dunnettreader + old_testament   19

Doohwan Ahn - From Greece to Babylon: The political thought of Andrew Michael Ramsay (1686–1743) | History of European Ideas, Dec 2011 — ScienceDirect
History of European Ideas, December 2011, Vol.37(4):421–437, doi:10.1016/j.histeuroideas.2010.12.005 -- Doohwan Ahn , University of Cambridge, Hughes Hall
This paper explores the political thought of Andrew Michael Ramsay with particular reference to his highly acclaimed book called A New Cyropaedia, or the Travels of Cyrus (1727). Dedicated to Prince Charles Edward Stuart, the Young Pretender, to whom he was tutor, this work has been hitherto viewed as a Jacobite imitation of the Telemachus, Son of Ulysses (1699) of his eminent teacher archbishop Fénelon of Cambrai. By tracing the dual legacy of the first Persian Emperor Cyrus in Western thought, I demonstrate that Ramsay was as much indebted to Jacques-Bénigne Bossuet's Discourse on Universal History (1681) as he was to Fénelon's political romance. Ramsay took advantage of Xenophon's silence about the eponymous hero's adolescent education in his Cyropaedia, or the Education of Cyrus (c. 380 B.C.), but he was equally inspired by the Book of Daniel, where the same Persian prince was eulogised as the liberator of the Jewish people from their captivity in Babylon. The main thrust of Ramsay's adaptation was not only to revamp the Humanist-cum-Christian theory and practice of virtuous kingship for a restored Jacobite regime, but on a more fundamental level, to tie in secular history with biblical history. In this respect, Ramsay's New Cyropaedia, or the Travels of Cyrus, was not just another Fénelonian political novel but more essentially a work of universal history. In addition to his Jacobite model of aristocratic constitutional monarchy, it was this Bossuetian motive for universal history, which was first propounded by the German reformer Philipp Melanchthon in his Chronicon Carionis (1532), that most decisively separated Ramsay from Henry St. John, Viscount Bolingbroke, author of another famous advice book for princes of the period, The Idea of a Patriot King (written in late 1738 for the education of Frederick Lewis, Prince of Wales, but officially published in 1749).
article  downloaded  Academia.edu  intellectual_history  17thC  18thC  universal_history  France  British_history  political_philosophy  Ramsay  Bolingbroke  Fenelon  Bossuet  Jacobites  monarchy  Patriot_King  mirror_for_princes  Bible-as-history  ancient_history  ancient_Greece  Xenophon  Old_Testament  Cyrus_the_Great  Melanchthon  constitutional_monarchy  constitutional_regime  limited_monarchy  Frederick_Prince_of_Wales  Bonnie_Prince_Charlie  kingship 
november 2016 by dunnettreader
Adam Kotsko, review essay - The Devil – Writ Large and in the Details | Marginalia - October 2015
Philip C. Almond, The Devil: A New Biography, Cornell University Press, 2014, 296pp., $29.95 At first glance, these two studies of the place of the devil in the… Kotsko isn't enthusiastic -- the book on Ugartic tablets as evidence of a widely transmitted and shared story of the origins of the devil, demins, etc. that may or not be in the Old Testament but was picked up during the patristic era and passed on -- Kotsko thinks their method is shoddy -' As for Almond, it's too intellectualized, failing to explain the shifts in psychology -- what was going on when belief in devil or witches was viewed as rationality itself, etc
Instapaper  books  reviews  religious_history  intellectual_history  cultural_history  religious_culture  Judaism  religious_belief  Old_Testament  apocrypha  witchcraft  devil  angels  sin  supernatural  ancient_Israel  ancient_Near_East  Biblical_criticism  philology  folklore  cultural_transmission  theology  Early_Christian  early_modern  17thC  Enlightenment  from instapaper
october 2015 by dunnettreader
Pope Francis - Lumen Fidei (29 June 2013) - ENCYCLICAL LETTER ON FAITH | Vatican
Thanks to faith we have come to understand the unique dignity of each person, something which was not clearly seen in antiquity. In the second century the pagan Celsus reproached Christians for an idea that he considered foolishness and delusion: namely, that God created the world for man, setting human beings at the pinnacle of the entire cosmos. "Why claim that [grass] grows for the benefit of man, rather than for that of the most savage of the brute beasts?"[46] "If we look down to Earth from the heights of heaven, would there really be any difference between our activities and those of the ants and bees?"[47] At the heart of biblical faith is God’s love, his concrete concern for every person, and his plan of salvation which embraces all of humanity and all creation, culminating in the incarnation, death and resurrection of Jesus Christ. Without insight into these realities, there is no criterion for discerning what makes human life precious and unique. Man loses his place in the universe, he is cast adrift in nature, either renouncing his proper moral responsibility or else presuming to be a sort of absolute judge, endowed with an unlimited power to manipulate the world around him.
religious_history  21stC  Catholics  Papacy  faith  revelation  reason  religious_belief  Biblical_exegesis  church_history  Early_Christian  Old_Testament  New_Testament  Augustine  human_rights  human_nature  creation  soteriology  dignity  imago_dei  nature  nature-mastery  modernity  environment  social_thought  poverty  religious_experience  downloaded 
july 2015 by dunnettreader
Noah Millman - An Anthropological Approach to Gay Marriage | The American Conservative - April 2015
This is an absolutely superb post, pointing out the universal logic across cultures to establish default rules for managing the key elements of family law shared across nuclear and extended families which the society has an interest in ensuring are dealt with in a regular rather than ad hoc fashion -- reproduction of the society through the production of children and their upbringing and material survival, and property relations, especially inheritance. He uses the Old Testament, and the shifts in rules as the culture developed (marrying the widow of one’s brother to ensure that the brother had an inheritance line within the family, which "law" has obviously been relaxed or abandoned as the clan or extended family ceased to be the organizing structure for families and property), as well as common practices (implicit rules) when the standard pattern of relations wasn't working (the patriarchs using concubines to produce heirs when their wives were barren). He also gives the example in Kenya of an unmarried older woman with no children who marries a younger woman, serves as the 'husband" in the marriage, and the younger woman uses men to get pregnant and "bear the children of the all-female family" who will inherit the "husband's" property. The contemporary state in the US has an interest in providing default rules for marriage, family formation and child care, and property relations including inheritance -- and since WE HAVE same-sex marriages that present exactly the same legal issues, the state has an interest in extending its default rules to those arrangements.
politics-and-religion  family  property  inheritance  marriage  US_legal_system  SCOTUS  Old_Testament  religion-fundamentalism  Biblical_authority  religious_culture  culture_wars  homosexuality  civil_liberties  gender_history  gender-and-religion  Instapaper  from instapaper
may 2015 by dunnettreader
Robert Paul Wolff - On Eric Auerbach's "Mimesis" (1 of 2) - The Philosopher's Stone: DOWN MEMORY LANE - April 2015
I launched this blog in 2007 and began posting seriously in 2009. In 2010, in a fury of activity lasting several months, I wrote and posted a Memoir that… Lovely discussion of Auerbach's contrast of Homer vs story of Abraham -- Wolff heavily influenced by Auerbach's underlying theory re the connections between how the "real world" is conceived, including man's place in it, the linguistic resources available (e.g. Song of Roland vs Decameron), and authorial choices. - both parts copied to Instapaper
literary_history  Homer  Old_Testament  Bible-as-literature  Auerbach  philology  narrative  philosophy_of_language  Instapaper  from instapaper
april 2015 by dunnettreader
Robert Paul Wolff - On Eric Auerbach's "Mimesis" (2 of 2) - The Philosopher's Stone: AUERBACH -- COMPLETION - April 2015
Lovely discussion of Auerbach's contrast of Homer vs story of Abraham -- Wolff heavily influenced by Auerbach's underlying theory re the connections between how the "real world" is conceived, including man's place in it, the linguistic resources available (e.g. Song of Roland vs Decameron), and authorial choices. - both parts copied to Instapaper
literary_history  Homer  Old_Testament  Bible-as-literature  Auerbach  philology  narrative  philosophy_of_language  from instapaper
april 2015 by dunnettreader
Robert Bellah - The renouncers « The Immanent Frame - August 2008
This post is a condensed version of a keynote delivered at a conference "The Axial Age and its Consequences for Subsequent History and the Present" sponsored by the John Templeton Foundation in cooperation with Robert Bellah and Hans Joas. -- After discussing Habermas' theory of a legitimation crisis in the axial civilizations and the critique - political, moral and religious - of the key axial age figures whom he calls "the renouncers" -- The great utopias served for the renouncers as stark contrasts to the actual world, and their vision of that other world could be called “theory” in Plato’s sense. But the very distance they felt from the world to which they returned made possible another kind of “theory,” another kind of seeing—that is, a distant, critical view of the actual world in which they lived. The renouncer sees the world with new eyes: as Plato says of the ones who have returned to the cave, they see the shadows for what they are, not naively as do those who have never left. One could say that the ideological illusion is gone. Once disengaged vision becomes possible then theory can take another turn: it can abandon any moral stance at all and look simply at what will be useful, what can make the powerful and exploitative even more so. -- The axial age gave us “theory” in two senses, and neither of them has been unproblematic ever since. The great utopian visions have motivated some of the noblest achievements of mankind; they have also motivated some of the worst actions of human beings. Theory in the sense of disengaged knowing, inquiry for the sake of understanding, with or without moral evaluation, has brought its own kind of astounding achievements but also given humans the power to destroy their environment and themselves. Both kinds of theoria have criticized but also justified the class society that first came into conscious view in the axial age. They have provided the intellectual tools for efforts to reform and efforts to repress. It is a great heritage. ... It has given us the great tool of criticism. How will we use it? -- downloaded page as pdf to Note
sociology_of_religion  intellectual_history  religious_history  axial_age  cultural_critique  political_philosophy  moral_philosophy  Buddhism  Old_Testament  prophets  China  India  ancient_Greece  ancient_philosophy  Indian_religion  Indian_philosophy  Confuscianism  ancient_religions  Chinese_history  Plato  Plato-Republic  Aristotle  phronesis  utopian  downloaded  EF-add 
november 2014 by dunnettreader
JORDAN S. DOWNS - "THE CURSE OF MEROZ" AND THE ENGLISH CIVIL WAR (2014). | The Historical Journal, 57, pp 343-368. - Cambridge Journals Online - Abstract
JORDAN S. DOWNS -- University of California, Riverside -- This article attempts to uncover the political significance of the Old Testament verse Judges 5:23, ‘the curse of Meroz’, during the English Civil War. Historians who have commented on the printed text of Meroz have done so primarily in reference to a single edition of the parliamentarian fast-day preacher Stephen Marshall's 1642 Meroz cursed sermon. Usage of the curse, however, as shown in more than seventy unique sermons, tracts, histories, libels, and songs considered here, demonstrates that the verse was far more widespread and politically significant than has been previously assumed. Analysing Meroz in its political and polemical roles, from the outbreak of the Irish Rebellion in 1641 and through the Restoration of Charles II in the 1660s, sheds new light on the ways in which providentialism functioned during the Civil Wars, and serves, more specifically, to illustrate some of the important means by which ministers and polemicists sought to mobilize citizens and construct party identities. --* I am grateful to Richard Cust, Barbara Donagan, Peter Lake, Isaac Stephens, Stefania Tutino, and the two anonymous reviewers who read and commented on earlier versions of this article. Special thanks are due to Tom Cogswell for his guidance and extensive feedback
article  paywall  17thC  British_history  British_politics  English_Civil_War  Restoration  religious_history  religious_culture  Providence  sermons  religious_lit  Bible-as-history  Biblical_authority  Old_Testament  political_press  pamphlets  popular_culture  popular_politics  partisanship  parties  identity  identity_politics  Parliamentarians  EF-add 
august 2014 by dunnettreader
Gerald A. Larue - Chaper 6: The People, from the Paleolithic to the Chalcolithic Periods - Old Testament Life and Literature (1968) | infidels.org
long before the Hebrews entered the historical scene there were people living in the Fertile Crescent and Egypt. To grasp the magnificent human heritage that fell to the Hebrews and those who lived during the biblical period, the next two chapters will provide an overview of ancient Near Eastern history as reconstructed out of the researches of historians and archaeologists, first, from the Paleolithic to the Chalcolithic periods; and next [chapter 7] from the Early Bronze to the Late Bronze periods.
archaeology  ancient_history  prehistoric  MENA  Old_Testament  Egypt  Mesopotamia  Israel 
may 2014 by dunnettreader
James Hankins - Exclusivist Republicanism and the Non-Monarchical Republic | JSTOR: Political Theory, Vol. 38, No. 4 (August 2010), pp. 452-482
The idea that a republic is the only legitimate form of government and that non-elective monarchy and hereditary political privileges are by definition illegitimate is an artifact of late eighteenth century republicanism, though it has roots in the "godly republics" of the seventeenth century. It presupposes understanding a republic (respublica) to be a non-monarchical form of government. The latter definition is a discursive practice that goes back only to the fifteenth century and is not found in Roman or medieval sources. This article explains how the definition emerged in Renaissance Italy. -- downloaded pdf to Note
article  jstor  intellectual_history  political_philosophy  political_history  political_culture  antiquity  Roman_Empire  Roman_Republic  concepts-change  Renaissance  15thC  16thC  17thC  18thC  English_Civil_War  French_Revolution  American_Revolution  republicanism  republics-Ancient_v_Modern  city_states  monarchy  limited_monarchy  Absolutism  Old_Testament  downloaded  EF-add 
february 2014 by dunnettreader
Review by: Steven B. Smith - The Hebrew Republic: Jewish Sources and the Transformation of European Political Thought by Eric Nelson | JSTOR: Perspectives on Politics, Vol. 8, No. 4 (December 2010), pp. 1217-1219
Has same question I did - how relates to his earlier Greek influence book, including on same cast of characters like Harrington. Smith disagrees with painting Spinoza as an Erastian clone of Hobbes, and that to extent Old Testament is relevant, Spinoza's civil religion doesn't come from Hebrew Republic but from Moses as legislator founder.
books  reviews  kindle  intellectual_history  British_history  British_politics  Dutch  17thC  Old_Testament  republicanism  Harrington  Hobbes  Spinoza  Milton  Agrarian_Laws  property  monarchy  mixed_government  EF-add 
february 2014 by dunnettreader
David Nirenberg's Anti-Judaism, Reviewed: Anthony Grafton - Imaginary Jews: The strange history of antisemitism in Western culture | New Republic Oct 2013
For David Nirenberg—whose Anti-Judaism is one of the saddest stories, and one of the most learned, I have ever read—Jewel, and Jerome and Augustine are typical figures from an enormous tapestry. From antiquity to more recent times, an endless series of writers and thinkers have crafted versions and visions of Jews and Judaism that are as ugly and frightening as they are effective.
books  reviews  religious_history  religious_culture  Early_Christian  medieval_history  16thC  17thC  Judaism  Christianity  Old_Testament  Augustine  theology  chosen_people  hermeneutics  New_Testament  Biblical_criticism  EF-add 
october 2013 by dunnettreader
Ofri Ilany, From Divine Commandment to Political Act: The Eighteenth-Century Polemic on the Extermination of the Canaanites (2012)
Project MUSE - Ofri Ilany. "From Divine Commandment to Political Act: The Eighteenth-Century Polemic on the Extermination of the Canaanites." Journal of the History of Ideas 73.3 (2012): 437-461.Project MUSE. Web. 28 Aug. 2013. <http://muse.jhu.edu/>.
The article discusses the ways in which eighteenth-century European writers treated the biblical account of the conquest of Canaan by the Israelites and the massacre of its inhabitants. The legitimacy of Canaanite extermination was one of the most controversial historical-theological questions in the Enlightenment’s Republic of Letters, as English Deists and other anti-clerical writers protested against the immorality of the extermination commandment. Conservative Bible scholars of the German historical-critical school, who attempted to defend the morality of the Bible, were forced to devise novel legal and theoretical tools in order to justify the conquest of the land by modern reasoning.
article  Project_MUSE  18thC  intellectual_history  religious_history  anticlerical  Old_Testament  Biblical_criticism  God-attributes  Bolingbroke  paywall  EF-add 
august 2013 by dunnettreader

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