dunnettreader + platonism   11

JEFFREY ANDREW BARASH - ON THE AMBIVALENCE OF BLUMENBERG'S INTERPRETATION OF CASSIRER'S THEORY OF MYTH | JSTOR - History and Theory ( Oct 2011)
Fulltitle -- MYTH IN HISTORY, PHILOSOPHY OF HISTORY AS MYTH: ON THE AMBIVALENCE OF HANS BLUMENBERG'S INTERPRETATION OF ERNST CASSIRER'S THEORY OF MYTH, History and Theory, Vol. 50, No. 3 (October 2011), pp. 328-340 This essay explores the different interpretations proposed by Ernst Cassirer and Hans Blumenberg of the relation between Platonic philosophy and myth as a means of bringing to light a fundamental divergence in their respective conceptions of what precisely myth is. It attempts to show that their conceptions of myth are closely related to their respective assumptions concerning the historical significance of myth and regarding the sense of history more generally. Their divergent conceptions of myth and of history, I argue, are at the same time not simply matters of abstract speculation, but spring from fundamental presuppositions concerning myth's political significance. The present elucidation aims not only to set in relief one or another of the ways in which Cassirer or Blumenberg understood myth, nor even to present Blumenberg's critical reception of Cassirer's theories, but above all to contribute to the interpretation of the political implications of myth and of its historical potency in our contemporary epoch. -- most ftnts to Blumenberg in German, especially Work on Myth -- downloaded pdf to Note
article  jstor  intellectual_history  20thC  historiography  cultural_history  political_culture  Blumenberg  Cassirer  myth  epistemology-history  epistemology-social  identity  national_tale  national_ID  symbols-political  symbols-religious  symbol  political_discourse  Platonism  Neoplatonism  German_Idealism  neo-Kantian  hermeneutics  political-theology  downloaded 
january 2016 by dunnettreader
John Sellars - Stoic Ontology and Plato's "Sophist" (2010) | Academia.edu
in V. Harte, M.M. McCabe, R.W. Sharples, A. Sheppard, eds, Aristotle and the Stoics Reading Plato, Bulletin of the Institute of Classical Studies, Suppl. 107 (2010), 185-203 -- Keywords: Metaphysics, Plato, and Stoicism -- downloaded pdf to Note
article  Academia.edu  intellectual_history  Stoicism  metaphysics  ancient_philosophy  ancient_Greece  ontology  Being  nothing  ideas-theories  concepts  universals  categories  Plato  Platonism  Seneca  Zenon_of_Citium  commentaries  late_antiquity  ancient_Rome  bibliography  downloaded 
november 2015 by dunnettreader
Andrea Nightingale and David Sedley, eds. - Ancient Models of Mind: Studies in Human and Divine Rationality | Classical Philosophy | Cambridge University Press (hbk 2010, obk 2015)
In honor of A. A. Long: Publications 1963–2009 -- Table of Contents 1. Plato on aporia and self-knowledge, Andrea Wilson Nightingale -- 2. Cross-examining happiness: reason and community in the Socratic dialogues of Plato Sara Ahbel-Rappe -- 3. Inspiration, recollection, and mimesis in Plato's Phaedrus, Kathryn A. Morgan -- 4. Plato's Theaetetus as an ethical dialogue, David Sedley -- 5. Divine contemplating mind, Allan Silverman -- 6. Aristotle and the history of Skepticism, Alan Code -- 7. Stoic selection: objects, actions, and agents, Stephen White -- 8. Beauty and its relation to goodness in Stoicism, Richard Bett -- 9. How dialectical was Stoic dialectic?, Luca Castagnoli -- 10. Socrates speaks in Seneca, De vita beata 24-28, James Ker -- 11. Seneca's Platonism: the soul and its divine origin, Gretchen Reydams-Schils -- 12. The status of the individual in Plotinus, Kenneth Wolfe -- downloaded marketing materials to Note
books  kindle-available  ancient_philosophy  ancient_Greece  ancient_Rome  Hellenism  Plato  Platonism  Aristotle  Stoicism  Seneca  Plotinus  Neoplatonism  moral_philosophy  epistemology-moral  God-attributes  eudaimonia  aporia  soul  imago_dei  virtue_ethics  virtue  self-knowledge  self-examination  self-development  dialectic  beauty  good  sociability  downloaded 
october 2015 by dunnettreader
Yitzhak Y. Melamed, review - Joseph Almog, Everything in Its Right Place: Spinoza and Life by the Light of Nature // Notre Dame Philosophical Reviews - September 11, 2014
Joseph Almog, Everything in Its Right Place: Spinoza and Life by the Light of Nature, Oxford University Press, 2014, 143pp.,-- Yitzhak Y. Melamed, Johns Hopkins University -- one can easily trace the influence of "continental" figures such as Étienne Balibar and Antonio Negri on Almog's reading. But Almog is an acolyte of no one (except Nature, and to a lesser extent, Spinoza). The book is marked by the freshness of an independently thinking mind, a mind which appears at some moments to be celebrating a quasi-religious "new-birth." This book is rich in genuine insights, though it does not engage in patient, close analysis of arguments and texts. Toward the end Almog unfolds his discontent with the "dissective philosopher" who "run[s] his deductions, and feel[s] the gratification of being the master of a domain of propositions" (107). For Almog, Part I of Spinoza's Ethics is a paradigm of such "dissective philosophy," and the philosophical key is letting go of such an analytic attitude and "letting instead the key come to you by way of understanding informally 'love of God (Nature)'" (107). I do not share these views, and I will shortly explain why. More importantly, I believe this "New Age" attitude really harms the work, which could have been even more impressive than it is.
books  reviews  intellectual_history  17thC  Spinoza  style-philosophy  continental_philosophy  nature  anthropocentrism  human_nature  humanism  mathematics  Platonism  political_philosophy  sociability  moral_philosophy 
september 2014 by dunnettreader
The Question of Certainty by John Dewey (1929)
Source: The Quest for Certainty (1933), publ. Capricorn Books, 1960. -- Chapter II - Philosophy's Search for the Immutable -- The failure and frustration of actual life is then attributed to the fact that this world is finite and phenomenal, sensible rather than real, or to the weakness of our finite apprehension, which cannot see that the discrepancy between existence and value is merely seeming, and that a fuller vision would behold partial evil an element in complete good. Thus the office of philosophy is to project by dialectic, resting supposedly upon self-evident premises, a realm in which the object of completest cognitive certitude is also one with the object of the heart's best aspiration. The fusion of the good and the true with unity and plenitude of Being thus becomes the goal of classic philosophy. -- Practical activity is dismissed to a world of low grade reality. Desire is found only where something is lacking and hence its existence is a sign of imperfection of Being. Hence one must go to passionless reason to find perfect reality and complete certitude. But nevertheless the chief philosophic interest is to prove that the essential properties of the reality that is the object of pure knowledge are precisely those characteristics which have meaning in connection with affection, desire and choice. After degrading practical affairs in order to exalt knowledge, the chief task of knowledge turns out to be to demonstrate the absolutely assured and permanent reality of the values with which practical activity is concerned! Can we fall to see the irony in a situation wherein desire and emotion are relegated to a position inferior in every way to that of knowledge, while at the same time the chief problem of that which is termed the highest and most perfect knowledge is taken to be the existence of evil-that is, of desires errant and frustrated?
etexts  Dewey  pragmatism  epistemology  ontology  Great_Chain_of_Being  Platonism  idealism-transcendental  Hegelian  evil  theodicy  certainty  desire  moral_philosophy  values  morality-objective  morality-conventional  moral_psychology  epistemology-social  EF-add 
may 2014 by dunnettreader
Richard Rorty's Platonists, Positivists, and Pragmatists (1982)
Source: Consequences of Pragmatism, University of Minnesota Press, 1982. Introduction only reproduced, “Fair Use” provisions; Transcribed Andy Blunden 1998. -- One can use language to criticise and enlarge itself, as one can exercise one’s body to develop and strengthen and enlarge it, but one cannot see language-as-a-whole in relation to something else to which it applies, or for which it is a means to an end... But Philosophy, the attempt to say “how language relates to the world” by saying what makes certain sentences true, or certain actions or attitudes good or rational, is, on this view, ... the impossible attempt to step outside our skins – the traditions, linguistic and other, within which we do our thinking and self-criticism – and compare ourselves with something absolute. This Platonic urge to escape from the finitude of one’s time and place, the “merely conventional” and contingent aspects of one’s life, is responsible for the original Platonic distinction between two kinds of true sentence. By attacking this latter distinction, the holistic “pragmaticising” strain in analytic philosophy has helped us see how the metaphysical urge – common to fuzzy Whiteheadians and razor-sharp “scientific realists” – works. It has helped us be sceptical about the idea that some particular science (say physics) or some particular literary genre (say Romantic poetry, or transcendental philosophy) gives us that species of true sentence which is not just a true sentence, but rather a piece of Truth itself.
etexts  intellectual_history  20thC  pragmatism  Platonism  Logical_Positivism  empiricism  neo-Kantian  analytical_philosophy  analytic-synthetic  philosophy_of_language  epistemology  Rorty  EF-add 
may 2014 by dunnettreader
Nietzsche and Antiquity (Edited by Paul Bishop) 9781571132826 - Boydell & Brewer
This volume collects a wide-ranging set of essays examining Friedrich Nietzsche's engagement with antiquity in all its aspects. It investigates Nietzsche's reaction and response to the concept of "classicism," with particular reference to his work on Greek culture as a philologist in Basel and later as a philosopher of modernity, and to his reception of German classicism in all his texts. The book should be of interest to students of ancient history and classics, philosophy, comparative literature, and Germanistik. Taken together, these papers suggest that classicism is both a more significant, and a more contested, concept for Nietzsche than is often realized, and it demonstrates the need for a return to a close attention to the intellectual-historical context in terms of which Nietzsche saw himself operating. An awareness of the rich variety of academic backgrounds, methodologies, and techniques of reading evinced in these chapters is perhaps the only way for the contemporary scholar to come to grips with what classicism meant for Nietzsche, and hence what Nietzsche means for us today. The book is divided into five sections -- The Classical Greeks; Pre-Socratics and Pythagoreans, Cynics and Stoics; Nietzsche and the Platonic Tradition; Contestations; and German Classicism -- and constitutes the first major study of Nietzsche and the classical tradition in a quarter of a century.
books  find  intellectual_history  literary_history  cultural_critique  cultural_history  ancient_Greece  Greek_lit  ancient_philosophy  19thC  Germany  historicism  philology  pre-Socratics  Platonism  Plato  Stoicism  German_Idealism  German_lit  moral_philosophy  aesthetics  EF-add 
march 2014 by dunnettreader
Special Issue -Living Alone Together [Introduction and key article by Tzvetan Todorov] | JSTOR: New Literary History, Vol. 27, No. 1, Winter, 1996
Issue Introduction - Living Alone Together (pp. 1-14) Tzvetan Todorov and Marilyn Gaddis Rose. *--*--* Replies to Introduction *--* (1) Community and Individuality (pp. 15-24) Patricia H. Werhane. *--* (2) A Reply to Tzvetan Todorov's "Living Alone Together" (pp. 25-34) Frances Ferguson. *--* (3) "Living Together Alone or Together": Commentary on Tzvetan Todorov's "Living Alone Together" (pp. 35-41) Stephen A. Mitchell. *--* (4) [downloaded] Todorov's Otherness (pp. 43-55) Robert Wokler. *--* (5) Misanthropology (pp. 57-72) Gary Saul Morson. *--* (6) Conflict and Sociability in Hegel, Freud, and Their Followers: Tzvetan Todorov's "Living Alone Together" (pp. 73-82) Daniel Burston. *--* (7) Regarding Others (pp. 83-93) Stewart Justman. *--*--* Response *--* The Gaze and the Fray (pp. 95-106) Tzvetan Todorov and Marilyn Gaddis Rose. *--*--* A. Self and Others in Culture. *--* Keeping the Self Intact during the Culture Wars: A Centennial Essay for Mikhail Bakhtin (pp. 107-126) Caryl Emerson. *--* Cultural Dreaming and Cultural Studies (pp. 127-144) Marianne DeKoven. *--* Orality, Literacy, and Their Discontents (pp. 145-159) Denis Donoghue.
journal  article  jstor  intellectual_history  literary_history  lit_crit  literary_theory  human_nature  social_theory  moral_philosophy  psychology  sociability  self  self-love  self-development  bildung  self-and-other  ancient_philosophy  Plato  Platonism  Socrates  Aristotle  Cicero  community  individualism  authenticity  constructivism  Rousseau  Hegel  Freud  conflict  Bakhtin  conversation  dialogue  literacy  EF-add 
february 2014 by dunnettreader
Special section 4 authors, 4 recent readings of Genealogy of Morals | JSTOR: Journal of Nietzsche Studies, No. 35/36, SPRING-AUTUMN 2008
Letter from the Assistant Editor(pp. 86-87) Rebecca Bamford. *--* (1) For Whom the Bell Tolls (pp. 88-105) Daniel Conway. *--* (2) How Does the Ascetic Ideal Function in Nietzsche's Genealogy? (pp. 106-123) Lawrence J. Hatab. *--* (3) Beyond Selflessness in Ethics and Inquiry (pp. 124-140) Christopher Janaway. *--* (4) Nietzsche's Genealogy Revisited(pp. 141-154) David Owen. -- the group of articles looks quite helpful -- didn't download
article  jstor  intellectual_history  moral_philosophy  ancient_philosophy  19thC  Germany  ancient_Greece  Platonism  Nietzsche  Schopenhauer  positivism  Darwinism  asceticism  genealogy-method  morality-conventional  morality-Christian  morality-Nietzche  EF-add 
february 2014 by dunnettreader
Jerrold J. Katz - Précis of "The Metaphysics of Meaning" | JSTOR: Philosophical Issues, Vol. 4 (1993), pp. 128-134
Lead paper to which a bunch of people respond separately and Katz responds to each in separate papers. Launches defense of Platonism (all physical spatio-temporal stuff is real but that isn't everything that's real) against "naturalism" - separate strands from Wittgenstein and a scientistic version from Quine. He focuses on meaning - that possible intensional without physical reference - that Quine's extreme physicalism rules out except neurobiologically. His discussion of the Wittgenstein strand looks like it gets into linguistics, Chomsky etc.
article  jstor  metaphysics  naturalism  physicalism  scientism  Platonism  Wittgenstein  Quine  philosophy_of_language  meaning  linguistics  EF-add 
january 2014 by dunnettreader

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