)
JSTOR: History and Theory, Vol. 31, No. 3 (Oct., 1992), pp. 276-298.....Downloaded pdf to Note
article  jstor  historiography  intellectual_history  Cambridge_School  Pocock  downloaded  EF-add 
august 2013 by dunnettreader
Markku Peltonen: Politeness and Whiggism, 1688-1732 (2005)
JSTOR: The Historical Journal, Vol. 48, No. 2 (Jun., 2005), pp. 391-414 Downloaded pdf to Note Good challenge to Pocock on Whigs modernizing civic virtue to accommodate commerce via non-aristocratic politeness - especially dismantles Klein's simplistic Shaftsbury=Spectator=Whiggism=anti-Tories Useful bibliography, both English and French, 17thC-18thC Focus on Mandeville and Cato's Letters as anti Shaftsbury
jstor  article  17thC  18thC  Britain  France  cultural_history  political_history  British_politics  Whigs  Addison  Steele  Shaftesbury  Locke  Mandeville  Cato's_Letters  elites  aristocracy  commerce  urban  moral_philosophy  Tories  Ramsay  Fenelon  historiography  political_philosophy  civic_virtue  Pocock  bibliography  downloaded  EF-add 
july 2013 by dunnettreader

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