dunnettreader + parliamentary_supremacy   29

Elena Seghezza - Fiscal capacity and the risk of sovereign debt after the Glorious Revolution: A reinterpretation of the North–Weingast hypothesis (2015) — ScienceDirect
European Journal of Political Economy, June 2015, Vol.38:71–81, doi:10.1016/j.ejpoleco.2014.12.002
Dept. of Economics, University of Genoa, Via Vivaldi 5, 16126 Genova, Italy
Several explanations have been given to account for the fact that, in contrast to the claim made by North and Weingast (1989), the decline in interest rates on British sovereign debt did not occur until several years after the Glorious Revolution in 1688. This paper puts forward the hypothesis that the decline in the risk premium on Britain's sovereign debt was due to the significant increase in excise duties in the early part of the eighteenth century. This increase was possible for two reasons. On the one hand, with the Glorious Revolution, parliament no longer had reason to fear that the King would strengthen his political power due to the availability of more fiscal revenue. On the other hand, the new excise taxes were borne mostly by the poor, that is a social class not represented in parliament. The delay in reducing the interest rate on British sovereign debt, following the Glorious Revolution, was, therefore, due to the length of time needed to increase and improve the fiscal bureaucracy responsible for the collection of excise duties.
Keywords -- Glorious Revolution Fiscal capacity Sovereign debt Interest rates
article  paywall  political_economy  institutional_economics  North-Weingast  Glorious_Revolution  fiscal-military_state  fiscal_space  tax_policy  tax_collection  bureaucracy  sovereign_debt  interest_rates  Parliament  Parliamentary_supremacy  interest_groups  inequality  excise  lower_orders  taxes-consumption  landed_interest 
december 2016 by dunnettreader
Iain Begg - Theresa May’s timeline for Brexit: Canny tactics or Brexishambles? | LSE blogs
Theresa May has stated that the UK will trigger Article 50 before the end of March 2017. Iain Begg writes that while her speech gave some indication of timing, there is still no concrete statement on what kind of relationship the UK would actually like to negotiate with the EU. In the absence of this level of clarity he argues that the process risks turning into a shambles.
Brexit  May_Theresa  EU_governance  UK_politics  Parliament  Parliamentary_supremacy  Brexit-hard  trade-policy  trade-agreements  immigration  from pocket
october 2016 by dunnettreader
Eric Nelson - "Patriot Royalism: The Stuart Monarchy in American Political Thought, 1769-75" (2011) | William& Mary Quarterly
Nelson E. "Patriot Royalism: The Stuart Monarchy in American Political Thought, 1769-75". The William and Mary Quarterly [Internet]. 2011;3rd ser., 68 (4) :533-596. With responses by Gordon S. Wood, Pauline Maier, and Daniel Hulsebosch, as well a reply to critics ("Taking Them Seriously: Patriots, Prerogative, and the English Seventeenth Century"). -- preliminary to his "Royalist Revolution" -- downloaded pdf to Note
article  forum  downloaded  intellectual_history  political_philosophy  17thC  18thC  British_history  US_history  British_politics  British_Empire  British_Empire-constitutional_structure  Patriot_King  Patriots  American_colonies  American_Revolution  checks-and-balances  republics-Ancient_v_Modern  republicanism  Parliamentary_supremacy  Parliamentarians  Whigs  Whigs-oligarchy  Whigs-opposition  limited_monarchy  prerogative  liberalism-republicanism_debates  Whigs-Radicals  Commonwealthmen  Charles_I  George_III  Adams_John  US_constitution  Early_Republic  legislature  exec_branch  US_government  US_President  majoritarian  democracy  masses-fear_of  federalism  federal_preemption  national_interest  states_rights  government-forms  constitutions  constitutional_regime  Royalists 
may 2016 by dunnettreader
Bourke, R.: Empire and Revolution: The Political Life of Edmund Burke. (eBook and Hardcover)
Drawing on the complete range of printed and manuscript sources, Empire and Revolution offers a vivid reconstruction of the major concerns of this outstanding statesman, orator, and philosopher.In restoring Burke to his original political and intellectual context, this book strips away the accumulated distortions that have marked the reception of his ideas. In the process, it overturns the conventional picture of a partisan of tradition against progress. In place of the image of a backward-looking opponent of popular rights, it presents a multifaceted portrait of one of the most captivating figures in eighteenth-century life and thought. While Burke was a passionately energetic statesman, he was also a deeply original thinker. Empire and Revolution depicts him as a philosopher-in-action who evaluated the political realities of the day through the lens of Enlightenment thought, variously drawing on the ideas of such figures as Montesquieu, Rousseau, and Hume. A boldly ambitious work of scholarship, this book challenges us to rethink the legacy of Burke and the turbulent era in which he played so pivotal a role. -- Richard Bourke is professor in the history of political thought and codirector of the Centre for the Study of the History of Political Thought at Queen Mary University of London. He is the author of Peace in Ireland: The War of Ideas and the coeditor of Political Judgement. -- Big early chunk on Vindication of Natural Society -- TOC and Intro (24 pgs) downloaded to Note
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september 2015 by dunnettreader
Josh Chafetz - Democracy’s Privileged Few: Legislative Privilege and Democratic Norms in the British and American Constitutions | Yale University Press - 2011
This book is the first to compare the freedoms and protections of members of the United States Congress with those of Britain’s Parliament. Placing legislative privilege in historical context, Josh Chafetz explores how and why legislators in Britain and America have been granted special privileges in five areas: jurisdictional conflicts between the courts and the legislative houses, freedom of speech, freedom from civil arrest, contested elections, and the disciplinary powers of the houses. Legislative privilege is a crucial component of the relationship between a representative body and the other participants in government, including the people. In recounting and analyzing the remarkable story of how parliamentary government emerged and evolved in Britain and how it crossed the Atlantic, Chafetz illuminates a variety of important constitutional issues, including the separation of powers, the nature of representation, and the difference between written and unwritten constitutionalism. This book will inspire in readers a much greater appreciation for the rise and triumph of democracy. -- see kindle sample
books  kindle-available  political_history  17thC  18thC  19thC  20thC  21stC  constitutions  constitutional_law  constitutional_regime  democracy  checks-and-balances  separation-of-powers  representative_institutions  political_participation  UK_Government  British_history  British_politics  British_Empire-constitutional_structure  American_colonies  US_constitution  Congress  Parliament  Parliamentary_supremacy  House_of_Commons  House_of_Lords  House_of_Representatives  constituencies  judiciary  judicial_review  exec_branch  monarchy  monarchical_republic  MPs  legal_history  legal_theory  legal_culture  legitimacy  Founders  Madison  Blackstone  Mill  prerogative  bill_of_rights  bills_of_attainder  elections-disputed  Bolingbroke 
august 2015 by dunnettreader
- DAVID LEWIS JONES - British Parliaments and Assemblies: A Bibliography of Printed Materials (2009) Parliamentary History - Wiley Online Library
Each section a pdf downloaded to Note - combined, c 25,000 entries *--* Section 1: Preface, Introduction, The Westminster Parliament 1-4005. **--** Section 2: The Medieval Parliament 4006-4728 **--** Section 3: Tudor Parliaments 4729-5064 **--* Section 4: Stuart Parliaments 5063-6805 **--** Section 5: The Unreformed Parliament 1714-1832 6806-9589. **--** Section 6: The Reformed Parliament 1832-1918 9590-15067 **--** Section 7: Parliament 1918-2009 15068-21582. **--** Section 8: The Judicial House of Lords 21583-21835. -- The Palace of Westminster 21836-22457. -- The Irish Parliament 22458-23264 -- The Scottish Parliament (to 1707) 23265-23482 -- The New Devolved Assemblies 23483-23686 -- The Scottish Parliament (1999-) 23687-24251 -- Northern Ireland 24252-24563 -- The National Assembly for Wales 24537-24963 -- Minor Assemblies
bibliography  historiography  Medieval  medieval_history  15thC  16thC  17thC  18thC  19thC  20thC  21stC  political_culture  political_philosophy  political_economy  political_history  politics-and-religion  political_participation  political_press  legal_history  legal_system  legal_theory  British_history  British_politics  Britain  British_Empire  British_foreign_policy  English_constitution  British_Empire-constitutional_structure  monarchy  monarchy-proprietary  monarchical_republic  limited_monarchy  Parliament  Parliamentary_supremacy  House_of_Commons  House_of_Lords  sovereignty  government-forms  governing_class  government_finance  government_officials  Scotland  Ireland  Ireland-English_exploitation  elites  elite_culture  common_law  rule_of_law  1690s  1700s  1707_Union  1680s  Glorious_Revolution  Glorious_Revolution-Scotland  English_Civil_War  Three_Kingdoms  composite_monarchies  Absolutism  ancient_constitution  religion-established  Church_of_England  Reformation  reform-legal  reform-political  elections  franchise  state-building  opposition  parties  pa 
december 2014 by dunnettreader
Derek Hirst, review - Glenn Burgess, The Politics of the Ancient Constitution: An Introduction to English Political Thought, 1603-1642 | JSTOR: The American Historical Review, Vol. 100, No. 2 (Apr., 1995), pp. 516-517
Helpful discussion of where Burgess fits within historiography debates, both with respect to the legal and political issues of the ancient constitution, (dominated by Pocock) and the broader "causes of the English Civil War" revisionism, anti revisionism, post revisionism etc. Burgess analyzes 3 different discourses each for a different sphere (e.g. king-in-parliament, prerogative, taxation and judicial review spoke the language of law and ancient constitution whereas religious sphere was a discourse of obedience). Major increase in tensions when a sphere (e.g. religious) deployed language from another sphere (e, g. divines advocating taxation in sermons). and juduc Main criticism by Hirst is Burgess significantly reduces the importance of Coke. On the positive side, Burgess explains the nearly universal consensus re significance of the ancient constitution, the common law and role of the judiciary and most of the monarch's prerogative powers. Hirst says Burgess has provided a framework for the consensus that gives a coherent foundation for distinctive key figures like Bacon and Selden. That serves to highlight where constructive ambiguity maintained consensus, where fault lines were hidden, where and how major conflicts emerged and a logic of the dynamics of how conflicts played out. -- downloaded pdf to Note
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october 2014 by dunnettreader
PHILIP LOFT -- POLITICAL ARITHMETIC AND THE ENGLISH LAND TAX IN THE REIGN OF WILLIAM III. (2013). | The Historical Journal, 56, pp 321-343. - Cambridge Journals Online - Abstract
PHILIP LOFT - University College London -- This article explores the role of the method of political arithmetic and political arithmeticians in the changing methods of raising finance during the Nine Years War. It discusses the actions of parliament-men in committees and their interaction with reports containing data, and the influence of projectors on the decision to introduce, and later abandon, the pound rate. Throughout this period, political arithmeticians were active participants, providing data, advice, and schemes to the treasury and parliament, and when they were not, ‘country’ MPs, in particular, were active in calling for data and leading its cross-examination. This article suggests that debates on public finance did not occur along party lines, with ‘county communities’ given fresh presence by the quantification of the inequality of the land tax burden. Political arithmetic is shown to have played an important role in the processes and negotiations that occurred over the setting of taxation policy in the ‘long eighteenth century’. -* I thank Julian Hoppit for his generous encouragement and comments on this article. Thanks also to Clare Jackson, Andrew Preston and the anonymous reviewers. - available for download - to Note
article  17thC  18thC  British_history  British_politics  economic_history  political_economy  Glorious_Revolution  William_III  Nine_Years_War  taxes  landed_interest  land_tax  fiscal_policy  fiscal-military_state  political_arithmetick  Parliament  House_of_Commons  Parliamentary_supremacy  Country_Party  oversight-legislature  public_finance  public_policy  partisanship  Whig_Junto  Tories  Whigs-opposition  sovereign_debt  downloaded  EF-add 
august 2014 by dunnettreader
Albert Venn Dicey, Introduction to the Study of the Law of the Constitution (LF ed. 1982, Roger E. Michener ed) - Online Library of Liberty
Albert Venn Dicey, Introduction to the Study of the Law of the Constitution, ed. Roger E. Michener (Indianapolis: Liberty Fund 1982). 07/17/2014. <http://oll.libertyfund.org/titles/1714> -- Liberty Fund’s edition of Dicey’s most famous work on English constitutional law in which he defended the idea of the sovereignty of parliament under an independent judiciary and the rule of law. -- downloaded pdf to Note
books  etexts  19thC  20thC  intellectual_history  legal_history  legal_system  political_philosophy  English_constitution  Parliamentary_supremacy  judicial_review  rule_of_law  constitutionalism  government-forms  downloaded  EF-add 
july 2014 by dunnettreader
Jeremy Waldron - Separation of Powers or Division of Power? (2012) :: SSRN
NYU School of Law, Public Law Research Paper No. 12-20 - April 24, 2012 -- The rationale of the separation of powers is often elided with the rationale of checks and balances and with the rationale of the dispersal of power generally in a constitutional system. This paper however focuses resolutely on the functional sepaartion of powers in what MJC Vile called its "pure form". Rexeamining the theories of Locke, Montesquieu, and Madison, the paper seeks to recover (amidst all their tautologies and evasions) a genuine case in favor of this principle. The paper argues that the rationale of the separation of powers is closely related to that of the rule of law: it is partly a matter of the distinct integrity of each of the separated institutions (courts, legislature, and administration). But above all, it is a matter of articulated governance (as contrasted with compressed undifferentiated exercises of power). -- Number of Pages in PDF File: 34 -- Keywords: constitutionalism, constitutions, courts, legislature, Madison, Montesquieu, rule of law, separation of powers -- downloaded pdf to Note
paper  SSRN  legal_system  legal_history  English_constitution  US_constitution  17thC  18thC  checks-and-balances  separation-of-powers  government-forms  mixed_government  judiciary  judicial_review  legislature  executive  sovereignty  Locke-2_Treatises  Montesquieu  Madison  constitutionalism  limited_monarchy  limited_government  Parliamentary_supremacy  rule_of_law  downloaded  EF-add 
july 2014 by dunnettreader
John Locke, Encouragement of Irish Linen Manufacture (August 1697) - Online Library of Liberty
John Locke, H.B. Fox Bourne, The Life of John Locke. In Two Volumes (London: Henry S. King, 1876). Vol. 2 pp. 363-372. 07/16/2014. <http://oll.libertyfund.org/titles/2332> -- Available as Facsimile PDF 352 KB This is a facsimile or image-based PDF made from scans of the original book -- Locke’s detailed proposals to encourage the Irish linen industry which was quoted in full in Fox Bourne’s The Life of John Locke (1876), vol. 2, pp. 363-372.
etexts  17thC  intellectual_history  British_history  British_politics  political_economy  Locke  biography  Ireland  Ireland-English_exploitation  industry  agriculture  protectionism  development  interest_groups  Parliament  Parliamentary_supremacy  Irish_Parliament  1690s  Whig_Junto  Board_of_Trade  UK_government-colonies  EF-add 
july 2014 by dunnettreader
The Best of the OLL No. 44: “The English Bill of Rights” (1689) - Online Library of Liberty
The Best of the OLL No. 44: “The English Bill of Rights” (1689) (Indianapolis: Liberty Fund, 2013). -- This is part of “The Best of the Online Library of Liberty” which is a collection of some of the most important material in the OLL. A thematic list with links to HTML versions of the texts is available here. The English Bill of Rights (1689) is part of a series of legal statements about the rights of Englishmen which were proclaimed during the 17th century. Others include the Petition of Right (1628), the Agreement of the People (1647, 1648), and the Habeas Corpus Act (1679). It was a clear statement of the primacy of Parliament in the British system of government and defined the legal limits of the power of the government over the citizens. -- downloaded pdf to Note
etexts  17thC  British_history  British_politics  political_history  constitutionalism  limited_monarchy  Glorious_Revolution  civil_liberties  government-forms  mixed_government  Parliamentary_supremacy  Parliament  primary_sources  downloaded  EF-add 
july 2014 by dunnettreader
David Womersley, ed. - Liberty and American Experience in the Eighteenth Century (2006) - Online Library of Liberty
David Womersely, Liberty and American Experience in the Eighteenth Century, edited and with an Introduction by David Womersley (Indianapolis: Liberty Fund, 2006). 07/13/2014. <http://oll.libertyfund.org/titles/1727> -- This volume is a collection of essays which examines some of the central themes and ideologies central to the formation of the United States including Edmund Burke’s theories on property rights and government, the influence of Jamaica on the American colonies, the relations between religious and legal understandings of the concept of liberty, the economic understanding of the Founders, the conflicting viewpoints between moral sense theory and the idea of natural rights in the founding period, the divisions in thought among the revolutionaries regarding the nature of liberty and the manner in which liberty was to be preserved, and the disparity in Madison’s political thought from the 1780s to the 1790s. -- authors include Jack Greene, David Wootton, Gordon Wood. -- downloaded pdf to Note
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july 2014 by dunnettreader
Marchamont Nedham, Excellencie of a Free-State: Or, The Right Constitution of a Commonwealth, ed. Blair Worden - Online Library of Liberty
Marchamont Nedham, Excellencie of a Free-State: Or, The Right Constitution of a Commonwealth, edited and with an Introduction by Blair Worden (Indianapolis: Liberty Fund, 2011). 07/13/2014. <http://oll.libertyfund.org/titles/2449> -- This edition brings back into print, after two and a half centuries, the pioneering work of English republicanism, Marchamont Nedham’s The Excellencie of a Free-State, which was written in the wake of the execution of King Charles I. First published in 1656, and compiled from previously written editorials in the parliamentarian newsbook Mercurius Politicus, The Excellencie of a Free-State addressed a dilemma in English politics, namely, what kind of government should the Commonwealth adopt? One possibility was to revert to the ancient constitution and create a Cromwellian monarchy. The alternative was the creation of parliamentary sovereignty, in which there would be a “due and orderly succession of supreme authority in the hands of the people’s representatives.” Nedham was convinced that only the latter would “best secure the liberties and freedoms of the people from the encroachments and usurpations of tyranny.” -- downloaded pdf to Note
books  etexts  17thC  British_history  British_politics  political_philosophy  English_constitution  republicanism  republics-Ancient_v_Modern  limited_monarchy  English_Civil_War  Interregnum  Protectorate  Puritans  Charles_I  politics-and-religion  political_press  commonwealth  Cromwell  political_participation  historiography-17thC  ancient_constitution  mixed_government  government-forms  representative_institutions  Parliamentary_supremacy  Parliamentarians  Nedham  newspapers  tyranny  civil_liberties  constitutionalism  downloaded  EF-add 
july 2014 by dunnettreader
The Lamp of Experience - Online Library of Liberty
Trevor Colbourn, The Lamp of Experience: Whig History and the Intellectual Origins of the American Revolution (Indianapolis: Liberty Fund 1998). 07/13/2014. <http://oll.libertyfund.org/titles/674> -- In a landmark work, a leading scholar of the eighteenth century examines the ways in which an understanding of the nature of history, seen as as a continual struggle between liberty and virtue on one hand and arbitrary power and corruption on the other, influenced the thinking of the founding fathers. -- downloaded pdf to Note
books  etexts  17thC  18thC  intellectual_history  British_history  British_politics  Atlantic  American_colonies  American_Revolution  Early_Republic  Adams_John  Jefferson  Bolingbroke  historiography-18thC  historians-and-politics  historiography-Whig  Founders  English_constitution  history_of_England  British_Empire-constitutional_structure  Parliamentary_supremacy  limited_monarchy  republicanism  republics-Ancient_v_Modern  downloaded  EF-add 
july 2014 by dunnettreader
M.J.C. Vile, Constitutionalism and the Separation of Powers (2nd ed.) - Online Library of Liberty
M.J.C. Vile, Constitutionalism and the Separation of Powers (2nd ed.) (Indianapolis, Liberty Fund 1998). 07/12/2014. <http://oll.libertyfund.org/titles/677> -- Arguably no political principle has been more central than the separation of powers to the evolution of constitutional governance in Western democracies. In the definitive work on the subject, M. J. C. Vile traces the history of the doctrine from its rise during the English Civil War, through its development in the eighteenth century – when it was indispensable to the founders of the American republic – through subsequent political thought and constitution-making in Britain, France, and the United States. The author concludes with an examination of criticisms of the doctrine by both behavioralists and centralizers – and with “A Model of a Theory of Constitutionalism.” The new Liberty Fund second edition includes the entirety of the original 1967 text published by Oxford, a major epilogue entitled “The Separation of Powers and the Administrative State,” and a bibliography. -- downloaded pdf to Note
books  etexts  17thC  18thC  19thC  20thC  political_philosophy  political_history  constitutionalism  government-forms  separation-of-powers  checks-and-balances  British_history  British_politics  English_Civil_War  English_constitution  American_colonies  American_Revolution  US_constitution  British_Empire-constitutional_structure  Parliamentary_supremacy  Patriot_King  judiciary  rule_of_law  French_Revolution  republicanism  republics-Ancient_v_Modern  Third_Republic  Napoleonic_Empire  Directoire  Fifth_Republic  administrative_agencies  executive  legislation  liberalism-republicanism_debates  federalism  Founders  Federalist  Bolingbroke  Montesquieu  patronage  corruption  downloaded  EF-add 
july 2014 by dunnettreader
The Works of John Adams, vol. 4 (Novanglus, Thoughts on Government, Defence of the Constitution) - Online Library of Liberty
John Adams, The Works of John Adams, Second President of the United States: with a Life of the Author, Notes and Illustrations, by his Grandson Charles Francis Adams (Boston: Little, Brown and Co., 1856). 10 volumes. Vol. 4. 07/12/2014. <http://oll.libertyfund.org/titles/2102> -- A 10 volume collection of Adams’ most important writings, letters, and state papers, edited by his grandson. Vol. 4 contains Novanglus [history of the American colonies and their relations with Britain from 1754 to 1774], Thoughts on Government, and Defence of the Constitutions [descriptions of modern and ancient republics (categorized as democratic, aristocratic and, some ancient, as monarchic), and writings on the history and theories of forms of government by ancient and modern historians and philosophers. Lists Dr Swift as well as Hume -must have read 4 Last Years. -- downloaded pdf to Note
books  etexts  18thC  intellectual_history  political_philosophy  Adams_John  ancient_history  ancient_philosophy  ancient_Greece  ancient_Rome  republics-Ancient_v_Modern  government-forms  historians-and-politics  British_history  British_politics  British_Empire-constitutional_structure  British_foreign_policy  Swift  Hume  American_colonies  American_Revolution  George_III  Parliamentary_supremacy  limited_monarchy  English_constitution  UK_government-colonies  British_Empire  downloaded  EF-add 
july 2014 by dunnettreader
The Roots of Liberty: Magna Carta, Ancient Constitution, and the Anglo-American Tradition of Rule of Law, ed. Ellis Sandoz, - Online Library of Liberty
Ellis Sandoz, The Roots of Liberty: Magna Carta, Ancient Constitution, and the Anglo-American Tradition of Rule of Law, edited and with an Introduction by Ellis Sandoz (Indianapolis: Liberty Fund, 2008). 07/12/2014. <http://oll.libertyfund.org/titles/2180> -- This is a critical collection of essays on the origin and nature of the idea of liberty. The authors explore the development of English ideas of liberty and the relationship those ideas hold to modern conceptions of rule of law. The essays address early medieval developments, encompassing such seminal issues as the common-law mind of the sixteenth century under the Tudor monarchs, the struggle for power and authority between the Stuart kings and Parliament in the seventeenth century, and the role of the ancient constitution in the momentous legal and constitutional debate that occurred between the Glorious Revolution and the American Declaration of Independence. Authors -- Corinne Comstock Weston - John Phillip Reid - Paul Christianson - Christopher W. Brooks - James Clarke Holt - Editor: Ellis Sandoz -- a lot of historiography discussion of legal history, politics and political philosophy - interesting to see their take on Pocock - original publication date 1993, so bibliography will be a bit dated and the articles won't reflect all the waves of revisionism but important place to start -- downloaded pdf to Note
books  etexts  legal_history  legal_theory  political_philosophy  Anglo-American  16thC  17thC  18thC  English_constitution  ancient_constitution  Anglo-Saxons  Norman_Conquest  Magna_Carta  Tudor  Elizabeth  James_I  Charles_I  Charles_II  James_II  William_III  Hanoverian_Succession  common_law  lawyers  judiciary  rule_of_law  British_history  British_politics  Atlantic  American_colonies  government-forms  mixed_government  Absolutism  republicanism  limited_monarchy  Parliament  Parliamentary_supremacy  citizens  legitimacy  authority  resistance_theory  Patriot_King  civil_liberties  civic_humanism  liberty  taxes  property  petitions  Petition_of_Right  House_of_Commons  House_of_Lords  checks-and-balances  separation-of-powers  franchise  bibliography  downloaded  EF-add 
july 2014 by dunnettreader
John Millar, An Historical View of the English Government [1803], eds. Mark Salber Philips and Dale R. Smith - Online Library of Liberty
John Millar, An Historical View of the English Government, From the Settlement of the Saxons in Britain to the Revolution in 1688, in four volumes, edited by Mark Salber Philips and Dale R. Smith, introduction by Mark Salber Philips (Indianapolis: Liberty Fund, 2006). 07/11/2014. <http://oll.libertyfund.org/titles/1886> -- An Historical View of the English Government consists of three parts, concerned with the most substantive revolutions in English government and manners: from the Saxon settlement to the Norman Conquest, from the Norman Conquest to the accession of James I, and from James I to the Glorious Revolution. Through these three phases Millar traces the development of the “great outlines of the English constitution”—the history of institutions of English liberty from Saxon antiquity to the revolution settlement of 1689. Millar demonstrates serious concern for the maintenance of liberties achieved through revolution and maintains that the manners of a commercial nation, while particularly suited to personal and political liberty, are not such as to secure liberty forever.
books  etexts  18thC  intellectual_history  Scottish_Enlightenment  British_history  British_politics  historiography-Whig  historiography-18thC  historians-and-politics  ancient_constitution  English_constitution  Anglo-Saxons  Norman_Conquest  Magna_Carta  Tudor  Elizabeth  James_I  Charles_I  Charles_II  James_II  William_III  English_Civil_War  Restoration  Glorious_Revolution  Revolution_Principles  commerce  liberty  Parliament  Parliamentary_supremacy  monarchy  civil_liberties  civilizing_process  downloaded  EF-add 
july 2014 by dunnettreader
Simon Targett - Government and Ideology during the Age of Whig Supremacy: The Political Argument of Sir Robert Walpole's Newspaper Propagandists | JSTOR: The Historical Journal, Vol. 37, No. 2 (Jun., 1994), pp. 289-317
Contrary to received historical wisdom, Sir Robert Walpole, the pragmatist par excellence, was diverted by political ideas. Thus he invested time and an unprecedented amount of money in political newspapers. This article investigates the primary pro-government newspapers and, as well as identifying the leading circle of political writers sponsored by Walpole, addresses the varied and complex arguments that appeared in their `leading essay' each week for twenty years. After identifying some common but misleading historical representations of Walpolean political thought, the article examines the treatment of three broad philosophical questions - human nature, the origin, nature and extent of government, and political morality - so demonstrating that Walpole's spokesmen were not narrowly pragmatic. Subsequently, the article focuses upon the careful pro-government response to the common charges that Walpole corrupted the political system and betrayed traditional whig values. In doing so, the article highlights the skills of some underrated eighteenth-century political writers and, more importantly, emphasizes the union of government and ideology in Walpolean political thinking. -- very useful references -- Downloaded pdf to Note
article  jstor  intellectual_history  18thC  1720s  1730s  1740s  British_history  British_politics  political_philosophy  moral_philosophy  human_nature  mixed_government  English_constitution  Parliament  Parliamentary_supremacy  partisanship  elections  franchise  political_culture  corruption  government_officials  governing_class  political_economy  political_press  Walpole  Hervey  Whigs-oligarchy  Whigs-opposition  Tories  Craftsman  Bolingbroke  bibliography  downloaded  EF-add 
june 2014 by dunnettreader
Common-place: Trevor Burnard - The American Revolution, the West Indies, and the Future of Plantation British America
Conference presentation -- One lesson that British imperialists refused to learn from the American Revolution was that the prejudices of settler elites needed to be respected...The British Empire from the 1780s onward became more, not less, authoritarian and became ever more dependent upon metropolitan direction exercised tightly among a close group of initiates experienced in plantation affairs... Such imperial obstinacy proved especially problematic for West Indian planters. Britain acted less consultatively and less in the interests of West Indians after the American Revolution than before. In 1784, for example, against strong West Indian protests, they severed the West Indies economically from North America by insisting on recognizing the United States of America as a foreign nation whose ships should be banned from British ports. For the first time in the 18thC, and increasingly thereafter, West Indian lobbyists in London found themselves unable to get their way in West Indian policy matters. This diminished political influence, moreover, was combined with a British tendency to see West Indian planters less as gauche nouveau riches who brought material benefits to the Empire than as crude, cruel, sexually lascivious deviants. Metropolitan opinion saw West Indian planters as given to "mongrelisation" in their relations with black women. As a consequence, they were thought to be intellectually and morally bankrupt. It was not economics but politics that was the real problem facing the West Indies after the American Revolution.
18thC  19thC  British_politics  British_Empire  British_Empire-constitutional_structure  West_Indies  planters  plantations  slavery  Parliament  Parliamentary_supremacy  trade-policy  racialism  abolition  EF-add 
may 2014 by dunnettreader
Harold J. Berman - The Origins of Historical Jurisprudence: Coke, Selden, Hale | JSTOR: The Yale Law Journal, Vol. 103, No. 7 (May, 1994), pp. 1651-1738
In the 17thC, leading English jurists introduced into the Western legal tradition a new philosophy of law which both competed with and complemented the 2 major schools of law that had opposed each other: natural law theory and legal positivism. The basic tenet of the historical school is that the primary source of the validity of law, including both its moral and political validity, is its historicity, especially the developing customs and ongoing traditions of the community whose law it is. Historical experience is thought to have a normative significance. This theory was adumbrated by Edward Coke, developed by John Selden, and articulated by Matthew Hale, who integrated it with the 2 older theories. In the late 18thC & early 19thC, the 3 theories split apart & the historical school emerged as an independent philosophy. Historical jurisprudence predominated in Europe and the US in the late 19thC & early 20thC, but has been ignored or repudiated by most American legal philosophers. It continues to play an important role in the thinking of American judges and lawyers, especially in constitutional law and in areas where common law still prevails. Its full-fledged articulation only emerged in the context of the English Revolution and its ideals of judicial independence and parliamentary supremacy. Historical jurisprudence had important connections both with Puritan theology and with developments in the natural sciences. In legal science, it was reflected particularly in the development of the doctrine of precedent. In the 18thC, it was given expression by Blackstone and Burke, and in the 19thC it was finally established as a separate school of jurisprudence by the great German jurist Carl Friedrich von Savigny.
article  jstor  intellectual_history  legal_history  legal_system  legal_theory  moral_philosophy  political_philosophy  political_culture  common_law  constitutionalism  17thC  18thC  19thC  20thC  British_history  British_politics  Coke  Selden  Blackstone  Burke  natural_law  positive_law  civil_code  judiciary  English_Civil_War  Glorious_Revolution  Parliamentary_supremacy  downloaded  EF-add 
may 2014 by dunnettreader
John A. Phillips, review essay - Peers and Parliamentarians versus Jacobites and Jacobins: Eighteenth-Century Stability? | JSTOR: Journal of British Studies, Vol. 25, No. 4 (Oct., 1986), pp. 504-514
Reviewed works - (1) Aristocratic Century: The Peerage of Eighteenth-Century England by John Cannon; *--* (2) British Parliamentary Parties, 1742-1832: From the Fall of Walpole to the First Reform Act by Brian W. Hill; *--* (3) Britain in the Age of Walpole by Jeremy Black; *--* (4) British Radicalism and the French Revolution, 1789-1815 by H. T. Dickinson -- he's not impressed with Cannon who focuses on peerage and thereby misses the aristocracy and elite changes more generally, plus dodgy statistics
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february 2014 by dunnettreader

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