dunnettreader + ottomans   18

Judith Herrin - Byzantium: The Surprising Life of a Medieval Empire. (Paperback 2009) - Princeton University Press
Avoiding a standard chronological account of the Byzantine Empire's millennium--long history, she identifies the fundamental questions about Byzantium--what it was, and what special significance it holds for us today. Bringing the latest scholarship to a general audience in accessible prose, Herrin focuses each short chapter around a representative theme, event, monument, or historical figure, and examines it within the full sweep of Byzantine history--from the foundation of Constantinople, the magnificent capital city built by Constantine the Great, to its capture by the Ottoman Turks.

She argues that Byzantium's crucial role as the eastern defender of Christendom against Muslim expansion during the early Middle Ages made Europe--and the modern Western world--possible. Herrin captivates us with her discussions of all facets of Byzantine culture and society. She walks us through the complex ceremonies of the imperial court. She describes the transcendent beauty and power of the church of Hagia Sophia, as well as chariot races, monastic spirituality, diplomacy, and literature. She reveals the fascinating worlds of military usurpers and ascetics, eunuchs and courtesans, and artisans who fashioned the silks, icons, ivories, and mosaics so readily associated with Byzantine art.

An innovative history written by one of our foremost scholars, Byzantium reveals this great civilization's rise to military and cultural supremacy, its spectacular destruction by the Fourth Crusade, and its revival and final conquest in 1453. - no ebook - lots of illustrations - Introduction downloaded to Tab S2
books  downloaded  Byzantium  Roman_Empire  medieval_history  elite_culture  religious_history  religious_culture  Islam  Islamic_civilization  Islam-expansion  architecture  architecture-churches  diplomatic_history  military_history  Christendom  Christianity-Islam_conflict  Orthodox_Christianity  Crusades  Constantinople  13thC  14thC  15thC  Ottomans  court_culture  courtiers  ritual  art_history  decorative_arts  popular_culture 
august 2016 by dunnettreader
Review- Jerry Brotton, This Orient Isle (2016) – Elizabethan England's relationship with the Islamic world | Guardian April 2016
This Orient Isle by Jerry Brotton - Allen Lane , March 2016
Review – Elizabethan England's relationship with the Islamic world
Spies, merchants and chancers: this sparkling book sets out Elizabethan England’s complex and extensive relationship with the Islamic world
cultural_transmission  diffusion  connected_history  theater  voyages  orientalism  16thC  maritime_history  British_foreign_policy  Marlowe  Ottomans  books  Islamic_civilization  diplomatic_history  Elizabethan  Philip_II  English_lit  Spain  cultural_exchange  Shakespeare  cultural_history  reviews  Papacy-English_relations  travel_lit  British_history 
april 2016 by dunnettreader
Kenneth Harl - The Barbarian Empires of the Steppes | The Great Courses
36 lectures - list price $320
- the video version is a must in order to follow the names of groups, locations and movements
A few bothered by mispronunciation and a lot of ahs - but most reviewers very enthusiastic - and replaying lectures to get all the info. Counters a few complaints that it's too superficial, or that it pays too much attention to the sedentary civilizations that were affected - the last complaint seems to miss the very purpose of the course.
Byzantium  Eastern_Europe  military_history  Central_Asia  empires  government-forms  medieval_history  military_tactics  Egypt  Persia  ancient_Rome  nomadic_invasions  cultural_history  Ghengis_Khan  trade  video  Eurasia  Roman_Empire  government-revenues  Ottomans  Iraq  Chinese_history  Black_Sea  Islamic_civilization  Atilla_the_Hun  ancient_history  India  Iran  China  late_antiquity  Sufis  Mamluks  cultural_exchange  military_technology  Golden_Horde  Turcic_tribes  Han_China  MENA  religious_history  Mongols  Tamerlane  Caliphate  courses  Buddhism  cultural_transmission  trade-policy  empires-tributary  barbarians  steppes 
april 2016 by dunnettreader
Maria Fusaro - Political Economies of Empire in the Early Modern Mediterranean: The Decline of Venice and the Rise of England 1450–1700 (to be released April 2015) | Cambridge University Press
Maria Fusaro presents a new perspective on the onset of Venetian decline. Examining the significant commercial relationship between England and Venice in the period 1450–1700, Fusaro demonstrates how Venice's social, political and economic circumstances shaped the English mercantile community in unique ways. By focusing on the commercial interaction between them, she also re-establishes the analysis of the maritime political economy as an essential constituent of the Venetian state political economy. This challenging interpretation of some classic issues of early modern history will be of profound interest to economic, social and legal historians and provides a stimulating addition to current debates in imperial history, especially on the economic relationship between different empires and the socio-economic interaction between 'rulers and ruled'. **--* "For the first time Maria Fusaro gives us the English among the creeks and islands of the Venetian empire, as seen by the Venetians themselves. Using archives hitherto little-known or wholly unknown, she paints a lively picture of Anglo-Venetian commerce, diplomacy and war." Nicholas Rodger, University of Oxford **--** Introduction: political economies of empire *-* 1. The medieval background *-* 2. The reversal of the balance *-* 3. The Ottoman Levant *-* 4. Genoa, Venice and Livorno (a tale of three cities) *-* 5. Trade, violence and diplomacy *-* 6. Diplomacy, trade and religion *-* 7. The Venetian peculiarities *-* 8. The English mercantile community in Venice *-* 9. The English and other mercantile communities *-* 10. The goods of the trade *-* 11. Empires and governance in the Mediterranean *-* 12. Coda and conclusions -- marketing materials not yet available for download
books  find  political_economy  economic_history  political_history  15thC  16thC  17thC  Mediterranean  Venice  Italy  city_states  Genoa  Livorno  British_history  mercantilism  trade  trading_companies  empires  Ottomans  Ottoman_Empire  maritime_history  international_political_economy  international_system  international_law  diplomacy  diplomatic_history  commerce  privileges-corporate  trading_privileges  religion-and-economics  trade_finance  trade-cultural_transmission  governance-regional  maritime_law  commercial_law  commercial_interest  foreigners-resident  wars-causes  military_history  competition-interstate  mercantilism-violence  trade-policy_enforcement  naval_history  shipping  weaponry 
february 2015 by dunnettreader
Jeff Horn - Economic Development in Early Modern France: The Privilege of Liberty, 1650–1820 (release date for hardback mid-Feb 2015) | European history after 1450 | Cambridge University Press
Privilege has long been understood as the constitutional basis of Ancien Régime France, legalising the provision of a variety of rights, powers and exemptions to some, whilst denying them to others. In this fascinating new study however, Jeff Horn reveals that Bourbon officials utilized privilege as an instrument of economic development, freeing some sectors of the economy from pre-existing privileges and regulations, while protecting others. He explores both government policies and the innovations of entrepreneurs, workers, inventors and customers to uncover the lived experience of economic development from the Fronde to the Restoration. He shows how, influenced by Enlightenment thought, the regime increasingly resorted to concepts of liberty to defend privilege as a policy tool. The book offers important new insights into debates about the impact of privilege on early industrialisation, comparative economic development and the outbreak of the French Revolution. **--** 1. Introduction: profits and economic development during the Old Régime *--* 2. Privileged enclaves and the guilds: liberty and regulation *--* 3. The privilege of liberty put to the test: industrial development in Normandy *--* 4. Companies, colonies, and contraband: commercial privileges under the Old Régime *--* 5. Privilege, liberty, and managing the market: trading with the Levant *--* 6. Outside the body politic, essential to the body economic: the privileges of Jews, Protestants and foreign residents *--* 7. Privilege, innovation, and the state: entrepreneurialism and the lessons of the Old Régime *--* 8. The reign of liberty? Privilege after 1789 -- look for pdf of Intro once released
books  find  political_economy  economic_history  political_history  17thC  18thC  19thC  France  privileges-corporate  economic_culture  economic_policy  development  monarchy  profit  entrepreneurs  guilds  trading_companies  trade-policy  regulation  industrialization  industrial_policy  Colbert  Colbertism  urban_development  urban_elites  commerce  commercial_interest  French_government  Huguenots  Jews  colonialism  French_Empire  colonies  corporate_finance  monopolies  Levant  MENA  Ottomans  liberties  liberty  Ancien_régime  Louis_XIV  Louis_XV  Louis_XVI  French_Revolution  French_Revolutionary_Wars  Napoleonic_Wars  Restoration-France  bourgeoisie  haute_bourgeoisie  markets  markets-structure  foreign_trade  foreign_policy  foreigners-resident 
february 2015 by dunnettreader
Jose Rabasa, Masayuki Sato, Edoardo Tortarolo, Daniel Woolf - The Oxford History of Historical Writing: Volume 3: 1400-1800 : : Amazon.com:
Volume III of The Oxford History of Historical Writing contains essays by leading scholars on the writing of history globally during the early modern era, from 1400 to 1800. The volume proceeds in geographic order from east to west, beginning in Asia and ending in the Americas. It aims at once to provide a selective but authoritative survey of the field and, where opportunity allows, to provoke cross-cultural comparisons. This is the third of five volumes in a series that explores representations of the past from the beginning of writing to the present day, and from all over the world. -- only hdbk
books  amazon.com  find  libraries  historiography  15thC  16thC  17thC  18thC  Renaissance  historiography-17thC  historiography-18thC  historians-and-state  historians-and-politics  historians-and-religion  China  India  Ottomans  Italy  Germany  France  British_history  Scottish_Enlightenment  Enlightenment  philosophes  philosophy_of_history  philology  antiquaries  evidence  scepticism 
august 2014 by dunnettreader
Encyclopedia of the Early Modern World, by the Gale Group, Inc. | Answers.com
The history of Europe from the mid-15th century until the French Revolution. Includes notable events such as wars and revolutions as well as broader processes like the Renaissance and the Enlightenment; biographical information on leading figures; individual national histories; and meaningful developments in the arts, religion, politics, exploration and warfare.
books  etexts  reference  Europe-Early_Modern  Renaissance  exploration  colonialism  16thC  17thC  18thC  British_history  British_politics  Atlantic  American_colonies  France  Germany  Italy  Spain  Spanish_Empire  British_Empire  Dutch  Dutch_Revolt  Reformation  Counter-Reformation  Netherlands  Holy_Roman_Empire  Austria  Denmark  Sweden  Russia  Poland  Ottomans  commerce  intellectual_history  Scientific_Revolution  Enlightenment  Scottish_Enlightenment  French_Enlightenment  Absolutism  Thirty_Years_War  Wars_of_Religion  Louis_XIV  military_history  political_culture  political_history  politics-and-religion  art_history  religious_history 
august 2014 by dunnettreader
ANDERS INGRAM -- THE OTTOMAN SIEGE OF VIENNA, ENGLISH BALLADS, AND THE EXCLUSION CRISIS (2014).| The Historical Journal, 57, pp 53-80.- Cambridge Journals Online - Abstract
ANDERS INGRAM - National University of Ireland, Galway --The second Ottoman siege of Vienna (1683) generated a higher volume of English writing than any other seventeenth-century event involving the Ottomans. This article focuses upon ballads written in the immediate aftermath of the siege and relates them to the concurrent English political context of the Tory reaction to the exclusion crisis. Situating these ballads within the publication milieu of pamphlet news and political polemic, it examines the figures who produced them and the audiences they were aimed at. Following from this, it shows how the use of commonplace images and associations with the ‘Turk’ as a recurring figure in early modern writing allowed these ballads to find, or depict, synchronicities between the events of the siege of Vienna, and the English political scene. -* I am grateful to Daniel Carey and Christine Woodhead for their help and comments at various stages.
article  paywall  find17thC  British_history  British_politics  political_culture  Exclusion_Crisis  Tories  Ottomans  Austria  Holy_Roman_Empire  military_history  Christendom  Christianity-Islam_conflict  despotism  popular_politics  popular_culture  political_press  ballads  pamphlets  newspapers  1680s  Charles_II  Whigs  EF-add 
august 2014 by dunnettreader
Franz-Stephan Grady - Meet the Elusive Man Responsible for Today’s Middle East Mayhem | The National Interest - June 2014
In the spring of 1915, bogged down British and French forces were desperately battling the Ottoman army on the Gallipoli peninsula trying to force the Dardanelles and occupy Istanbul. Amid the fighting, a 25-year-old Turkish officer, Lieutenant Muhammad Sharif Al-Faruqi, deserted to the British side on August 20, 1915. Trying to save his own skin and apparently determined to play a role in shaping the postwar future of the Middle-East, Al-Faruqi provided British intelligence with a host of assertions about himself and the Arab tribes under Ottoman suzerainty, which later turned out to be either wild exaggerations or plain lies. British intelligence, however, took Al-Faruqi’s statements at face value, which led the British to promise a great deal to the Arabs in exchange for revolting against the Turks. This in turn directly influenced the negotiations over the notorious Sykes-Picot agreement that in many ways has been at the root of much of the political upheaval in the Middle East ever since. Thus, Lieutenant Muhammad Sharif Al-Faruqi may very well be one of the greatest imposters in the history of international relations.
20thC  IR  political_history  military_history  spying  British_history  British_Empire  France  imperialism  Great_Powers  MENA  WWI  entre_deux_guerres  diplomatic_history  ethnic_conflict  sectarianism  Ottomans  Turkey  Iraq  Islamic_civilization  Shiites  Sunnis  Saudia_Arabia  Jordan  Israel  Great_Game  British_Empire-military  British_foreign_policy 
june 2014 by dunnettreader
Mark Hutchings - The ' Turk Phenomenon' and the Repertory of the Late Elizabethan Playhouse | Early Modern Literary Studies Special Issue 16 (October, 2007) 10.1-39
"Turk plays" popular up to Charles I - late-Elizabethan theatre drew on a conventional narrative of fear that was also.. one of fascination. ?..also energised by 2 linked events: the Reformation and Elizabeth's promotion of Anglo-Ottoman relations after excommunication by Pope Pius V in 1570. ?..in the last decade or so of the 16thC a sizeable proportion of the playhouse repertory became deeply influenced by this development... a complex artistic, ideological, and commercial phenomenon. -- In shifting from "author"-centred approaches that many theorists believe to be anachronistic to an emphasis on how companies operated, scholars have drawn attention to ...early modern theatre as a collective enterprise. - By its very nature the staging of the Ottoman Empire was sustained by artistic cross-fertilisation that was, in a broader sense collaborative .. as well as competitive. -- These plays were not necessarily mere ciphers of the historical past or present. The Jew of Malta far from endorses the behaviour of the besieged Christians in 1565. It is remarkable for its resistance to the Malta narrative in Christian accounts where the Turkish defeat (like at Lepanto) was celebrated. - While the Tamburlaine plays and their spin-offs called attention to Turkish tyranny and the Ottoman threat, the move away from the Marlovian aesthetic signalled a more ironic approach. Thus in Henry V, Henry's proposal to Katherine that they should produce a son to recapture Constantinople (an anachronism) is undercut by the ambiguous, "Shall we not?" For the audience a deeper irony is available - "the original phrase 'to go to Constantinople to take the Turk by the beard' became a repository for vacuous ideals, a phrase that could only be rehearsed with an increasing sense of self-satire" -- online journal html
article  English_lit  theater  genre  16thC  Tudor  Elizabethan  Marlowe  Shakespeare  Ottomans  cultural_history  playwrights  actors  trade-policy  consumers  exotic  orientalism  diplomatic_history  Reformation  Christendom  Christianity-Islam_conflict  Papacy-English_relations  Counter-Reformation  elite_culture  EF-add 
june 2014 by dunnettreader
Benedict S. Robinson -Harry and Amurath | JSTOR: Shakespeare Quarterly, Vol. 60, No. 4 (Winter, 2009), pp. 399-424
Before his coronation, as he announces his intention to invade France, and as he proposes marriage to Katharine, Henry V invokes the specter of a Turkish double. These moments in Shakespeare’s play punctuate the major political transitions of his reign; moreover, they condense a pattern of thought vital to these plays, one that concerns the constitution of English nationalist discourse from the often recalcitrant materials of a Christian political imaginary. In the 16thC, Christendom remained the object of powerful emotional cathexis, but the forms of allegiance and action it authorized were in dispute. Henry redirects the energies that once coalesced around the political and communal ideal of a Christian commonwealth to the commonwealth of England. But as Henry invokes the Turk as his opposite, he also suggests his resemblance to that figure. In this, Henry V opens up some serious questions about the “political theology” of the nation. In revealing the constitution of national community as a translated theology, Shakespeare suggests that this is a troubled process. Recent accounts of early modern nationalism have tended to downplay or forget Christendom as a transnational space of belonging both instrumental to the nation and still in competition with it. The strange relations between “Harry” and “Amurath” evoked in 2 Henry IV and Henry V are the traces of a wider struggle between Christendom and the nation as theopolitical spaces, a struggle that takes place in significant measure over the figure of Muslim difference. -- lots of cites to English constitutional history links to national identity (eg Pocock & critics), Blumenberg and Schmitt debates -- paywall
article  jstor  Project_MUSE  paywall  find  16thC  British_history  British_politics  Tudor  national_ID  Christendom  Ottomans  Reformation  Christianity-Islam_conflict  political-theology  Shakespeare  political_culture  religious_culture  politics-and-religion  ancient_constitution  nationalism  EF-add 
june 2014 by dunnettreader
Kenneth Chase: Firearms: A Global History to 1700: 9780521722407: Amazon.com: Books
Kenneth Chase traces the history of firearms from their invention in China in the 1100s to the 1700s, when European firearms had become clearly superior. In Firearms, Chase asks why it was the Europeans who perfected firearms, not the Chinese, and answers this question by looking at how firearms were used throughout the world. Early firearms were restricted to infantry and siege warfare, limiting their use outside of Europe and Japan. Steppe and desert nomads imposed a different style of warfare on the Middle East, India, and China--a style incompatible with firearms. By the time that better firearms allowed these regions to turn the tables on the nomads, Japan's self-imposed isolation left Europe with no rival in firearms design, production, or use, with lasting consequences.
books  military_history  economic_history  medieval_history  15thC  16thC  17thC  Asia  China  India  Ottomans  Europe-Early_Modern  Military_Revolution  Great_Divergence 
november 2013 by dunnettreader
Franco Venturi: Oriental Despotism (1963)
JSTOR: Journal of the History of Ideas, Vol. 24, No. 1 (Jan. - Mar., 1963), pp. 133-142 -- Venturi extends the tale told by Koebnerbeyond Montesquieu and Voltaire to the Physiocrats who tried to use it in a positive fashion that didn't take, and then works by French and English travelers with long experience in the purported Oriental despotic empires. They tried to disprove the exaggerated and false notions of political despotism. The debates further focused on property rights, and how close an analogy to feudalism was appropriate. The discussion continued into 19thC especially re British Empire relations with areas that came under imperial control. But the Oriental despotism meme now seems eternal myth that will not die.
article  jstor  intellectual_history  political_philosophy  historiography  Ottomans  China  India  imperialism  despotism  property_rights  liberty  feudalism  slavery  17thC  18thC  19thC  France  British_Empire  Montesquieu  Hobbes  Voltaire  downloaded  EF-add 
august 2013 by dunnettreader
R. Koebner: JSTOR: Despot and Despotism: Vicissitudes of a Political Term (1951)
JSTOR: Journal of the Warburg and Courtauld Institutes, Vol. 14, No. 3/4 (1951), pp. 275-302 -- downloaded pdf to Note -- Voltaire was very displeased with how Montesquieu popularized the neologism which first made its appearance in 17thC France and was adopted by the secret Bougainvilliers, Fenelon, Saint Simon opponents of Louis XIV. The paper then traces despot related usage starting with Plato and Aristotle through Church Fathers and Renaissance.
article  jstor  intellectual_history  political_philosophy  etymology  philology  ancient_philosophy  ancient_Greece  Early_Christian  Medieval  Renaissance  Papacy  monarchy  Absolutism  Ottomans  China  France  17thC  18thC  French_Enlightenment  Louis_XIV  enlightened_absolutism  Hobbes  Bayle  Fenelon  Bougainvilliers  Saint_Simon  Voltaire  Montesquieu  liberty  republicanism  downloaded  EF-add 
august 2013 by dunnettreader
Hillel Fradkin , Lewis Libby: Erdogan's War on Ataturk's Legacy | Hudson Institute
Erdogan's bulldozers seek to remake not just Gezi Park, but the face of Ataturk's Turkey. Erdogan has just broken ground on a massive new bridge across the Bosporus to be named for Ottoman Sultan Selim I, often known as Selim the Grim. As all Turkish school children know, Selim's conquests in 1517 first won Ottoman sultans the title of Caliph. Ottoman rulers bore this title for the next 400 years, until Ataturk abolished it. On an elevated headland on the Asian side of Istanbul, facing Europe, Erdogan now undertakes to build the largest mosque in the world. Highly visible almost everywhere in Istanbul, it will resemble and surpass the great, celebratory mosques built over centuries by the Ottoman sultans. No such mosque has been built since Ataturk ended the caliphate. Thus, the square, the bridge, the mosque, the marching song are each a repudiation of Ataturk's legacy. They herald the caliphate over the republic, Erdogan's vision over Ataturk's.

By insisting on rebuilding these barracks, Erdogan honors those who resisted the secularization and the pro-Western movement that created modern Turkey. Indeed, it was Ataturk who razed the barracks and built the park seventy years ago as a sign of Turkey's modernization and secularism. Quite literally, what Ataturk built, Erdogan tears down. What Ataturk reviled, Erdogan prizes.

Erdogan has shown no sign of shifting course, as he continues to polarize. If, as expected, he responds to these challenges, as other politicians before him, by solidifying his base, he will lean even more toward Islamist and neo-Ottoman interests.
MENA  democracy  Turkey  Islamic_civilization  Ottomans  secularism  authoritarian  EU 
august 2013 by dunnettreader
Hillel Fradkin , Lewis Libby  > Turkey and the Dream of Ottoman Revival |《 Hudson Institute
Speaking at Dicle University in Diyarbakir on March 15, Mr. Davutoglu called the past century a "parenthesis": a departure from the authentic political order to which Kurds, Turkey and the Middle East will soon return. His talk, titled "The Great Restoration: Our New Political Understanding from the Very Old to Globalization," was colored deeply by the "neo-Ottomanism" that both he and Turkish Prime Minister Recep Tayyip Erdogan champion.

The unity of the 18th and 19th centuries, such as it was, derived from Ottoman power, both Caliphate and Empire. Contemporary Turkey cannot fill that role. Ankara's frustrations in the Syrian civil war show that..... Indeed, the Middle East may soon most resemble the ancient "disunity" of the 16th and 17th centuries, when Ottoman Sunnism contended with Iranian Safavid Shiism.
MENA  Turkey  Iran  Islamic_civilization  Ottomans  18thC  19thC  20thC  21stC  US_foreign_policy  EF-add 
august 2013 by dunnettreader

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