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Kristine Haugen - Imagined Universities: Public Insult and the Terrae Filius in Early Modern Oxford (2000) | Academia.edu
Abstract: The 17th-century University of Oxford was plagued by an extremely insulting Latin commencement speaker known as the terrae filius, or "son of the earth." The speakers were routinely expelled from the university, while manuscript copies proliferated -- a few speeches were even owned by John Locke. How did such a custom arise, what were the social effects of the filius' speeches, and what forces surrounded the filius' eventual suppression? It's argued that in the heyday of the filius, his insults actually served a sort of rhetoric of the rotten apple: the observed transgressions of the few were held up against an imagined and far more virtuous, decorous, and pious Oxford. Meanwhile, the filius himself might be understood in terms of two long-established university social types -- the disputant and the tour guide.
More Info: History of Universities 16,2 (2000): 1-31 -- Publication Date: Jan 1, 2000 -- Publication Name: HISTORY OF UNIVERSITIES-OXFORD-
Research Interests: Rhetoric, Sociology of Knowledge, 17th-Century Studies, History of Universities, Restoration and Eighteenth-Century English Literature, 18th Century British Literature, 17th Century British (Literature), University of Oxford, and Academic Satire
article  Academia.edu  17thC  18thC  cultural_history  British_history  university  Oxford  education-higher  satire  English_lit  rhetoric  sociology_of_knowledge  identity-institutions  downloaded  institution-building  intellectual_history  status  cultural_critique  cultural_capital  Amhurst  Craftsman  Bolingbroke  Bourdieu 
july 2016 by dunnettreader
HEATHER ELLIS - 'This starting, feverish heart': Matthew Arnold and the Problem of Manliness | JSTOR: Critical Survey, Vol. 20, No. 3, Victorian Masculinities (2008), pp. 97-115
Fascinating re Victorian obsession with sturdy, active "manliness" uncorrupted by effeminate activities like poetry or scholarship - Arnold greatly influenced by Cardinal Newman's revaluation of Christian manliness with what were feminine stereotypes - love of poetry, contemplation, etc. But Arnold also quasi idolized his father, Thomas Arnold, arch critic of Newman and promoter of all the vigorous manly virtues. Lots of quotes across much of 19thC from the literary journals, where conflicts over cultural ideals were waged re education, literary form and style, appropriate models for exemplary history and so on. Among Arnold's critics James Fitzjames Stephen. Leslie Stephen's brother was a nasty piece of work. -- downloaded pdf to Note
article  jstor  cultural_history  literary_history  English_lit  19thC  British_history  Victorian  masculinity  culture_wars  Newman_JH  Arnold_Matthew  cultural_critique  Tractarians  Oxford  education-higher  education-civic  Stephen_Leslie  literary_journals  poetics  High_Church  high_culture  downloaded 
october 2014 by dunnettreader
Oxford drama fit for a queen: William Gager’s “Dido” four centuries later | Hortulus Oct 2013
Note the tradition linking Queen Elizabeth to Christ Church - her portrait still over head tabke. An element in Queen Anne visit to Oxford in 1702?

The production of William Gager’s Dido in the Great Hall of Christ Church, Oxford, on 21st September 2013 was by any measure a special occasion. The Early Drama at Oxford (EDOX) research project aims to bring to light medieval and early modern plays staged within the University. One of the guiding lights of the project is Elisabeth Dutton, who directed Gager’s play as part of their ‘Performing Dido’ event, with the work performed alongside Edward’s Boys production of Christopher Marlowe’s more famous dramatization of the tale from Virgil. Gager’s Latin drama had been originally acted in June 1583 as part of the Christ Church celebrations in honour of visiting Polish prince, Albrecht Łaski. 430 years after this first performance, Gager’s Latin, smoothly translated into English by graduate student Elizabeth Sandis, was again staged before an influential Polish visitor – this time Minister Counsellor Mr Dariusz Łaska. As on the original occasion, parts were played by male university students (here with a couple of slightly older exceptions) before an audience partaking of a College banquet. It was impossible not to find thrilling an event so similar in many ways to that experienced by sixteenth century Oxonians – even down to a reconstructed period menu.
16thC  English_lit  theater  university  Oxford  Elizabeth  Virgil  actors  Bolingbroke  EF-add 
december 2013 by dunnettreader

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