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THE WARBURG INSTITUTE: Afterlife of Ovid
The Afterlife of Ovid

 7 - 8 March 2013

This conference will investigate the Medieval and Renaissance reading of Ovid and his influence on poetry and painting.

Hosted by: The Warburg Institute and the Institute of Classical Studies 

Organised by: Philip Hardie (Cambridge), Peter Mack (Warburg Institute) and John North (Institute of Classical Studies) 

Speakers: Alessandro Barchiesi (Stanford), Hélène Casanova-Robin (Sorbonne Paris IV), Frank Coulson (Ohio State), Fátima Díez-Platas (Santiago e Compostela), Ingo Gildenhard (Durham), Philip Hardie (Cambridge), Maggie Kilgour (McGill), Gesine Manuwald (UCL), Elizabeth McGrath (Warburg), John Miller (Virginia), Victoria Moul (King’s College), Caroline Stark (Ohio Wesleyan) and Hérica Valladares (John Hopkins)
-- selected presentations available as podcasts
Latin_lit  Renaissance  literary_history  Ovid  17thC  Milton  audio  English_lit  conference 
december 2015 by dunnettreader
Maggie Kilgour - Milton and the Metamorphosis of Ovid (2012) | Oxford University Press
Milton and the Metamorphosis of Ovid contributes to our understanding of the Roman poet Ovid, the Renaissance writer Milton, and more broadly the transmission and transformation of classical traditions through history. It examines the ways in which Milton drew on Ovid's oeuvre, as well as the long tradition of reception that had begun with Ovid himself, and argues that Ovid's revision of the past, and especially his relation to Virgil, gave Renaissance writers a model for their own transformation of classical works. Throughout his career Milton thinks through and with Ovid, whose stories and figures inform his exploration of the limits and possibilities of creativity, change, and freedom. Examining this specific relation between two very individual and different authors, Kilgour also explores the forms and meaning of creative imitation. Intertexuality was not only central to the two writers' poetic practices but helped shape their visions of the world. While many critics seek to establish how Milton read Ovid, Kilgour debates the broader question of why does considering how Milton read Ovid matter? How do our readings of this relation change our understanding of both Milton and Ovid; and does it tell us about how traditions are changed and remade through time?
books  kindle-available  Latin_lit  literary_history  Ovid  ancient_Rome  epic  poetry  Renaissance  English_lit  influence-literary  imitation  Virgil 
june 2015 by dunnettreader
Elaine Fantham - Ovid's Metamorphoses (2004) | Oxford University Press
Oxford Approaches to Classical Literature (Series Editors: Kathleen Coleman and Richard Rutherford) introduces individual works of Greek and Latin literature to readers who are approaching them for the first time. Each volume sets the work in its literary and historical context, and aims to offer a balanced and engaging assessment of its content, artistry, and purpose. A brief survey of the influence of the work upon subsequent generations is included to demonstrate its enduring relevance and power. All quotations from the original are translated into English. Ovid's Metamorphoses have been seen as both the culmination of and a revolution in the classical epic tradition, transferring narrative interest from war to love and fantasy. This introduction considers how Ovid found and shaped his narrative from the creation of the world to his own sophisticated times, illustrating the cruelty of jealous gods, the pathos of human love, and the imaginative fantasy of flight, monsters, magic, and illusion. Elaine Fantham introduces the reader not only to this marvelous and complex narrative poem, but to the Greek and Roman traditions behind Ovid's tales of transformation and a selection of the images and texts that it inspired.
books  kindle-available  Latin_lit  literary_history  Ovid  ancient_Rome  epic  poetry  ancient_Greece  Greek_lit  ancient_religions  gods-antiquity  imitation  influence-literary 
june 2015 by dunnettreader
Matthew Bowser - The Golden Age of Rome: Augustus’ program to better the Roman Empire (2013 undergrad thesis) | History of the Ancient World - October 2014
Undergraduate Thesis, University of Pittsburgh, 2013 -- posted to History of the Ancient World website - Argument continues among historians to this day whether Augustus should be considered the benefactor that Vergil portrays, who restored virtue and order, or as the tyrant Tacitus describes. Using evidence from a variety of contemporary sources, I intend to show that Augustus did in fact work to bring about the Age of Gold that Vergil promises. Whether through warfare, legislation, political maneuvering, or propaganda, I believe that his actions from the start reflect a clear program to make the Roman Empire the most powerful and most secure state that it could be, and that he was not just working for personal ambition. I have narrowed down the concept of the Golden Age, as portrayed by the poets, to three primary qualities: peace and security, the flourishing of the old Republican virtues, and prosperity under a glorious, divine leader. I will address each of these aspects in turn, consulting evidence from the period to show how Augustus’ regime worked to satisfy them. This evidence will include contemporary literature, historical facts and records, art, architecture, religion, and symbolism. I will also address the major criticisms of each facet by eyewitnesses such as Ovid and Propertius, by Roman historians such as Tacitus and Suetonius, and by various modern scholars of Roman history. Studying the success of Augustus’ methods can reap numerous benefits, including a deeper understanding of later dictators and their programs. -- downloaded pdf to Note
thesis  ancient_history  empires  Roman_Republic  Roman_Empire  Augustan_Rome  political_history  political_culture  civic_virtue  civil_religion  literary_history  Latin_lit  Virgil  Tacitus  historians-and-politics  state-building  Ovid  Suetonius  historiography  historiography-antiquity  downloaded  EF-add 
october 2014 by dunnettreader
Gabriele Bucchi - Au delà du tombeau: Pyrame et Thisbé dans deux réécritures de la Renaissance italienne | Italique, XIII, 2010, p. 53-80
Italique [En ligne], XIII | 2010, mis en ligne le 23 juin 2014, URL : http://italique.revues.org/282 ; DOI : 10.4000/italique.282 *--* La fable de Pyrame et Thisbé tirée des Métamorphoses d’Ovide (iv 55-166) fut pendant le Moyen Âge et la Renaissance une des plus connues parmi celles du poème latin. -- je voudrais prendre en considération deux réécritures, parues à une année de distance l’une de l’autre dans deux recueils poétiques de la Renaissance italienne: la Favola di Piramo e Tisbe des Amori di Bernardo Tasso (1534) et du poème du même titre paru une année plus tard dans les Rime toscane (1535) du mystérieux «Amomo», un poète italien exilé en France, que Nicole Bingen a récemment proposé d’identifier avec le Napolitain Antonio Caracciolo. -- je souhaiterais mettre en évidence la présence d’intertextes qui opèrent dans la réécriture de l’auteur classique. En effet, tout en restant dans un dialogue privilégié avec le texte latin, les deux auteurs se montrent néanmoins sensibles aux suggestions d’autres textes en langue vulgaire qui s’étaient à leur tour inspirés des Métamorphoses. C’est le cas, comme on le verra, de la paraphrase de Boccace dans le De claris mulieribus et surtout de deux épisodes de l’Orlando Furioso, dont le modèle se révèle (surtout pour Amomo) un vrai paradigme pour la scène de l’adieu des amants in articulo mortis. Finalement, je voudrais suggérer une lecture parallèle de l’épisode des funérailles de Clorinde dans la Gerusalemme liberata de Torquato Tasso (xii) avec un passage de la fable ovidienne réécrite par son père. -- downloaded pdf to Note
article  revues.org  Italian_lit  16thC  Renaissance  vernacular  Ovid  imitation  intertextual  Tasso  Boccaccio  Ariosto  fable  poetry  poetics  literary_history  influence-literary  downloaded  EF-add 
september 2014 by dunnettreader
Betty Rose Nagle, review - William Fitzgerald, How to Read a Latin Poem: If You Can’t Read Latin Yet (2013) | Bryn Mawr Classical Review 2014.01.07
This engagingly written and cleverly organized book contains sophisticated discussions of a wide range of poets, periods, and genres, primarily in the form of close readings of the Latin originals. By what means, and how successfully, does its author accommodate that hypothetical Latinless reader? He does not do this by dumbing anything down; these are readings from which the proficient can profit, too. The poets and works included come mostly from the “greatest hits” list, but there are some unorthodox choices as well, such as Sulpicia in the chapter on love poetry, several Priapea included with Catullus and Martial in a chapter on invective, and Persius as the featured satirist. The first two chapters treat antithetical topics (love, hate); the middle two treat respectively a collection (Horace’s Odes) and a corpus (Virgil’s works) written during the same period; the fifth treats another pair of contemporaries, the Neronians Petronius [actually Lucan?] and Seneca; and the sixth, thematic again, pairs Lucretius and Ovid as philosophical and narrative “science fiction.” There is also an introduction for his readers, cleverly followed by a “Prelude” discussing two poems addressed to their readers, and a brief “Epilogue,” using Hadrian’s animula as a bridge to a few comments about the very different poetry of Christian hymns. Ancillaries include a pronunciation guide, suggestions for further reading, a glossary of terms, an index of names and topics, and another of poems. -- Oxford University Press - only hdbk on amazon.com - ebook available on Google_Books for c $20 - is OUP having a kindle fight? From Google preview, looks fabulous
books  reviews  buy  Google_Books  Latin_lit  Horace  Virgil  Ovid  Seneca  Lucretius  satire  Augustan_Rome  politics-and-literature  ancient_Rome  Roman_Empire  poetry  EF-add 
july 2014 by dunnettreader
Bryn Mawr Classical Review (BMCR) - Home
Bryn Mawr Classical Review (BMCR) (ISSN 1055-7660) publishes timely open-access, peer-reviewed reviews of current scholarly work in the field of classical studies (including archaeology). This site is the authoritative archive of BMCR's publication, from 1990 to the present. Reviews from August 2008 on are also posted on our blog.
website  books  reviews  intellectual_history  literary_history  ancient_history  ancient_philosophy  social_history  cultural_history  economic_history  archaeology  art_history  religious_history  religious_culture  historiography  ancient_Greece  ancient_Rome  Greek_lit  Latin_lit  poetry  theater  Augustan_Rome  pre-Socratics  Plato  Socrates  Aristotle  Hellenism  Cicero  Stoicism  Epicurean  Virgil  Horace  Ovid  Roman_Empire  Roman_Republic  Roman_law 
may 2014 by dunnettreader
Decameron Web | Literature index page
(1) Medieval Attitudes toward Literature (2) Literary Relations -- ** Dante and Boccaccio, ** The Proem of the Decameron: Boccaccio between Ovid and Dante, ** Authorship, ** The Decameron and the English Romantics -- (3) Narratology and Structural Exegesis -- ** Numerology in the Decameron, ** The Novella before Boccaccio, ** Performance and Interpretation, ** Performance and Interpretation 2, ** Nightingales and Filostrato's Apologia (V.4), ** The Rubrics of the Decameron, ** Madonna Filippa (VI.7): Feminist Mouthpiece or Misogynistic Tool? -- (4) Hypertext -- ** Hypertext, Hypermedia and the History of the Text, ** Boccaccio Online: Teaching the Decameron as Hypertext at Brown University -- (5) Theoretical Perspectives -- ** Poststructuralism and a Figural Narrative Model, ** Lotman and the Problem of Artistic Space, ** Weinrich and the Grammar of the Frame, ** The Narrative Frame, ** Framing the Decameron, ** Seduction by Silence in the Frame -- (6) La novella tra Testo e Ipertesto: il Decameron come modello
website  literary_history  lit_crit  Italian_lit  English_lit  14thC  Medieval  Renaissance  humanism  Latin_lit  Boccaccio  Ovid  Dante  Romanticism  narrative  literary_theory  digital_humanities 
may 2014 by dunnettreader
David Hopkins: Dryden and the Garth-Tonson Metamorphoses (1988)
JSTOR: The Review of English Studies, New Series, Vol. 39, No. 153 (Feb., 1988), pp. 64-74 -- downloaded pdf to Note
article  jstor  English_lit  literary_history  17thC  18thC  1690s  1710s  Dryden  Pope  Addison  publishing  imitation  translation  poetry  Ovid  networks-literary  downloaded  EF-add 
september 2013 by dunnettreader

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