dunnettreader + papacy   79

David Loades - Foxe in theological context | The Acts and Monuments Online
Foxe in theological context
by David Loades
The issues covered by the trials and inquisitions which Foxe narrates in these books are limited and endlessly repetitive. Christology is hardly ever discussed. The taking of oaths and obedience to secular authority are raised in some cases, usually when the inquisitors are trying to pin charges of anabaptism on their victims. In the unusual case of Cranmer considerable use is made of 'lawful authority', because of his own high profile insistence upon obedience to the Royal Supremacy. Foxe is always at pains to ensure that his martyrs insist upon the lawfulness of oaths. Obedience is more difficult, and the normal response is 'we must obey God rather than man'. However this is always qualified by some statement to the effect that a Christian who is required by his conscience to disobey a lawful command will submit willingly to the penalties prescribed. Foxe is extremely sensitive to the catholic charge that protestantism is a religion of disobedience.The issues which dominate the great majority of trials are: vernacular liturgy and scripture, and the nature and number of the sacraments.
Evernote  16thC  British_history  Reformation  Protestants  religious_belief  religious_practices  sacraments  transubstantiation  priestcraft  priesthood  priests-authority  hierarchy  ecclesiology  Papacy  purgatory  indulgences  dogmatism  church_history  sola_scriptura 
september 2017 by dunnettreader
DUMAS, Alexandre – Henri IV | Litterature audio.com
Reader - Cocotte - 6 hr 29 mn - Henri IV fait partie de la série Les Grands Hommes en robe de chambre, écrite par Alexandre Dumas en 1855 et 1856.
Roman_Catholicism  Catholics-France  Dumas  17thC  16thC  Huguenots  French_history  audio-books  Papacy  Wars_of_Religion  biography  nation-state  court_culture  French_language  French_lit  Henri_IV  19thC 
november 2016 by dunnettreader
Robert A. Markus - Gregory the Great and his World (1997) | Cambridge University Press
The book is a study of Gregory the Great, the pope who sent Augustine (of Canterbury) and his fellow missionaries to convert the heathen English to Christianity (597). Markus gives a full account of Gregory's life and work, his thought and spirituality, within the setting of the world at the end of the sixth century. At a time of catastrophic change in Europe, Gregory's work as pope stands on the threshold of medieval Western Europe. The book deals with every aspect of his pontificate, providing a major contribution to the study of late antique society. -- No modern equivalent in any language -- Takes into account advance in historical scholarship over the 90 years since Dudden, and modern perspectives in the study of Late Antiquity -- Downloaded frontmatter (incl maps), excerpt, index via Air to DBOX -- added to Evernote
books  biography  6thC  intellectual_history  religious_history  medieval_history  Gregory_the_Great  theology  Papacy  Christianity  Christendom  Byzantine_Empire  Roman_Empire  Lombards  Italy  Church_history  missionaries  religious_culture  religious_lit  barbarians  Visigoths  North_Africa  heresy 
september 2016 by dunnettreader
Robert A. Markus - Saeculum: History & Society in the Theology of St Augustine (1970, rev 2007) | Cambridge University Press
Significant intro to rev'd edition, included in downloaded frontmatter along with TOC and original Preface. -- In this book Professor Markus's main concern is with those aspects of Augustine's thought which help to answer questions about the purpose of human society, and particularly with his reflections on history, society and the Church. He relates Augustine's ideas to their contemporary context and to older traditions, and shows which aspects of his thought he absorbed from his intellectual environment. Augustine appears from this study as a thinker who rejected the 'sacralization' of the established order of society, and the implications of this for a theology of history are explored in the last chapter. -- Downloaded frontmatter, excerpt & index via Air to DBOX - added to Evernote
books  downloaded  intellectual_history  theology  philosophy_of_history  Late_Antiquity  Early_Christian  Augustine  human_nature  eschatology  social_order  Providence  teleology  religion-established  politics-and-religion  religious_culture  Roman_Empire  paganism  pluralism  secularism  Roman_religion  secularization  Papacy  ecclesiology 
september 2016 by dunnettreader
Robert A. Markus The End of Ancient Christianity (1990) |Cambridge University Press
Highly recommended by Patrick Boucheron -- This study is concerned with one, central historical problem: the nature of the changes that transformed the intellectual and spiritual horizons of the Christian world from its establishment in the fourth century to the end of the sixth. Why, for example, were the assumptions, attitudes and traditions of Gregory the Great so markedly different from those of Augustine? The End of Ancient Christianity examines how Christians, who had formerly constituted a threatened and beleaguered minority, came to define their identity in a changed context of religious respectability in which their faith had become a source of privilege, prestige and power. Professor Markus reassesses the cult of the martyrs and the creation of schemes of sacred time and sacred space, and analyzes the appeal of asceticism and its impact on the Church at large. These changes form part of a fundamental transition, perhaps best described as the shift from "Ancient" toward "Medieval" forms of Christianity; from an older and more diverse secular culture towards a religious culture with a firm Biblical basis. -- Downloaded TOC, Preface & excerpt via Air to DBOX - added to Evernote
books  downloaded  religious_history  religious_culture  politics-and-religion  religion-established  Christianity  Roman_Empire  Late_Antiquity  Early_Christian  paganism  secularization  Roman_religion  pluralism  eschatology  Augustine  Gregory_the_Great  Church_history  Papacy  ecclesiology 
september 2016 by dunnettreader
Porter and Teisch eds. - The Enlightenment in National Context (1981) | Cambridge University Press
Table of Contents

Preface
1. The Enlightenment in England Roy Porter
2. The Scottish Enlightenment Nicholas Phillipson
3. The Enlightenment in France Norman Hampson
4. The Enlightenment in the Netherlands Simon Schama
5. The Enlightenment in Switzerland Samuel S. B. Taylor
6. The Italian Enlightenment Owen Chadwick
7. The Protestant Enlightenment in Germany Joachim Whaley
8. The Enlightenment in Catholic Germany T. C. W. Blanning
9. Reform Catholicism and political radicalism in the Austrian Enlightenment Ernst Wangermann
10. Bohemia: from darkness into light Mikuláš Teich
11. The Enlightenment in Sweden Tore Frängsmyr
12. The Russian Enlightenment Paul Dukes
13. Enlightenment and the politics of American nature J. R. Pole
Afterword Mikuláš Teich
Excerpt 10 pgs of Porter re England - downloaded via iPhone to DBOX
Italy  England  Sweden  Austria  Germany  Counter-Enlightenment  Protestants  Radical_Enlightenment  church_history  Protestant_International  cultural_history  Scottish_Enlightenment  reform-political  political_culture  Counter-Reformation  downloaded  French_Enlightenment  Russia  Papacy  British_history  Dutch  18thC  Roman_Catholicism  books  Enlightenment  Prussia  intellectual_history 
may 2016 by dunnettreader
Grell and Scriber eds. -Tolerance and Intolerance in the European Reformation (1996) | Cambridge University Press
This volume offers a re-interpretation of the role of tolerance and intolerance in the European Reformation. It questions the traditional notion of a progressive development towards greater religious toleration from the beginning of the sixteenth century onwards. Instead, it places incidents of religious tolerance and intolerance in their specific social and political contexts. Fifteen leading scholars offer a comprehensive interpretation of this subject, covering all the regions of Europe that were directly affected by the Reformation in the crucial period between 1500, when northern humanism had begun to make an impact, and 1648, the end of the Thirty Years War. In this way, Tolerance and Intolerance in the European Reformation provides a dramatically different view of how religious toleration and conflict developed in early modern Europe. - excerpt is TOC and full Intro including ftnts - downloaded via iPhone to DBOX
Lutherans  persecution  politiques  social_movements  Huguenots  Erastianism  church_history  Europe-Early_Modern  change-social  Calvinism  religious_wars  heresy  Kirk  religion-established  books  legitimacy  Thirty_Years_War  networks-religious  Papacy  iconoclasm  Counter-Reformation  16thC  Church-and-State  anti-Calvinists  religious_history  godly_persons  Church_of_England  social_order  politico-theology  Wars_of_Religion  Socinians  downloaded  Arminians  religious_belief  Inquisition  religious_culture  17thC  religious_lit  Thirty-Nine_Articles  Reformation  tolerance  Puritans  heterodoxy 
may 2016 by dunnettreader
Grell and Porter eds. - Toleration in Enlightenment Europe (2000) | Cambridge University Press
The Enlightenment is often seen as the great age of religious and intellectual toleration, and this 1999 volume is a systematic European survey of the theory, practice, and very real limits to toleration in eighteenth-century Europe. A distinguished international team of contributors demonstrate how the publicists of the European Enlightenment developed earlier ideas about toleration, gradually widening the desire for religious toleration into a philosophy of freedom seen as a fundamental attribute and a precondition for a civilized society. Nonetheless Europe never uniformly or comprehensively embraced toleration during the eighteenth century: although religious toleration was central to the Enlightenment project, advances in toleration were often fragile and short-lived. -- excerpt contains TOC and full Chapter 1 - Intro - including ftnts to Chapter 1 - downloaded via iPhone to DBOX
High_Church  1730s  Papacy  French_Enlightenment  civil_liberties  Enlightenment  Church_of_England  Church-and-State  Holy_Roman_Empire  Locke  philosophes  Spain  Spinoza  Toland  Italy  British_history  tolerance  anti-Semitism  political_philosophy  Dutch  downloaded  Germany  citizenship  Austria  Inquisition  18thC  religious_history  17thC  church_history  intellectual_history  enlightened_absolutism  books 
may 2016 by dunnettreader
Harold Samuel Stone - Vico's Cultural History: The Production and Transmission of Ideas in Naples ...(1997) - Google Books
Based on a U of Chicago thesis supervised by Stephen Toulmin.
A study of the cultural world of Giambattista Vico, one of the most creative social theorists of the eighteenth century. Based on extensive manuscript as well as printed materials, and relying on the methods of book and publishing history, this volume describes Vico's intellectual community. Special attention is paid to the interaction between scholars and Naples' vibrant operatic and artistic community. The first part of the book investigates a controversy concerning an inquisitorial investigation, Neapolitan travel literature, the papers of a scientific academy, and the patronage system for book publication. The second part describes the cultural context of Vico's writings and especially the three editions of "The New Science," This work explains the accomplishments that made Naples one of the great cultural centers of the early Enlightenment.
Habsburgs  Papacy  Cartesians  intellectual_history  18thC  cultural_history  War_of_Spanish_Succession  atomism  patronage  Bourbons  17thC  Italy  Enlightenment  Deism  Naples  books  Republic_of_Letters  Inquisition  history_of_book  Vico 
may 2016 by dunnettreader
Harro Hopfl - Jesuit Political Thought (2008) | Cambridge University Press
Harro Höpfl presents here a full-length study of the single most influential organized group of scholars and pamphleteers in early modern Europe (1540–1630), namely the Jesuits. He explores the academic and political controversies in which they were engaged in and their contribution to academic discourse around ideas of 'the state' and 'politics'. He pays particular attention to their actual teaching concerning doctrines for whose menacing practical implications Jesuits generally were vilified: notably tyrannicide, the papal power to depose rulers, the legitimacy of 'Machiavellian' policies in dealing with heretics and the justifiability of breaking faith with heretics. Höpfl further explores the paradox of the Jesuits' political activities being at once the subject of conspiratorial fantasies but at the same time being widely acknowledged as among the foremost intellects of their time, with their thought freely cited and appropriated. This is an important work of scholarship. -- Intro excerpt downloaded via iPhone to DBOX
16thC  Counter-Reformation  downloaded  resistance_theory  politico-theology  kindle-available  religious_history  political_philosophy  17thC  Absolutism  universalism  Erastianism  enlightened_absolutism  intellectual_history  moral_psychology  moral_philosophy  Papacy  church_history  politics-and-religion  Church-and-State  Jesuits  books  authority  religion-established 
march 2016 by dunnettreader
Ada Palmer - Plato essay, #historypix, and the excessively exciting life of Pope Urban VIII - February 2016
Essay with pictures of a spectacular tapestry sequence in a corridor of the Vatican that's a perfect example of patronage, High Baroque, and Counter-Reformation iconography of legitimacy of authority of the Church hierarchy -- advancemeng of (classical) learning, military - new Fortress for Rome - mediator, peacekeeping within Christendom, straight pipeline to the heavens - both pagan and Christian -- a keeper!
Pocket  EF-add  17thC  art_history  Vatican  Rome  Papacy  baroque  iconography  Counter-Reformation  patronage-artistic  Papal_States  from pocket
february 2016 by dunnettreader
l'abbé J.-E.-A. Gosselin - Histoire littéraire de Fénelon (1867) - Notice bibliographique | BnF Catalogue général
Type : texte imprime, monographie
Auteur(s) : Gosselin, Jean-Edme-Auguste (1787-1858)  Voir les notices liées en tant qu'auteur
Titre(s) : Histoire littéraire de Fénelon, ou Revue historique et analytique de ses oeuvres, pour servir de complément à son histoire et aux différentes éditions de ses oeuvres [Texte imprimé] / par M... [l'abbé J.-E.-A. Gosselin. avec des Recherches bibliographiques sur le "Télémaque" / par l'abbé A.-P.-P. Caron]
Publication : Paris : Lecoffre, 1867
Description matérielle : XIII-480 p. ; gr. in-8
Autre(s) forme(s) du titre : 
Titre alternatif : Revue historique et analytique de ses oeuvres, pour servir de complément à son histoire et aux différentes éditions de ses oeuvres
Notice n° :  FRBNF30524555
Humongous- double columns and fine print / the detailed TOC alone must run close to 20 pgs
Download possible - see on Gallica app
Louis_XIV  education  Catholics-France  religious_history  17thC  heterodoxy  19thC  education-women  religious_lit  French_lit  Papacy  Fenelon  Huguenots  literary_history  Gallica  education-elites  court_culture  spiritual_practices  Edict_of_Nantes  Quietism  theology  intellectual_history  Ancients-and-Moderns  books  mirror_for_princes  moral_philosophy  classicism 
february 2016 by dunnettreader
Hervé Serry - Saint Thomas sociologue ? 2094)- Cairn.info
Face à l’émergence de la sociologie comme discipline scientifique, l’Église catholique des années 1880-1920 et ses partisans dans les milieux intellectuels se mobilisent rapidement. L’école durkheimienne est ainsi controversée aussi bien par les instances cléricales que par des intellectuels laïques catholiques prolongeant leur action. Cette opposition s’arrime sur la volonté de forger une « sociologie catholique », dont la philosophie thomiste qui guide alors la doctrine officielle de l’Église serait le socle, afin de ne pas laisser le terrain du savoir sur le social aux opposants de l’Église. Méconnue, l’argumentation théorique et politique que développent les entrepreneurs de cette sociologie catholique, dont certains sont les héritiers de Frédéric Le Play, permet d’explorer l’élaboration, à l’époque où l’école française de sociologie s’impose, des fondements de certains schèmes de pensée qui, dans les sciences sociales, privilégient la « liberté » des individus contre les déterminismes sociaux. -- downloaded via iPhone to DBOX
anti-individualism  Counter-Enlightenment  intellectual_history  theology  social_theory  article  Catholics-and-politics  France  3rd_Republic  pre-WWI  Thomism  downloaded  laïcité  epistemology  scientific_method  human_nature  Aquinas  19thC  political_culture  Thomism-19thC  cultural_history  Papacy  Durkheim  anti-modernity  religious_history  intelligentsia  Fin-de-Siècle 
february 2016 by dunnettreader
Samuel Moyn - Religious freedom between truth and tactic « The Immanent Frame - March 2012
In the last issue of First Things, a self-described coalition of “Catholics and Evangelicals together” defends religious freedom. The coalition includes a number of notable Americans, like Charles Colson and George Weigel, with endorsements from the archbishops of Chicago, New York, and Philadelphia, along with many others. According to the statement, the situation is unexpectedly urgent. After the fall of the Soviet Union, “throughout the world, a new era of religious freedom seemed at hand.” But, now it is blatantly clear that the scourge of intolerance—especially secularist intolerance—persists. -- downloaded pdf to Note
US_politics  2010s  religious_culture  freedom_of_conscience  Catholics-and-politics  Evangelical  culture_wars  persecution  Vatican_II  Papacy  Protestants  Religious_Right  public_sphere  public_opinion  public_policy  Tocqueville  politics-and-religion  Christian_Right  Christianity  Christianity-Islam_conflict  secularism  liberalism-public_reason  liberalism  downloaded 
november 2015 by dunnettreader
Pope Pius XI, Mit Brennender Sorge (14/03/1937) - ENCYCLICAL ON THE CHURCH AND THE GERMAN REICH | Vatican
It is with deep anxiety and growing surprise that We have long been following the painful trials of the Church and the increasing vexations which afflict those who have remained loyal in heart and action in the midst of a people that once received from St. Boniface the bright message and the Gospel of Christ and God's Kingdom. And what the representatives of the venerable episcopate, who visited Us in Our sick room, had to tell Us, in truth and duty bound, has not modified Our feelings. To consoling and edifying information on the stand the Faithful are making for their Faith, they considered themselves bound, in spite of efforts to judge with moderation and in spite of their own patriotic love, to add reports of things hard and unpleasant. After hearing their account, We could, in grateful acknowledgment to God, exclaim with the Apostle of love: "I have no greater grace than this, to hear that my children walk in truth" (John iii. 4). But the frankness indifferent in Our Apostolic charge and the determination to place before the Christian world the truth in all its reality, prompt Us to add: "Our pastoral heart knows no deeper pain, no disappointment more bitter, than to learn that many are straying from the path of truth." -- downloaded pdf to Note
religious_history  political_history  politics-and-religion  20thC  entre_deux_guerres  Catholics  Papacy  Nazis  Germany  church_history  downloaded 
july 2015 by dunnettreader
POPE PAUL VI - Populorum Progressio (March 26, 1967) - ENCYCLICAL ON THE DEVELOPMENT OF PEOPLES | Vatican
The progressive development of peoples is an object of deep interest and concern to the Church. This is particularly true in the case of those peoples who are trying to escape the ravages of hunger, poverty, endemic disease and ignorance; of those who are seeking a larger share in the benefits of civilization and a more active improvement of their human qualities; of those who are consciously striving for fuller growth. -- downloaded pdf to Note
religious_history  20thC  post-WWII  Catholics  Papacy  Vatican_II  religious_belief  religious_culture  social_thought  social_problem  social_theory  modernity  poverty  inequality  justice  development  progress  downloaded 
july 2015 by dunnettreader
Pius XI, Quadragesimo Anno (May 151931) - ENCYCLICAL ON RECONSTRUCTION OF THE SOCIAL ORDER | Vatican
Forty years have passed since Leo XIII's peerless Encyclical, On the Condition of Workers, first saw the light, and the whole Catholic world, filled with grateful recollection, is undertaking to commemorate it with befitting solemnity. Other Encyclicals of Our Predecessor had in a way prepared the path for that outstanding document and proof of pastoral care: ...against the tenets of Socialism[5] against false teachings on human liberty,[6] and others of the same nature fully expressing the mind of Leo XIII. Yet the Encyclical, On the Condition of Workers, compared with the rest had this special distinction that at a time when it was most opportune and actually necessary to do so, it laid down for all mankind the surest rules to solve aright that difficult problem of human relations called "the social question." For toward the close of the 19thC, the new kind of economic life that had arisen and the new developments of industry had gone to the point in most countries that human society was clearly becoming divided more and more into two classes. One class, very small in number, was enjoying almost all the advantages which modern inventions so abundantly provided; the other, embracing the huge multitude of working people, oppressed by wretched poverty, was vainly seeking escape from the straits wherein it stood.
religious_history  economic_history  church_history  19thC  20thC  Catholics  Papacy  Industrial_Revolution  Gilded_Age  labor  labor_history  working_class  poverty  modernity  social_thought  social_problem  social_theory  socialism  liberty  religious_culture  religious_belief  entre_deux_guerres  laisser-faire  downloaded 
july 2015 by dunnettreader
Leo XIII - Dall'alto dell'Apostolico Seggio - ENCYCLICAL ON FREEMASONRY IN ITALY - Oct 1890 | Vatican
The facts are incontestable which have happened in the clear light of day; not separated one from another, but so connected together as in their series to reveal with fullest evidence a system of which they are the actual operation and development. The system is not new; but the audacity, the fury, and the rapidity with which it is now carried out, are new. It is the plan of the sects that is now unfolding itself in Italy, especially in what relates to the Catholic religion and the Church, with the final and avowed purpose, if it were possible, of reducing it to nothing. - It is needless now to put the Masonic sects upon their trial. They are already judged; their ends, their means, their doctrines, and their action, are all known with indisputable certainty. Possessed by the spirit of Satan, whose instrument they are, they burn like him with a deadly and implacable hatred of Jesus Christ and of His work; and they endeavour by every means to overthrow and fetter it. This war is at present waged more than elsewhere in Italy, in which the Catholic religion has taken deeper root; and above all in Rome, the centre of Catholic unity, and the See of the Universal Pastor and Teacher of the Church. -- YIKES!
religious_history  19thC  religious_culture  religious_wars  Italy  free-thinkers  Freemasonry  anti-Catholic  anticlerical  church_history  Papacy 
july 2015 by dunnettreader
Leo XIII - Rerum Novarum - ENCYCLICAL ON CAPITAL AND LABOR (1892) | Vatican
Rights and Duties of Capital and Labor -- That the spirit of revolutionary change, which has long been disturbing the nations of the world, should have passed beyond the sphere of politics and made its influence felt in the cognate sphere of practical economics is not surprising. The elements of the conflict now raging are unmistakable, in the vast expansion of industrial pursuits and the marvellous discoveries of science; in the changed relations between masters and workmen; in the enormous fortunes of some few individuals, and the utter poverty of the masses; the increased self reliance and closer mutual combination of the working classes; as also, finally, in the prevailing moral degeneracy. The momentous gravity of the state of things now obtaining fills every mind with painful apprehension; wise men are discussing it; practical men are proposing schemes; popular meetings, legislatures, and rulers of nations are all busied with it - actually there is no question which has taken deeper hold on the public mind. -- downloaded pdf to Note
religious_history  economic_history  19thC  capitalism  Industrial_Revolution  Gilded_Age  labor  labor_history  labor_standards  human_rights  dignity  poverty  political_economy  religious_culture  Catholics  Papacy  social_theory  social_thought  social_problem  social_gospel  working_class  laisser-faire  downloaded 
july 2015 by dunnettreader
Steve Knepper - Pope Francis and Humane Ecology | The Hedgehog Review - July 2015
Pope Francis’s new encyclical calls for a holistic ethic, an “integral ecology” that insists on the dignity of both human and nonhuman nature and on the shared roots of ecological and social problems. This ethic holds that “everything is connected. Concern for the environment thus needs to be joined to a sincere love for our fellow human beings and an unwavering commitment to resolving the problems of society.” Many responses to Laudato Si’ have focused on Francis’s treatment of particular issues, such as air conditioning or carbon credits. Yet the call for an integral ecology is what makes the encyclical truly distinctive. (..) Patrick Deneen claimed that Laudato Si’ develops “a Thomistic and Aristotelian theme: ‘how human beings live in and with and through nature, in ways that do not fall into what Pope Francis calls, again and again, the twin temptations of, on the one hand, viewing human beings as separate from nature in our capacity to dominate nature, [and] on the other side, a kind of anti-humanism which regards human beings as equally foreign to nature, but now as a kind of virus that has to—in some ways—be eliminated.” Francis’s integral ecology thus challenges some tendencies on both the right and the left. It does so by staying resolutely focused on the poor.
Instapaper  Pope_Francis  Papacy  climate  environment  poverty  human_rights  humanism  human_condition  Thomism-21stC  Aristotelian  nature  nature-mastery  ecology  ecology-economic  anti-humanism  green_economy  green_finance  energy  energy-markets  water  climate-adaptation  LDCs  economic_growth  economic_culture  theology  creation_ex_nilho  conservation  dignity  empathy  from instapaper
july 2015 by dunnettreader
Pope Francis - Lumen Fidei (29 June 2013) - ENCYCLICAL LETTER ON FAITH | Vatican
Thanks to faith we have come to understand the unique dignity of each person, something which was not clearly seen in antiquity. In the second century the pagan Celsus reproached Christians for an idea that he considered foolishness and delusion: namely, that God created the world for man, setting human beings at the pinnacle of the entire cosmos. "Why claim that [grass] grows for the benefit of man, rather than for that of the most savage of the brute beasts?"[46] "If we look down to Earth from the heights of heaven, would there really be any difference between our activities and those of the ants and bees?"[47] At the heart of biblical faith is God’s love, his concrete concern for every person, and his plan of salvation which embraces all of humanity and all creation, culminating in the incarnation, death and resurrection of Jesus Christ. Without insight into these realities, there is no criterion for discerning what makes human life precious and unique. Man loses his place in the universe, he is cast adrift in nature, either renouncing his proper moral responsibility or else presuming to be a sort of absolute judge, endowed with an unlimited power to manipulate the world around him.
religious_history  21stC  Catholics  Papacy  faith  revelation  reason  religious_belief  Biblical_exegesis  church_history  Early_Christian  Old_Testament  New_Testament  Augustine  human_rights  human_nature  creation  soteriology  dignity  imago_dei  nature  nature-mastery  modernity  environment  social_thought  poverty  religious_experience  downloaded 
july 2015 by dunnettreader
Sandy Levinson - The continuing relevance of Stephen A. Douglas: "Popular sovereignty," federalism, and moral relativism" | Balkinization - June 2015
Consider the following passages from the anguished dissents (..by) Scalia and Alito in Obergefell: [re their "indifference" re substance of SSM - notes how much this clashes with their Catholic beliefs that insist on moral absolutes determined by "natural law"] -- Federalism is (..) as a practical matter, as a means of acknowledging the diverse views we have about matters of political or social morality (..) there's much to said for this as a means for maintaining social peace, albeit at the cost of accepting the maintenance of what many might consider significant injustice in some of the states. But note well that what Scalia and Alito are doing is really reviving the theory of "popular sovereignty" best identified with the Little Giant Sen. Stephen A. Douglas with regard to the issue of slavery. (,.) Douglas professed himself indifferent to the moral critique of slavery. (..) What this translated into was the desirability of letting each state, as it joined the Union, make its own decision as to slavery or freedom. Somewhat more complicated was the right of the pre-state territory to make its own decision, in territorial legislatures, to welcome slaveowners. Douglas, to his political detriment, argued that they could place stumbling blocks in the way of the slaveowners, but, if they chose not to, that was all right too. The important thing was to recognize the fundamentally "federal" nature of the Union, a collection of people with decidedly different views about the legitimacy of owning other human beings as chattels, and to allow that decision to be made locally rather than on a one-size-fits-all national basis.
Instapaper  SCOTUS  constitutional_law  19thC  states_rights  federalism  slavery  morality-conventional  morality-divine_command  morality-Christian  rights-legal  natural_law  natural_rights  positivism-legal  Holmes  Douglas_Stephen  Lincoln  antebellum_era  abolition  marriage  Thomism  Thomism-21stC  Catholics  Papacy  from instapaper
june 2015 by dunnettreader
Emile Chabal - Jeremy Jennings, Revolution and the Republic. A History of Political Thought in France since the 18thC | Books & ideas - Dec 2012
.. the French themselves have rarely agreed on the meaning of politics, let alone the meaning of specific events such as the Revolution or the Commune. This means that, before we can even begin to approach the questiodn of what actually happened in French politics, we have to understand what people thought was happening. This is where Jennings’s vast 500-page book comes into its own. With his encyclopaedic knowledge, he is able to guide us through some of the most impassioned debates in modern French politics. This is not, strictly speaking, an essay; it does not have a clearly defined argument. Rather, it is an examination of the most important political thinkers in modern France brought together in ten thematic chapters.(..)[heavily influenced by recent French historians and political thinkers especially Rosanvallon but also traces of Furet and Claude Lefort -- their focus on the struggles over "indeterminate" representation -- heavy attention to 19thC figures, especially from 1st half gives the discussion 19thC liberal spin -- not really through today as advertised] The cursory treatment of the 20thC implies that the majority of key debates in French politics had, at the very least, been exhaustively addressed by 1918. Whatever came next – whether it was the Popular Front, Vichy, Gaullism or socialist rule in the 1980s – was little more than a rerun of older divisions and disagreements. The remarkably brief discussions of Aron or Foucault contrast sharply with the painstaking reconstructions of a whole host of 19thC figures. But why neglect 20thC political thought when it could have given further strength to an argument about the struggle to define a French political community? Even if one were to remain within the confines of the chapter headings -- treats Gaullism and Marxism as marginal -- can't write about postwar France without De Gaulle or neglect Empire where universalising ideologies confronted reality with feedbacks.
books  reviews  18thC  19thC  20thC  France  intellectual_history  political_philosophy  political_culture  politics-and-religion  liberalism-19thC  French_Revolution-impact  Tocqueville  Constant  de_Staël  Guizot  Michelet  historiography-19thC  Terror  violence  revolutions  representative_institutions  representation  democracy  republicanism  Catholics-and-politics  Papacy  secularism  Bonapartism  universalism  historiography-postWWII 
june 2015 by dunnettreader
Panel discussion - Max Weber’s work and its relation to historical writing (Dec 2014) :: German Historical Institute London (GHIL)
Chair: Andreas Gestrich (German Historical Institute London) -- Discussants: David d’Avray, Peter Ghosh and Joachim Radkau -- Max Weber is one of the most prestigious social theorists in recent history. Many of his academic works are modern classics. Even 100 years after his death, his books are still read, edited, translated and interpreted. In recent years a number of biographies have shed new light on Weber’s life and work. In commemoration of Max Weber’s 150th anniversary, the German Historical Institute hosts a discussion with three Weber experts, British historians David d’Avray and Peter Ghosh and German historian Joachim Radkau, on Max Weber’s work and its relation to historical writing. **--** Peter Ghosh is Jean Duffield Fellow in Modern History at St Anne’ College, University of Oxford. His research interests focus primarily on the history of ideas, both social and political theory and also the history of historiography. His latest publication Max Weber and The Protestant Ethic: Twin Histories (Oxford University Press, 2014) offers an intellectual biography of Weber framed along historical lines. **--** David d’Avray, Professor of Medieval History at University College London, has worked on medieval marriage, on preaching, on attitudes to kingship and death, on rationalities, and on ‘longue durée’ structures of papal history. In Rationalities in History: a Weberian Analysis (Cambridge University Press 2010), he writes a new comparative history in the spirit of Max Weber. Reassessing seminal Weberian ideas, he applies value rationality to the comparative history of religion and the philosophy of law. **--** Joachim Radkau is Professor for Modern History at the University of Bielefeld. His latest research interests concentrate on environmental history, the history of nature conservation, and Max Weber’s self and social perception. In his extensive biography Max Weber: Die Leidenschaft des Denkens (Carl Hanser Verlag, 2005) (Max Weber: Passion for thinking), Radkau embeds Weber’s life and work in their historical context. -- MP3 download, 113 min, 64.2 MB -- downloaded to Note
audio  intellectual_history  Weber  social_theory  comparative_history  historiography-19thC  German_historical_school  German_scholarship  historicism  philosophy_of_law  sociology_of_religion  medieval_history  longue_durée  Papacy  biography  political_philosophy  political_culture  religious_culture  religious_history  rationality  environment  ecology-history  downloaded 
april 2015 by dunnettreader
Anthony Favier - Catholics and gender - Books & ideas - March 2015 (French version 2014)
Translated by Kate McNaughton -- Tags : catholicism | gender | homosexuality | marriage | education | feminism -- The criticism of “gender theory” that is expressed in some Catholic circles is not just a travesty of gender studies: it detracts from the development of a feminist theology and current efforts at establishing a dialogue within the Catholic Church -- tracks the history of hysterical anti-feminism and anti gender studies wrapped up with counter-revolution post Vatican II -- studying "gender" as a social and cultural phenomenon became the boogeyman for Catholic focus on the threats of liberal modernity to "Catholic anthropology" -- the hot button issues of reproductive rights, women in positions in the Church, and acknowledgement of homosexuality and gay marriage. After decades of overt hostile opposition, the French Church is sending out a new generation of Jesuit scholars to start distinguishing between the realities of cultural bases of gender vs the "extreme ideology" that has been labeled "gender theory." A 2014 statement on family by French bishops acknowledges much of "gender studies" as common sense, FREX how inequalities of power are implicated in many gender-defined social roles -- which they distinguish from rabid gender ideology. -- saved to Instapaper
20thC  21stC  Catholics  France  feminism  homosexuality  gender  Papacy  Vatican_II  ecclesiology  politics-and-religion  family  civil_liberties  equality  Jesuits  culture_wars  cultural_change  Instapaper 
april 2015 by dunnettreader
R.I. Moore - The Formation of a Persecuting Society: Authority and Deviance in Western Europe 950-1250, 2nd ed (2007) | Wiley Online Library
The 10th to 13thCs in Europe saw the appearance of popular heresy and the establishment of the Inquisition, the expropriation and mass murder of Jews, and the propagation of elaborate measures to segregate lepers from the healthy and curtail their civil rights. These were traditionally seen as distinct and separate developments, and explained in terms of the problems which their victims presented to medieval society. In this stimulating book, first published in 1987 and now widely regarded as a a classic in medieval history, Moore argues that the coincidences in the treatment of these and other minority groups cannot be explained independently, and that all are part of a pattern of persecution which now appeared for the first time to make Europe become, as it has remained, a persecuting society. Moore updates and extends his original argument with a new, final chapter, "A Persecuting Society". Here and in a new preface and critical bibliography, he considers the impact of a generation's research and refines his conception of the "persecuting society" accordingly, addressing criticisms of the 1st ed. -- free access to pdfs of new preface, a final bibliographical essay & the bibliography & index -- downloaded all pdfs but index to Air
books  bibliography  medieval_history  religious_history  political_history  social_history  10thC  11thC  12thC  13thC  persecution  heterodoxy  heresy  Judaism  Inquisition  Papacy  religious_culture  civil_liberties  authority  deviance  norms  hierarchy  Crusades  power  downloaded  EF-add 
january 2015 by dunnettreader
Jean Balsamo - Dante, l’Aviso piacevole et Henri de Navarre | Italique, I, 1998, p. 79-94.
Italique [En ligne], I | 1998, mis en ligne le 05 mars 2009, DOI : 10.4000/italique.89. **--** re reception of Dante in France - in fight against Papacy, both French Catholics and Huguenots could use his attacks on the Papacy -- a familiar publication that combined anti -Papal comments in Date, Boccaccio and Petrarch, had a bizarre history linked to Henry IV- -' L’Aviso piacevole était une des nombreuses variations sur ce lieu rhétorique de la pensée protestante. Ce livre étrange, composé d’une matière italienne, édité en Angleterre, opportunément publié pour servir l’action de Henri de Navarre, était destiné à des lecteurs italiens ou italianisants de Genève, de Bâle, de Londres ou de Paris plus qu’aux Italiens de Florence ou de Rome qu’il ne pouvait guère toucher. Le nonce Ragazzoni, dans deux lettres adressées au cardinal Rusticucci, évoquait les autres livres suscités par le bref de Sixte Quint, le Brutum Fulmen de Hotman et le traité de Pierre de Belloy, dont il désignait le commanditaire, le garde des Sceaux Cheverny. Ces deux ouvrages, que le nonce avait eu beaucoup de peine à se procurer furent immédiatement mis à l’Index. L’Aviso piacevole au contraire semble être passé presque inaperçu. Il ne put échapper toutefois ... à la vigilance de Robert Bellarmin, venu en France avec la légation du cardinal Caetani. Bellarmin citait le recueil dans son appendix au traité De summo Pontefice publié dans le De Controversiis christianae fidei, et il entreprit de le réfuter. -- downloaded pdf to Note
article  revues.org  literary_history  religious_history  Dante  reception  16thC  France  Wars_of_Religion  Henri_IV  Gallican  Huguenots  Protestant_International  publishing  publishing-clandestine  Papacy  Reformation  Counter-Reformation  Machiavelli  republicanism  downloaded  EF-add 
september 2014 by dunnettreader
Niccolo Machiavelli, The Historical, Political, and Diplomatic Writings of Niccolo Machiavelli, Vol. 1. (Life of Machiavelli, History of Florence), tr. from the Italian, by Christian E. Detmold (Boston, J. R. Osgood and company, 1882). - Online Library of
<http://oll.libertyfund.org/titles/774> - Volume 1 of a 4 volume set of Machiavelli’s writings which contains a lengthy introduction on the life of Machiavelli, the History of Florence, The Prince, Discourses on Livy, and his letters and papers from his time as a diplomat. This volume contains his famous History of Florence. - life and historical context based especially on 19thC Italian historiography -- downloaded kindle version of html
books  etexts  Liberty_Fund  downloaded  intellectual_history  political_philosophy  historiography-Renaissance  historiography-19thC  Machiavelli  Italy  Florence  Italian_Wars  Papacy  France  Louis_XI  nation-state  state-building  military_history  militia  republics-Ancient_v_Modern  mercenaires  diplomatic_history  IR_theory  EF-add 
september 2014 by dunnettreader
Niccolo Machiavelli, Il Principe, edited by L. Arthur Burd, with an Introduction by Lord Acton (Oxford: Clarendon Press, 1891) - Online Library of Liberty
Facsimile PDF 23.8 MB This is a facsimile or image-based PDF made from scans of the original book. -- A heavily annotated edition by Burd with the famous introduction by Lord Acton. The text is in the original Italian. -- Burd has an enormous amount of context- historical background for all the players before and after invasion of Italy - and cross-references to other works by Machiavelli, Guicciardini etc -picks up language usage, concepts etc - and comments on previous commentaries on The Prince with which he agrees or has differences -- downloaded pdf to Note -- probably available in Google_Books
books  etexts  Liberty_Fund  downloaded  intellectual_history  political_philosophy  moral_philosophy  political_history  Renaissance  Italian_Wars  15thC  16thC  Machiavelli  Guiccidarini  historiography-Renaissance  historiography-19thC  Italy  Florence  Papacy  France  raison-d'-état  republics-Ancient_v_Modern  institutions  legal_history  state-building  EF-add 
september 2014 by dunnettreader
John Emerich Edward Dalberg, Lord Acton, Historical Essays and Studies, edited by John Neville Figgis and Reginald Vere Laurence (London: Macmillan, 1907) - Online Library of Liberty
A collection of Acton’s articles from journals such as the Quarterly Review, the English Historical Review, the Nineteenth Century, the Rambler, the Home and Foreign Review, the North British Review, and the Bridgnorth Journal. *--* I: WOLSEY AND THE DIVORCE OF HENRY VIII. *-* II: THE BORGIAS AND THEIR LATEST HISTORIAN. &-* III: SECRET HISTORY OF CHARLES II. *-* IV: THE CIVIL WAR IN AMERICA ITS PLACE IN HISTORY. *-* V: THE RISE AND FALL OF THE MEXICAN EMPIRE *-* VI: CALVIN *-* VII: THE CAUSES OF THE FRANCO-PRUSSIAN WAR *-* VIII: THE WAR OF 1870 *-* IX: GEORGE ELIOT’S LIFE. *-* X: MR. BUCKLE’S THESIS AND METHOD. *-* XI: MR. BUCKLE’S PHILOSOPHY OF HISTORY. *-* XII: GERMAN SCHOOLS OF HISTORy. *-* XIII: TALLEYRAND’S MEMOIRS. *-* XIV: THE LIFE OF LORD HOUGHTON *-* XV: A HISTORY OF THE PAPACY DURING THE PERIOD OF THE REFORMATION. *-*. XVI: A SHORT HISTORY OF NAPOLEON THE FIRST. By John Robert Seeley THE FIRST NAPOLEON: A SKETCH, POLITICAL AND MILITARY. By John Codman Ropes. *-* XVII: MABILLON ET LA SOCIÉTÉ DE L’ABBAYE DE SAINT-GERMAIN-DES-PRÉS À LA FIN DU XVIIE SIÈCLE. Par Emmanuel de Broglie. *-* XVIII: A HISTORY OF ENGLAND, 1837-1880.1 By the Rev. J. Franck Bright, D.D., Master of University College, Oxford. *-* XIX: A HISTORY OF THE FRENCH REVOLUTION. By H. Morse Stephens. Vol. II. *-* XX: WILHELM VON GIESEBRECHT -- downloaded kindle version of html
books  etexts  Liberty_Fund  downloaded  intellectual_history  historiography  historiography-17thC  historians  historiography-19thC  Mabillon  historicism  German_scholarship  Eliot_George  Henry_VIII  Reformation  Papacy  Restoration  Charles_II  US_Civil_War  biography-writing  Calvin  Franco-Prussian_war  Napoleon  British_history  French_Revolution  Spanish_Empire  Latin_America  imperialism  Renaissance  15thC  16thC  17thC  18thC  19thC  reviews  diplomatic_history  Napoleonic_Wars  Congress_of_Vienna  Talleyrand  EF-add 
september 2014 by dunnettreader
RICHARD REX -- THE RELIGION OF HENRY VIII (2014) | The Historical Journal, 57, pp 1-32. - Cambridge Journals Online - Abstract
RICHARD REX - University of Cambridge --This article takes issue with the influential recent interpretation of Henry VIII's religious position as consistently ‘Erasmian’. Bringing to the discussion not only a re-evaluation of much familiar evidence but also a considerable quantity of hitherto unknown or little-known material, it proposes instead that Henry's religious position, until the 1530s, sat squarely within the parameters of ‘traditional religion’ and that the subsequent changes in his attitudes to the cult of the saints, monasticism, and papal primacy were so significant as to be understood and described by Henry himself in terms of a veritable religious ‘conversion’. This conversion, which was very much sui generis, is not easily to be fitted within the confessional frameworks of other sixteenth-century religious movements (though it was by no means unaffected by them). It hinged upon Henry's new understanding of kingship as a supreme spiritual responsibility entrusted to kings by the Word of God, but long hidden from them by the machinations of the papacy. His own providential deliverance from blindness was, he believed, but the beginning of a more general spiritual enlightenment
article  paywall  religious_history  church_history  16thC  British_history  British_politics  Henry_VIII  Reformation  Erastianism  religion-established  religious_belief  Church_of_England  divine_right  kingship  Papacy  Papacy-English_relations  Erasmus  Providence  Absolutism  Tudor  EF-add 
august 2014 by dunnettreader
Steven D. Smith, review essay - Discourse in the Dusk: The Twilight of Religious Freedom? | JSTOR: Harvard Law Review, Vol. 122, No. 7 (May, 2009), pp. 1869-1907
Reviewed work(s): Religion and the Constitution — Volume 2: Establishment and Fairness by Kent Greenawalt -- Smith claims a millennium of tradition re church and state is unraveling (a la MacIntyre decadent tradition) and US policy and jurisprudence tends to ignore erosion of their fundamental justifications -- starts with Pope Gregory and Henry IV and investiture controversy -- downloaded pdf to Note
books  reviews  article  jstor  intellectual_history  political_philosophy  theology  religion-established  religious_culture  religious_history  church_history  civil_liberties  freedom_of_conscience  tolerance  pluralism  secularism  US_constitution  bill_of_rights  legal_theory  philosophy_of_law  medieval_history  Papacy  Reformation  downloaded  EF-add 
july 2014 by dunnettreader
The Collected Papers of Frederic William Maitland, vol. 3 of 3 (1911) - Online Library of Liberty
Frederic William Maitland, The Collected Papers of Frederic William Maitland, ed. H.A.L. Fisher (Cambridge University Press, 1911). 3 Vols. Vol. 3. 07/17/2014. <http://oll.libertyfund.org/titles/873> -- Vol. 3 of a three volume collection of the shorter works of the great English legal historian, including many essays on aspects of medieval law and some biographical essays. Includes trusts and corporations, canon law, miscellaneous bits on Elizabethan period, especially relations with Papacy-- downloaded mobi version of book scan OCR
books  etexts  medieval_history  legal_history  legal_system  British_history  12thC  13thC  14thC  15thC  16thC  Elizabeth  Reformation  canon_law  Papacy  Papacy-English_relations  Church_of_England  Wales  property  property-confiscations  corporations  corporate_law  trusts  downloaded  EF-add 
july 2014 by dunnettreader
Lord Acton, Lectures on the French Revolution (LF ed. 2000, ed. Steven J. Tonsor ) - Online Library of Liberty
Delivered at Cambridge University between 1895 and 1899, Lectures on the French Revolution is a distinguished account of the entire epochal chapter in French experience by one of the most remarkable English historians of the nineteenth century. In contrast to Burke a century before, Acton leaves condemnation of the French Revolution to others. He provides a disciplined, thorough, and elegant history of the actual events of the bloody episode – in sum, as thorough a record as could be constructed in his time of the actual actions of the government of France during the Revolution. There are twenty-two essays, commencing with “The Heralds of the Revolution,” in which Acton presents a taxonomy of the intellectual ferment that preceded – and prepared – the Revolution. An important appendix explores “The Literature of the Revolution.” Here Acton offers assessments of the accounts of the Revolution written during the late eighteenth and the nineteenth centuries by, among others, Burke, Guizot, and Taine. -- downloaded pdf of typeset to Note
books  etexts  Liberty_Fund  18thC  19thC  intellectual_history  historiography-19thC  historiography-Whig  France  French_Enlightenment  French_Revolution  philosophes  Ancien_régime  Terror  monarchy  Absolutism  political_participation  historians-and-politics  historians-and-religion  anticlerical  Papacy  Catholics  downloaded  EF-add 
july 2014 by dunnettreader
John Locke, A Letter concerning Toleration and Other Writings, ed. Mark Goldie - Online Library of Liberty
John Locke, A Letter concerning Toleration and Other Writings, edited and with an Introduction by Mark Goldie (Indianapolis: Liberty Fund, 2010). 07/13/2014. <http://oll.libertyfund.org/titles/2375> -- Part of the Thomas Hollis Library (series editor David Wormersley) published by Liberty Fund. This volume contains A Letter Concerning Toleration, excerpts of the Third Letter, An Essay on Toleration, and various fragments, including Constitution of Carolina excerpts, pamphlet debates e.g. with Samuel Parker. -- downloaded pdf to Note
books  etexts  17thC  intellectual_history  political_philosophy  moral_philosophy  theology  Locke  Locke-religion  British_history  British_politics  religious_history  politics-and-religion  tolerance  dissenters  religion-established  religious_belief  religious_lit  religious_culture  political_culture  Church_of_England  atheism_panic  scepticism  Epicurean  heterodoxy  Christology  salvation  soul  natural_law  natural_rights  obligation  Catholics-England  Papacy  Papacy-English_relations  Protestant_International  colonialism  American_colonies  UK_government-colonies  reformation_of_manners  English_constitution  constitutionalism  Carolina  Shaftesbury_1st_Earl  Board_of_Trade  civil_liberties  civil_religion  downloaded  EF-add 
july 2014 by dunnettreader
Hugh Trevor-Roper, The Crisis of the Seventeenth Century - Online Library of Liberty
Hugh Trevor-Roper, The Crisis of the Seventeenth Century: Religion, the Reformation and Social Change (Indianapolis: Liberty Fund, 2001). 07/13/2014. <http://oll.libertyfund.org/titles/719> -- The Crisis of the Seventeenth Century collects nine essays by Trevor-Roper on the themes of religion, the Reformation, and social change. As Trevor-Roper explains in his preface, “the crisis in government, society, and ideas which occurred, both in Europe and in England, between the Reformation and the middle of the seventeenth century” constituted the crucible for what “went down in the general social and intellectual revolution of the mid-seventeenth century.” The Civil War, the Restoration, and the Glorious Revolution in England laid the institutional and intellectual foundations of the modern understanding of liberty, of which we are heirs and beneficiaries. Trevor-Roper’s essays uncover new pathways to understanding this seminal time. Neither Catholic nor Protestant emerges unscathed from the examination to which Trevor-Roper subjects the era in which, from political and religious causes, the identification and extirpation of witches was a central event. -- downloaded pdf to Note -- see his introduction for discussion of historiography on topics covered in each essay since they were written, some from mid 1950s
books  etexts  17thC  Europe-Early_Modern  intellectual_history  historiography  revisionism  Reformation  Catholics-England  Papacy  Church_of_England  Puritans  witchcraft  religious_culture  political_culture  politics-and-religion  religious_wars  Calvinist  Arminian  English_constitution  monarchy  Parliament  Aristotelian  natural_philosophy  science-and-religion  theology  moral_philosophy  human_nature  historiography-17thC  scepticism  colonialism  Scotland  James_I  Charles_I  Thirty_Years_War  France  Germany  Spain  Dutch  Dutch_Revolt  downloaded  EF-add 
july 2014 by dunnettreader
François Guizot, The History of the Origins of Representative Government in Europe [1861] trans. Andrew R. Scoble, ed. Aurelian Craiutu - Online Library of Liberty
François Guizot, The History of the Origins of Representative Government in Europe, trans. Andrew R. Scoble, Introduction and notes by Aurelian Craiutu (Indianapolis: Liberty Fund, 2002). 07/13/2014. <http://oll.libertyfund.org/titles/878> -- Guizot reflects on the principles, goals, and institutions of representative government in Europe from the fifth to the reign of the Tudors in England. In Part 1 he examines such topics as the “true” principles of representative government, the origin and consequences of the sovereignty of the people, and analyzes the architecture of the English Constitutional monarchy. -- downloaded pdf to Note
books  etexts  19thC  historiography-19thC  historians-and-politics  political_history  representative_institutions  constitutionalism  ancient_constitution  republics-Ancient_v_Modern  Gothic_constitution  Goths  late_antiquity  Roman_Empire  medieval_history  Charlemagne  Papacy  canon_law  monarchy  nobility  Parliament  Parlement  estates  feudalism  Europe-Medieval  Europe-Early_Modern  Holy_Roman_Empire  France  Germany  British_history  English_constitution  14thC  15thC  16thC  Anglo-French  Norman_Conquest  War_of_Roses  Hundred_Years_War  sovereignty  consent  popular_politics  political_participation  limited_monarchy  downloaded  EF-add 
july 2014 by dunnettreader
Jon Wright , review - Eamon Duffy - Fires of Faith: Catholic England under Mary Tudor
further work on Mary Tudor's reign - in addition to cleaning up her reputation, builds on rehabilitation of Reginald Pole by T Mayer
books  reviews  16thC  Tudor  Catholics-English  Reformation  Papacy  Church_of_England  Counter-Reformation  Bolingbroke 
july 2014 by dunnettreader
Margaret C. Jacob - How Radical Was the Enlightenment? What Do We Mean by Radical? | Diametros
Distinguished Professor of History, UCLA Email: mjacob@history.ucla.edu
-- The Radical Enlightenment has been much discussed and its original meaning somewhat distorted. In 1981 my concept of the storm that unleashed a new, transnational intellectual movement possessed a strong contextual and political element that I believed, and still believe, to be critically important. Idealist accounts of enlightened ideas that divorce them from politics leave out the lived quality of the new radicalism born in reaction to monarchical and clerical absolutism. Taking the religious impulse seriously and working to defang it of bellicosity would require years of labor. First all the world’s religions had to be surveyed, see Picart’s seven folio volumes; and Rousseau’s Savoyard vicar had to both preach and live religion simply as true virtue; and finally Jefferson editing the Bible so as to get the irrational parts simply removed, thus making people more fit to grant a complete religious toleration. Throughout the century all these approaches to revealed religion may be legitimately described as radical. Each produced a different recommendation for its replacement. As I have now come to see, the pantheism I identified in 1981 would lead in many directions, among them lay the search to understand all human religiosity and to articulate a universal natural religion. -- Keywords - Atheism materialism absolutism French Protestant refugees Dutch cities religious toleration Bernard Picart Jonathan Israel English freethinkers Papal condemnation Rousseau pantheism Jefferson -- downloaded pdf to Note
article  intellectual_history  religious_history  cultural_history  political_history  17thC  18thC  Dutch  British_history  Enlightenment  Radical_Enlightenment  French_Enlightenment  political_culture  politics-and-religion  religion-established  religious_belief  comparative_religion  comparative_anthropology  monotheism  natural_religion  natural_philosophy  materialism  tolerance  natural_rights  naturalism  pantheism  atheism  atheism_panic  anticlerical  Absolutism  monarchy  monarchy-proprietary  publishing  public_sphere  Picart  Rousseau  Jefferson  revelation  Biblical_authority  Bible-as-history  Biblical_criticism  Huguenots  free-thinkers  Papacy  papal_infallibility  censorship  Republic_of_Letters  rational_religion  American_colonies  Early_Republic  ecclesiology  querelle_des_rites  virtue  moral_philosophy  downloaded  EF-add 
july 2014 by dunnettreader
Baron John Emerich Edward Dalberg-Acton, Lord Acton - Historical essays & studies (1907) - Google Books
Contents -- WOLSEY AND THE DIVORCE OF HENRY VIII. *--* The Borgias and their Latest Historian. *--* Secret History of Charles II. *--* The Civil War in America. *--* The Rise and Fall of the Mexican Empire. *--* Cavour. *--* The Causes of the Franco-Prussian War. *--* The War of 1870 *--* German Schools of History *--* Talleyrands Memoirs. *--* The Life of Lord Houghton. *--* A History of the Papacy during the Period of the Reformation. *--* A Sketch Political and Military. *--* Mabillon et la Société de l'Abbaye de Saint Germain des Pres a la Fin du XVIIeme Siècle. *--* A History of England 1837-1880 *--* A History of the French Revolution. *--* George Eliots Life. *--* Mr Buckles Thesis and Method. *--* Mr Buckles Philosophy of History. *--* Wilhelm von Giesebrecht *--* Appendix - Letter to Bishop Creighton -- downloaded pdf to Note
books  etexts  Google_Books  intellectual_history  19thC  British_history  historiography-19thC  historiography-17thC  historicism  Reformation  Counter-Reformation  Papacy  Henry_VIII  Renaissance  15thC  16thC  17thC  18thC  French_Revolution  Counter-Enlightenment  Romanticism  German_Idealism  philosophy_of_history  US_Civil_War  Italy  diplomatic_history  Talleyrand  Napoleonic_Wars  Napoleon_III  empires  French_Empire  Eliot_George  Franco-German_relations  Franco-Prussian_war  Victorian  Edwardian  downloaded  EF-add 
july 2014 by dunnettreader
Fred Clark - The Stupidest Thing I Have Ever Read | Slacktavist June 2014
-- This is from Religion Dispatches, by Patricia Miller titled, “The Story Behind the Catholic Church’s Stunning Reversal on Contraception” -- Here’s Miller: "The [papal] commission voted overwhelmingly to recommend that the ban against artificial means of birth control be lifted. -- Unhappy with the direction of the commission, the Vatican packed the last commission meetings with 15. But even the bishops voted 9 to 3 (3 abstained) to change the teaching, -- Despite the commission’s years of work and theologically unassailable conclusion that the church’s teaching on birth control was neither infallible nor irreversible, Pope Paul VI stunned the world on July 29, 1968, when he reaffirmed the church’s ban on modern contraceptives in Humanae Vitae. -- The pope had deferred to a minority report prepared by 4 conservative theologian priests that said the church could not change its teaching on birth control because admitting the church had been wrong about the issue for centuries would raise questions about the moral authority of the pope, especially on matters of sexuality, and the belief that the Holy Spirit guided his pronouncements. “The Church cannot change her answer because this answer is true. … It is true because the Catholic Church, instituted by Christ … could not have so wrongly erred during all those centuries of its history,” they wrote. As one of the conservative theologians famously asked one of the female members of the commission, what would happen to “the millions we have sent to hell” for using contraception if the teaching were suddenly changed.
religious_history  church_history  Catholics  Papacy  papal_infallibility  20thC  sexuality  feminism  patriarchy  women-work  women-rights  family  authority  tradition  links  EF-add 
june 2014 by dunnettreader
Dale Van Kley, review essay, Where the Rot Started? - Brad S. Gregory, The Unintended Reformation: How a Religious Revolution Secularized Society - | Books and Culture
Excellent essay -- Gregory places almost all blame on the Protestants for the disunity of Christendom, marginalization of religious institutions and thought, and horrors of modern age, including moral relativism and global warming. Like Gillespie, puzzling stress on Dun Scotus ("univocal being") and William of Ockham (nominalism) for (enabling? producing?) a cosmos in which scientific inquiry could dispense with God. Gregory omits a number of factors on the Catholic side (beyond the Lutheran Reformation itself that the Papacy might have handled via reforms instead of confrontation and denial of fallibility). Van Kley's list of factors (especially French) that Gregory omits -- (1) splits in Catholicism throughout middle ages, e.g. frequent appearance of latent heresies if reformers couldn't get a new order founded; (2) Papal alliance with secular rulers to stamp out conciliar movement and reinforce papal infallibility - made compromise with Luther etc impossible and still inhibits any meaningful ecumenism; (3) Counter-Reformation shift from assessing theological grounds of specific doctrines to asserting absolute unchallengable authority based on external marks (as defined by Catholics) of the true church - a style of argument that wasn't going to survive sola scriptura, new science, Enlightenment etc; (4) Papal overreaction that stamped out Gallican and liberal Catholicism, which in turn stimulated anticlericalism and anti-regime sentiments from both left and right, thereby reducing the flexibility of the Ancien Regime to address social and economic problems or reform institutions; (5) a counter-revolutionary anti-intellectual unholy alliance between Papacy and Jansénistes that produced the uncompromising radicalism of laïcité. And that's not all Van Kley covers.
books  reviews  kindle-available  historiography  religious_history  church_history  intellectual_history  theology  ecclesiology  Christianity  Reformation  16thC  17thC  18thC  19thC  20thC  21stC  Catholics  Papacy  Protestants  modernity  relativism  science-and-religion  Scientific_Revolution  Enlightenment  French_Enlightenment  Jansenists  Counter-Enlightenment  Counter-Reformation  counter-revolution  politics-and-religion  secularization  secularism  heterodoxy  heresy  Gallican  Absolutism  liberalism  self  morality-divine_command  morality-Christian  natural_law  nominalism  Duns_Scotus  medieval_philosophy  EF-add 
june 2014 by dunnettreader
Matthew Milliner, review essay - Lenten Reading - Ephraim Radner, A Brutal Unity: The Spiritual Politics of the Christian Church | Books and Culture 2013
Radner, a Protestant, [argues] that something in our modern world has gone wrong. However, he places the blame less on an elusive pattern of secularization (Taylor) or on Protestant fragmentation (Gregory) than on the much wider phenomenon of Christian disunity... Christian disunity is what gave birth to—or rather, miscarried—the liberal democratic state. These are massive claims, and Radner marshals the erudition... A Brutal Unity is ..an "eristology," which Radner defines as "the study of hostility in its disordering forms and forces." -- Radner [opens with a] polemic against Wm Cavanaugh's The Myth of Religious Violence, [which] unjustifiably absolves Christians from their share in the violence of the liberal state. ...the nations as we know them arose from the inability of Christians to refrain from mutual murder. Radner marches his readers deep into the Rwandan genocide and the Holocaust.... "[Nazi death squads] were Protestants and Catholics both." To suggest otherwise—whether to exonerate Pope Pius XII or to overemphasize the role of Bonhoeffer—is to succumb to "hallucinogenic fantasy." "The dead bodies, as it were, are already gathered by the time churches admit to complicity in their murder." Radner explores Catholic and Protestant .. attempts to deny the reality of Christian disunity by carving out an inviolable space of "the Church as such"... The saving of the church from her own sins by concocting an invisible or elusive sanctity is, admittedly, a traditional theological move, but... were this approach employed Christologically, it would be plainly Gnostic. - Radner [makes] the villain of his story Ephiphanius of Salamis (d. 403), who listed heresies and distanced the church from her enemies, especially the Jews. ?..inaugurated the "Epiphanian paradigm" and its program of exclusionary violence...the church's "brutal unity." Providentialism and proceduralism are the [church's] blinders... The former is the notion that God was somehow at work in church councils, however violent; the latter is the idea that somehow bureaucratic decisions and parliamentary process betray the hand of God. We should, Radner believes, trust neither.
books  reviews  kindle-available  religious_history  church_history  Christianity  theology  intellectual_history  Early_Christian  medieval_history  Europe-Early_Modern  16thC  17thC  18thC  19thC  20thC  Christendom  Church_Fathers  church_councils  Reformation  Papacy  violence  genocide  Holocaust  Protestants  Catholics  modernity  religious_wars  nation-state  liberalism  ecclesiology  Augustine  Providence  heterodoxy  Judaism  gnostic  EF-add 
june 2014 by dunnettreader
Mark Noll, review essay - His Kingdom Stretch from Shore to Shore - Christianity worldwide 16thC-18thC | Books and Culture
Books review : David Hempton, The Church in the Long Eighteenth Century: The I.B.Tauris History of the Christian Church; Dale T. Irvin, ed, History of the World Christian Movement, Vol. 2: Modern Christianity from 1454-1800 -- .. intriguing that books written for such different ends coalesce in making some of the same larger judgments. Both books, thus, stress the delicate interplay between Christian expansion outside Europe and the fragmentation of Christianity within Europe. ...how, as divisions within Europe hardened between Catholics and Protestants, and soon between established churches and sectarian opponents of state churches, Christianity became the genuinely world religion. Hempton is equally perceptive on how 18th-century Europe witnessed intellectual, social, and political "challenges from which Christianity at least among educated elites, has never fully recovered," even as Western Protestants initiated the missionary efforts that successfully planted Christian faith around the globe. Both books also agree that the Jesuits were the era's most farsighted and effective "world Christians." ..the particular disaster for Latin America when Spanish and Portuguese officials sent the Jesuits packing in order to preserve the top-down, exploitative, and often syncretistic faith that best served the colonizers' interests. And they record the significance of the Moravians—so to speak, married Jesuits with children—who pushed Protestants beyond the identification of Christianity as such with European Christianity. The books are also agreed that the great Christian scandal of the early modern era was slavery. - ... both books clarify what most centrally defines the Christian faith itself. For Hempton it is the recognition at "the most profound level that Christianity is in its essence a missionary religion." For Irvin and Sunquist, it is the claim that Christian faith can never be adequately grasped except as a "world movement." Walls describes this dual character as "the indigenous principle" in constant tension with "the pilgrim principle."
books  reviews  religious_history  Christianity  16thC  17thC  18thC  exploration  colonialism  missionaries  Jesuits  Moravians  Reformation  Counter-Reformation  religious_culture  religious_belief  Latin_America  Africa  African_trade  West_Indies  China  querelle_des_rites  theology  heterodoxy  Papacy  sectarianism  slavery  Enlightenment  Spanish_Empire  universalism  monotheism  intellectual_history  social_history  church_history  enthusiasm  spirituality  self  rational_religion  ecclesiology  Protestants  EF-add 
june 2014 by dunnettreader
Stuart Elden, 2013 The Birth of Territory, reviewed by Gerry Kearns | Society and Space - Environment and Planning D
The Birth of Territory interrogates texts from various dates to see if they describe rule as the legal control over a determined space. Time after time we learn that a set of political writings that concern land, law, terrain, sovereignty, empire, or related concepts do not articulate a fully-fledged notion of territory. We may end up asking like the proverbial kids in the back of the car: “Are we there yet.” Elden is certainly able to show that earlier formulations are reworked in later periods, as with the discussion of Roman law in the medieval period; there is a lot in the political thought of each period, however, that relates to land and power but does not get reworked in later times. This means that what really holds many of the chapters together is that they are studies of how land and power were discussed at that time, and that is not so very far from taking land and power as quasi-universals. In fact, there is probably a continuum between categories that have greater or lesser historical specificity, rather than there being a clear distinction between the two. Yet, I must admit that this singular focus gives a welcome coherence to the book for all that it seems to discard large parts of the exposition as not required for later chapters. -- see review for Elden views on Westphalia and HRE contra Teschke ; review references classic and recent works on geography, terrain, law,mapping
books  reviews  kindle-available  intellectual_history  historiography  geography  bibliography  political_history  legal_history  ancient_Greece  ancient_Rome  Roman_Empire  ancient_history  Early_Christian  late_antiquity  Augustine  Papacy  Holy_Roman_Empire  feudalism  Italy  medieval_history  Renaissance  city_states  citizenship  sovereignty  territory  maps  landowners  property  Roman_law  exiles  Absolutism  16thC  17thC  Wars_of_Religion  France  Germany  British_history  Ireland  Irish-Gaelic  IR  IR_theory  colonialism  legal_theory  legitimacy  EF-add 
june 2014 by dunnettreader
JAMES WARD - Brass money and wooden shoes: Transmuting anti-Catholic rhetoric in Swift's "Drapier's Letters" | JSTOR: Eighteenth-Century Ireland / Iris an dá chultúr, Vol. 25 (2010), pp. 82-97
This article discusses Jonathan Swift's appropriation of anti-Catholic rhetoric in The Drapier's Letters. The discussion draws both on pamphlets which preceded Swift's intervention in the Wood's halfpence affair and on the wider tradition in English and Irish political thought of conceiving political liberty negatively against the threat of Catholic absolutism. Swift exploits the historical resonance of anti-Catholicism while subtly reorienting or 'transmuting' it, retaining its emotional appeal but directing it against a new target. Such manipulations show that The Drapier's Letters construct their audience as both a political constituency to be mobilized and a satiric target to be mocked. -- downloaded pdf to Note
article  jstor  political_history  intellectual_history  literary_history  political_culture  religious_culture  18thC  Ireland  Anglo-Irish_constitution  anti-Catholic  Absolutism  Papacy  Walpole  Whigs-oligarchy  George_II  Woods_halfpence  Swift  satire  political_press  politics-and-literature  liberty  Ireland-English_exploitation  currency  downloaded  EF-add 
may 2014 by dunnettreader
Kenan Malik - A BOOK IN PROGRESS [PART 18]: ALISDAIR MACINTYRE, ENLIGHTENMENT AND TRADITION | Pandaemonium August 2012
Abelard’s real renown was as the most brilliant philosopher and theologian of his age. His work was, however, highly controversial because it challenged orthodox opinion, particularly about the Trinity, which Abelard tried to derive through reason. Twice he was condemned for heresy, and twice he meekly accepted his condemnation. MacIntyre approves of both the condemnation and of Abelard’s submission to authority. Abelard and his principal accuser, the Cistercian abbot Bernard of Clairvaux, both agreed, MacIntyre suggests, ‘that the integrity of the life of enquiry requires such interventions by authority’. Abelard, like all heretics, had been driven by ‘pride of will’. Heresy, MacIntyre writes, ‘is always a sign of pride in choosing to elevate one’s own judgment above that of genuine authority’. What defines a tradition, and hence moral truth, is not just reason or dialogue or debate but ‘genuine authority’. The ‘open-endedness’ of MacIntyre’s traditions is clearly strictly circumscribed.

It was precisely the claim that truth could be defined by authority that philosophers began to challenge from the sixteenth century on, and that came to define the Enlightenment, a challenge without which, as Jonathan Israel observes, modern ideas of ‘universality, equality and democracy’ could not have emerged. In defending the authority of premodern traditions against the Enlightenment idea of autonomy, MacIntyre may be taking a stance against the subjectivity of moral claims that he so despises. But the question he never properly addresses is how those modern moral ideas with which he has great sympathy would ever have evolved at all had the authority of those premodern traditions not been challenged in the first place.
books  bookshelf  moral_philosophy  Catholics  Papacy  Aquinas  authority  tradition  Burke  Enlightenment  liberalism  secularism  virtue_ethics  EF-add 
december 2013 by dunnettreader
The Roman Curia - Index
THE ROMAN CURIA

In exercising supreme, full, and immediate power in the universal Church, the Roman pontiff makes use of the departments of the Roman Curia which, therefore, perform their duties in his name and with his authority for the good of the churches and in the service of the sacred pastors.
CHRISTUS DOMINUS, 9

Sections of the site under the tab Roman Curia

Secretariat of State
Congregations
Tribunals
Pontifical Councils
Synod of Bishops
Offices
Pontifical Commissions
Swiss Guard
Labour Office of the Apostolic See
Pontifical Academies
Pontifical Committ

Institutions Connected with the Holy See

Vatican Secret Archives
Vatican Apostolic Library
Vatican Press
L'Osservatore Romano
Vatican Publishing House
Vatican Radio
Vatican Television Center
Papal Basilica of St Peter in Vatican City
Papal Basilica of St John Lateran
Papal Basilica of St Paul Outside the Walls
Papal Basilica of St Mary Major
Office of Papal Charities
Agency for the Evaluation and Promotion of Quality
in Ecclesiastical Universities and Faculties (AVEPRO)
Financial Information Authority
website  Catholics  Papacy  ecclesiology  theology  diplomacy  religion  university  libraries  religious_lit  charity  canon_law  Italy 
november 2013 by dunnettreader
Pope John Paul II : Redemptoris Missio (On Evangelization) - Catholic Culture
Apostolic Exhortation, Mission of the Redeemer, of Pope John Paul II promulgated on December 7, 1990.
20thC  Catholics  Papacy  theology  ecclesiology  religious_culture 
november 2013 by dunnettreader
Vatican II: Decree on the Mission Activity of the Church (Ad Gentes) - Catholic Culture
This decree of the Second Vatican Council was proclaimed by His Holiness, Pope Paul VI, on December 7, 1965.
20thC  Catholics  Vatican_II  Papacy  theology  ecclesiology  religious_culture 
november 2013 by dunnettreader
Pope issues first Apostolic Exhortation: Evangelii Gaudium | Vatican News Nov 2013
Downloaded pdf to Note -- Pope Francis has issued his first Apostolic Exhortation on Tuesday, Evangelii Gaudium, translated into English as The Joy of the Gospel. The 224-page document outlines the Pope’s vision for a missionary Church, whose “doors should always be open”. The Pope speaks on numerous themes, including evangelization, peace, homiletics, social justice, the family, respect for creation, faith and politics, ecumenism, interreligious dialogue, and the role of women and of the laity in the Church.
Catholics  Papacy  theology  ecclesiology  21stC  religious_culture  downloaded  EF-add 
november 2013 by dunnettreader
Press conference on Pope Francis' Evangelii Gaudium (The Joy of the Gospel) - Vatican News Nov 2013
Pope Francis has issued his first Apostolic Exhortation on Tuesday, Evangelii Gaudium, translated into English as The Joy of the Gospel. The 224-page document outlines the Pope’s vision for a missionary Church, whose “doors should always be open”. The Pope speaks on numerous themes, including evangelization, peace, homiletics, social justice, the family, respect for creation, faith and politics, ecumenism, interreligious dialogue, and the role of women and of the laity in the Church.

At a press conference in the Vatican on Tuesday for the presentation of Pope Francis’ new Apostolic Exhortation, the presidents of the Pontifical Councils for evangelisation and communications, plus the secretary general of the Synod of Bishops, spoke about the themes contained in the 224 page document.

Please find below the English translations of the presentations, firstly by Archbishop Rino Fisichella, president of the Pontifical Council for New Evangelisation, secondly, by Archbishop Claudio Celli, president of the Pontifical Council for Social Communications and thirdly, by Archbishop Lorenzo Baldisseri, secretary general of the Synod of Bishops:
21stC  Catholics  Papacy  theology  ecclesiology  religious_culture 
november 2013 by dunnettreader
Timothy C. Johnson - Reciprocity as the Foundation of Financial Economics | SSRN - Oct 2013
This paper argues that the fundamental principle of contemporary financial economics is balanced reciprocity, not the principle of utility maximisation that is important in economics more generally. The argument is developed by analysing the mathematical Fundamental Theory of Asset Pricing with reference to the emergence of mathematical probability in the seventeenth century in the context of the ethical assessment of commercial contracts. This analysis is undertaken within a framework of Pragmatic philosophy and Virtue Ethics. The purpose of the paper is to mitigate future financial crises by reorienting financial economics to emphasise the objectives of market stability and social cohesion rather than individual utility maximisation. -- Downloaded pdf to Note
paper  SSRN  economic_history  legal_history  economic_theory  Aristotle  Aquinas  Papacy  medieval_history  Renaissance  16thC  17thC  18thC  moral_philosophy  moral_economy  financial_innovation  probability  mathematics  commerce  risk  interest_rates  prices  pragmatism  virtue_ethics  downloaded  EF-add 
november 2013 by dunnettreader
Henri de Lubac, S.J. | Ignatius Insight Author Page
Links to his books published by Ignatius Press and excerpts from some of the books -- on Origien, the Church as Mother
20thC  Catholics  Papacy  Jesuits  Biblical_criticism  Early_Christian  theology  religious_history 
september 2013 by dunnettreader
Anthony Molho: Recent Works on the History of Tuscany: Fifteenth to Eighteenth Centuries (1990)
JSTOR: The Journal of Modern History, Vol. 62, No. 1 (Mar., 1990), pp. 57-77 -- among other things, model of centralizing Renaissance state being substituted with dualistic (more powerful prince and reinforcement of corporate liberties, especially territorial) - and accommodation between secular leadership and Papacy re governance
article  jstor  lit_survey  historiography  15thC  16thC  17thC  18thC  Italy  state-building  Papacy  Italian_Wars  local_government  bibliography  EF-add 
september 2013 by dunnettreader
R. Koebner: JSTOR: Despot and Despotism: Vicissitudes of a Political Term (1951)
JSTOR: Journal of the Warburg and Courtauld Institutes, Vol. 14, No. 3/4 (1951), pp. 275-302 -- downloaded pdf to Note -- Voltaire was very displeased with how Montesquieu popularized the neologism which first made its appearance in 17thC France and was adopted by the secret Bougainvilliers, Fenelon, Saint Simon opponents of Louis XIV. The paper then traces despot related usage starting with Plato and Aristotle through Church Fathers and Renaissance.
article  jstor  intellectual_history  political_philosophy  etymology  philology  ancient_philosophy  ancient_Greece  Early_Christian  Medieval  Renaissance  Papacy  monarchy  Absolutism  Ottomans  China  France  17thC  18thC  French_Enlightenment  Louis_XIV  enlightened_absolutism  Hobbes  Bayle  Fenelon  Bougainvilliers  Saint_Simon  Voltaire  Montesquieu  liberty  republicanism  downloaded  EF-add 
august 2013 by dunnettreader

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